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Melissa Berman

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  1. I agree, even when the Twins were in the division basement last year I still went to a bunch of games and had a great time with my friends. Weather is beautiful and absolutely a great time to get some amazing seats like you mentioned (I also like those early season snow games for that too!) Looking forward to Ryan vs Ohtani this Friday!
  2. Joe Ryan vs Ohtani, that will be a great game to get to! Definitely will be better attendance than there otherwise would be with any other matchup/ opponent
  3. The days are getting shorter and the baseball season is fading (and so are the Twins playoff hopes), but if you are still hoping to get to Target Field to enjoy some fall baseball, the Twins are running a myriad of deals in order to get fans out to the ballpark on a dime. Image courtesy of Bruce Kluckhohn-USA TODAY Sports Currently, the Twins are ranked 20/30 teams in attendance with 22,321 fans per game. History shows that team performance has a sizeable impact on attendance: in 2019, the AL Central Champion, Bomba Squad Twins drew 28,322 fans per game, and some of its most-attended games were in September. With kids back in school and the Twins 2022 playoff hopes looking grim, the team is running some new deals and fan incentives to combat potential light fan attendance. Here is a roundup of the deals the Twins are running the rest of the season and some of my other money-saving ballpark tips. College night every night- Every September home game is now college night, including weekends. Students can grab $5 standing room tickets on the Twins website or through the MLB Ballpark app. Students who buy a ticket will also get a free MLB.tv subscription for the rest of the 2022 season. https://www.mlb.com/twins/tickets/specials/student-discount. Cheap single-game tickets- Twins fans will have the opportunity to see Mike Trout and potential MVP Shohei Ohtani for cheap during the Angels series September 23-25. Tickets for this series start at $14 through the Twins website (and are similarly priced after fees on ticket resale sites like StubHub). Tickets to the White Sox series September 27-29 start at $9. Tip: buy the tickets in person at the Target Field box office to avoid paying online ticket fees. And if you go to the Tuesday, September 27 game, grab some dollar hotdogs at the last Dollar Dog night of the season. Four Pack- A new deal the Twins are running- every Monday-Thursday game fans can purchase a four-pack of tickets that includes a Home Run Porch View or Field Box ticket, hot dog, pop and chips. https://www.mlb.com/twins/tickets/specials/daily-specials. Tip: if you do not get the four-pack and are still looking for discounted food and drinks, head to the Family Value section in centerfield (sections 133 and 327). A bit of a hidden gem, at this stand offers $2 cups of pop, $5 cans of beer, $4 soft pretzels and hot dogs, and $3 bags of popcorn. Fan appreciation weekend- The Angels series September 23-25 is also Fan Appreciation Weekend. The first 20,000 fans to arrive at Target Field for the Friday and Saturday games will receive a Target Field beanie, which should come in handy in 2023 when the Twins play 16 home games in April, the most of any month. Are you going to head out to Target Field for any more games this season, or have you moved on to 2023? Leave a COMMENT below. View full article
  4. Currently, the Twins are ranked 20/30 teams in attendance with 22,321 fans per game. History shows that team performance has a sizeable impact on attendance: in 2019, the AL Central Champion, Bomba Squad Twins drew 28,322 fans per game, and some of its most-attended games were in September. With kids back in school and the Twins 2022 playoff hopes looking grim, the team is running some new deals and fan incentives to combat potential light fan attendance. Here is a roundup of the deals the Twins are running the rest of the season and some of my other money-saving ballpark tips. College night every night- Every September home game is now college night, including weekends. Students can grab $5 standing room tickets on the Twins website or through the MLB Ballpark app. Students who buy a ticket will also get a free MLB.tv subscription for the rest of the 2022 season. https://www.mlb.com/twins/tickets/specials/student-discount. Cheap single-game tickets- Twins fans will have the opportunity to see Mike Trout and potential MVP Shohei Ohtani for cheap during the Angels series September 23-25. Tickets for this series start at $14 through the Twins website (and are similarly priced after fees on ticket resale sites like StubHub). Tickets to the White Sox series September 27-29 start at $9. Tip: buy the tickets in person at the Target Field box office to avoid paying online ticket fees. And if you go to the Tuesday, September 27 game, grab some dollar hotdogs at the last Dollar Dog night of the season. Four Pack- A new deal the Twins are running- every Monday-Thursday game fans can purchase a four-pack of tickets that includes a Home Run Porch View or Field Box ticket, hot dog, pop and chips. https://www.mlb.com/twins/tickets/specials/daily-specials. Tip: if you do not get the four-pack and are still looking for discounted food and drinks, head to the Family Value section in centerfield (sections 133 and 327). A bit of a hidden gem, at this stand offers $2 cups of pop, $5 cans of beer, $4 soft pretzels and hot dogs, and $3 bags of popcorn. Fan appreciation weekend- The Angels series September 23-25 is also Fan Appreciation Weekend. The first 20,000 fans to arrive at Target Field for the Friday and Saturday games will receive a Target Field beanie, which should come in handy in 2023 when the Twins play 16 home games in April, the most of any month. Are you going to head out to Target Field for any more games this season, or have you moved on to 2023? Leave a COMMENT below.
  5. Earlier this year, Twins Daily covered a host of experimental rules MLB was trying out in its minor leagues during the 2022 season. On Friday, September 9, MLB's Joint Competition Committee, which evaluates and ratifies proposed rule changes, officially approved these rules for use in the majors beginning in 2023. Baseball purists can exhale for now: "robot umpires," currently being experimented with at the minor league level, are not coming to MLB quite yet. The pitch clock, ban on the shift, and larger base sizes were the only three rules proposed by MLB to the Joint Competition Committee- a voting body consisting of four active players, six members appointed by MLB and one umpire that was created as part of the this spring's 2022-26 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). Though an automatic ball-strike system, otherwise known as "robot umpires" or "robo umps" is currently being experimented with at the minor-league level, a formal rule change proposal related to the robot umpires has not yet been made to the committee and is not expected for the 2023 season. A common thread connecting these approved changes is MLB's goals of making the game faster and improving player safety. Though these rules will be new at the MLB level, each of these has been tested and deemed successful in the minors during the 2021 and 2022 seasons. Here is a rundown of the changes MLB fans will see in 2023. Pitch Clock For the first time, MLB will implement a pitch clock. Pitchers will be required to deliver the pitch within 20 seconds with runners on base or 15 seconds with the bases empty. The batter must be in the box "alert to the pitcher" with at least eight seconds left on the timer. In order to further keep the game moving, there will be a 30-second timer between batters. In addition, MLB will also implement a limit on throws to first base, which has reportedly increased stolen base attempts in the minors. MLB explained how a pitch clock would work in detail on Friday. The pitch clock has been seen as an overwhelming success at the minor-league level- if success is measured by faster games. MLB reports that games have sped up by an average of 26 minutes at the minor-league level with use of the pitch clock. Players appear to have gotten used to the pitch clock: according to MLB, in its most recent week, the MiLB has seen an average of only .45 pitch clock violations per game. In MLB's eyes, the same amount of game action (or even more, if there are more stolen bases) will be packed into a shorter amount of time, thus increasing excitement for fans. Time will tell whether or not this change will actually lead to greater fan engagement or recapture the interest of a younger age demographic. MLB has the oldest fans among the major sports, with an average age of 57, according to a 2017 survey by Sports Business Journal. Twins Daily covered the pros and cons of a pitch clock earlier this year. Bigger bases First, second, and third base will be increased by three inches (from 15 inches by 15 inches to 18 inches by 18 inches). MLB’s stated goal of using the larger bases is to reduce player injuries on the base paths. With slightly shorter base paths, MLB is also hoping it will increase the amount of stolen base attempts, and thus bolster game excitement. Though a few inches over the course of a 90-foot base path might not sound like much, seasoned baseball fans know that the amount of plays that come down to an inch or two is not insignificant. Larger bases were used in the Arizona Fall League and at the Triple-A level in 2021, and MLB found that they not only reduced injuries but contributed to an increase in stolen base rates due to the slightly shortened base paths and the larger base size making it more difficult to overslide the base. Bigger bases are being used in all full-season minor leagues during the current 2022 season. Previous Twins Daily coverage evaluating the new, oversized bases. Banning the shift New to MLB in 2023, the defensive team will be required to have at least four players on the infield when the pitcher delivers, with two on either side of second base. MLB is hoping that these restrictions "increase the batting average on balls in play, to allow infielders to better showcase their athleticism and to restore more traditional outcomes on batted balls." In other words, MLB wants to see more hits and higher player batting averages, Defensive shifts have been around for years, but in recent years, MLB shifts have greatly increased in prevalence, thus leading to the league cracking down. Currently, in 2022 the league-wide batting average on balls in play is .291 . This is six points lower than in 2012 and 10 points lower than in 2006. According to MLB, this can be attributed to an increase infield in shifts over the years, which have risen by 589% since the start of the 2018 season. A shift ban is being used in Double-A and both Class A levels during the 2022 season. - - Now that these rules are official, what do you think? Will you enjoy faster MLB game times? Do you think robot umpires will actually make it to the majors? Leave a COMMENT below.
  6. Like it or not, change is here: a pitch clock, shift ban, and bigger bases are officially coming to the game's highest level in 2023. Image courtesy of Vincent Carchietta-USA TODAY Sports Earlier this year, Twins Daily covered a host of experimental rules MLB was trying out in its minor leagues during the 2022 season. On Friday, September 9, MLB's Joint Competition Committee, which evaluates and ratifies proposed rule changes, officially approved these rules for use in the majors beginning in 2023. Baseball purists can exhale for now: "robot umpires," currently being experimented with at the minor league level, are not coming to MLB quite yet. The pitch clock, ban on the shift, and larger base sizes were the only three rules proposed by MLB to the Joint Competition Committee- a voting body consisting of four active players, six members appointed by MLB and one umpire that was created as part of the this spring's 2022-26 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). Though an automatic ball-strike system, otherwise known as "robot umpires" or "robo umps" is currently being experimented with at the minor-league level, a formal rule change proposal related to the robot umpires has not yet been made to the committee and is not expected for the 2023 season. A common thread connecting these approved changes is MLB's goals of making the game faster and improving player safety. Though these rules will be new at the MLB level, each of these has been tested and deemed successful in the minors during the 2021 and 2022 seasons. Here is a rundown of the changes MLB fans will see in 2023. Pitch Clock For the first time, MLB will implement a pitch clock. Pitchers will be required to deliver the pitch within 20 seconds with runners on base or 15 seconds with the bases empty. The batter must be in the box "alert to the pitcher" with at least eight seconds left on the timer. In order to further keep the game moving, there will be a 30-second timer between batters. In addition, MLB will also implement a limit on throws to first base, which has reportedly increased stolen base attempts in the minors. MLB explained how a pitch clock would work in detail on Friday. The pitch clock has been seen as an overwhelming success at the minor-league level- if success is measured by faster games. MLB reports that games have sped up by an average of 26 minutes at the minor-league level with use of the pitch clock. Players appear to have gotten used to the pitch clock: according to MLB, in its most recent week, the MiLB has seen an average of only .45 pitch clock violations per game. In MLB's eyes, the same amount of game action (or even more, if there are more stolen bases) will be packed into a shorter amount of time, thus increasing excitement for fans. Time will tell whether or not this change will actually lead to greater fan engagement or recapture the interest of a younger age demographic. MLB has the oldest fans among the major sports, with an average age of 57, according to a 2017 survey by Sports Business Journal. Twins Daily covered the pros and cons of a pitch clock earlier this year. Bigger bases First, second, and third base will be increased by three inches (from 15 inches by 15 inches to 18 inches by 18 inches). MLB’s stated goal of using the larger bases is to reduce player injuries on the base paths. With slightly shorter base paths, MLB is also hoping it will increase the amount of stolen base attempts, and thus bolster game excitement. Though a few inches over the course of a 90-foot base path might not sound like much, seasoned baseball fans know that the amount of plays that come down to an inch or two is not insignificant. Larger bases were used in the Arizona Fall League and at the Triple-A level in 2021, and MLB found that they not only reduced injuries but contributed to an increase in stolen base rates due to the slightly shortened base paths and the larger base size making it more difficult to overslide the base. Bigger bases are being used in all full-season minor leagues during the current 2022 season. Previous Twins Daily coverage evaluating the new, oversized bases. Banning the shift New to MLB in 2023, the defensive team will be required to have at least four players on the infield when the pitcher delivers, with two on either side of second base. MLB is hoping that these restrictions "increase the batting average on balls in play, to allow infielders to better showcase their athleticism and to restore more traditional outcomes on batted balls." In other words, MLB wants to see more hits and higher player batting averages, Defensive shifts have been around for years, but in recent years, MLB shifts have greatly increased in prevalence, thus leading to the league cracking down. Currently, in 2022 the league-wide batting average on balls in play is .291 . This is six points lower than in 2012 and 10 points lower than in 2006. According to MLB, this can be attributed to an increase infield in shifts over the years, which have risen by 589% since the start of the 2018 season. A shift ban is being used in Double-A and both Class A levels during the 2022 season. - - Now that these rules are official, what do you think? Will you enjoy faster MLB game times? Do you think robot umpires will actually make it to the majors? Leave a COMMENT below. View full article
  7. Bally Sports+ will officially launch on September 26th in all 19 Bally Sports Regional Networks, but as of now, fans in Minnesota will only be able to watch Wild and Timberwolves games. This means that Twins fans will not be able to catch the remainder of the 2022 season on the standalone service once it launches, but Bally Sports is hoping that changes for 2023. "Bally Sports currently has the rights to stream the Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Royals, Miami Marlins, Milwaukee Brewers and Tampa Bay Rays on Bally Sports+. We are in discussions with MLB and our other MLB team partners to expand our offering next year," said Bally Sports on their website. When Bally Sports announced the service, there was also uncertainty regarding whether fans would be able to watch out-of-market games using the service, similar to MLB.TV, a service which gives subscribers access to the broadcasts of all teams (subject to blackout restrictions). According to the company's website FAQ, the answer appears to be "no," writing that "the Bally Sports+ product is another way to watch your local teams, so the same league territory restrictions apply to out-of-market games." According to their website, fans can determine if they live in a specific Bally Sports region by visiting GetMyHomeTeams.com and inputting their zip code. Bally Sports+ comes at at time when several prominent streaming and satellite providers do not offer Bally Sports, including Hulu, YouTube TV, and Dish Network. This lack of access has been a source of frustration for sports fans with these providers, and Bally Sports+ could be a solution for them- for a price. Fans can purchase a monthly subscription for $19.99, or an annual subscription for $189.99 (about $16 a month) with the option for a seven-day free trial.
  8. Earlier this year, Twins Daily covered the details of Sinclair Broadcasting Group's new standalone streaming service, Bally Sports+. Now the service has an official launch date, but Twins games will not be included on the service, not yet at least. Bally Sports+ will officially launch on September 26th in all 19 Bally Sports Regional Networks, but as of now, fans in Minnesota will only be able to watch Wild and Timberwolves games. This means that Twins fans will not be able to catch the remainder of the 2022 season on the standalone service once it launches, but Bally Sports is hoping that changes for 2023. "Bally Sports currently has the rights to stream the Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Royals, Miami Marlins, Milwaukee Brewers and Tampa Bay Rays on Bally Sports+. We are in discussions with MLB and our other MLB team partners to expand our offering next year," said Bally Sports on their website. When Bally Sports announced the service, there was also uncertainty regarding whether fans would be able to watch out-of-market games using the service, similar to MLB.TV, a service which gives subscribers access to the broadcasts of all teams (subject to blackout restrictions). According to the company's website FAQ, the answer appears to be "no," writing that "the Bally Sports+ product is another way to watch your local teams, so the same league territory restrictions apply to out-of-market games." According to their website, fans can determine if they live in a specific Bally Sports region by visiting GetMyHomeTeams.com and inputting their zip code. Bally Sports+ comes at at time when several prominent streaming and satellite providers do not offer Bally Sports, including Hulu, YouTube TV, and Dish Network. This lack of access has been a source of frustration for sports fans with these providers, and Bally Sports+ could be a solution for them- for a price. Fans can purchase a monthly subscription for $19.99, or an annual subscription for $189.99 (about $16 a month) with the option for a seven-day free trial. View full article
  9. Awesome piece, Theo. Love the corresponding pictures too. Looks like that such a cool event to be at
  10. Thanks so much, I appreciate you a lot It was so fun to write. I'll be looking for those microphones now!
  11. Thanks so much for the very kind compliment It was super fun to learn about what goes on behind the scenes to make these broadcasts happen
  12. Thank you so much for the kind words I had a blast writing it and interviewing him + I learned a lot! It was my goal to pass on what I learned!
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