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Dave Overlund

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  1. Man this organization can be frustrating. Why not make Bundy the piggyback and keep Winder's development on track as a starting pitcher? Why not make Lewis the 3B instead of giving at bats to Urshela? Baffling. This also can't be great for relations between the team and his agent.... Scott Boras.
  2. I think 3B makes the most sense. Sending him down now to protect rental Urshela's playing time just wouldn't add up to me.
  3. Provus and Gladden were hilarious about this. Gladden was talking about how it should be Buxton who hits it then, like magic, he does! Gladden does the home run call and talks about the 1,000th home run. When the correction came down, Gladden was (pretending to be) salty that his call wouldn't go down in history and went so far as to suggest they clip his home run call and add it to the end of whoever actually hit the home run. Pretty good radio. 14 (2).mp3
  4. Whatever ends up happening this season, there are some real 2001 vibes going on. A young nucleus learning on the fly, pitchers on their way up, very few payroll obligations moving forward. The watchability of this team is off the charts IMO. It's so refreshing to see Miranda, Lewis, Larnach, Jeffers, etc out there rather than Simmons, Cave, Refsnyder, etc. Same for Duran/Colome and Ryan/Shoemaker or Winder/Happ. I am fine with hitting bumps on the road when it is for the greater good.
  5. Dick Bremer was born and raised in Minnesota and has been a Twins fan all of his life. There really aren't too many instances where a hometown kid becomes the announcer of his favorite team. Born in St. Paul and raised in Dumont, Minnesota, Bremer is the fourth-longest tenured radio or television broadcaster in Major League Baseball. He trails only the Royals' Denny Matthews (1969), the Brewers' Bob Uecker (1971), and Texas' Eric Nadel (1979) and is tied with Seattle's Rick Rizzs (1983) and Boston's Joe Castiglione (1983). On that list, only Bremer and Uecker are currently broadcasting games for their hometown teams. With such a long tenure comes an intimate knowledge of the team's history. Cory Provus, who I really enjoy quite a bit on the radio broadcasts, can look up stats and stories from the 1984 season when Kirby Puckett made his debut or watch videos of the 1991 parade, but he wasn't there and didn't live it the same way Bremer did. Not only does Bremer possess a nearly unprecedented wealth of Twins knowledge, but his personality is also a great fit for baseball fans in the Upper Midwest with a dry sense of humor and a large dose of humility. He seems to understand that viewers tune in to watch the games, not for him. That can be rare in today's world. When I was a kid I had two memorable interactions with Bremer. One at Spring Training where I was basically starstruck passing him in the concourse in Ft. Myers. I managed to sputter out "How will the Twins do this year?" and he gave me a thoughtful, long answer and asked me what I thought. As a kid, I felt so cool having a real conversation with a famous adult. Years later in the 2000's, I was settling into my customary Upper General Admission seat in Section 212 for an afternoon game. I looked down the row a bit, and there was Dick Bremer reading a newspaper in the nosebleeds waiting for the game to start. I remember thinking that it was really neat that he would watch a game from up there on a day the game wasn't televised. In fact, I was in that very seat for one of my favorite Bremer calls: In other words, he strikes me as a real fan of the team. This can be bad (In my opinion Paul Allen takes this a bit too far, nothing against him he's great at what he does) but Bremer seems to know how to toe that line perfectly. I still get goosebumps when I watch this highlight from 2009, coincidentally featuring Kubel as well: That is not a forced home run call. That's not a planned out, "A-Bomb From A-Rod" corny home run call. That is a man who is genuinely excited about what he just saw. I think it is natural to get 'sick of' a broadcaster after this long of a time. If you hear anyone every day for over 30 years, they are probably going to wear on you a bit whether it is a spouse, boss, or sports broadcaster. For the folks who wish for a change in the broadcast booth, be careful what you wish for. There can never be another Dick Bremer. The man has seen it all.
  6. Since 1983, the year after I was born, Dick Bremer has been the voice of the Minnesota Twins on television. After nearly 40 years behind the microphone, I get the sense that some fans are ready to move on from Bremer, at least according to some of the chatter in the Game Threads here. I am here to tell you that those fans are spoiled and don't know how good they have it with Bremer. Dick Bremer was born and raised in Minnesota and has been a Twins fan all of his life. There really aren't too many instances where a hometown kid becomes the announcer of his favorite team. Born in St. Paul and raised in Dumont, Minnesota, Bremer is the fourth-longest tenured radio or television broadcaster in Major League Baseball. He trails only the Royals' Denny Matthews (1969), the Brewers' Bob Uecker (1971), and Texas' Eric Nadel (1979) and is tied with Seattle's Rick Rizzs (1983) and Boston's Joe Castiglione (1983). On that list, only Bremer and Uecker are currently broadcasting games for their hometown teams. With such a long tenure comes an intimate knowledge of the team's history. Cory Provus, who I really enjoy quite a bit on the radio broadcasts, can look up stats and stories from the 1984 season when Kirby Puckett made his debut or watch videos of the 1991 parade, but he wasn't there and didn't live it the same way Bremer did. Not only does Bremer possess a nearly unprecedented wealth of Twins knowledge, but his personality is also a great fit for baseball fans in the Upper Midwest with a dry sense of humor and a large dose of humility. He seems to understand that viewers tune in to watch the games, not for him. That can be rare in today's world. When I was a kid I had two memorable interactions with Bremer. One at Spring Training where I was basically starstruck passing him in the concourse in Ft. Myers. I managed to sputter out "How will the Twins do this year?" and he gave me a thoughtful, long answer and asked me what I thought. As a kid, I felt so cool having a real conversation with a famous adult. Years later in the 2000's, I was settling into my customary Upper General Admission seat in Section 212 for an afternoon game. I looked down the row a bit, and there was Dick Bremer reading a newspaper in the nosebleeds waiting for the game to start. I remember thinking that it was really neat that he would watch a game from up there on a day the game wasn't televised. In fact, I was in that very seat for one of my favorite Bremer calls: In other words, he strikes me as a real fan of the team. This can be bad (In my opinion Paul Allen takes this a bit too far, nothing against him he's great at what he does) but Bremer seems to know how to toe that line perfectly. I still get goosebumps when I watch this highlight from 2009, coincidentally featuring Kubel as well: That is not a forced home run call. That's not a planned out, "A-Bomb From A-Rod" corny home run call. That is a man who is genuinely excited about what he just saw. I think it is natural to get 'sick of' a broadcaster after this long of a time. If you hear anyone every day for over 30 years, they are probably going to wear on you a bit whether it is a spouse, boss, or sports broadcaster. For the folks who wish for a change in the broadcast booth, be careful what you wish for. There can never be another Dick Bremer. The man has seen it all. View full article
  7. "Any kind of legitimate external boost would be welcome." This. It's by no means just the Twins, but I will never understand why teams aren't more aggressive with roster moves early in the season before it's too late. It's clear what this team's weaknesses are, why not try to address them before just punting in July. Upton is one name being mentioned, Conforto is still out there... plus the Twins have a strong farm system they could use to bolster the bullpen via trades. Instead, most teams just let it all play out until their July fire sale.
  8. Twins MVP - Alex Kirilloff Twins Top Pitcher - Joe Ryan Twins Most Improved - Miguel Sano Twins Top Rookie - Jhoan Duran Gold Glove Winners - Correa, Buxton Silver Slugger Winners - None Twins Record - 75-87 Place in Division - Third AL Central First- White Sox AL Central Second - Royals AL Central Third - Twins AL Central Fourth - Tigers AL Central Fifth - Cleveland Minor League Hitter - Aaron Sabato Minor League SP - Matt Canterino Minor League RP - Matt Belisle I am 100% all-in on post-hype Kirilloff!!!
  9. I agree with you, but to play devil's advocate, why sign Correa if the goal isn't to win the WS this year? That's why I am so confused about this offseason. 95% of their moves signal an intent to compete in the future, then they sign Correa. It's so odd.
  10. I share my motto for the upcoming Twins season with '90's science fiction TV show "The X-Files." I want to believe. However, looking at this pitching staff, I am having a hard time suspending my disbelief to buy in with this team. Who the heck is going to pitch? Who will play in the outfield when Buxton and/or Kepler are inevitably injured at some point this season? Who is the closer? Before the internet, folks would prepare for the upcoming season by reading one of the many preview magazines that cost an arm and a leg at the grocery store. My dad would always say that you could tell how good a team would be by how many times the preview of it said "if." There are way too many "ifs" this year for me to take the Twins seriously. I don't think they will be awful, but I don't think they are in any way a World Series team this season. Of course I am also on record as saying I thought the Wild would stink this season. So it goes. "If" Byron Buxton stays healthy... "If" Bailey Ober can be successful... "If" Dylan Bundy is one of the few reclamation projects this FO has tried that works... "If" Joe Ryan, Josh Winder, etc can be stretched out for a full season... "If" Chris Archer can provide competent innings, let alone return to his all star form... "If" Alex Kirilloff develops into an impactful, everyday player... "If" Gary Sanchez cuts down on his strikeouts... "If" Jorge Polanco can repeat his monster 2021 season... "If" Ryan Jeffers can be a solid full time catcher... There are too many "ifs" this year. I think there will be high points this season and I hope that the team is competitive well into October. But they will need a lot of things to go their way. I have been a Twins fan since I was born, and I always WANT the team to do well. I just don't know how to convince myself that they will be good this season.
  11. Before the internet, folks would prepare for the upcoming season by reading one of the many preview magazines that cost an arm and a leg at the grocery store. My dad would always say that you could tell how good a team would be by how many times the preview of it said "if." I share my motto for the upcoming Twins season with '90's science fiction TV show "The X-Files." I want to believe. However, looking at this pitching staff, I am having a hard time suspending my disbelief to buy in with this team. Who the heck is going to pitch? Who will play in the outfield when Buxton and/or Kepler are inevitably injured at some point this season? Who is the closer? Before the internet, folks would prepare for the upcoming season by reading one of the many preview magazines that cost an arm and a leg at the grocery store. My dad would always say that you could tell how good a team would be by how many times the preview of it said "if." There are way too many "ifs" this year for me to take the Twins seriously. I don't think they will be awful, but I don't think they are in any way a World Series team this season. Of course I am also on record as saying I thought the Wild would stink this season. So it goes. "If" Byron Buxton stays healthy... "If" Bailey Ober can be successful... "If" Dylan Bundy is one of the few reclamation projects this FO has tried that works... "If" Ryan, Jax, etc can be stretched out for a full season... "If" Chris Archer can provide competent innings, let alone return to his all star form... "If" Alex Kirilloff develops into an impactful, everyday player... "If" Gary Sanchez cuts down on his strikeouts... "If" Jorge Polanco can repeat his monster 2021 season... "If" Ryan Jeffers can be a solid full time catcher... There are too many "ifs" this year. I think there will be high points this season and I hope that the team is competitive well into October. But they will need a lot of things to go their way. I have been a Twins fan since I was born, and I always WANT the team to do well. I just don't know how to convince myself that they will be good this season. View full article
  12. I respect your opinion and don't totally disagree, but the problem in my opinion is Sanchez can't catch and he is a redundant offensive player in this lineup (strikeouts and the occasional home run). The Yankees don't really have anything special behind him to take his spot and they are a team trying to win now, so them letting him go is a red flag in my opinion. At this point, to me, it looks like the Twins took on the Yankees garage sale items in exchange for saving a few bucks. Hopefully this is proven wrong by whatever moves the Twins make moving forward.
  13. I don't have a problem moving Donaldson, but blowing up the catcher position to do so is baffling. Again, it just comes down to money in my opinion. It always does. There are plenty of teams who would eat part of that salary to get something worthwhile back in return.
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