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  1. Past hour
  2. This OL is just gross. Also, Wyatt Davis is trending towards Willie Beavers territory of major bust for the team.
  3. It all depends on Martin and/or Lewis. If either of them is to be a good shortstop at the major league level for years to come then by the beginning of 2023 at least one of them should have progressed enough to take the position. If that's what the front office thinks will happen it would be silly of them to acquire a high-level free agent shortstop when resources are badly needed to shore up other areas of the roster. It makes sense to me to use a placeholder for one year, just like thought they were doing a year ago with Simmons before Lewis' injury set the timetable back by a year. Gordon or possibly Polanco are the only internal options.
  4. Trevor Megill did re-sign to a minor league deal, per Darren Wolfson.\ on Twitter.
  5. I'm not clear. Does this include only first-rounders or all players drafted?
  6. Did you look at his ERAs? He started our well - 3.69 and 3.89. Then 4.01, 4.81, 4.81, 5.02,5.19, 5.44,5.55, 5.95, 6.02, 6.16, 6.67, 7.87 It was a constant trend upwards and ERAs in those days were not inflated like now. Like I said he was an enigma to me. Yes he won games, but he might be the best argument for wins not telling the true story. I liked him, but this is an amazing trend.
  7. Well Galvis gave Simmons, Iglesias and Villar a nice Christmas present. Less competition for the unattractive SS options will likely lead to higher contracts.
  8. Today
  9. Aren't all postseason losses heartbreaking?
  10. I could write a ton on this subject but I will try to keep short. Both sides are to blame for this, and they should stop trying to 'win' the public on this, because they both look dumb doing it. That being said, addressing the main issues Manfred brought up I do agree will hurt the game. We saw in the late 90's Yankees, Red Sox, and a few other huge market teams signing crazy large contracts, pricing so many out of the market. You would see some teams dipping toe in, the Rangers, or Mariners from time to time, but mostly just the top 6 or so teams would sign all the big names. Teams like the Twins were being talked about contracting the league. The league said we need to reign this in a little bit, and convinced the players of the tax. The gap in payrolls is still crazy from the top to the bottom. If you take away revenue sharing small market teams will in now way ever be able to keep home grown players. Not that Oakland or Rays do now. However, if you add in reducing years of control, this will make the issue larger. Small market teams will have to either keep top talents in minor longer to have them during peak years, or lose them prior to peak years. The writer talks about how they are all billionaire owners, which is true, but that does not mean as business owners they should be expected to lose money to keep fans happy, they will not be billionaires for long if they start losing 50 to 100 mil a year because they try to keep up with Yankees and Dodgers in terms of contracts. The NFL and NBA CBA's will not work in MLB. For a few reasons, one NFL all the money is from national media contracts, and NBA has huge national media contracts. Much of the money from media contracts for MLB are local, and some teams have their own network. You would then require the Yes network to share money with Rays which Yankees would never agree to do. That would make NFL style no workable. NBA style is not workable either because they have 15 man rosters, and single players make huge differences, so doing a max contract based on salery cap is workable, but in baseball, guys come up and down all the time, more than 35 guys get used in a normal year. That being said, you can take parts of either to try and make a working cap/floor system. The players have been against the cap always because they have never wanted to cap what they could earn, but in both NFL and NBA the cap brings a floor. Meaning teams have to spend above a certain amount no matter what. This leads to more vets getting contracts. One of the main issues the MLB players have had is teams going with young cheap guys and "tanking" and not offering the young to mid 30 vets that are just above replacement value contracts. If you impose a floor then those guys will start to get those contracts again, because a teams will need to pay more to players. If you then added the first FA period being a restricted FA time, like both leagues have, where team leaving can match the contract, this could lead to teams willing to shorten the initial 6 years service time for FA. I bet they could work out a situation where there is max years on that first FA contract based on say MVP voting, or something like that. Say 4 years of play equals FA now. Then if they had got MVP award or certain other rewards and ranking on the voting will affect how long the contract can be. The cost will never be capped. This will be a huge change in the CBA and I doubt it will at all happen because of how the players have always wanted to get back at the owners from the start of baseball where the owners made a ton of the players and the players had a take or leave it option for contracts and could not take services elsewhere. The players and owners need to understand the bigger the pie to share is better for all, but if you fight over the pie you have, the people making it will take their money to other entertainment.
  11. I completely agree that would put us in a better spot. Maybe he would accept 23 or above. I see the Tigers as being more aggressive than the Twins at this point. I really haven't followed the Rangers much. Don't get me wrong, I would love to see the Twins sign him. I just don't see history on our side.
  12. With the recent signings of SS, do people really think Story signs a 5 year 125 contract? I think not. The price per year may be close, but with Seager getting his 10 years 325, Story will be holding out for something similar I bet. When you compare the two Seager is only 1 year younger, but both have played 6 seasons basically, Seager had a 27 game season his first taste. Story is known to be a much better defender than Seager. There overall war is better for Story. I have been low on Story as his home road splits are bad and suggest he gets a bit of a boost from Coores. Seager home road splits are pretty much even. Regardless, I see Story looking to get something much closer to Seager deal than 5 for 125. I bet he is seeking something like 8 at 240. Teams may not look there, but when you compare his overall numbers and that he is considered better defender than Seager and others that have signed, I bet he is looking closer to a Seager deal than a Seimian or Baez deal, who both have played a lot at 2b and not just SS over the years.
  13. With all due respect, I took a peek back at my posts and I can't find a word that even hinted that I liked the union, I just liked the work at that point in my life and had to join the union to work there. I simply said I understand the mindset of unions, and this union in particular is taking it to the extreme. I also said in almost every post I have made that I do not side with the owners (I don't side with either), I simply accept the reality of the disparaties involved between ownership and employee. As another aside, every union I have been in looked out for future hires coming into the union as well as current members. If that were true of this union, they would be bargaining to the hilt for the MILB players coming up through the ranks and will be there members soon. But they don't seem to be very good at that, judging from the conditions of being a minor league player today (and in the past). That is the area I hold against the union; otherwise I don't care how much they get, I just do not believe the owners will give them as much as they demand. And they need to accept that just as much as any union has had to. When the golden goose is done being cooked, both sides will have the chefs hat on, only the players will be the only losers (along with the fans). The owners will just buy something else.
  14. Not really? He had several fine years in Balto; he was ok in 1996, quality in 1997-1998, back to ok again in 1999 and then the innings and pitches took their toll and the injuries came. Never the same after that. But he compiled 15 bWAR from 1995-1999 for the O's and frankly was exactly the kind of pitcher the Twins need right now: consistent and chewed up the innings.
  15. I believe Galvis has signed in Japan to dodge the lockout Shane Mack-style. I would love Story on this team, though. His defense is superior and he can hit. I'm not worried about his road OPS; that's going to normalize once he's away from altitude full time (we know that playing in Colorado has impact on not just your home stats but your road ones as well) but even if his hitting stats are closer to his road averages he's still a fine hitter for SS. But I don't think it's going to happen. I think someone offers Story "too much money" and this front office will fold, if they ever considered it in the first place. They just don't seem interested in giving free agents long term contracts for big money this off-season. (the failures to sign any significant starters may be telling) If they're setting a rule for themselves that they're not handing out 5 year plus deals to any free agents, then this is going to be a garbage fire of an offseason, the Buxton signing (which I'm delighted with) not withstanding. Skipping long term free agent contracts protects you against making a big mistake, but it substantially limits your upside as well, and until some of this young pitching pipeline proves out, we need to assume some risk...because right now we're assuming big, unsustainable risk with our starters, just doing it more cheaply.
  16. The Galvis news was surprising and a little weird to me. I'd think that with two of the top tier of shortstops on the free agent market going to one team, the outlook on the market for anyone else who might be a viable starting SS would only be better than it was a week or two ago. I wonder if non-marquee-tier free agents are more worried about being squeezed in a short negotiating period, after the lockout, than we would imagine from the outside.
  17. The answer is quite simple at shortstop. The Twins will pick from the leftovers. just like they do with Pitchers. The last time this organization went out and got a difference maker was in 1991 which coincides with their last Championship. What a coincidence!
  18. I would only quibble that unions do come with downsides. I think this is an oversimplification that isn't fair to the point.. Your last paragraph is spot on though.
  19. Perhaps this logic should also apply to owners as well. If they want to profit from their real estate they should stop soaking taxpayers and use their own money.
  20. Well reasoned post, that I mostly agree with. Generally when I’m in the should I fire an employee the question is (a) can I trust them? Or did they break an unbreakable rule? (b) can I get someone better? What are the alternatives? for the exercise, A isn’t relevant that we know of, so let’s use B. In terms of how I make my decisions, I tend to fall on the analytical side. Not that I don’t use my instincts too, but my instincts only start the search for the data. They aren’t the decisive factor. If I’m looking for a manager, I want someone who uses the same toolset that I use, but can challenge my assumptions to present a logical argument contrary to my beliefs. Homogeneity leads to incomplete decisions. in that context, I don’t believe Falvine would want a Tony LaRussa, I think the FO would want someone less tied to tradition and instinct. I believe the FO values the Baldelli type and would look for similar skills in the future. so with that framework, I don’t believe there is another manager in a similar vein as Baldelli that is available and better than Baldelli. For those that want Baldelli to go, they need to wait for the trust in Baldelli to fade. Another season of losing and a lost clubhouse or two seasons of losing (punting ‘22 might already be in the plan) might see Baldelli get fired. More likely he gets poached by another team and the Twins find their “next Baldelli”
  21. Scott was an enigma. For one year he looked like a HOF Ace, but if you look at his career after 1995 his era was terrible even when he was racking up wins at Baltimore. I was disappointed, but glad to see him gone. However, when he was on in his early years it was a wonderful sporting event.
  22. I already had the 3rd link you provided highlighted. Everyone here should read this article if they want to have a quick way to get educated on MLB salaries and team spending. The great thing about this article is the author made the effort to get input from a couple different college professors of economics. An interesting tidbit ... The economists cited have consulted for MLB and the union. According to these professors, MLB is representing the numbers accurately which means the union is misrepresenting the facts according to these economists.
  23. Today we continue the Twins No-Hitter series with Part 4. Scott Erickson had gone through many ups and downs in his first four years in the big leagues, and certainly has in his life since then. However, on one late-April night in 1994, Erickson stole the show. Hello, Twins Fans! When I was younger, my maternal grandparents used to say, "Hello Sportsfan!" and I loved that. It would not apply to me until I was much older since I grew up in theater and music. Baseball was never far from me though. I went to countless games in the summer with KidStop (If you know - you know), and I remember watching Kirby Puckett, Kent Hrbek, and Chuck Knoblauch and loving the feeling of the crowd roaring inside the Metrodome. A lot of you have shared similar experiences with me after reading the previous no-hitter articles. Jamie Johnson, who is a follower of TwinsDaily, had the experience of attending both of the no-hitters at the Dome and told me how it felt to him: These moments are what baseball is all about and for Jamie, getting to experience BOTH no-hitters at the Metrodome is an extraordinary memory (and incredibly unlikely!). Minnesota sports made more memories last week. The Vikings beat the Packers, and the Gophers beat the Badgers. So it's a perfect time to talk about the second no-hitter in Metrodome history where the Twins stuck it to the Brewers. No-No Number 4: Scott Erickson - 1994 The Pitcher: Scott Erickson The Date: April 27, 1994 The Opponent: Milwaukee Brewers The Stadium: Metrodome (First No-Hitter in the Metrodome) The Pitcher's Background and Story Scott Erickson grew up on the west coast in sunny Long Beach, California. where he returned to retire after his 15-year stint as a pitcher in Major League Baseball. While attending both San Jose Junior College and the University of Arizona, not only did he graduate with degrees, he played ball. While attending Arizona, Erickson set a school record for wins with an 18-3 record, had the most wins in the country (18), most innings pitched (175), and complete games (14). He was only there for a year, but his impressive numbers and hard work earned him a unanimous First Team All-American honor, and he was inducted into the Arizona Wildcat Hall of Fame. Erickson was drafted four times before he signed with the Twins in 1989. Whether it was to get selected higher in the draft or a desire to pitch in college, the 21-year-old was ready to prove to the other scouts and organizations that even though his fastball was only hitting in the 80's, he was right where he needed to be for the Twins. Erickson worked hard to develop his slider and honed his two fastballs and a changeup that made him sometimes unhittable. The outcome of the game and his ability to focus and work hard to get where he wanted to be shocked not only him but also others." The thing that impresses me is his ability to concentrate through the pressure of a nine-inning game," said [Jack] Morris (in a June 1991 New York Times interview). "That's a great trait for a young pitcher, and it has a lot to do with his success. He gets into his little world." 1994 was a challenging year for baseball and left a bad taste in a lot of people's mouths. The American and National League decided to realign the teams and add a central division. The Twins struggled to an 8-14 record by the time the game against the Royals took place. They finished the season at 53-60 and in fourth place in the AL. Later the strike took away the post season and the World Series. The drama of the strike overshadowed the accomplishments of many teams and players, including Scott Erickson's no-hitter. This particular game was a gem, but overall it was a mediocre-at-best season for the Twins and Erickson, who led baseball with 19 losses. The Game The Metrodome was sparsely filled. A mere 17,988 fans filled the stadium. It was still early in the season. There was nothing special or crazy about this game, the stadium or the teams. Before the game, he wasn't feeling that great. Nothing said this would be a no-hitter; there was no precursor to routine or even a belief that the Twins could manage a win. In an interview after the game Erickson shared, "I haven't changed anything since my last three starts," he said. "I had a better slider today, reminiscent of years past." He did say at one-point once he realized after the sixth or seventh inning he treated each inning as if it was the first inning. His catcher Matt Walbeck recalled the game as his favorite memory with the Twins in a Twins Daily story, “My biggest memory, my happiest moment playing for the Twins, was catching Scott Erickson’s no-hitter. By far. That was my career highlight.” Opponent The Milwaukee Brewers were not faring any better than the Twins. The Brewers had an awful 1993 season, and the decision to re-brand was a year into the making, but it was just putting lipstick on a pig. The new colors were supposed to bring a vibe, and the new logo was "so cool" one team official was "concerned it would fall victim to gang usage." The Brewers fans, though? They disagreed. In a poll taken by the local newspaper, only 20% of 300 fans polled liked the new colors and logo. There was just nothing Milwaukee could do right from their logo to their gameplay. They finished their season 53-62, 5th in the American League Central Division but fairing better than the Twins sitting at 11-9 when they came to the Dome. When they made it to the Metrodome, they had a slew of problems. However, they also had some positives like injured players from 1993 that were starting to bounce back and make improvements that helped carry the team after the all-star break. The Twins had a line-up that still lingered from the 1991 World Series, players like: Chuck Knoblach, Kirby Puckett, and Kent Hrbek. It’s not that Milwaukee didn’t have a great line up, they had two stand out players who seemed to carry the team throughout the season, Greg Vaughn paced Milwaukee with 19 home runs Dave Nilsson drove in 69 runs and topped batters with significant playing time by hitting .275. Even with two all star hitters, they weren't a team that was feared coming into the Dome that day in April. How many pitchers pitched Scott Erickson was the only Twins pitcher that game. Erickson exploded into the Twins pitching scene in 1991, helping the Twins get to their 1991 World Series. Since then, he struggled; in fact, he was the most hittable pitcher in 1993. Erickson walked four batters and struck out five while throwing 128 pitches. 128 pitches! That blew my mind. His catcher, Matt Walbeck, noticed he continued to get stronger throughout the game. He was confident, and his fastball was moving faster than ever. Not a single hit, run, or error. Scott Erickson was on fire. Home or Away The game was at the Dome, and the crowd was small, but by the time they were loud, they realized what was going on. In the ninth inning - all 17,988 people were on their feet cheering for Erickson. He shut down the Brewers for nine innings, completing the first no-hitter in the Metrodome and breaking the Twins 27-year no-hitter drought Did the pitcher hit Scott Erickson did not hit in this game. He left that to the all-star lineup. The offense was able to capitalize on Brewers pitching , scoring six runs. Kent Hrbek homered. Kirby Puckett hit a ground-rule double, and Chuck Knoblauch singled in a run. By the fourth inning, the Twins were up 5-0, but that did not slow down the pace of Erickson, or the Twins bats, which scored one more run to seal the deal. The Twins wore down the pitching of the Brewers, forcing them to bring four pitchers to the mound throughout the game after starting pitcher Jaime Navarro gave up the five runs to the Twins. Wrap it up! Scott Erickson had one of the best no-hitter performances that I have researched. I know I ranked his no-hitter at #3 out of five Twins no-hitters, but I have to be fair to my criteria, and allowing for four walks is not a massive deal in the grand scheme. The fact that it was the first no-hitter in the Metrodome is also exciting. A no-hitter on artificial turf was impressive in itself, but the Dome was also the place to hit "home runs," so to see that much control and focus on pulling off the no-hitter was indeed against the odds and statistics. The fans that were there for that game experienced the rush of emotions. They erupted in noise when Greg Vaughn’s fly ball landed in left fielder Alex Cole’s glove for the last out. Those fans will never forget the pitcher that beat the odds in a season when the chips were down. I look forward to discussions! MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email View full article
  24. Hello, Twins Fans! When I was younger, my maternal grandparents used to say, "Hello Sportsfan!" and I loved that. It would not apply to me until I was much older since I grew up in theater and music. Baseball was never far from me though. I went to countless games in the summer with KidStop (If you know - you know), and I remember watching Kirby Puckett, Kent Hrbek, and Chuck Knoblauch and loving the feeling of the crowd roaring inside the Metrodome. A lot of you have shared similar experiences with me after reading the previous no-hitter articles. Jamie Johnson, who is a follower of TwinsDaily, had the experience of attending both of the no-hitters at the Dome and told me how it felt to him: These moments are what baseball is all about and for Jamie, getting to experience BOTH no-hitters at the Metrodome is an extraordinary memory (and incredibly unlikely!). Minnesota sports made more memories last week. The Vikings beat the Packers, and the Gophers beat the Badgers. So it's a perfect time to talk about the second no-hitter in Metrodome history where the Twins stuck it to the Brewers. No-No Number 4: Scott Erickson - 1994 The Pitcher: Scott Erickson The Date: April 27, 1994 The Opponent: Milwaukee Brewers The Stadium: Metrodome (First No-Hitter in the Metrodome) The Pitcher's Background and Story Scott Erickson grew up on the west coast in sunny Long Beach, California. where he returned to retire after his 15-year stint as a pitcher in Major League Baseball. While attending both San Jose Junior College and the University of Arizona, not only did he graduate with degrees, he played ball. While attending Arizona, Erickson set a school record for wins with an 18-3 record, had the most wins in the country (18), most innings pitched (175), and complete games (14). He was only there for a year, but his impressive numbers and hard work earned him a unanimous First Team All-American honor, and he was inducted into the Arizona Wildcat Hall of Fame. Erickson was drafted four times before he signed with the Twins in 1989. Whether it was to get selected higher in the draft or a desire to pitch in college, the 21-year-old was ready to prove to the other scouts and organizations that even though his fastball was only hitting in the 80's, he was right where he needed to be for the Twins. Erickson worked hard to develop his slider and honed his two fastballs and a changeup that made him sometimes unhittable. The outcome of the game and his ability to focus and work hard to get where he wanted to be shocked not only him but also others." The thing that impresses me is his ability to concentrate through the pressure of a nine-inning game," said [Jack] Morris (in a June 1991 New York Times interview). "That's a great trait for a young pitcher, and it has a lot to do with his success. He gets into his little world." 1994 was a challenging year for baseball and left a bad taste in a lot of people's mouths. The American and National League decided to realign the teams and add a central division. The Twins struggled to an 8-14 record by the time the game against the Royals took place. They finished the season at 53-60 and in fourth place in the AL. Later the strike took away the post season and the World Series. The drama of the strike overshadowed the accomplishments of many teams and players, including Scott Erickson's no-hitter. This particular game was a gem, but overall it was a mediocre-at-best season for the Twins and Erickson, who led baseball with 19 losses. The Game The Metrodome was sparsely filled. A mere 17,988 fans filled the stadium. It was still early in the season. There was nothing special or crazy about this game, the stadium or the teams. Before the game, he wasn't feeling that great. Nothing said this would be a no-hitter; there was no precursor to routine or even a belief that the Twins could manage a win. In an interview after the game Erickson shared, "I haven't changed anything since my last three starts," he said. "I had a better slider today, reminiscent of years past." He did say at one-point once he realized after the sixth or seventh inning he treated each inning as if it was the first inning. His catcher Matt Walbeck recalled the game as his favorite memory with the Twins in a Twins Daily story, “My biggest memory, my happiest moment playing for the Twins, was catching Scott Erickson’s no-hitter. By far. That was my career highlight.” Opponent The Milwaukee Brewers were not faring any better than the Twins. The Brewers had an awful 1993 season, and the decision to re-brand was a year into the making, but it was just putting lipstick on a pig. The new colors were supposed to bring a vibe, and the new logo was "so cool" one team official was "concerned it would fall victim to gang usage." The Brewers fans, though? They disagreed. In a poll taken by the local newspaper, only 20% of 300 fans polled liked the new colors and logo. There was just nothing Milwaukee could do right from their logo to their gameplay. They finished their season 53-62, 5th in the American League Central Division but fairing better than the Twins sitting at 11-9 when they came to the Dome. When they made it to the Metrodome, they had a slew of problems. However, they also had some positives like injured players from 1993 that were starting to bounce back and make improvements that helped carry the team after the all-star break. The Twins had a line-up that still lingered from the 1991 World Series, players like: Chuck Knoblach, Kirby Puckett, and Kent Hrbek. It’s not that Milwaukee didn’t have a great line up, they had two stand out players who seemed to carry the team throughout the season, Greg Vaughn paced Milwaukee with 19 home runs Dave Nilsson drove in 69 runs and topped batters with significant playing time by hitting .275. Even with two all star hitters, they weren't a team that was feared coming into the Dome that day in April. How many pitchers pitched Scott Erickson was the only Twins pitcher that game. Erickson exploded into the Twins pitching scene in 1991, helping the Twins get to their 1991 World Series. Since then, he struggled; in fact, he was the most hittable pitcher in 1993. Erickson walked four batters and struck out five while throwing 128 pitches. 128 pitches! That blew my mind. His catcher, Matt Walbeck, noticed he continued to get stronger throughout the game. He was confident, and his fastball was moving faster than ever. Not a single hit, run, or error. Scott Erickson was on fire. Home or Away The game was at the Dome, and the crowd was small, but by the time they were loud, they realized what was going on. In the ninth inning - all 17,988 people were on their feet cheering for Erickson. He shut down the Brewers for nine innings, completing the first no-hitter in the Metrodome and breaking the Twins 27-year no-hitter drought Did the pitcher hit Scott Erickson did not hit in this game. He left that to the all-star lineup. The offense was able to capitalize on Brewers pitching , scoring six runs. Kent Hrbek homered. Kirby Puckett hit a ground-rule double, and Chuck Knoblauch singled in a run. By the fourth inning, the Twins were up 5-0, but that did not slow down the pace of Erickson, or the Twins bats, which scored one more run to seal the deal. The Twins wore down the pitching of the Brewers, forcing them to bring four pitchers to the mound throughout the game after starting pitcher Jaime Navarro gave up the five runs to the Twins. Wrap it up! Scott Erickson had one of the best no-hitter performances that I have researched. I know I ranked his no-hitter at #3 out of five Twins no-hitters, but I have to be fair to my criteria, and allowing for four walks is not a massive deal in the grand scheme. The fact that it was the first no-hitter in the Metrodome is also exciting. A no-hitter on artificial turf was impressive in itself, but the Dome was also the place to hit "home runs," so to see that much control and focus on pulling off the no-hitter was indeed against the odds and statistics. The fans that were there for that game experienced the rush of emotions. They erupted in noise when Greg Vaughn’s fly ball landed in left fielder Alex Cole’s glove for the last out. Those fans will never forget the pitcher that beat the odds in a season when the chips were down. I look forward to discussions! MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  25. Glassdoor has MLB analysts making $76k/yr. This site has a list of some typical salaries. https://blog.completepayroll.com/a-breakdown-of-major-league-baseball-player-and-front-office-salaries This is the Twins' front office of 138 positions by my count. https://www.mlb.com/twins/team/front-office. Not sure what size it was 10 or 20 years ago, but I expect there are many ways front offices are expanding. Not only from an analytics standpoint, but player support and languages, etc. I can't say how much more money it costs, but it's not free. It also seems to me teams have been aggressively updating their stadiums much more so than they did in the past. Old stadiums aren't staying outdated. They're getting the latest in screens, concessions, re-building areas which were poorly utilitized, etc. This article suggests the 50/50 split is already happening and has been steady for well over a decade. https://www.theringer.com/mlb/2018/2/21/17035624/mlb-revenue-sharing-owners-players-free-agency-rob-manfred
  26. Updates for tomorrow: It also looks like Peterson is out with COVID (he's vaccinated, BTW). Lots of moving pieces for tomorrow's game, including potentially having 1 active RB and 2 FBs.
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