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Health and careers

Posted by mikelink45 , 02 July 2020 · 759 views

covid-19 mlb sickness ian desmond tommy hottovy ryan zimmerman
Health and careers The Covid sickness that hit coach Tommy Hottovy created a memorable video https://www.espn.com/mlb/ as he discussed his case - it is good to watch since so many act like the Covid-19 is just another flu. As the TD contributor Doctor Gast states - the video is mostly about the pain of separation. Should you want to know more about the survival from this virus you might want to read this San Francisco report - https://www.sfgate.c...ng-15347792.php or this description of the Brain Fog that comes after the virus by the American Psychological Association https://www.apa.org/...ermath-covid-19. The choices of Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman and Jo Ross not to play should be applauded for their courage just as the Twins decision to protect their oldest coaches was wise and prudent. As much as I want to see and read about baseball I do not want to read about tragedies.

When we are young we all make poor decisions based on our own sense of mortality. I made climbs, ran rapids, and pushed the envelop thinking that nothing could happen to me. My son, at age 21 did the same thing, and he died as a result. Age does not protect us. Nor does physical fitness. This is a serious time and now we learn that there is a new swine flu that might follow Covid. It is frightening. And maybe time to remember how we can be chopped down by microscopic organisms in the prime of our life.

Baseball players are constantly facing injury - concussions, thoracic injuries, Tommy John surgery, broken bones. The good thing about them is that they heal. Bad backs ruined careers and freak accidents like the gas that Christy Mathewson was exposed to during training. His respiratory system was weakened and resulted in contracting tuberculosis, from which he died in Saranac Lake, New York in 1925. He was only 45. Tuberculosis also took seven other players who are mostly lost to memory because their careers were too short and too long ago.

We watched drugs ruin careers like Doc Gooden and Daryl Strawberry, two more who had a HOF path ahead of them. And Sandy Koufax had his amazing career stopped at its peak because of arthritis. Like so many elderly people I can only relate too well to the pain that he suffered from this debilitating disease.

I remember when J R Richards suffered a stroke and had to leave the field. This great Astros pitcher seemed like a sure HOF player, a person who would hold all the Astros records - he averaged 16 wins per season his first five years. In 1980 he was 10 - 4 with a 1.90 era and he was in magnificent physical condition. In two years he was homeless and sleeping under a bridge. He went on to the ministry and preached to those same homeless individuals. It was a big fall from the top.

Jimmy Piersall suffered from mental illness and a potentially great career was ruined by bipolar disorder and still he was so good he managed 17 years.

When it comes to disease what baseball fan does not know of Lou Gehrig and ALS - now called Lou Gehrig Disease. The Iron Horse was toppled and dead at age 38. He seemed invincible but disease does not avoid the strong and healthy.

Ross Youngs died at age 30 of Brights Disease (a kidney disease). He played 10 years with a 322 BA.

Dave Parker, former Pirate and one of my favorite players lives with Parkinson's disease a serious and long term disease that impacts so many aspects of your body functions. Kirk Gibson lives with Parkinsons and Dee Gordon plays baseball with it. But this is serious and life changing.

HOF pitcher Addie Joss from Wisconsin attended St. Mary's College (later part of Wyalusing Academy) in Prairie du Chien and the University of Wisconsin. "In April 1911, Joss became ill and he died the same month due to tuberculous meningitis. He finished his career with 160 wins, 234 complete games, 45 shutouts and 920 strikeouts."

Wikipedia provided this list of type 1 diabetes sufferers from MLB
  • Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70).
  • Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), and Oakland Athletics (2014–) outfielder, type 1.[13]
  • Mark Lowe, Seattle Mariners (2006–2010, 2015), Texas Rangers (2010–2012), Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2013), Cleveland Indians (2014), Toronto Blue Jays (2015), and Detroit Tigers (2016–) pitcher, type 1.[14]
  • Brandon Morrow, Seattle Mariners (2007–2009) and Toronto Blue Jays (2010–2014) pitcher, type 1.[14]
  • Dustin McGowan, Toronto Blue Jays (2005–2008, 2011, 2013–2014), Philadelphia Phillies (2015), and Miami Marlins (2016–) pitcher, type 1.
  • Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn Dodgers (1947–1956), type 2, deceased (1972 at age 53).
  • Bill Gullickson, Montreal Expos (1979–1994), type 1[15]
  • Adam Duvall, Cincinnati Reds (2015–), Type 1
  • James "Catfish" Hunter, Kansas City/Oakland Athletics (1965-1974) and New York Yankees (1975-1979) pitcher, type 1, deceased (1999 at age 53 of ALS)
There are more stories of Alzheimer's that may have come from concussions, cancers, and other, but finally, we should look to the Spanish Flu - "the flu took: Cy Swain, a minor leaguer from 1904 to 1914 who slugged 39 home runs in 1913; Larry Chappell, a big league outfielder for the White Sox, Indians and Boston Braves between 1913 and 1917; catcher Leo McGraw, a minor leaguer between 1910 and 1916; catcher Harry Glenn, a minor leaguer from 1910 to 1918 who spent time with the 1915 Cardinals; minor league pitcher Dave Roth, who played between 1912 and 1916; and minor league pitcher Harry Acton, who played in 1917." https://baseballhall...-spare-baseball

The Twins have their own tragic stories too - Danny Thompson, a promising shortstop was diagnosed with Leukemia when he was 26, in 1973. He played four more seasons and died ten weeks after his final game. Walter Bond - died of Leukemia in the closing weeks of the 1967 baseball season — a year during which he had made the Twins' roster coming out of spring training. Wikipedia entry says this about the end - "Bond made the team and batted .313 in part-time duty during the season's first month. But the Twins released him on May 15, and although Bond caught on with the Jacksonville Suns, his declining health forced him to the sidelines after only three games.[2] He entered a Houston hospital for treatment, but died there at age 29. Said his physician, Dr. Hatch Cummings: "He showed the strength of character and will that only champions possess. It was an exhibition of courage, and in the best tradition of baseball."

We want baseball, but we can live without it if it comes down to a threat to players health and lives.

  • SQUIRREL, heresthething and thuuuuney like this



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Doctor Gast
Jul 02 2020 03:19 PM

I don`t want to sound insensitive but Hottovy only mentioned the emotional suffering he went through being separated from his wife. I`ve been away from my wife for months at a time, shortly after we got married & even worse after the birth of our daughter, I was separated for months. That was hard times & I can relate to what he went through but we got through them & grew from it & appreciate each other that much more. Life is never easy, that`s how we grow. Hottovy didn`t enlightened us with the physical consequence of covid 19 so we can`t really evaluate that aspect of his story although many assume the worse.

 

    • mikelink45 likes this

 

I don`t want to sound insensitive but Hottovy only mentioned the emotional suffering he went through being separated from his wife. I`ve been away from my wife for months at a time, shortly after we got married & even worse after the birth of our daughter, I was separated for months. That was hard times & I can relate to what he went through but we got through them & grew from it & appreciate each other that much more. Life is never easy, that`s how we grow. Hottovy didn`t enlightened us with the physical consequence of covid 19 so we can`t really evaluate that aspect of his story although many assume the worse.

Your evaluation is valid and I have no problem with it. But separation is just one of many issues and that separation will increase without the disease for the players asked to go through this experiment.We will have to see how they all handle the emotional aspect.Here is an article that explores the real issues of going home after surviving covid. https://www.nytimes....-survivors.html

    • SQUIRREL likes this

 

I don`t want to sound insensitive but Hottovy only mentioned the emotional suffering he went through being separated from his wife. I`ve been away from my wife for months at a time, shortly after we got married & even worse after the birth of our daughter, I was separated for months. That was hard times & I can relate to what he went through but we got through them & grew from it & appreciate each other that much more. Life is never easy, that`s how we grow. Hottovy didn`t enlightened us with the physical consequence of covid 19 so we can`t really evaluate that aspect of his story although many assume the worse.

Please note the updated beginning of the essay.