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Jeremy Nygaard

Twins Daily Contributor
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About Jeremy Nygaard

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    Twins Draft Czar
  • Birthday 05/27/1983

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    Elementary Teacher

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  1. It may have been. There have been a lot of new rules that haven't erased the old rules permanently etched in my brain.
  2. Like I said, I'm not sure that the years are right. Maybe they're too long... but the idea is simply to start the clock at the initial signing, not an arbitrary time that the team decides, and then give the teams the option to stop and start as they desire. There are going to be groups of players that would look at this and think, "Nope. This is bad for us." Look at the current setup and it's probably the same. But the idea that the Union is going to negotiate a deal that makes it better for all the player groups... well, the owners aren't going to fall for that either. I do think, thoug
  3. The current system is going to prevent Kris Bryant from reaching free agency until he's 30.
  4. You're already giving up a ton of years with minor league years + optional years + six years of service. Even the best players aren't hitting free agency within 10 years of signing. Sure, maybe the years are too long. But let's start the clock at signing so we can move on from the in-career (lack of) moves that pit teams vs players. There would probably be better players getting non-tendered... or likely traded.
  5. “Service Time Manipulation” has become a common term in regards to baseball over the last few years. It has again reared its ugly head after comments made by former Seattle Mariners President Kevin Mather became public.Mather, inexplicably, shared unspoken but well-known secrets about how teams… well, his team, specifically, will keep MLB-ready players in the minors to prolong team control for an additional season. This isn’t new and certainly isn’t a secret. The Cubs did it to Kris Bryant. The Blue Jays did it to Vlad, Jr. The Twins, who never played service time games under Terry Ryan, did
  6. Mather, inexplicably, shared unspoken but well-known secrets about how teams… well, his team, specifically, will keep MLB-ready players in the minors to prolong team control for an additional season. This isn’t new and certainly isn’t a secret. The Cubs did it to Kris Bryant. The Blue Jays did it to Vlad, Jr. The Twins, who never played service time games under Terry Ryan, did it to Byron Buxton in 2018 by not bringing him back for September, while healthy, to leave him 12 days short of achieving a “service year.” Because of that, Buxton will enter his last year of arbitration after this sea
  7. It's weird talking about the Twins making their last pick on the second day of the draft. It's even weirder talking about their fourth pick being their last pick. But here we are...If you're just catching up, the Twins took Aaron Sabato in the first round. Sabato is a first baseman from North Carolina. You can learn about him here. In the second round, the Twins took an outfielder, Alerick Soularie, from Tennessee. There's a ton of information on Soularie on this site. After forfeiting their third round pick, the Twins took a prep pitcher, Marco Raya, in the fourth round. The last pick t
  8. If you're just catching up, the Twins took Aaron Sabato in the first round. Sabato is a first baseman from North Carolina. You can learn about him here. In the second round, the Twins took an outfielder, Alerick Soularie, from Tennessee. There's a ton of information on Soularie on this site. After forfeiting their third round pick, the Twins took a prep pitcher, Marco Raya, in the fourth round. The last pick the Twins made of the 2020 Draft is who this article is about: Kala'i Rosario, a prep outfielder from Hawaii. The Twins popped the best prospect from Hawaii in outfielder Kala'i Ro
  9. Yeah, we tried to assemble the best teams possible. Like if we were able to simulate a six-team league featuring only Twins minor leaguers, for example.
  10. We continue our Minor League Draft with the fifth through eighth rounds. Keep in mind that with six teams being drafted, almost all of the Top 30 prospects have come off the board by this point. Strategies to construct these teams have started to come into place for each team and despite getting a little deeper into the farm system, you'll read a few times of players getting sniped right before someone else wanted to pick them. Let us know which team - after having eight players - is the best.If you missed the first round rounds, you can view them here. A brief primer: We're taking 16 play
  11. If you missed the first round rounds, you can view them here. A brief primer: We're taking 16 players with "prospect" or "rookie" status. Positions on each team included: Catcher, first base, second base, third base, shortstop, three outfielders, a bench player/hitter, three starting pitchers, three relief pitchers, and an extra pitcher. (Please note that comments under the picks were made by the person making the selection.) Round 5 Seth Stohs - Luis Rijo RH SP When the Twins acquired Rijo in July 2018, he had put up solid numbers and was known for his pitch ability. Then last summ
  12. Watching the NFL draft over the last three days allowed for a semi-normal return to life. Looking forward to the 2020 MLB Draft, though, we see something far from normal. Already delayed to July, we may see a condensed five-round version of the traditional draft, a far cry from the 40 rounds we’ve come to expect. There’s also the possibility that the 2021 Draft may be shortened too. But what happens if there is no 2020 season? How will the 2021 draft order be determined?Let’s look at a few options: 1) Based on previous three years’ win total What might be the “simplest” idea in terms of
  13. Let’s look at a few options: 1) Based on previous three years’ win total What might be the “simplest” idea in terms of calculating, the draft order could be ordered by reverse win totals over the previous three season. It would result in this order: 1 Tigers (58.33) 2 Orioles (58.67) t3 Marlins (65.67) t3 Royals (65.67) 5 White Sox (67.00) 6 Padres (69.00) 7 Reds (70.00) 8 Giants (71.33) 9 Blue Jays (72.00) 10 Rangers (74.33) 11 Pirates (75.33) 12 Phillies (75.67) 13 Angels (77.33) 14 Mets (77.67) 15 Mariners (78.33) 16 Rockies (83.00) 17 Braves (86.33) t18 D-backs (86.67) t18 Rays (86.6
  14. Over the span of just a couple of months in the summer of 2009, the Twins added the trio of Jorge Polanco, Max Kepler and Miguel Sano. In doing so, they shelled out just $4.675 million. On the cheap, the team added three players who have become big parts of the nucleus of the 2020 Twins and all have signed long-term extensions. The summer of 2009 was an outlier from a normal year on the International market, but let's take a look at the Twins activity recently.One of the biggest mysteries and also one of the best ways to add quality to a system is through International Free Agency. It’s one
  15. One of the biggest mysteries and also one of the best ways to add quality to a system is through International Free Agency. It’s one of the best because you look at some of the premier players in the game and they come from the Dominican Republic or Venezuela, countries where players are not subjected to the draft. But it’s a mystery in the sense that teams have only so much money to spend, yet only a few signings make headlines and you never seem to know if teams have more to spend or even who the players are. Putting this report together at any time of the year is going to be misleading. W
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