Jump to content
Twins Daily
  • Create Account

RandBalls Stu

Twins Daily Contributor
  • Posts

    317
  • Joined

  • Last visited

4 Followers

Recent Profile Visitors

10,840 profile views

RandBalls Stu's Achievements

First Round Pick

First Round Pick (4/14)

  • Aw Shucks
  • Making the Rounds
  • Chatty
  • Dipping a Toe
  • Dollar Dog Night

Recent Badges

1.1k

Reputation

  1. The tale of a man who was traded twice in ten days, but oh what a ten days it was. Subject: Jaime Garcia Why You Remember Him: The summer of 2017. The Twins were contending for an AL Central pennant, trailing division-leading Cleveland by a mere half-game. Shoring up their rotation for late-summer glory, the team moved prospect Huascar Ynoa (more on him later) to Atlanta for veteran starter Jaime Garcia (along with Anthony Recker and cash money). Garcia immediately stepped in and picked up a win in his first start, giving up three earned runs and eight hits in 6 2/3 innings. And then he was gone. That half-game deficit was as of July 20. Ten days later, the Twins were seven games back of a surging Cleveland and in the rearview of a hot Kansas City squad. With the trade deadline looming, Minnesota reversed course and sent Garcia to the Yankees for Zach Littell and Dietrich Enns. The kicker, of course, is that the Twins still snagged the last wild card spot in a subpar American League and lost to Garcia’s Yankees. He did not pitch in New York’s 8-4 victory, marking one of the few Twins playoff defeats to the Bronx Bombers that could have been even more humiliating. What You Might Remember, Part 1: Littell left Minnesota in free agency in 2020 and became a crucial part of San Francisco’s 2021 NL West-winning bullpen. It is very, very fair to say the Twins could have used him in 2021. What You Might Remember, Part 2: Ynoa had an up-and-down year for Atlanta last season, posting a 4.05 ERA in 17 starts, hitting a grand slam, breaking his pitching hand by punching a bench, and being a late scratch for a critical NLCS start, eventually missing the rest of the postseason. The whole World Series thing probably makes up for that. It is very, very fair to say the Twins could have used him in 2021. What You Don’t Remember, Part 1: Dietrich Enns is currently pitching in Japan for the Saitama Seibu Lions. It is very, very fair to say the Twins might have used him in 2021. What You Don’t Remember, Part 2: Anthony Recker is now part of the Mets broadcast team. It is very, very fair to say that Bally Sports North might have used him in 2021. The 2017 Jaime Garcia Trade Winners, Ranked: Atlanta San Francisco, despite not being involved in either trade New York Minnesota What’s He Up To: Garcia decade-long career ended after a stint with the Cubs in 2018. He now works with Water Mission, a Christian organization that provides clean water to the developing world. Question for Commenters: What was your favorite Jaime Garcia Twins moment? View full article
  2. Subject: Jaime Garcia Why You Remember Him: The summer of 2017. The Twins were contending for an AL Central pennant, trailing division-leading Cleveland by a mere half-game. Shoring up their rotation for late-summer glory, the team moved prospect Huascar Ynoa (more on him later) to Atlanta for veteran starter Jaime Garcia (along with Anthony Recker and cash money). Garcia immediately stepped in and picked up a win in his first start, giving up three earned runs and eight hits in 6 2/3 innings. And then he was gone. That half-game deficit was as of July 20. Ten days later, the Twins were seven games back of a surging Cleveland and in the rearview of a hot Kansas City squad. With the trade deadline looming, Minnesota reversed course and sent Garcia to the Yankees for Zach Littell and Dietrich Enns. The kicker, of course, is that the Twins still snagged the last wild card spot in a subpar American League and lost to Garcia’s Yankees. He did not pitch in New York’s 8-4 victory, marking one of the few Twins playoff defeats to the Bronx Bombers that could have been even more humiliating. What You Might Remember, Part 1: Littell left Minnesota in free agency in 2020 and became a crucial part of San Francisco’s 2021 NL West-winning bullpen. It is very, very fair to say the Twins could have used him in 2021. What You Might Remember, Part 2: Ynoa had an up-and-down year for Atlanta last season, posting a 4.05 ERA in 17 starts, hitting a grand slam, breaking his pitching hand by punching a bench, and being a late scratch for a critical NLCS start, eventually missing the rest of the postseason. The whole World Series thing probably makes up for that. It is very, very fair to say the Twins could have used him in 2021. What You Don’t Remember, Part 1: Dietrich Enns is currently pitching in Japan for the Saitama Seibu Lions. It is very, very fair to say the Twins might have used him in 2021. What You Don’t Remember, Part 2: Anthony Recker is now part of the Mets broadcast team. It is very, very fair to say that Bally Sports North might have used him in 2021. The 2017 Jaime Garcia Trade Winners, Ranked: Atlanta San Francisco, despite not being involved in either trade New York Minnesota What’s He Up To: Garcia decade-long career ended after a stint with the Cubs in 2018. He now works with Water Mission, a Christian organization that provides clean water to the developing world. Question for Commenters: What was your favorite Jaime Garcia Twins moment?
  3. This week, we discuss a man with a gigantic cell phone who couldn't strike out if he tried. Subject: Brian Harper Why You Remember Him: At the base Twins fan level, he was on the 1991 Twins and caught Game 7. For the folks who were there, we can tell you he was impossible to strike out, made one of the most ridiculous defensive plays in team history despite a rep for iffy defense, and has a baseball card with Zach Morris’ cell phone. Harper was a journeyman before joining the Twins, and not a very highly regarded one at that. How did he blossom here? Bill James: In summary, the Twins got a catcher on the cheap, in his prime, who was an on-base machine that ran up counts. I mean no offense in any way to Junior Ortiz, Tim Laudner, or Sal Butera--I celebrate all Twins catchers of that era--but do they win the 1991 World Series without him? Probably maybe? I’d rather not find out. What You Don’t Remember: Led American League catchers in errors in 1989 and in stolen bases allowed in 1992 and 1993. His not-great rep on defense had some meat on the bone. That said, he and Kent Hrbek got Lonnie Smith and Sid Bream out on a 3-2-3 double play in the 8th inning of the best World Series game ever played. You probably remember that. What You Might Remember: Rather than re-sign him after the 1993 season, the Twins replaced him with Matt Walbeck, who they acquired from the Cubs for Willie Banks. Harper played in just 66 more games in his career. What’s He Up To: Brian and his son Brett work at Player’s Choice, a baseball academy in Scottsdale founded by Steve Ontiveros. View full article
  4. Subject: Brian Harper Why You Remember Him: At the base Twins fan level, he was on the 1991 Twins and caught Game 7. For the folks who were there, we can tell you he was impossible to strike out, made one of the most ridiculous defensive plays in team history despite a rep for iffy defense, and has a baseball card with Zach Morris’ cell phone. Harper was a journeyman before joining the Twins, and not a very highly regarded one at that. How did he blossom here? Bill James: In summary, the Twins got a catcher on the cheap, in his prime, who was an on-base machine that ran up counts. I mean no offense in any way to Junior Ortiz, Tim Laudner, or Sal Butera--I celebrate all Twins catchers of that era--but do they win the 1991 World Series without him? Probably maybe? I’d rather not find out. What You Don’t Remember: Led American League catchers in errors in 1989 and in stolen bases allowed in 1992 and 1993. His not-great rep on defense had some meat on the bone. That said, he and Kent Hrbek got Lonnie Smith and Sid Bream out on a 3-2-3 double play in the 8th inning of the best World Series game ever played. You probably remember that. What You Might Remember: Rather than re-sign him after the 1993 season, the Twins replaced him with Matt Walbeck, who they acquired from the Cubs for Willie Banks. Harper played in just 66 more games in his career. What’s He Up To: Brian and his son Brett work at Player’s Choice, a baseball academy in Scottsdale founded by Steve Ontiveros.
  5. Subject: Jeffrey Alan “Buddy” Boshers Why You Remember Him: In the eminently forgettable 2016 Twins season (59-103, sadness everywhere, any teen fan who watched them is a Goth now and that’s to be expected), a man took the mound for the Minnesota Twins. A man with a plan. A man named…Buddy. Boshers, a Huntsville, Alabama native, pitched in 37 games for that cursed squad. He went 2-0 with a 4.25 ERA. He followed it up with 38 games for the much-improved 2017 team and didn’t lose that season either. Yes, win-loss records are a devalued currency. Yes, he was a situational reliever. Yes, he was often in games where Ricky Nolasco had already given up seven runs in 2.2 innings. BUT STILL: Buddy Boshers never lost a game for the Minnesota Twins, including one of their most historically inept teams. Where is his bobblehead, Twins PR? What You Don’t Remember: He was a 4th-round draft pick! The Angels selected him in 2008. America’s Ten Greatest Buddys, Ranked: Buddy Holly Buddy Guy Buddy Rich Buddy Hackett Buddy Miles Buddy Ryan Buddy Ebsen “Buddy Holly” by Weezer Buddy Boshers Buddy Valastro, TV's The Cake Boss (Yes, I'm aware of the NBA's Buddy Hield, but he's Bahamian. Also, Hield got his nickname from Married With Children's Bud Bundy. The more you know.) What’s He Up To: Appears to be semi-retired after pitching for the Blue Jays in 2019. He spent 2021 working at The Yard, “North Alabama’s premier private indoor sports and training complex designed for softball and baseball players of all ages and skill levels.” Also found him on Facebook and his family is adorable.
  6. This week’s subject is a grown man named Buddy. Subject: Jeffrey Alan “Buddy” Boshers Why You Remember Him: In the eminently forgettable 2016 Twins season (59-103, sadness everywhere, any teen fan who watched them is a Goth now and that’s to be expected), a man took the mound for the Minnesota Twins. A man with a plan. A man named…Buddy. Boshers, a Huntsville, Alabama native, pitched in 37 games for that cursed squad. He went 2-0 with a 4.25 ERA. He followed it up with 38 games for the much-improved 2017 team and didn’t lose that season either. Yes, win-loss records are a devalued currency. Yes, he was a situational reliever. Yes, he was often in games where Ricky Nolasco had already given up seven runs in 2.2 innings. BUT STILL: Buddy Boshers never lost a game for the Minnesota Twins, including one of their most historically inept teams. Where is his bobblehead, Twins PR? What You Don’t Remember: He was a 4th-round draft pick! The Angels selected him in 2008. America’s Ten Greatest Buddys, Ranked: Buddy Holly Buddy Guy Buddy Rich Buddy Hackett Buddy Miles Buddy Ryan Buddy Ebsen “Buddy Holly” by Weezer Buddy Boshers Buddy Valastro, TV's The Cake Boss (Yes, I'm aware of the NBA's Buddy Hield, but he's Bahamian. Also, Hield got his nickname from Married With Children's Bud Bundy. The more you know.) What’s He Up To: Appears to be semi-retired after pitching for the Blue Jays in 2019. He spent 2021 working at The Yard, “North Alabama’s premier private indoor sports and training complex designed for softball and baseball players of all ages and skill levels.” Also found him on Facebook and his family is adorable. View full article
  7. Subject: Darin Mastroianni Why You Remember Him: In the fallow times after Target Field’s opening season, the Twins saw a lot of players. You know the staggering amount of roster churn that took place last season when [expletive] started going sideways? This went on for years in the early-to-mid 2010s. You could be watching Dickandbert and they’d be talking about Wilkin Ramirez or Shairon Martis and you’d look up and say “who the in the sam hell is that” and by the time you turned up the volume they were optioned to the minors. By comparison, Mastroianni stuck around. The outfielder and University of Southern Indiana Hall of Famer played for the Twins in 2012, 2013, and briefly in 2016 before retiring. 2012 was his busiest campaign, playing 77 games and finishing 13th in the American League with 21 stolen bases. What You Don’t Remember: Look at this lineup from May 7, 2016. LOOK AT IT. Double Santanas! ByungHo Park! One of the Arcias! For the record, they lost to the White Sox 7-2 and fell to 8-22 on the season. Chris Sale pushed his record to 7-0 and didn’t take a Fiskars to any throwback uniforms. What You Might Remember: He was the fourth outfielder version of a timeshare, as he alternated between the Blue Jays and Twins from 2011-2016. putting in two stints with both franchises. What’s He Up To: He married a local woman, started a family and stayed here. He’s currently a financial advisor for Edward Jones if you’d like to put your IRA in the hands of a former MLBer with frankly the sickest beard in the financial advisory game. Maybe you'd trust your retirement with a Jason Kubel or a Cole De Vries. Ask yourself if they can pull off that kind of beard. Kubel might be able to but it would take a while and come in all patchy.
  8. This week's subject is a journeyman outfielder who stayed local and developed an incredible beard. Subject: Darin Mastroianni Why You Remember Him: In the fallow times after Target Field’s opening season, the Twins saw a lot of players. You know the staggering amount of roster churn that took place last season when [expletive] started going sideways? This went on for years in the early-to-mid 2010s. You could be watching Dickandbert and they’d be talking about Wilkin Ramirez or Shairon Martis and you’d look up and say “who the in the sam hell is that” and by the time you turned up the volume they were optioned to the minors. By comparison, Mastroianni stuck around. The outfielder and University of Southern Indiana Hall of Famer played for the Twins in 2012, 2013, and briefly in 2016 before retiring. 2012 was his busiest campaign, playing 77 games and finishing 13th in the American League with 21 stolen bases. What You Don’t Remember: Look at this lineup from May 7, 2016. LOOK AT IT. Double Santanas! ByungHo Park! One of the Arcias! For the record, they lost to the White Sox 7-2 and fell to 8-22 on the season. Chris Sale pushed his record to 7-0 and didn’t take a Fiskars to any throwback uniforms. What You Might Remember: He was the fourth outfielder version of a timeshare, as he alternated between the Blue Jays and Twins from 2011-2016. putting in two stints with both franchises. What’s He Up To: He married a local woman, started a family and stayed here. He’s currently a financial advisor for Edward Jones if you’d like to put your IRA in the hands of a former MLBer with frankly the sickest beard in the financial advisory game. Maybe you'd trust your retirement with a Jason Kubel or a Cole De Vries. Ask yourself if they can pull off that kind of beard. Kubel might be able to but it would take a while and come in all patchy. View full article
  9. This week, Twins Daily checks in on a good-natured southern gentleman who once brought a legend to tears. Subject: Matthew LeCroy Why You Remember Him: Catchers are inherently memorable. This is just a theory, but as with hockey goaltenders, it takes a different breed to voluntarily have projectiles launched at you at fearsome speeds. As if this weren’t hazardous enough, they expose their most delicate area to the baseball (ask Mitch Garver) while a large man swings a wooden spindle within mere inches of his brainpan. They’re just built different, I guess. Even the non-greats find a place in your memory palace. From Junior Ortiz to Mike Redmond, I celebrate them all. Matthew LeCroy was a catcher (and designated hitter/first baseman) for the Twins from 2000-2005. Prone to striking out, he managed to belt 17 dingers in 2003 and 2005. In a clubhouse already brimming with characters, the South Carolina native stood out as the kind of guy who allegedly tried to get Eddie Guardado to eat possum. LeCroy’s defensive liabilities were exposed most notably in 2006, when he signed with the Washington Nationals. Manager Frank Robinson pulled him from a game against the Astros after the latter gave up seven stolen bases and committed two errors. Robinson fought back tears as he explained the decision after the game, clearly not wanting to humiliate the veteran. Robinson was a tough, tough SOB who came up during the civil rights era, but Matty LeCroy trying to play catcher on a bum knee got him up in his feelings. LeCroy returned to the Twins in 2007, his final major league season. Twins Daily was unable to confirm if he ever got Guardado to consume the protein-rich possum flesh. What You Don’t Remember: Frank Robinson appeared in an episode of the CBS sitcom Yes, Dear with Ernie Banks and Johnny Bench. There were 122 episodes of Yes, Dear. It was on TV for years. I couldn’t tell you a single other thing about this show. What’s He Up To: Managing former Twins Triple-A affiliate Rochester. View full article
  10. Subject: Matthew LeCroy Why You Remember Him: Catchers are inherently memorable. This is just a theory, but as with hockey goaltenders, it takes a different breed to voluntarily have projectiles launched at you at fearsome speeds. As if this weren’t hazardous enough, they expose their most delicate area to the baseball (ask Mitch Garver) while a large man swings a wooden spindle within mere inches of his brainpan. They’re just built different, I guess. Even the non-greats find a place in your memory palace. From Junior Ortiz to Mike Redmond, I celebrate them all. Matthew LeCroy was a catcher (and designated hitter/first baseman) for the Twins from 2000-2005. Prone to striking out, he managed to belt 17 dingers in 2003 and 2005. In a clubhouse already brimming with characters, the South Carolina native stood out as the kind of guy who allegedly tried to get Eddie Guardado to eat possum. LeCroy’s defensive liabilities were exposed most notably in 2006, when he signed with the Washington Nationals. Manager Frank Robinson pulled him from a game against the Astros after the latter gave up seven stolen bases and committed two errors. Robinson fought back tears as he explained the decision after the game, clearly not wanting to humiliate the veteran. Robinson was a tough, tough SOB who came up during the civil rights era, but Matty LeCroy trying to play catcher on a bum knee got him up in his feelings. LeCroy returned to the Twins in 2007, his final major league season. Twins Daily was unable to confirm if he ever got Guardado to consume the protein-rich possum flesh. What You Don’t Remember: Frank Robinson appeared in an episode of the CBS sitcom Yes, Dear with Ernie Banks and Johnny Bench. There were 122 episodes of Yes, Dear. It was on TV for years. I couldn’t tell you a single other thing about this show. What’s He Up To: Managing former Twins Triple-A affiliate Rochester.
  11. Subject: Carl Pavano Why You Remember Him: Oh, man. Carl Pavano. Won a title with the Marlins, signed a big free agent deal with the Yankees, then promptly spent the entirety of that deal plagued by injuries (145 innings over four years!). He acquired tabloid nicknames like “American Idle” and “Crash Test Dummy” for his trouble, a helpful reminder that the Twin Cities media is a like a soft, cozy blanket compared to New York’s. The Twins, who have been playing the reclamation project lottery for starting pitchers as long as I’ve been alive, scooped him up in a trade with Cleveland in 2009. Unlike Sidney Ponson, he thrived in Minnesota. Sporting an exquisite mustache from which he likely acquired the strength to build this late-career surge, Pavano was a horse in 2010, finishing 17-11 with a 3.75 ERA, seven complete games, and two shutouts over 221 innings pitched. Would people wear fake Pavano mustaches to Target Field? Yes. Yes, they would. Because this is Minnesota and because they’re New York, he also lost two ALDS games to the Yankees in 2009 and 2010. (If you need a reminder, the 2009 loss was the game after Phil Cuzzi ruined Christmas and America and it was the final Twins game in the Metrodome; the 2010 loss was at Target Field to Andy Pettitte.) Although not quite as effective in 2011 (9-13, 4.30 ERA), he still managed to eat 222 innings. If Dylan Bundy throws 200 innings with that ERA in 2022, we should name a suburb after him. Columbia Heights? Pavano retired in 2014. What You Don’t Remember: The PTBNL traded to Cleveland for Pavano? Yohan Pino. Five years later, he would make his first major league start for…the Minnesota Twins. What You Might Remember: After a rough 2011 outing, Pavano beat the living hell out of a garbage can. If he’d only waited a few more years he could have been a valuable addition to the Houston Astros. What’s He Up To: He did some TV work for the Marlins upon retirement. Most recently, he put his very fancy home on the market. The status of the mustache is unclear at this time, but Twins Daily hopes for the best.
  12. This week, Twins Daily checks in on a veteran starting pitcher with an injury history who actually worked out for the Minnesota Twins. Subject: Carl Pavano Why You Remember Him: Oh, man. Carl Pavano. Won a title with the Marlins, signed a big free agent deal with the Yankees, then promptly spent the entirety of that deal plagued by injuries (145 innings over four years!). He acquired tabloid nicknames like “American Idle” and “Crash Test Dummy” for his trouble, a helpful reminder that the Twin Cities media is a like a soft, cozy blanket compared to New York’s. The Twins, who have been playing the reclamation project lottery for starting pitchers as long as I’ve been alive, scooped him up in a trade with Cleveland in 2009. Unlike Sidney Ponson, he thrived in Minnesota. Sporting an exquisite mustache from which he likely acquired the strength to build this late-career surge, Pavano was a horse in 2010, finishing 17-11 with a 3.75 ERA, seven complete games, and two shutouts over 221 innings pitched. Would people wear fake Pavano mustaches to Target Field? Yes. Yes, they would. Because this is Minnesota and because they’re New York, he also lost two ALDS games to the Yankees in 2009 and 2010. (If you need a reminder, the 2009 loss was the game after Phil Cuzzi ruined Christmas and America and it was the final Twins game in the Metrodome; the 2010 loss was at Target Field to Andy Pettitte.) Although not quite as effective in 2011 (9-13, 4.30 ERA), he still managed to eat 222 innings. If Dylan Bundy throws 200 innings with that ERA in 2022, we should name a suburb after him. Columbia Heights? Pavano retired in 2014. What You Don’t Remember: The PTBNL traded to Cleveland for Pavano? Yohan Pino. Five years later, he would make his first major league start for…the Minnesota Twins. What You Might Remember: After a rough 2011 outing, Pavano beat the living hell out of a garbage can. If he’d only waited a few more years he could have been a valuable addition to the Houston Astros. What’s He Up To: He did some TV work for the Marlins upon retirement. Most recently, he put his very fancy home on the market. The status of the mustache is unclear at this time, but Twins Daily hopes for the best. View full article
  13. Subject: Matt Capps Why You Remember Him: Once upon a time, the Twins had a promising catcher named Wilson Ramos stuck behind Joe Mauer. They didn’t have a closer. Joe Nathan was hurt. Terrifying actual giant man Jon Rauch was ineffective. This was also right about the time when people were noticing how much more valuable a good catcher was than a position you could fill with literally any Tom, Ric, or Eddie who could hurl a decent fastball for one inning. But. But! The Twins were still in “we need a proven closer” mode, and they were not going to head into the meat of the schedule without one. What would Goose Gossage think? WHAT WOULD GOOSE GOSSAGE THINK? So, they sent Ramos to Washington for Matt Capps. And Capps was...fine-ish. And “bilateral leg weakness” became a familiar term. And the light-hitting Drew Butera was the catcher instead of Mauer or Ramos. And then the Twins were bad for a long time. Not that I’m bitter about it. What You Don’t Remember: His middle name is Dicus. And he was the winning pitcher in the 2010 All-Star Game. What’s He Up To: Working in the TV booth for the Pirates. One of his co-workers? Former FSN staple Robby Incmikoski. Where have you gone, Telly Hughes? Anything else: The spoonerism for his name is the best one for a Twins pitcher since Willie Banks.
  14. For the duration of this dumb lockout, I’m going to find former Twins of note, tell you a little bit about them, and let you know what they’re doing now to the best of my ability. Subject: Matt Capps Why You Remember Him: Once upon a time, the Twins had a promising catcher named Wilson Ramos stuck behind Joe Mauer. They didn’t have a closer. Joe Nathan was hurt. Terrifying actual giant man Jon Rauch was ineffective. This was also right about the time when people were noticing how much more valuable a good catcher was than a position you could fill with literally any Tom, Ric, or Eddie who could hurl a decent fastball for one inning. But. But! The Twins were still in “we need a proven closer” mode, and they were not going to head into the meat of the schedule without one. What would Goose Gossage think? WHAT WOULD GOOSE GOSSAGE THINK? So, they sent Ramos to Washington for Matt Capps. And Capps was...fine-ish. And “bilateral leg weakness” became a familiar term. And the light-hitting Drew Butera was the catcher instead of Mauer or Ramos. And then the Twins were bad for a long time. Not that I’m bitter about it. What You Don’t Remember: His middle name is Dicus. And he was the winning pitcher in the 2010 All-Star Game. What’s He Up To: Working in the TV booth for the Pirates. One of his co-workers? Former FSN staple Robby Incmikoski. Where have you gone, Telly Hughes? Anything else: The spoonerism for his name is the best one for a Twins pitcher since Willie Banks. View full article
  15. “It’s just not right,” said the cornfed rube. The owners of Major League Baseball locked out the players just after midnight on Thursday morning, ensuring baseball’s first work stoppage in over a quarter century. And Shad Browne knows who to blame. “These players are greedy and entitled, I’m sick of ‘em,” said the Fairmont landscaper. “They get paid money to play a game and sometimes you’ve gotta take a stand.” The owners, wealthier than the players by a monstrous degree and living lives of unimaginable luxury, do not receive the same level of disdain from Browne. “Lotta these owners are entrepreneurs who pulled themselves up by their bootstraps to make their money,” said Browne incorrectly. “Meanwhile, the modern player just takes a day off when they feel like it. The way I see it, you don’t play, you don’t get paid.” Browne, who took PTO last Monday because the Vikings lost and he was “super hungover,” said he sees a lot of himself in owners, despite this being remarkably untrue. “They’re just trying to run a business same as anyone else,” he said with the steady resolve that only the deeply ignorant possess. “I guess I’d just like to see a little more gratitude and a little less attitude from the millennial generation.” Browne, who used the word “meritocracy” in reference to a country where you don’t have to work a day in your life if your great-granddad sold mustard gas to Kaiser Wilhelm, dismissed the notion that the owners should take some of the blame for instigating the lockout they instigated. “At the end of the day, they’ve got a business to run,” said Browne, for whom the concept of generational wealth has never so much as registered for one second of one day. “If the players can’t handle that, they can get a job just like anyone else. “It’s just not right,” said the cornfed rube. View full article
×
×
  • Create New...