Jump to content
  • Create Account

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'target field'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Twins
  • Minors
  • Saints
  • Just For Fun
  • Twins Daily

Categories

  • Unregistered Help Files
  • All Users Help Files

Categories

  • Twins & Minors
  • Vintage
  • Retrospective
  • Twins Daily

Forums

  • Baseball Forums
    • Minnesota Twins Talk
    • Twins Minor League Talk
    • Twins Daily Front Page News
    • Other Baseball
    • Archived Game Threads
  • MinnCentric Forums
    • The Sports Bar
    • Minnesota Vikings Talk
    • Minnesota Wild Talk
    • Minnesota Timberwolves Talk
  • Current Affairs's Politics and Human Rights
  • Current Affairs's Non-political current affairs
  • Twins Daily's Questions About The Site

Blogs

  • Blog awstafki
  • The Lurker's Annual
  • Mike Sixel's Blog
  • Twins fan in Texas
  • highlander's Blog
  • Patrick Wozniak's Blog
  • Blog dennyhocking4HOF
  • From the Plaza
  • The Special Season
  • Twins Daily's Blog
  • Blog Twins best friend
  • Kyle Eliason's Blog
  • Extra Innings
  • SkinCell Pro: How Does Remove Mole & Skin Tag Work?
  • Blog Badsmerf
  • mikelink45's Blog
  • MT Feelings
  • Keto Burn Max Benefits
  • Blog crapforks
  • Off The Baggy
  • VikingTwinTwolf's Blog
  • A Blog to Be Named Later
  • Cormac's Corner
  • Blog MaureenHill
  • Halsey Hall Chapter of SABR
  • Road Tripping with the Twins
  • Greg Allen
  • Classic Minnesota Twins
  • The Line of Mendoza
  • BombazoMLB
  • Blog Twins Daily Admin
  • joshykid1's Blog
  • What if the Twins had drafted Prior or Teixeira instead of Mauer?
  • the_brute_squad's Blog
  • Better Baseball Is Ahead
  • Nick's Twins Blog
  • Blog jianfu
  • joshykid1's Blog
  • The PTBNL
  • Levi Hansen
  • SethSpeaks.net
  • Blog leshaadawson
  • Underwriting the Twins
  • Small Sample Size
  • parkerb's Blog
  • Tim
  • TwinsGeek.com
  • Blog Roaddog
  • Mauerpower's Blog
  • SotaPop's Blog
  • Face facts!!!
  • Over the Baggy
  • curt1965's Blog
  • Heezy1323's Blog
  • LA Vikes Fan
  • North Dakota Twins Fan
  • Blog Reginald Maudling's Shin
  • curt1965's Blog
  • Miller1234's Blog
  • Twins Curmudgeon
  • Blog Kirsten Brown
  • if we aint spendin 140 million
  • Boone's Blog
  • Rounding Third
  • Kirilloff & Co.
  • Shallow Thoughts - bean5302
  • The Hanging SL
  • Red Wing Squawk
  • Distraction via Baseball
  • Nine of twelve's Blog
  • Blog Lindsay Guentzel
  • Blog Karl
  • Vance_Christianson's Blog
  • Curveball Blog
  • waltomeal's Blog
  • Knuckleballs - JC
  • Blog jrzf713
  • The Minor League Lifestyle
  • Jason Kubel is America
  • weneedjackmorris' Blog
  • Off The Mark
  • Blog freightmaster
  • Playin' Catch
  • Sethmoko's Blog
  • Dome Dogg's Blog
  • Blog Scott Povolny
  • Blog COtwin
  • Hrbowski's Blog
  • Minnesota Twins Whine Line
  • Bomba Blog
  • Blog Chad Jacobsen
  • Blog ScottyBroco
  • tobi0040's Blog
  • Back Office Twins Baseball Blog
  • DannySD's Blog
  • nobitadora's Blog
  • blogs_blog_1812
  • Blog Adam Krueger
  • Hammered (adj.) Heavily inebriated, though to a lesser extent than ****faced.
  • Thegrin's Blog
  • 3rd Inning Stretch's Blog
  • Jeremy Nygaard
  • The W.A.R. room
  • Christopher Fee's Blog
  • Postma Posts
  • Rolondo's Blog
  • blogs_blog_1814
  • Blog Fanatic Jack
  • Dominican Adventure
  • Cory Engelhardt's Blog
  • markthomas' Blog
  • blogs_blog_1815
  • Blog AJPettersen
  • Blog AllhopeisgoneMNTWINS
  • BW on the Beat
  • jfeyereisn17's Blog
  • 2020 Offseason Blueprint
  • Blog TimShibuya
  • Fumi Saito's Blog
  • This Twins Fans Thoughts
  • Long Live La Tortuga
  • Blog TonyDavis
  • Blog Danchat
  • sdtwins37's Blog
  • Thinking Outside the Box
  • dbminn
  • Blog travistwinstalk
  • jokin's Blog
  • Thoughts from The Catch
  • BlakeAsk's Blog
  • Tom Schreier's Blog
  • less cowBlog
  • Hansen101's Blog
  • The Gopher Hole
  • 2020 Twins BluePrint - HotDish Surprise
  • Blog bkucko
  • The Circleback Blog
  • All Things Twins
  • Blog iTwins
  • Drinking at the 573
  • The Thirsty Crow and the google boy from peepeganj
  • Catching Some Zs
  • Blog TCAnelle
  • Singles off the Wall
  • tarheeltwinsfan's Blog
  • A View From The Roof
  • The Blog Days of Summer
  • Jordan1212's Blog
  • You Shouldn't Have Lost
  • TwinsTakes.com Blog on TwinsDaily.com - Our Takes, Your Takes, TwinsTakes.com!
  • Blog SgtSchmidt11
  • Dantes929's Blog
  • Critical Thinking
  • Blog Matt VS
  • Blog RickPrescott
  • The Dollar Dome Dog
  • Travis M's Blog
  • Diamond Dollars
  • Blog jorgenswest
  • Twinsfan4life
  • Travis M's Interviews
  • whatyouknowtwinsfan's Blog
  • Blog righty8383
  • Blog TwinsWolvesLynxBlog
  • Supfin99's Blog
  • tarheeltwinsfan's Blog
  • Blog glunn
  • Blog yumen0808
  • Unkind Bounces
  • Doctor Gast's Blog
  • One Man's View From Section 231
  • Don't Feed the Greed? What does that mean...
  • Diesel's Blog
  • Blog denarded
  • Blog zymy0813
  • Twins Peak
  • Minnesota Twins Health and Performance: A Blog by Lucas Seehafer PT
  • Blog kirbyelway
  • Blog JP3700
  • twinssouth's Blog
  • Ports on Sports Blog
  • Blog Twins Fan From Afar
  • Blog E. Andrew
  • The 10th Inning Stretch
  • Hans Birkleberry's Blog
  • Blog twinsarmchairgm
  • Pitz Hits
  • samthetwinsfan's Blog
  • Blog JB (the Original)
  • soofootinsfan37's Blog
  • You Can Read This For Free
  • One Post Blog
  • Blog Dez Tobin
  • South Dakota Tom's Blog
  • hrenlazar2019's Blog
  • MNSotaSportsGal Twins Takes
  • Blog kemics
  • Blog AM.
  • DerektheDOM's Blog
  • Twins Tunes
  • Blog jtrinaldi
  • Blog Bill
  • Not Another Baseball Blog
  • Down on the Farm
  • Most likely pitchers making their MLB debut in 2021 for Twins.
  • Blog Wookiee of the Year
  • mike8791's Blog
  • Pensacola Blue Wahoos: Photo-A-Day
  • Puckets Pond
  • Blog Jim H
  • A trade for the off season
  • curt1965's Blog
  • Kasota Gold
  • The POSTseason
  • Blog guski
  • Blog rickyriolo
  • SgtSchmidt11's Blog
  • Twinternationals
  • Blog birdwatcher
  • Blog acrozelle
  • Axel Kohagen's Catastrophic Overreactions
  • Bashwood12's Blog
  • Spicer's Baseball Movie Reviews
  • Beyond the Metrodome
  • Blog yangxq0827
  • The Pat-Man Saga
  • TheTeufelShuffle's Blog
  • ebergdib's blog
  • Blog Thegrin
  • Zachary's Blog
  • scottyc35
  • Danchat's Aggregated Prospect Rankings
  • Thrylos' Blog - select Tenth Inning Stretch posts
  • Blog taune
  • scottyc35's Blog
  • World's Greatest Online Magazine
  • Blog tweety2012
  • DRizzo's Blog
  • mrtwinsfan's Blog
  • Blog asmus_ndsu
  • Otto Gets Blotto
  • Betsy Twins Report
  • Blog shawntheroad
  • Blog David-14
  • Blog Buddy14
  • Blog keithanderson
  • Blog Topperanton
  • Blog lightfoot789
  • Blog Axel Kohagen
  • Blog Lesser Dali
  • Blog Neinstein
  • Blog Bob Sacamento
  • Blog J-Dog Dungan
  • Thoughts of a Bullpen Catcher
  • Blog Dilligaf69
  • blogs_blog_1599
  • Twin Minds
  • My Opening Day Poem
  • Blog Teflon
  • Blog yanking it out...
  • Blog Anare
  • Blog Charlie Beattie
  • Blog Coach J
  • What to do with Morneau?
  • Peanuts from Heaven
  • Blog Physics Guy
  • Twins Adjacent
  • Field of Twins
  • Martin Schlegel's Blog
  • The Long View
  • Blog grumpyrob
  • Off The Mark
  • Blog Jeff A
  • Blog jwestbrock
  • by Matt Sisk
  • Blog Sarah
  • Blog RodneyKline
  • Blog JeffB
  • Anorthagen's Twins Daily Blogs
  • Low Profile MI Trade
  • Blog CC7
  • Blog dwintheiser
  • Blog Docsilly
  • Blog cmathewson
  • Blog mnfireman
  • Blog twinsfanstl
  • Blog dave_dw
  • Blog MN_Twins_Live
  • Standing Room Only
  • Blog gkasper
  • Blog puck34
  • Blog Old Twins Cap
  • Blog diehardtwinsfan
  • Blog Twinfan & Dad
  • Blog LimestoneBaggy
  • Blog Brian Mozey
  • vqt94648's Blog
  • Blog Loosey
  • Blog fairweather
  • World Series Champions 2088
  • Blog Drtwins
  • Blog peterb18
  • Blog LindaU
  • Kevin Slowey was Framed!
  • Blog Christopher Fee
  • Very Well Then
  • Pitch2Contact.com
  • A View from the Slot
  • Blog severson09
  • Blog husker brian
  • Blog Ray Tapajna
  • Sell high?
  • Blog bogeypepsi
  • Blog tshide
  • Blog Gene Larkin Fan Club
  • Blog jimbo92107
  • Blog DefinitelyNotVodkaDave
  • Blog Cap'n Piranha
  • The Blog Formerly Known as Undomed
  • Frank Vantur's Blog
  • Blog Ricola
  • Blog AScheib50
  • SamGoody's Blog
  • Blog clutterheart
  • Blog Trent Condon
  • Blog bwille
  • blogs_blog_1635
  • Blog strumdatjag
  • Blog huhguy
  • blogs_blog_1636
  • Blog 3rd Inning Stretch
  • Blog 10PagesOfClearBlueSky
  • blogs_blog_1637
  • Blog Tyomoth
  • SD Buhr/Jim Crikket
  • blogs_blog_1638
  • Blog bear333
  • Blog sln477
  • Blog abbylucy
  • Blog Gernzy
  • Troy's Twins Thoughts
  • Blog OtherHoward219
  • blogs_blog_1642
  • Blog ScrapTheNickname
  • Blog TicketKing
  • Blog sotasports9
  • Twins Rubes
  • Blog goulik
  • Hosken's Blog
  • Blog one_eyed_jack
  • Blog joelindell
  • Blog rikker49
  • Blog nickschubert
  • Blog DreInWA
  • You're Not Reading This
  • Blog Hugh Morris
  • The Blog Formerly Known as Undomed
  • Kottke's Cuts
  • Blog Dakota Watts
  • Blog markroehl
  • Blog jjswol
  • Blog Tibs
  • blogs_blog_1654
  • Blog jlovren
  • Blog Boone
  • Puckmen's Blog
  • Minnesota native to attend Twins predraft workout
  • Blog obryaneu
  • Blog JohnFoley
  • Blog TwinsArmChairGM_Jon
  • Bloop Singles
  • Blog Ryan Atkins
  • Blog the blade
  • Blog Lonestar
  • Blog jdotmcmahon
  • Blog WayneJimenezubc
  • Blog Sconnie
  • Blog PogueBear
  • Blog pierre75275
  • cHawk Talks Baseball
  • Blog Paul Bebus
  • flyballs in orbit
  • Blog A33bates
  • Blog lunchboxhero_4
  • lidefom746's Blog
  • Blog coddlenomore
  • Blog Trevor0333
  • Blog lee_the_twins_fan
  • Blog StreetOfFire
  • Blog clark47dorsey
  • Texastwinsfan blog
  • Blog KCasey
  • Blog Joey Lindseth
  • Blog jakelovesgolf
  • Blog mchokozie
  • Thoughts from the Stands
  • cHawk’s Blog
  • Blog best game in the world
  • Heather's thoughts
  • Blog sammy0eaton
  • HitInAPinch's Blog
  • Blog Mauerpower
  • Blog Jdosen
  • Blog twinsfanohio
  • Beyond the Limestone
  • Blog dougkoebernick
  • Get to know 'em
  • 5 Tool Blog
  • Cole Trace
  • Blog Sunglasses
  • Blog CTB_NickC
  • Blog Colin.O'Donnell
  • "And we'll see ya' ... tomorrow night."
  • Blog richardkr34
  • Gopher Baseball with Luke Pettersen
  • Blog KelvinBoyerxrg
  • Blog twinsfan34
  • Blog CaryMuellerlib
  • Blog jtkoupal
  • FunnyPenguin's Blog
  • Blog Sierra Szeto
  • Blog ExiledInSeattle
  • A Realistic Fix to the 2014 Twins
  • Blog naksh
  • Blog bellajelcooper
  • rickymartin's Blog
  • Blog twinsajsf
  • Blog keeth
  • Blog Murphy Vasterling Cannon
  • Twins Winter Caravan
  • Blog tracygame
  • Blog rjohnso4
  • Half a Platoon
  • Blog jangofelixak
  • Blog SirClive
  • tooslowandoldnow's Blog
  • Blog Troy Larson
  • Blog thetank
  • nicksaviking blog
  • Blog iekfWjnrxb
  • Blog SouthDakotaFarmer
  • Bill Parker
  • East Coast Bias
  • Blog tobi0040
  • Lee-The-Twins-Fan's Blog
  • Blog foe-of-nin
  • Blog cocosoup
  • Minnesota Groan
  • Blog wRenita5
  • rgvtwinstalk
  • Major Minnesotans
  • Blog Aaron 12
  • Blog janewong
  • The Twins Almanac
  • Blog boys
  • Blog bennep
  • Hambino the Great's Blog
  • Blog JadaKingg25
  • Jesse Lund's Blog
  • Blog Brabes1987
  • RealStoriesMN
  • Blog sanal101
  • Blog Spikecurveball
  • Blog Devereaux
  • D-mac's Blog
  • Blog tarheeltwinsfan
  • kakakhan's Blog
  • Blog Oliver
  • Blog travis_aune
  • Twins and Losses
  • In My Opinion
  • Blog ieveretgte4f
  • Blog Sam Morley
  • Pinto's Perspective
  • Blog curt1965
  • VeryWellThen's Blog
  • Extcs
  • The Foul Play-by-Play Twins Blog
  • Dave The Dastardly's Blog
  • Blog winunaarec
  • Negativity Police's Blog
  • Blog Robb Jeffries
  • Adam Houck's Blog
  • SaintsTrain
  • Loosey's Blog
  • Blog EE in Big D
  • Talkin' Twins with Jonathon
  • Steve Penz's Blog
  • Blog jtequilabermeah
  • The Tenth Inning Stretch
  • Apathy for the Game
  • Dave The Dastardly's Blog
  • Blog hmariloustarkk
  • Car detailing
  • Blog Brendan Kennealy
  • Twins Fan From Afar's Blog
  • Visit500
  • Blog totocc
  • SD Buhr's Blog
  • KirbyHawk75's Blog
  • Blog Bark's Lounge
  • huhguy's Blog
  • Blog TwinsFanLV
  • NumberThree's Blog
  • Blog pandorajewelry
  • The Go Gonzo Journal Twins Blog
  • Twinsnerd123's Blog
  • Blog cClevelandSmialekp
  • Talk to Contact
  • Boo-urns
  • Blog silverslugger
  • jtkoupal's Blog
  • Broker's Blog
  • Blog Twinsoholic
  • diehardtwinsfan's Blog
  • Brad's Blog
  • Javier Maschrano - the rising star of Argentina
  • Be Always in Fashion &in Trendy Look
  • Blog Salazar
  • curt1965's Blog
  • Be Always in Fashion &in Trendy Look
  • ThejacKmp's Blog
  • Blog vMaymeHansone
  • stringer bell's Blog
  • Blog brvama
  • AJPettersen's Blog
  • WiscoTwin
  • Rants (not Rantz)
  • iec23966's Blog
  • Blog loisebottorf83
  • CodyB's Blog
  • Staying Positive
  • Target Field of Dreams' Blog
  • Intentional Balk
  • Blog rodmccray11282
  • ReturnOfShaneMack's Blog
  • Blog SksippSvefdklyn
  • A blog about the Twins & more
  • Thome the Moneyball
  • tobi0040's Blog
  • Lefty74's Blog
  • USAFChief's Blog
  • tobi0040's Blog
  • Tony Nato's Blog
  • Clear's Blog
  • Blog LeeStevensonuuf
  • Waking up the Twins
  • Blog GrahamCharleshqr
  • First Base and the legacy of Kent Hrbek
  • carly148
  • Blog MWLFan
  • Minnie Paul and Mary
  • twinstarheelsfan's Blog
  • This game's fun, OK?
  • Blog TimeAgreell
  • Tsuyoshi's Island
  • NASCAR Steve's Blog
  • Kevin Horner's Blog
  • blogs_blog_1742
  • Blog CDog
  • Hold for the Batter
  • John the Analytics Guy
  • mrmpls' Blog
  • Zlog
  • samberry's Blog
  • nmtwinsfan's Blog
  • Under Teflon Skies
  • Views from the road
  • St. Paul Saints
  • Blog tkyokoperkinsn
  • Alskn's Northern Lights
  • Talkin' Turnstiles
  • Find Stats Elsewhere
  • Blog LaBombo
  • hugelycat's Blog
  • Deduno Abides' Blog
  • Milldaddy35's Blog Area
  • Blog Fire Dan Gladden
  • Baseball Intelligence
  • framedoctor's Blog
  • Blog Riverbrian
  • Blog Brandon
  • Organizational Depth Chart
  • Left Field Gap
  • gtkilla
  • Hicks' Left-Handed Helmets
  • MauerState7's Blog
  • 80MPH Changeup
  • Twins Pitch Breakdown
  • What you know about that blog
  • Blog DaTwins
  • positive1's Blog
  • rikker49's Blog
  • baxterpope15's Blog
  • Blog ThejacKmp
  • Random Thoughts About Baseball
  • Don't Feed the Greed Guy's Blog
  • Run Prevention
  • Blog ericchri
  • pierre75275's Blog
  • Don't Feed the Greed Guy's Blog
  • Cargo Cult Sabermetrics
  • Blog 81Exposruledbaseball
  • Deduno Abides' Blog
  • David Howell's Blog
  • Blog daanderson20
  • Twin Billing
  • sorney's Blog
  • TCAnelle's Blog
  • Blog shs_59
  • rikker49's Blog
  • Crackin' Wax's Cardboard Corner
  • Blog jm3319
  • jsteve96's Blog
  • The Always Fashionable; Uncle Charlie
  • Blog stringer bell
  • twinssouth's Blog
  • Baseball Good
  • Blog everettegalr
  • twinsfan34's Blog
  • menthmike's Blog
  • Blog Obie
  • B Richard's Blog
  • Brazilian Twins Territory
  • The Hidden Baseball
  • Blog SpinnesotaGirl
  • Marthaler
  • InfieldFlyRuled
  • Coopcarlson3's Blog
  • Blog SoDakTwinsFan5
  • Blog LastOnePicked
  • Bob Sacamento's Blog
  • MnTwinsTalk's Blog
  • Blog Top Gun
  • Twinfan & Dad's Blog
  • Nebtwinsfan's Blog
  • Blog TKGuy
  • GLO Blog
  • Ben Fadden's Blog
  • ajcondon's Blog
  • Blog TheMind07
  • Daily Twins Daily
  • TwinkiePower's Blog
  • Blog Michael Blomquist
  • VeryWellThen
  • MN_ExPat's Blog
  • Channing1964's Blog
  • Blog Darin Bratsch
  • Twin's Organizational News
  • Around The Horn
  • Blog beckmt
  • jjswol's Twins Trivia Blog
  • BeantownTwinsFan's Blog
  • Blog YourHouseIsMyHouse
  • jjswol's Twins Trivia Blog
  • Blog jay
  • SF Twins Fan's Blog
  • Morneau
  • TNTwinsFan's Blog
  • Musings from Twins Territory
  • Original Twin
  • Blog El Guapo
  • Doubles' Blog
  • Kirbek's Leaps and Pulls
  • Blog jokin
  • Brandon's Blog
  • A Look Back
  • Science of Baseball
  • Blog IdahoPilgrim
  • Sam Morley's Blog
  • oregontwin's Blog
  • Rounding Second
  • Blog Lyric53
  • The Curse of the Trees
  • gagu's Blog
  • Twins in CA
  • Blog Oldgoat_MN
  • Giant Baseball Cards
  • Blog twinfan49
  • docsillyseth's Blog
  • Kirby O'Connor's Blog
  • dfklgkoc
  • Blog ContinuumGuy
  • Wille's Way
  • Minnesota Sports Statistics Analysis
  • Ryan Stephan's Twinpinions
  • blogs_blog_2805
  • Blog tradingadvantage
  • brvama's Blog
  • Minnesota SSA's Blog
  • Danchat's Strat-O-Matic Blog
  • Blog Chance
  • NoCryingInBaseball's Blog
  • It Takes All Kinds
  • TFRazor's Blog
  • Blog twinslover
  • Sarah's Blog
  • theJemmer's Blog
  • Spikecurveball's Blog
  • Four Six Three
  • blogs_blog_2809
  • 2012 Draft.
  • travistwinstalk's Blog
  • Seth Stohs' Blog
  • Through a Child's Eyes
  • Colexalean Supplement Reviews
  • Blog jiamay
  • Dome Dogg's Blog
  • Fanspeak's Twins and AL Central Blog
  • In Pursuit of Pennants
  • minnesotasportsunlimited's Blog
  • Jacob Booth Blogs
  • Blog stewthornley
  • mickeymental's Blog
  • Baseball Bat's Offseason Blueprint
  • AJswarley's Blog
  • Twins Outsider's Blog
  • Blog h2oface
  • Iowa Twins Fan
  • Twinkie Talk
  • Battle Your Tail Off
  • JackWhite's Blog
  • bikram's Blog
  • Twins Nation Podcast

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Personal Blog Name


Personal Blog URL


Location:


Biography


Occupation


Interests


Twitter

  1. The Suburban Era: Metropolitan Stadium Metropolitan Stadium was one of the first stadiums to be part of a trend that moved from city centers to the suburbs. One of the biggest reasons for this trend was the lack of space and rising cost of land. Bloomington allowed the Twins to build a large complex with plenty of parking, especially since the team’s fans would be coming from multiple states and cars would be the main form of transportation. Paul Golberger, the author, said, “Metropolitan, in the midst of a huge parking lot, exemplifies the notion of the suburban stadium (and how logical that it would become the site of the Mall of America, the ultimate suburban mall).” Some fans were sad to see the Met’s eventual demise. Goldberger said, “Fans do get attached to places because they have intense emotional experiences there, and understandably they become the source of deep-seated, meaningful memories.” The Met helped convince a franchise to move to Minnesota and it served the team well for multiple decades including the team’s first World Series appearance, but baseball continued to evolve, and the Twins made the move from the suburbs into the city. The Domed Era: The Metrodome Houston’s AstroDome ushered in a new ballpark experience for fans and Minnesota would follow, although it would be 17 years after the AstroDome opened. The Metrodome certainly had its quirks and as a multipurpose stadium it didn’t exactly ever feel like a ballpark. Everything about the stadium was fake from the grass to the pumped in air, but it certainly fit in with some of the stadiums at the time. “The Metrodome was one of the most egregious of the domed stadiums with no connection to anything around it and no natural connection to baseball,” said Goldberger. Some of the Twins’ most memorable moments came under a Teflon roof on artificial grass, but all the Dome’s flaws made the move back outdoors even more impressive. The Return to Downtown Era: Target Field Target Field opened in 2010 and it followed in the footsteps of plenty of ballparks that returned to downtowns across the United States and became part of the city again. Camden Yards in Baltimore, Coors Field in Denver, and PNC Park in Pittsburgh are just a few examples of what a city can do to make a ballpark integrated into a downtown footprint. “Target is a really fine example of the later generation, where baseball not only came back into the city but was of the city, integrated with it,” said Goldberger. Later he said, “The home stadium for any team you care about will become a place you feel emotionally connected to, even if it’s a lousy piece of architecture and doesn’t do its job very well. But in a place like Target you can have the same emotional intensity and the same long-lasting memories and have a much happier environment besides.” The Future Target Field celebrated its 10th anniversary last season and the Twins front office and the Pohlad family continue to make upgrades on a yearly basis. Some teams like Atlanta and Texas abandoned relatively new ballparks in hopes of creating a different type of baseball experience. “There’s no reason a ballpark can’t last for 50, 75 or even 100 years with proper care,” said Goldberger. “There is absolutely no reason that the Texas Rangers had to tear down Globe Life Park, which was only 25.” The Twins have also embraced another budding ballpark trend by creating specific spaces at Target Field. Areas like Bat & Barrel, Minnie & Paul’s and Barrio are open to all fans and combine a social atmosphere that is far from the traditional way of watching a game. Goldberger said, “We’re seeing much more in the way of social spaces in ballparks now, including standing room areas where people can get drinks and wander, treating the experience of the game more like a cocktail party than something you need to observe from a fixed seat.” Moving forward there could be another possibility for growth without leaving Target Field. Some organizations have started to create spaces around the ballpark that make for a full-day experience. “Team owners, wanting to have more sources of revenue, are buying and controlling adjacent properties outside the gate,” said Goldberger. “We see that at Wrigley Field, and also at Busch Stadium, where the Cardinals have developed the adjacent site as Ballpark Village.” Target Field has certainly been a revelation when compared to previous Minnesota ballparks, but fans were very passionate about some of the quirks with Metropolitan Stadium and the Metrodome. Baseball is meant to be outside under the sun and it will be exciting to see what Target Field could be in the future. What are your memories with all of Minnesota’s ballparks? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
  2. Baseball is a sport where tradition is engrained in the fabric of the game. As far as baseball traditions go, the Twins Cities have a long history, but the MLB history in the city is relatively young. Last spring, Paul Goldberger released a book called Ballpark: Baseball in the American City and he chronicled baseball’s different ballpark eras and what they have meant to the cities in which they reside. Here’s how the Twins ballpark history follows closely with trends seen through baseball’s different eras. The Suburban Era: Metropolitan Stadium Metropolitan Stadium was one of the first stadiums to be part of a trend that moved from city centers to the suburbs. One of the biggest reasons for this trend was the lack of space and rising cost of land. Bloomington allowed the Twins to build a large complex with plenty of parking, especially since the team’s fans would be coming from multiple states and cars would be the main form of transportation. Paul Golberger, the author, said, “Metropolitan, in the midst of a huge parking lot, exemplifies the notion of the suburban stadium (and how logical that it would become the site of the Mall of America, the ultimate suburban mall).” Some fans were sad to see the Met’s eventual demise. Goldberger said, “Fans do get attached to places because they have intense emotional experiences there, and understandably they become the source of deep-seated, meaningful memories.” The Met helped convince a franchise to move to Minnesota and it served the team well for multiple decades including the team’s first World Series appearance, but baseball continued to evolve, and the Twins made the move from the suburbs into the city. The Domed Era: The Metrodome Houston’s AstroDome ushered in a new ballpark experience for fans and Minnesota would follow, although it would be 17 years after the AstroDome opened. The Metrodome certainly had its quirks and as a multipurpose stadium it didn’t exactly ever feel like a ballpark. Everything about the stadium was fake from the grass to the pumped in air, but it certainly fit in with some of the stadiums at the time. “The Metrodome was one of the most egregious of the domed stadiums with no connection to anything around it and no natural connection to baseball,” said Goldberger. Some of the Twins’ most memorable moments came under a Teflon roof on artificial grass, but all the Dome’s flaws made the move back outdoors even more impressive. The Return to Downtown Era: Target Field Target Field opened in 2010 and it followed in the footsteps of plenty of ballparks that returned to downtowns across the United States and became part of the city again. Camden Yards in Baltimore, Coors Field in Denver, and PNC Park in Pittsburgh are just a few examples of what a city can do to make a ballpark integrated into a downtown footprint. “Target is a really fine example of the later generation, where baseball not only came back into the city but was of the city, integrated with it,” said Goldberger. Later he said, “The home stadium for any team you care about will become a place you feel emotionally connected to, even if it’s a lousy piece of architecture and doesn’t do its job very well. But in a place like Target you can have the same emotional intensity and the same long-lasting memories and have a much happier environment besides.” The Future Target Field celebrated its 10th anniversary last season and the Twins front office and the Pohlad family continue to make upgrades on a yearly basis. Some teams like Atlanta and Texas abandoned relatively new ballparks in hopes of creating a different type of baseball experience. “There’s no reason a ballpark can’t last for 50, 75 or even 100 years with proper care,” said Goldberger. “There is absolutely no reason that the Texas Rangers had to tear down Globe Life Park, which was only 25.” The Twins have also embraced another budding ballpark trend by creating specific spaces at Target Field. Areas like Bat & Barrel, Minnie & Paul’s and Barrio are open to all fans and combine a social atmosphere that is far from the traditional way of watching a game. Goldberger said, “We’re seeing much more in the way of social spaces in ballparks now, including standing room areas where people can get drinks and wander, treating the experience of the game more like a cocktail party than something you need to observe from a fixed seat.” Moving forward there could be another possibility for growth without leaving Target Field. Some organizations have started to create spaces around the ballpark that make for a full-day experience. “Team owners, wanting to have more sources of revenue, are buying and controlling adjacent properties outside the gate,” said Goldberger. “We see that at Wrigley Field, and also at Busch Stadium, where the Cardinals have developed the adjacent site as Ballpark Village.” Target Field has certainly been a revelation when compared to previous Minnesota ballparks, but fans were very passionate about some of the quirks with Metropolitan Stadium and the Metrodome. Baseball is meant to be outside under the sun and it will be exciting to see what Target Field could be in the future. What are your memories with all of Minnesota’s ballparks? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email View full article
  3. There are a multitude of ways to analyze parks and StatCast data is only going to make it easier to pit one park against another. ESPN uses Park Factors as a way of ranking parks. According to their rankings, Target Field started out as a pitcher-friendly environment with the park ranking in the high-teens and low-20s for multiple seasons. That has held true in more recent years as Target Field was the 22nd ranked park when it came to runs scored in 2020. Obviously, a shortened season can impact those numbers, so let’s look back a little further in the time machine. In 2019, the Bomba Squad was on their way to setting the all-time home run record. However, Target Field only ranked 18th when it came to ESPN’s Park Factor. That number also compare similarly to 2018 when Target Field ranked 16th. In 2017 and 2016, Minnesota’s home park ranked in the top-10 for favoring hitters, so there may need to be some other avenues to explore when it comes to Target Field’s reputation. FanGraphs provides a more comprehensive data set when it comes to Park Factors as they look at comparative data over a five-year span. When looking at their Park Factors, a league average park is set to 100. Through the 2020 campaign, Target Field produced a five-year Park Factor of 101, which ranks 11th in baseball. Over the last three years, it has a 99 Park Factor, which ranked tied for 17th. Among AL teams, only Oakland, Seattle, and Tampa have a lower Park Factor. Pitcher List looks at Park Factors from a couple different lenses, Park Factors for Pitcher and for Hitters. When it comes to pitchers, Target Field ranks 16th with a -0.01 Park Factor. For hitters, Pitcher List breaks up the Park Factor into left- and right-handed results. Target Field ranks 22nd for left-handed hitters with a -0.43 Park Factor. Similarly, Target Field also ranks 22nd for righties with a -0.71. The only AL parks with a lower right-handed Park Factor are Fenway, Angel Stadium, and Yankee Stadium. Baseball Prospectus updated their system of Park Factors this off-season and there is clearly some volatility involved with the entire process. StatCast batted ball data was used in hopes of painting a more accurate picture over the short term. One interesting note from their data was the fact that Target Field ranked as one of the worst environments for right-handed hitters in 2020. Out of AL parks, only Comerica Park and Oakland Coliseum ranked lower. Overall, Target Field seems to be a pitcher friendly environment with many site’s Park Factors ranking the park in the middle or lower half when compared to the rest of baseball. As new parks continue to be built, it will be interesting to see how Target Field continues to rank in the years to come. Do you think Target Field is more favorable to pitchers or to hitters? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
  4. After a long and arduous battle over financials and restart principles leading up to Opening Day, we’ve finally got a level of consistency and schedule from Major League Baseball. Despite the best efforts of the Miami Marlins attempting to bring the league to its knees, virtually every other team has navigated what can be described as a new normal. https://twitter.com/StPaulSaints/status/1288880158401863680 While the effects of this global pandemic rage on in the world around us, the goal is still returning to a greater sense of normalcy sooner rather than later. Although not a part of MLB, the St. Paul Saints are taking the next step in their similar goals. After having played their season in the hub city of Sioux Falls, South Dakota to this point, they’ll return home to CHS Field on August 4th and fans will be in the ballpark. Their next-door neighbors may not be long behind them. KSTP’s Darren Wolfson noted on his latest version of The Scoop podcast that the Twins are loosely targeting August 14th as a date of return for fans in a limited capacity. Minnesota is currently scheduled to return home against the Kansas City Royals on that date, and they’d be 19 games into their 60-game schedule by that point. https://twitter.com/DWolfsonKSTP/status/1288889770911961088 Obviously, and as Wolfson also noted on Twitter, any return of fans would be subject to MLB approval. Currently the Twins are utilizing the concourses and suites as additional space to distance themselves while working out and getting ready for game time. While fans would be undoubtedly distanced throughout the ballpark, their presence would cannibalize some of the space presently helping the big leaguers work. As has been the case from the outset of the restart, MLB ownership is looking for additional revenue streams as often and as quickly as possible. Despite the notion that owning a franchise “isn’t very profitable” the more likely reality is that revenues, while still present, aren’t in the stratospheric levels this season. Owners are looking to drive them back up any way they can, and that certainly includes the introduction of a 16-team Postseason format. There’s a handful of different realities that could be in play regarding fans craving baseball action in 2020. Wolfson noted that the Twins home opener drew record numbers on Fox Sports North, and with fans all confined to their couches that makes a good deal of sense. It’s a bit unfortunate that MLB spent so much time hashing out labor disputes during the restart and failed to find ways to draw in new fans. The return of sports was always bound to be well received but converting those from other programming or holding onto casual onlookers while other leagues now restart, should have always been the goal. We’re not close to out of the woods when it comes to the impact felt from COVID-19. Ultimately it will be the progress that we make on that end allowing Dave St. Peter and the Minnesota Twins to bring Twins Territory back home. The wheels are in motion though, and if we can all continue to do our part, maybe MLB will grant us an opportunity for overpriced beer and a beautiful skyline this summer after all. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
  5. Attending MLB games has been a summer ritual for baseball fans, but the 2020 season could mark the first year where no fans will be able to attend games. The sights, sounds and smells of the ballpark are an integral part of the baseball experience. Twins fans have been lucky to spend the last 10 years roaming Target Field, one of the best ballparks in all of baseball.Recently at the Athletic, 9,000 fans were surveyed to decide what was MLB’s best ballpark. Target Field finished in third place behind Oracle Park (Giants) and Petco Park (Padres). The areas ranked in their survey included location, overall quality, atmosphere, amenities, sight lines, and aesthetics. There is a lot to love about Target Field and here is what the Twins Daily writers love most about Minnesota’s ballpark. John Bonnes: I love how they keep reinvesting in the park. It gets better every year. Several of my favorite places to hang out there literally didn't exist when it opened, including Minnie and Paul's, Bat & Barrel and the Gate 34 craft beer taps. I love that Sue the organist plays in a bar behind home plate and is approachable (and interacts, including selfies) with fans. I love the sandstone on the outside. I love the view of the skyline from the left field side. I love that the footprint is small. It's a lie to say there are no bad seats (some with limited outfield views), but there aren't too many bad seats. When I'm asked by visitors where they should sit (which is pretty often), I tell them they really can't go wrong. I love that they stay open after the game for a while, especially Bat & Barrel, to sort of wind down after the game. I really think an underrated aspect of the park is the attention they paid to the art. I'm not talking about the statues, which I can take or leave. But throughout the part, there are touches that we overlook. Check out the parking garage wind sculpture, some of the murals on the outside along the rail line, the enormous Kirby picture in the Delta Sky Club or the S Preston stuff (and MLB bat sculpture) near the parking garage entrance. I love that all the awards, including the World Series trophies, are available for fans to enjoy in Bat and Barrel. Seth Stohs: There are so many things to like about Target Field. There are the statues and the Gate Numbers. There is the breathtaking architecture. There is the giant screen towering beyond left field. There is history of the organization throughout the stadium, from large photos of Twins greats to the Carew and Puckett Atriums in the Legends club. The concourses are wide, and you can watch the game while standing in line. There are photo ops all over the ballpark. There is the smell of brats. Tom Froemming: I love how small it is. Even the cheap seats are still right on top of the field, much closer to the action than most other MLB parks. I also appreciate how many common areas there are where you can stand and watch the game. There have been many games where I never actually ventured to the seat my ticket was for. The view from along the third-base line is gorgeous. Being able to go see Sue Nelson play organ in 2 Gingers Pub adds a unique experience. Cody Christie: Minnesota’s ballparks have followed the trends that stretch back to their first park in Bloomington. Met Stadium and the Metrodome had their quirks, but Twins fans have found a perfect home in Target Field. A perfect downtown location, amazing views of the skyline, and a plethora of local food and beverage options help to set the ballpark apart from many others in baseball. The Twins have also made annual changes to the park to improve the fan experience. Hopefully, Target Field because a place that can one day be thought of in the same light as some of the other legendary ballparks across baseball. Nate Palmer: I will start with I never understood the hate for the Metrodome until I walked into Target Field. (That may be more a reflection of how little other ball parks I had been in than anything) To this point, everywhere I have sat inside the stadium provides a tremendous view of the game. The ability to walk the open concourse and still know what is going on is also tremendous. The skyline view, especially when sitting on the 1st base side, is also amazing. Especially on the nights when the sun does its work as well! Lastly, I would add the move to adding the "family friendly" priced options in the concessions was great for this father of 2. Next step is to take a page out of the Brewer's stadiums playbook (Whatever insurance field it is now) and allow fans to bring in unopened bottles would be great! Ted Schwerzler: Target Field is very much like Minneapolis itself. It has all the amenities of a larger stadium while being on a smaller scale. The skyline view behind the outer edges is amazing, and the standing viewing options may be some of the best in baseball. Seats are incredibly close to the action, but you also can’t go wrong taking a walk around the park and enjoying the action somewhere new every few innings. Matthew Taylor: Nothing beats the MPLS skyline view beyond the right field wall. Watching a game on the third baseline while taking in the skyline from our beautiful city is as good as it gets! Matthew Lenz: Target Field has so many great options and experiences where you can watch the game from. The balcony in CF, the porch in RF, a bar behind home plate or in LF. There’s really not a bad seat in the house. Idk how many times I’ve bought tickets to the game but never made it to my seat Nash Walker: Minneapolis mostly has brutal winters. It ends up being worth it when you’re watching the Twins at Target Field in the summer. The skyline is beautiful and being there makes me proud to be a Minnesotan. Cody Pirkl: Definitely the food and the friendly atmosphere. The whole park is basically a big piece of art too. Matt Braun: Well as someone who mainly frequents Safeco, the thing I like most about Target Field is that I don't feel like I'm being suffocated by a giant movable roof. In all seriousness, the atmosphere of the game is absolutely tremendous and has yet to be topped by any other stadium I've been at. The tiles mixed with the plants in the stadium give it such a fresh feel that makes it feel like a ballpark just happened to grow from the spot rather than being built there. Rena: Where do I even begin. I think the parking is extremely manageable and generally affordable at Target Field. To me, that’s huge. Even though it’s brand new, you can see a hint of history and Minnesota everywhere, from the Sheboygan brats to its proximity to the historic Warehouse District, and the gorgeous skyline. You’re not going to a game, you’re having an experience at Target Field. Plus, the refillable water bottle stations everywhere sponsored by Ecolab are neat. I had a heat stroke at Wrigley last summer and ended up spending almost $50 on water. Wouldn’t have happened here. Steve Lein: The Minnie & Paul sign in center is the best such team and in-game monument in the league, in my opinion. I've also sat nearly everywhere Target Field has to offer, and while sight lines get dinged in the upper decks of the outfield, you're still right on top of the action everywhere. There is not a more intimate setting for a game in Major League Baseball. While I do wish they'd bring back the Brat Dog at Hrbek's, there is still more than enough other fantastic local food and craft beer options throughout the stadium. My favorite stops are the Red Cow out on the upper deck concourse in center for a 60/40 burger, and the Minnesota Beer stand on the third base line for my favorite local beer. The Bat & Barrel and bars in left were great additions as well. The best thing they did in the design as far as watching the game goes, is the open concourses. You literally can watch the game from everywhere, and that is a major gripe of mine at many other stadiums, including the one with McCovey Cove that ranked number 1 in the survey (that place is a maze). What do you love most about Target Field? What are you going to miss this season? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
  6. Recently at the Athletic, 9,000 fans were surveyed to decide what was MLB’s best ballpark. Target Field finished in third place behind Oracle Park (Giants) and Petco Park (Padres). The areas ranked in their survey included location, overall quality, atmosphere, amenities, sight lines, and aesthetics. There is a lot to love about Target Field and here is what the Twins Daily writers love most about Minnesota’s ballpark. John Bonnes: I love how they keep reinvesting in the park. It gets better every year. Several of my favorite places to hang out there literally didn't exist when it opened, including Minnie and Paul's, Bat & Barrel and the Gate 34 craft beer taps. I love that Sue the organist plays in a bar behind home plate and is approachable (and interacts, including selfies) with fans. I love the sandstone on the outside. I love the view of the skyline from the left field side. I love that the footprint is small. It's a lie to say there are no bad seats (some with limited outfield views), but there aren't too many bad seats. When I'm asked by visitors where they should sit (which is pretty often), I tell them they really can't go wrong. I love that they stay open after the game for a while, especially Bat & Barrel, to sort of wind down after the game. I really think an underrated aspect of the park is the attention they paid to the art. I'm not talking about the statues, which I can take or leave. But throughout the part, there are touches that we overlook. Check out the parking garage wind sculpture, some of the murals on the outside along the rail line, the enormous Kirby picture in the Delta Sky Club or the S Preston stuff (and MLB bat sculpture) near the parking garage entrance. I love that all the awards, including the World Series trophies, are available for fans to enjoy in Bat and Barrel. Seth Stohs: There are so many things to like about Target Field. There are the statues and the Gate Numbers. There is the breathtaking architecture. There is the giant screen towering beyond left field. There is history of the organization throughout the stadium, from large photos of Twins greats to the Carew and Puckett Atriums in the Legends club. The concourses are wide, and you can watch the game while standing in line. There are photo ops all over the ballpark. There is the smell of brats. Tom Froemming: I love how small it is. Even the cheap seats are still right on top of the field, much closer to the action than most other MLB parks. I also appreciate how many common areas there are where you can stand and watch the game. There have been many games where I never actually ventured to the seat my ticket was for. The view from along the third-base line is gorgeous. Being able to go see Sue Nelson play organ in 2 Gingers Pub adds a unique experience. Cody Christie: Minnesota’s ballparks have followed the trends that stretch back to their first park in Bloomington. Met Stadium and the Metrodome had their quirks, but Twins fans have found a perfect home in Target Field. A perfect downtown location, amazing views of the skyline, and a plethora of local food and beverage options help to set the ballpark apart from many others in baseball. The Twins have also made annual changes to the park to improve the fan experience. Hopefully, Target Field because a place that can one day be thought of in the same light as some of the other legendary ballparks across baseball. Nate Palmer: I will start with I never understood the hate for the Metrodome until I walked into Target Field. (That may be more a reflection of how little other ball parks I had been in than anything) To this point, everywhere I have sat inside the stadium provides a tremendous view of the game. The ability to walk the open concourse and still know what is going on is also tremendous. The skyline view, especially when sitting on the 1st base side, is also amazing. Especially on the nights when the sun does its work as well! Lastly, I would add the move to adding the "family friendly" priced options in the concessions was great for this father of 2. Next step is to take a page out of the Brewer's stadiums playbook (Whatever insurance field it is now) and allow fans to bring in unopened bottles would be great! Ted Schwerzler: Target Field is very much like Minneapolis itself. It has all the amenities of a larger stadium while being on a smaller scale. The skyline view behind the outer edges is amazing, and the standing viewing options may be some of the best in baseball. Seats are incredibly close to the action, but you also can’t go wrong taking a walk around the park and enjoying the action somewhere new every few innings. Matthew Taylor: Nothing beats the MPLS skyline view beyond the right field wall. Watching a game on the third baseline while taking in the skyline from our beautiful city is as good as it gets! Matthew Lenz: Target Field has so many great options and experiences where you can watch the game from. The balcony in CF, the porch in RF, a bar behind home plate or in LF. There’s really not a bad seat in the house. Idk how many times I’ve bought tickets to the game but never made it to my seat Nash Walker: Minneapolis mostly has brutal winters. It ends up being worth it when you’re watching the Twins at Target Field in the summer. The skyline is beautiful and being there makes me proud to be a Minnesotan. Cody Pirkl: Definitely the food and the friendly atmosphere. The whole park is basically a big piece of art too. Matt Braun: Well as someone who mainly frequents Safeco, the thing I like most about Target Field is that I don't feel like I'm being suffocated by a giant movable roof. In all seriousness, the atmosphere of the game is absolutely tremendous and has yet to be topped by any other stadium I've been at. The tiles mixed with the plants in the stadium give it such a fresh feel that makes it feel like a ballpark just happened to grow from the spot rather than being built there. Rena: Where do I even begin. I think the parking is extremely manageable and generally affordable at Target Field. To me, that’s huge. Even though it’s brand new, you can see a hint of history and Minnesota everywhere, from the Sheboygan brats to its proximity to the historic Warehouse District, and the gorgeous skyline. You’re not going to a game, you’re having an experience at Target Field. Plus, the refillable water bottle stations everywhere sponsored by Ecolab are neat. I had a heat stroke at Wrigley last summer and ended up spending almost $50 on water. Wouldn’t have happened here. Steve Lein: The Minnie & Paul sign in center is the best such team and in-game monument in the league, in my opinion. I've also sat nearly everywhere Target Field has to offer, and while sight lines get dinged in the upper decks of the outfield, you're still right on top of the action everywhere. There is not a more intimate setting for a game in Major League Baseball. While I do wish they'd bring back the Brat Dog at Hrbek's, there is still more than enough other fantastic local food and craft beer options throughout the stadium. My favorite stops are the Red Cow out on the upper deck concourse in center for a 60/40 burger, and the Minnesota Beer stand on the third base line for my favorite local beer. The Bat & Barrel and bars in left were great additions as well. The best thing they did in the design as far as watching the game goes, is the open concourses. You literally can watch the game from everywhere, and that is a major gripe of mine at many other stadiums, including the one with McCovey Cove that ranked number 1 in the survey (that place is a maze). What do you love most about Target Field? What are you going to miss this season? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
  7. Promotion Night I thought one of the things missing without having Twins baseball at Target Field was the promotions they'd have at the ballpark so tonight is our first one! I have partnered up with SotaStick and are giving away this shirt tonight to the first person who wins Twingo. For Twingo comment which of the four boards you are choosing to play with on Twitch and then you are stuck with that board. If there are no winners prize will carry into Saturday's game at 1:10pmCT Twingo ONLY for Boston game at 7:00pm (Will explain rules during Seattle game at 5pm).https://docs.google.com/document/d/1t94Ajsn-YRACuXNu_yySn2xA161f70a0zsMslpt3uoo/edit?usp=sharing (Link for Twingo Cards)https://sotastickco.com/collections/mn-baseball/products/homer-t-shirt (Shirt being given away). Catch-up After a "rain-out,"(NFL Draft) yesterday the Twins will play a doubleheader today against Seattle and Boston. The Twins look to even the series with Seattle with Berrios on the mound and then for game two look to take game one behind Jake Odorizzi. Pre-game 4:40pmCT GM1, 6:50pmCT GM2 Where to watch. Stream AL Central Standings 1. Indians 17-10 2. Royals 13-11 3. Twins 13-12 4. White Sox 10-16 5. Tigers 5-20 Starting Pitchers (Game One) Seattle Taijuan Walker 0-3. 4.82 ERA, 28.0IP, 24 K'sMinnesota Jose Berrios 2-1, 6.17 ERA, 23.1IP, 27 K'sStarting Pitchers (Game Two) Boston Ryan Weber 0-0, 3.09ERA, 23.1IP, 14 K'sMinnesota Jake Odorizzi 1-3, 4.78ERA, 26.1IP, 26 K'sSeattle Batting Order 2B Dee Gordon .314 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI CF Mallek Smith .244 BA, 2 HR, 9 RBI RF Mitch Haniger .245 BA, 5 HR, 13 RBI 1B Daniel Vogelbach .254 BA, 2 HR, 6 RBI C Tom Murphy .250 BA, 6 HR, 14 RBI 3B Kyle Seager .221 BA, 6 HR, 7 RBI LF Braden Bishop .247 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI SS J.P. Crawford .198 BA, 4 HR, 13 RBI DH Dylan Moore .194 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBIMinnesota Batting Order DH Max Kepler .232 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBI SS Jorge Polanco .288 BA, 3 HR, 14 RBI 1B Miguel Sano .267 BA, 6 HR, 11 RBI RF Nelson Cruz .253 BA, 4 HR, 15 RBI LF Eddie Rosario .267 BA, 3 HR, 12 RBI 3B Josh Donaldson .272 BA, 2 HR, 8 RBI 2B Luis Arraez .286 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBI C Alex Avila .294 BA, 1 HR, 1 RBI CF Jake Cave .250 BA, 0 HR, 3 RBI________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Batting Orders Game Two. (Boston) RF Alex Verdugo .293 BA, 0HR, 5 RBI SS Xander Bogaerts .353 BA, 6HR, 17 RBI 3B Rafael Devers .264 BA, 4HR, 17 RBI DH J.D. Martinez .330 BA, 8 HR, 21 RBI LF Andrew Benintendi .203 BA, 2 HR, 5 RBI CF Jackie Bradley Jr. .145 BA, 1 HR, 3 RBI 2B Jose Peraza .265 BA, 1 HR, 6 RBI 1B Mitch Moreland .148 BA, 2 HR, 10 RBI C Christian Vazquez .156 BA, 2 HR, 11 RBITenative Twins Batting Order RF Max Kepler SS Jorge Polanco 1B Miguel Sano DH Nelson Cruz LF Eddie Rosario C Mitch Garver 3B Josh Donaldson 2B Luis Arraez CF Byron BuxtonBomba Tracker - 2020: 36 - 2019 through 25 games: 49 Storylines 1. This will be the Twins second doubleheader of the year, the last time was in Seattle where the Twins swept the two-game set 10-2 and 6-2. 2. Twingo night one again but there is a giveaway with it tonight and that will coincide with game two of the doubleheader as the Twins begin a three game set to top off their homestand with the Boston Red Sox. 3. After the series with Boston the Twins will be off on Monday, followed by a road trip in Cali as they take on the Dodgers followed by the Angels.
  8. Quick Note I have been reaching out to try and do some good with these streams of Twins "baseball," and back a charity for the games. Whether it be a charity related to COVID-19 relief, feeding families, etc, if anyone knows of a charity we could help out message me directly. Catch-up Tough ballgame yesterday as the Twins drop game two 4-2 against Seattle, but still sit only 3.0 games back of Cleveland and will look to move ahead in the series with Jhoulys Chacin, who went 8 1/3 shutout innings his last start, against the ace of the Mariner rotation in Marco Gonzales. Pre-game 6:25pmCT Where to watch. https://www.twitch.tv/thuuuuney/ AL Central Standings 1. Indians 17-9 2. Twins 13-11 3. Royals 13-11 4. White Sox 10-15 5. Tigers 5-19 Starting Pitchers Seattle: Marco Gonzales 2-2. 3.66 ERA, 32.0P, 17 K's Minnesota: Jhoulys Chacin 2-1, 2.22 ERA, 24.1IP, 20 K's Seattle Batting Order2B Dee Gordon .296 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI CF Mallek Smith .241 BA, 2 HR, 9 RBI RF Mitch Haniger .255 BA, 5 HR, 13 RBI 1B Daniel Vogelbach .239 BA, 2 HR, 4 RBI C Tom Murphy .240 BA, 6 HR, 12 RBI 3B Kyle Seager .192 BA, 6 HR, 7 RBI LF Braden Bishop .261 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI SS J.P. Crawford .184 BA, 4 HR, 12 RBI DH Dylan Moore .193 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBI Minnesota Batting OrderDH Max Kepler .231 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBI SS Marwin Gonzalez .296 BA, 1 HR, 1 RBI 3B Miguel Sano .278 BA, 6 HR, 11 RBI RF Nelson Cruz .264 BA, 4 HR, 15 RBI C Mitch Garver .260 BA, 4 HR, 11 RBI LF Eddie Rosario .265 BA, 3 HR, 11 RBI CF Byron Buxton .263 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBI 2B Luis Arraez .274 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBI 1B Ehire Adrianza .250 BA, 1 HR, 5 RBIBomba Tracker - 2020: 36 - 2019 through 24 games: 47 Storylines 1. Gulp.. Rocco has to shift the lineup card to give some key players days off but someone who will stay in the lineup and play Right Field for the first time since 2018... Nelson Cruz. 2. We mentioned yesterday that the game might be a bullpen game but for now Rocco will go with Chacin to start but expect Dobnak and Romero to come in if needed. Chacin went 8 1/3 scoreless in his last start as Chacin looks for win #2 in front of the home faithful. 3. Last time the Twins faced off against Marco Gonzales, they won on March 31st, 2020 in Seattle in a 6-2 thumping.
  9. Catch-up The Twins move back to .500 at home with their second walk-off win of the year courtesy of Byron Buxton and will look to take game two of the series tonight with Kenta Maeda on the mound for Minnesota. The Twins have won three of the last four and tonight will face off against Justin Dunn for Seattle, who the Twins beat 10-2 back on March 30th of this season. Pre-game 6:10pmCT Where to watch https://www.twitch.tv/thuuuuney/ AL Central Standings 1. Indians 17-8 2. Twins 13-10 3. Royals 13-10 4. White Sox 9-15 5. Tigers 5-18 Starting Pitchers Seattle: Justin Dunn 2-2. 7.85 ERA, 18.1P, 15 K's Minnesota: Kenta Maeda** 1-0, 1.33 ERA, 20.1IP, 38 K's **= Kenta Maeda: 5th in AL, Strikeouts (38). Seattle Batting Order 2B Dee Gordon .312BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI CF Mallek Smith .253 BA, 2 HR, 9 RBI RF Mitch Haniger .267 BA, 5 HR, 13 RBI 1B Daniel Vogelbach .234 BA, 2 HR, 4 RBI C Tom Murphy .225 BA, 4 HR, 9 RBI 3B Kyle Seager .188 BA, 5 HR, 6 RBI LF Braden Bishop .277 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI SS J.P. Crawford .192 BA, 4 HR, 12 RBI DH Dylan Moore .176 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBIMinnesota Batting Order RF Max Kepler .230 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBI SS Jorge Polanco .290 BA, 3 HR, 14 RBI 1B Mitch Garver .247 BA, 4 HR, 10 RBI DH Nelson Cruz .276 BA, 4 HR, 15 RBI 3B Josh Donaldson .284 BA, 2 HR, 8 RBI LF Eddie Rosario .278 BA, 3 HR, 11 RBI 2B Marwin Gonzalez .261 BA, 0 HR, 0 RBI C Alex Avila .357 BA, 1 HR, 1 RBI CF Byron Buxton .233 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBIBomba Tracker - 2020: 35 - 2019 through 23 games: 42 Storylines 1. What a performance out of the pen yesterday from Fernando Romero, a man on the cusp of possibly going back to Rochester pitches four brilliant no-hit innings to help secure the victory yesterday. While he enjoys a much deserved day off, the Twins turn to Kenta Maeda, who leads the team in strikeouts, for game two. 2. With the next off-day not until the 27th, the Twins will shake the lineup a little to give some rest to key members of the Bomba Squad. Today Miguel Sano and Luis Arraez get days off and in for them are Alex Avila, who will catch while Garver plays 1B, and Marwin Gonzalez. 3. With the rotation on short rest as well, tomorrow's game could be a bullpen day depending on how Maeda's start goes. Smeltzer, who has already started a game this year, would be in line for the start tomorrow if Jhoulys Chacin is not ready.
  10. Catch-up The Twins win the opening series of the home-stand but don't get the sweep as the former Twins Cj Cron and Jonathan Schoop rally in the 9th to win a thriller 9-8 for Detroit. But today the lineup card turns over to the Seattle Mariners as the Twins will begin a four game set and look to blaze it up and sweep Seattle for the second time this year. Pre-game 6:10pmCT Where to watch https://www.twitch.tv/thuuuuney/ AL Central Standings 1. Indians 17-7 2. Twins 12-10 3. Royals 12-10 4. White Sox 9-14 5. Tigers 5-17 Starting Pitchers Seattle: Justus Sheffield 0-2. 10.80 ERA, 11.2P, 7 K's Minnesota: Homer Bailey** 0-1, 1.61 ERA, 22.1IP, 21 K's **= Homer Bailey: 4th in AL, ERA (1.61). Detroit Batting Order 2B Dee Gordon .311 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI CF Mallek Smith .253 BA, 2 HR, 9 RBI RF Mitch Haniger .267 BA, 5 HR, 12 RBI 1B Daniel Vogelbach .230 BA, 2 HR, 4RBI C Tom Murphy .224 BA, 3 HR, 8 RBI 3B Kyle Seager .197 BA, 5 HR, 6 RBI LF Braden Bishop .279 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI SS J.P. Crawford .203 BA, 4 HR, 12 RBI DH Dylan Moore .185 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBIMinnesota Batting Order RF Max Kepler .229 BA, 5 HR, 8 RBI SS Jorge Polanco .281 BA, 2 HR, 12 RBI 3B Josh Donaldson .298 BA, 2 HR, 8 RBI DH Nelson Cruz .277 BA, 4 HR, 14 RBI 1B Miguel Sano* .265 BA, 6 HR, 11 RBI LF Eddie Rosario .267 BA, 3 HR, 11 RBI C Mitch Garver .243 BA, 4 HR, 10 RBI 2B Luis Arraez .294 BA, 1 HR, 4 RBI CF Byron Buxton .229 BA, 4 HR, 6 RBIBomba Tracker - 2020: 33 - 2019 through 22 games: 38 Storylines 1. Trevor May, Tyler Duffey, and Sergio Romo have been fantastic out of the pen thus far, totaling a 1.80ERA combined in 30IP out of the pen so far. But the other half of the pen has been abismal to say the least, posting a 7.04ERA in 55IP. The Twins have lost a great deal of games early due to collapse from the pen so with the bats becoming more consistent, Wes Johnson needs his bullpen to do the same. 2. The Twins swept Seattle earlier this year and now will begin a four game series after this first home series win this year. Toting the rubber for Minnesota is the veteran Homer Bailey, currently 4th in the AL in ERA. 3. With Cleveland staying red hot, the Twins will look to keep pace and lower their games back to 3.5 today with the possible win.
  11. Who do you all enjoy watching compete and showcase their skills at Baldelli's Ballyard? Here are my current favorites: Francisco Lindor Nolan Arenado Kevin Kiermaier Mike Trout Andrelton Simmons Ozzie Albies Lorenzo Cain Christian Yelich Giancarlo Stanton Cameron Maybin Julio D. Martinez Marcus Stroman Avisail Garcia (no one stands as dangerously close while on deck!) Yasiel Puig Matt Chapman Manny Machado I'm very eager to observe Kike Hernandez this season. Baseball rules!
  12. Minnesota will be making multiple changes to their safety netting prior to the start of the 2020 season. Besides extending netting down both foul lines, the height of the netting above the dugouts will also be raised. According to the Twins, the following Target Field seating areas will be covered by fan safety netting: · Dugout Box (Sections 1, 16 and 17) · Dugout Box Infield (Sections 2-6 and 11-15) · Thomson Reuters Champions Club (Sections 7-10) · Diamond Box (Sections 103-104 and 124-125) · Infield Box (Sections 105-108 and 120-123) · Home Plate Box (109-119) Extensions to the current netting will extend 85 more feet down the left field line and 65 feet further down the right field line. Minnesota had made previous netting changes before the 2016 and 2018 seasons. With the additions, netting now extends 255 feet down the right field line and 275 feet down the left field line. Four feet were added to the top of the dugouts to raise the height from 12 feet to 16 feet. Also, both foul lines added a minimum of seven feet in height at their tallest point. In a release to season ticket holders, the Twins said… “All Target Field fan safety netting uses state-of-the art technology, with thin strands and a knotless intersection to deliver a minimally obtrusive viewing experience. The netting is also composed of a combination of green hues, allowing it to blend with the playing field and provide greater visibility. Ensuring the unique baseball tradition of pregame player interaction remains part of the Target Field fan experience, the new netting is designed to be detached at the base and rolled up, providing a specific fan access point down each foul line during batting practice.” What are your thoughts on extending netting at Target Field? Please share your thoughts in the comments below. Not registered? Click here to create an account. To stay up to date, follow Twins Daily on Twitter and Facebook. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Just How Good is Blake Treinen, and Should the Twins Sign Him? — Twins High Impact Pitching Options Dwindling as Wheeler and Hamels Reach Agreements — Minnesota’s Internal First Base Options
  13. RandBall’s Stu: This freak April blizzard caused the Twins to postpone Friday evening’s game well over 24 hours before the scheduled first pitch. Metrodome: Huh. Is that right? RS: You sound like you’re being sarcastic. MD: You know what would have happened if the game was in the Metrodome? RS: I mean, I sup— MD: The game would have been played. Period. RS: How can you say that, though? MD: I’m saying it. I’ll say it again for you right now: The game would have been played. RS: But your roof was notorious for collapsing and tearing during particularly nasty storms like this one. MD: *deep sigh* Listen. A few incidents over 30 years of service does not make it notorious. You’re using isolated incidents to paint a picture that simply isn’t accurate. RS: But you have to admit, this is the kind of storm that would have made you cross your fingers. MD: I’m a stadium. I don’t have fingers. RS: It’s a metaphor. MD: Good for your English degree, cha-cha. Tell you what: Even if the roof collapsed or there was a tear in the fabric, you know what we would have done? We would have gotten the sewing machines and the air compressors out and gone to work. If you want to sit here with your metaphors and your internet weblog and sit in judgment of hard-working Minnesotans and a stadium that came in under budget for the taxpayers, feel free, but you’re wasting my time and yours. RS: I apologize if you feel that way, but— MD: That’s not an apology, but go on. RS: Changing topics, then. What is retirement like for The Metrodome? MD: It’s been great. I hang with some of the other retired multi-purpose stadiums. Three Rivers Stadium, Veterans Stadium, and Riverfront Stadium, we all meet for coffee every morning. Veterans Stadium has the best stories. RS: That’s the old Philadelphia ballpark, right? MD: Right. You know all those awful stories about Philly fans? They’re the tip of the iceberg. The depravity is remarkable. And that’s just the players! Tug McGraw, Lenny Dykstra…my God. My God. RS: Go on. MD: Are you kidding? And get sued? Anyway, you’re going to want to wait until…what’s Oakland’s stadium called this year? RS: It’s back to Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. MD: Wow. Everything old is new again. Like I was saying though, she’s been writing everything down. Raiders fans, Charlie Finley, raw sewage. Everything. RS: That sounds incredible. MD: There’s a story about Vida Blue and Lyle Alzado trying to buy a speedboat with cigarette coupons that’ll make your hair stand up straight for a week. RS: I know your time is limited, so I just wanted to ask you: You know how the revolving doors were like a vacuum and a wind tunnel at the same time? MD: Oh friend, do I ever. Saw a kid get a soiled Dome Dog wrapper blown right into the face once. Best night of my life except for Game 6. RS: Do you think you could ever show other stadiums how to do that? That was so cool. MD: Took that one with me when Minneapolis built that shark fin on top of me. Gotta bounce. Peace.
  14. The events are Monday March 11th, Tuesday March 19th and Wednesday March 20th from 4:00 – 7:00 PM. You can enter the ballpark at Delta Club Entrance on the skyway level. They’re hiring a number of positions, and you can find the whole list right here. There are all kinds of perks, including free meals, paid training and team retail store discounts. Also, for a limited time, there is a $200 sign-on bonus valid for new hires from 3/11 through 4/. You can also get $200 more if you refer a friend! Plus, you get to be part of the behind-the-scenes group that is responsible for the Twins game day experience. The job can be especially appealing because of its flexibility. It’s part time. It’s a great second income working in a great place. It is a limited commitment, perfect for students and retirees and the scheduling is flexible. What have you got to lose, other than a few hours of your time? Instead of paying to get into Target Field, see it in a way that few people do. For more information: Check out TFHire.com Or review all the jobs available here. For more information on the events, check out the attached flyer below. You can also email TFHire@DelawareNorth.com Or call Annie Parrish at 612-659-3968 You’re a baseball nut. You love the ballpark. We get it. So why not be part of the actual industry and get paid while you do it? Check out the information above and the job fair and decide for yourself. Hiring Event Flyer 3.5.2019.pdf
  15. The events are Tuesday April 17th and Thursday April 19th from 4:00 – 7:00, with doors opening at 3:30. You can enter the ballpark at the street level entrance on the south side of building where 7th St intersects with Twins Way. (Here is the Google Map view of the door to use.) They’re hiring a number of positions, and you can find the whole list right here. There are all kinds of perks, including free meals, paid training, a rewards and recognition program, and team retail store discounts. Plus, for a limited time, there is a $200 sign-on bonus valid for new hires until 4/30, that you can learn more about at this link. You also get to be part of the behind-the-scenes group that is responsible for the Twins game day experience. The job can be especially appealing because of its flexibility. It’s part time. It’s a great second income working in a great place. It is a limited commitment, perfect for students and retirees and the scheduling is flexible. What have you got to lose, other than a few hours of your time? You missed being able to go to Target Field this weekend. Instead, see it in a way that few people do, and you don’t have to miss any Twins games to attend. For more information: Learn about the job fair here. Check out SportServiceTargetField.com Or review all the jobs available and pre-apply here. (Just click through on the position in which you are interested.) You can also email TFHire@DelawareNorth.com Or call 612-659-3984 You’re a baseball nut. You love the ballpark. We get it. So why not be part of the actual industry and get paid while you do it? Check out the information above and the job fair and decide for yourself.
  16. Brand new Supershow! This week Dan, Panda, and Stubby J talk about the start of the MLB season, and making healthy lifestyle choices! Check out the show using the link below, or get it from iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and Pocket Casts! https://www.spreaker.com/user/the4dpodcastnetwork/twins-and-losses-supershow-episode-59-it
  17. As a former media critic, I’m used to playing the *******. So each year, when the local media waddles to Target Field to stuff their faces with free food and regurgitate PR, I take to Twitter to razz them. The journalism ethics of tonguing the hand that literally feeds you aside, these goobers never get to the important things fans want to know: how much more are things gonna cost, and did my favorite thing get dropped? Because these lickspittles won’t, I track prices and dropped items each year using the Twins’ concessions page. It always gets a lot of Twitter chatter, so at least my ego gets fed. Here are the 2017 headlines: Beer prices are up … by $2, for local brews! CAN YOU BELIEVE THIS CRAP TEAM IS RAISING BEER PRICES.The local brews are being upsized, to 16 ounces from 12. I’M SORRY I DIDN’T HEAR THAT MY TORCH IS CRACKLING.That means the per-ounce price is actually dropping 3 cents per ounce. OK ST. PETER IT’S SAFE TO COME OUT.The Butcher & Boar rib tips are gone. WHERE DID I PUT MY TORCH MATCH.Mainstays like popcorn, peanuts, pretzels, cones are up 50 cents. GO BACK TO THE PART ABOUT THE RIB TIPS. I know, Mr. or Ms. Hipster, you NEVER eat at the ballpark and you ONLY pre-game beer at a brew pub, but piss off, you’re lying. I’m not a huge fan of Target Field food - it’s clever on paper, but not “OMG Garlic Fries at Pac Bell” when it hits your mouth. Except for the rib tips. And the Hot Indian (which they did not take and even added a Chicken Tikka salad). My personal short list also includes Kramarczuk’s and the filling, overachieving Chicken Tenders. Target Field’s beer list, like the franchise itself, once punched above its weight but is now behind places like Comiskey Park —excuse me, GUARANTEED RATE FIELD — that just debuted a new Craft Cave (eyeroll) with over 75 craft beers (eye-pop). Philosophically I’m OK with the beer upsizing, and the Twins are too, looking to get an extra few bucks from the lightweights who buy just one. The one specialty beer that didn’t go up is Red Bridge Gluten Free — I’m guessing because they couldn’t upsize the bottle. We are all celiacs now. A lot of food items also didn’t go up: all the hot dogs (including Kramarczuk’s), Hot Indian, tacos, chips/guac, chili, corn dogs, Cracker Jacks, seeds, cotton candy, mini-donuts, and root beer floats. For some reason, Papa John’s Pizza (which is crap) and Angie’s Kettle Corn (yum), are going up a buck. The fish & chips is up $1.50 (they no longer mention walleye, by the way). No other 2016 food item went up more than 50 cents. You’ll get nicked that for souvenir sodas (but not regular), bottled ice tea (but not bottled water), and Killebrew root beer (but not Gatorade, hot chocolate, or milk). The cones are going up 50 cents but not the Dippin Dots THANKS TRUMP. Other 50-cent hikes include the burger with fries, Tony O’s Cuban, Red Cow’s 60-40 burger, the turkey burger, Luce’s by the slice, Grande Nacho Helmet and Chicken tenders. What items got dumped? Zimmern’s Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich. I like Andrew, but his stuff always seems like a 13-layer cake when pie will do. I’m still trying to wash out the grease of that pork belly thing he had a couple years back. RIP Murray’s Cheese Steak Sandwich, fried pickles and loaded pretzel bits — all mercy killings. A bit sad for the Pork Chop on a Stick, but only because it’s Minnesota and a stick. Calzones seem inoffensive enough, but they are gone from the website. I am mystified they killed the perfectly pleasant Pulled Pork sammy - between this, the rib tips and the Pork Chop, it’s Hogmaggedon at Target Field — but Zimmern has something called the Sloppy Ko, so maybe we’re getting the kimchee version, probably with artisan lard. There’s also some switching. Murray’s has replaced steak with smoked beef, which let’s face it is probably easier to eat. Red Cow Poutine is missing, but it’s possibly rebranded as Buffalo Chicken Poutine. Burritos are now branded Barrio Burritos and cost $1.50 more. The $6.50 tacos are gone, limiting you to Barrio’s $9 Carnitas or Chicken version. So there you have it: the news the ELITE NEWS MEDIA won’t tell you. Sometimes, it takes a jerk. David Brauer used to be a paid journalist for MinnPost and City Pages but now he tweets for free and podcasts for free at Britt & Brauer. Click here to view the article
  18. Beer prices are up … by $2, for local brews! CAN YOU BELIEVE THIS CRAP TEAM IS RAISING BEER PRICES. The local brews are being upsized, to 16 ounces from 12. I’M SORRY I DIDN’T HEAR THAT MY TORCH IS CRACKLING. That means the per-ounce price is actually dropping 3 cents per ounce. OK ST. PETER IT’S SAFE TO COME OUT. The Butcher & Boar rib tips are gone. WHERE DID I PUT MY TORCH MATCH. Mainstays like popcorn, peanuts, pretzels, cones are up 50 cents. GO BACK TO THE PART ABOUT THE RIB TIPS. I know, Mr. or Ms. Hipster, you NEVER eat at the ballpark and you ONLY pre-game beer at a brew pub, but piss off, you’re lying. I’m not a huge fan of Target Field food - it’s clever on paper, but not “OMG Garlic Fries at Pac Bell” when it hits your mouth. Except for the rib tips. And the Hot Indian (which they did not take and even added a Chicken Tikka salad). My personal short list also includes Kramarczuk’s and the filling, overachieving Chicken Tenders. Target Field’s beer list, like the franchise itself, once punched above its weight but is now behind places like Comiskey Park —excuse me, GUARANTEED RATE FIELD — that just debuted a new Craft Cave (eyeroll) with over 75 craft beers (eye-pop). Philosophically I’m OK with the beer upsizing, and the Twins are too, looking to get an extra few bucks from the lightweights who buy just one. The one specialty beer that didn’t go up is Red Bridge Gluten Free — I’m guessing because they couldn’t upsize the bottle. We are all celiacs now. A lot of food items also didn’t go up: all the hot dogs (including Kramarczuk’s), Hot Indian, tacos, chips/guac, chili, corn dogs, Cracker Jacks, seeds, cotton candy, mini-donuts, and root beer floats. For some reason, Papa John’s Pizza (which is crap) and Angie’s Kettle Corn (yum), are going up a buck. The fish & chips is up $1.50 (they no longer mention walleye, by the way). No other 2016 food item went up more than 50 cents. You’ll get nicked that for souvenir sodas (but not regular), bottled ice tea (but not bottled water), and Killebrew root beer (but not Gatorade, hot chocolate, or milk). The cones are going up 50 cents but not the Dippin Dots THANKS TRUMP. Other 50-cent hikes include the burger with fries, Tony O’s Cuban, Red Cow’s 60-40 burger, the turkey burger, Luce’s by the slice, Grande Nacho Helmet and Chicken tenders. What items got dumped? Zimmern’s Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich. I like Andrew, but his stuff always seems like a 13-layer cake when pie will do. I’m still trying to wash out the grease of that pork belly thing he had a couple years back. RIP Murray’s Cheese Steak Sandwich, fried pickles and loaded pretzel bits — all mercy killings. A bit sad for the Pork Chop on a Stick, but only because it’s Minnesota and a stick. Calzones seem inoffensive enough, but they are gone from the website. I am mystified they killed the perfectly pleasant Pulled Pork sammy - between this, the rib tips and the Pork Chop, it’s Hogmaggedon at Target Field — but Zimmern has something called the Sloppy Ko, so maybe we’re getting the kimchee version, probably with artisan lard. There’s also some switching. Murray’s has replaced steak with smoked beef, which let’s face it is probably easier to eat. Red Cow Poutine is missing, but it’s possibly rebranded as Buffalo Chicken Poutine. Burritos are now branded Barrio Burritos and cost $1.50 more. The $6.50 tacos are gone, limiting you to Barrio’s $9 Carnitas or Chicken version. So there you have it: the news the ELITE NEWS MEDIA won’t tell you. Sometimes, it takes a jerk. David Brauer used to be a paid journalist for MinnPost and City Pages but now he tweets for free and podcasts for free at Britt & Brauer.
  19. Ever wondered how the jockstrap was invented? Or how about the evolution of catching balls with bare hands to the gloves of today? In it was said that shaking hands with a catcher without any protection was like “shaking hands with walnuts.” Sports Illustrated writer and Bloomington, Minnesota native Steve Rushin wrote about the jock strap, how Americans were more skilled throwing grenades compared to their European allies because of baseball and more historical oddities. The book is called 34-Ton Bat, The Story of Baseball as told through Bobbleheads, Cracker Jacks, Jock Straps, Eye Black and 375 Strange and Unusual Objects. Here are 10 questions about his life growing up in Bloomington, The Met, how he landed his sports illustrated writing gig and about his recent visits to Target Field with his young children. Q: In 1979 on your 13th birthday you became an employee of the Minnesota Twins and as you say in your book “it unlocked a hidden world”. Tell me about your memories of the Met in your hometown of Bloomington, Minnesota. What was the highlight? A: Before I worked at the Met, I went as a fan. I’m one of five kids and my Dad would stop at Cal’s Market on Old Shakopee Road after Mass on a Sunday and buy a one-pound bag of peanuts to last the day. Late in the game, we might get a Frosty Malt, but we weren’t allowed to sail the lids onto the warning track, like so many of our lucky peers were doing. When I started working at the Met, in the commissary, making the food that the vendors sold, it was a revelation. I was backstage, in the ballpark before it opened to the public, and saw people like Reggie Jackson from ten feet away. When you’re 13, and have only ever seen someone like Reggie on TV, it’s a shock to see him up close, unfiltered by a screen, as if you never realized he existed in the flesh. The highlight of working those games—and there were so many—was getting to pull the tarp when it rained. To be 13 and running across a big-league field, in front of about 8,000 fans with garbage bags on their heads? I knew even then that life was unlikely to get better. Q: Did you know Twins Daily Writer and Founder John Bonnes, @TwinsGeek on twitter, growing up in Bloomington? A: I didn’t. If I had, I’d know much more about the Twins now. And then. But growing up in Bloomington you were never more than one degree of separation from the Twins. My brother was a lefthanded pitcher at Bloomington Lincoln and claims to have owned Hrbek whenever he pitched against Kennedy. I mentioned this to Hrbek once and he just laughed. I think he’s heard that from a lot of guys he faced in high school. Q: Was there a certain moment that inspired to you be a writer? Did you have a mentor? A: I learned to read watching Sesame Street and cereal boxes were my earliest literary influence. Another early influence was Oscar Madison, the sportswriter on “The Odd Couple.” He was a slob, ate hot dogs at ballgames and spent a lot of time loafing around his gigantic apartment in New York. That seemed like a good life. I once spent an evening with Jack Klugman for a Sports Illustrated column and thanked him for the inspiration. He said I wasn’t the first sportswriter to tell him that. My Mom, more than any one person, made me a writer. She got me a library card and encouraged me to read and would leave me at the B. Dalton bookstore for an hour when she shopped at Southdale. I would completely lose track of time, or even my surroundings, and get absorbed in a book. I didn’t know it then, but reading is the best preparation for writing. Q: Is there an unusual story about landing your job at Sports Illustrated? A: A junior college basketball coach had a three-on-three basketball tournament in his backyard in Bloomington. A buddy and I played in it. It was called the Saunders Hoop Invitational Tournament, or S.H.I.T. We were in high school. Sports Illustrated ran a long story on a huge 3-on-3 tournament in Michigan, and I wrote a letter to the editor of SI about our 3-on-3 tournament in Bloomington. The trophy was a Cool-Whip tub covered in aluminum foil. The author of the article in SI, Alexander Wolff, wrote to me to ask me more about our tournament, because he was writing a book on pickup basketball in America. So I wrote back to him, we became pen pals, and when I started writing stories in college, I’d send them to Alex, who passed one along to an editor SI, and eventually—just before I graduated from Marquette—the magazine ran my story. That got me a three-month internship as a fact-checker there and I never left. The junior college basketball coach who hosted the S.H.I.T., incidentally, was Flip Saunders. Q:What baseball writers do you most admire? past and present? A: Where to begin? I grew up reading Pat Reusse and Doug Grow in Minneapolis. My Dad traveled a lot, and in the age before the internet he’d bring home three-day-old newspapers from L.A. or New York, so I’d get to read columns by Jim Murray and Red Smith. I read all of Roger Angell’s books. They were some of the books I’d lose myself in at B. Dalton. When I arrived at SI, we had Peter Gammons and Steve Wulf and later Tom Verducci and Tim Kurkjian, all of whom were so good that the main thing I learned from them was not to try to be like them. There is more good baseball writing than there has ever been, and I won’t list all the current people I read for space considerations and fear of leaving someone out. Q: I see that you recently visited Minnesota and took in a game at Target Field with your children. What did that mean to you and was there a certain part of baseball that you felt you needed to teach them? For example, did you explain the meaning of Minnie and Paul to you daughter who thought one of them was Babe Ruth? A: The kids, thank goodness, like baseball. We were in Minneapolis when the Twins were out of town and took a tour of Target Field. The kids have this fantasy of being locked into a stadium overnight, like in “Night at the Museum,” and getting to eat all the popcorn and nachos and batting helmet sundaes they can, while running the bases and attempting to go yard. Sadly, we were not locked in at tour’s end, but we did come back on our last night in town for the Twins’ homestand-opener against the Orioles. They saw Hicks make a catch with his back to the plate and Dozier win it with a walk-off home run, and my 6-year-old son did ask—while pointing at the Twins logo in centerfield—“Who’s Babe Ruth shaking hands with?” We live in New England, and mostly go to Red Sox games, so it was nice to give them the experience I had as a kid: watching the Twins outdoors while learning how to crack open peanut shells. Q: What got you interested in writing your current book, the 34-Ton Bat, The Story of Baseball as told through Boobleheads, Cracker Jacks, Jock Straps, Eye Black and 375 Strange and Unusual Objects? A: That book evolved from wanting to know my grandfather. My Mom’s Dad was a member of the 1926 New York Giants but only played in one game, at catcher. I wanted to know what it was like to be at the Polo Grounds that Sunday afternoon in June of 1926, in hot flannel uniforms, without batting helmets, during Prohibition, and so forth. My uncle happened to still have the catcher’s mitt my grandfather wore that day, he mailed it to me, and I put it on and it was like shaking hands with the grandfather I never knew. My grandfather, Jimmy Boyle, died before I was born. I did what anyone would do with a baseball mitt, and placed it over my nose and mouth like an airplane oxygen mask. I could smell this ballpark in Harlem from 85 years ago. That led to me writing about the most compelling objects of the game—hats and mitts, of course, but also bobbleheads and ballpark organs and beer cups—all those things that beguiled me while working at the Met as a teenager. Q: Could you discus the process you went through at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown in researching the book? A: The Hall of Fame Library is a wonderful place. You have to put on white gloves to handle the files, so everyone in there looks like Mickey Mouse. I pored over files on ballpark concessions and novelties and souvenirs. I found an old foil hot dog wrapper in one file folder full of old newspaper clippings on hot dogs. Tom Shieber, the curator, was walking past me when it happened and took the wrapper to file elsewhere. I loved that this guy has a job in which he files foil hot dog wrappers from, I don’t know, Shea Stadium in 1978. I’d take those photocopied files home, and if I had any other questions, when I couldn’t be in Cooperstown, a brilliant researcher there named Bill Francis would try to help me answer them. I knew I was on to something when Bill had not been previously aware of some minor fact. He hadn’t realized that Milwaukee had a bring-your-own-beer policy in the ‘50s and ‘60s, or that the urinals at Ebbets Field were a disaster. These discoveries were a small triumph for me, because Bill knows everything. Q: Is there a story that stands out to you in the book that you enjoyed researching and writing about? Anything that surprised you? A: There is an interesting, otherwise-lost-to-history story in the book about an eccentric guy named Foulproof Taylor, who invented a protective cup for boxers and later a batting helmet, neither of which boxing or baseball was yet ready for in the 1920s and ‘30s. Foulproof was once famous in New York boxing circles for wearing his cup to gyms and asking fighters—world-famous fighters like Primo Carnera—to punch him in the groin as hard as they could. Most of them happily obliged. Foulproof was once the world champion of sack racing, but he began a slow fade into obscurity in the 1960s. A relative of his—a writer named Diane Taylor--proved a great source in keeping Foulproof’s story alive, and I was happy to tell that story in the book. Q: What new project is in the works? Any new books? A: I’m writing a memoir of my ‘70s childhood, specifically my growing up in the ‘70s in—of all places—Bloomington, Minnesota.
  20. The Topic Title is Right Handed Power but could as easily be Left Handed Lack of Power. The Twins power is concentrated in right handed hitters. Dozier, Hunter, and Plouffe are all right handed and the far and away leaders in homers. The top left handed home run hitter is......Mauer. If I have the numbers correct for the switch hitters, the Twins have gotten 64 homers from right handed hitters and 15 from lefties. Arcia could help balance that disparity. Another part of this is the fact that left field seems to be much more reachable for long balls at Target Field. Should the Twins be concerned about their lack of power from the left side? I think so, but OTOH, a homer is a homer no matter who hits it.
  21. Why is there a need for a Metrodome baggie wall in right field? Do we have to remember that the Twins played 27 years in the Teflon Palace? For fans, there is nostalgia and of course two World Series titles, where the Twins won all 8 World Series games at home. Target Field ushered in a new era of outdoor baseball, modern day amenities, the iconic Minnie and Paul Logo in centerfield, a green batter’s eye with 14 spruce trees and slightly similar dimensions of the Metrodome. Those dimension and the so-called worst batters eye in the league, suffocated the offense in the first couple of seasons. The trees were removed after the inaugural 2010 season but the dimensions remain the same. Principal Architect of the firm Populous Earl Santee transformed Target Field from an urban parking lot to one of the best ballparks in America. Remember that Santee designed the ballpark on a small 7.5 acreslot which as he described left Target field like a muffin. The below street level playing field, the small foul territory, and seats next to it in the 100’s section are crammed in that confined 7.5 of urban acreage in what I call the stump of the muffin. The spacious main concourse, press box, corporate suites, Metropolitan Club, Legends Club, the grandstands in left and right field, and the skyline seats under the canopy are the top of the muffin. They are sprawled out and over the field and “does its own thing” (If you are wondering where I came up the idea name of the bottom of the muffin Stump) Along with Santee, former Twins Executive Jerry Bell, has his fingerprints all over the ballpark. Bell wanted the ballpark to be fair to both hitters and pitchers. The small lot only provided Twins fans with a capacity of 39,020, good enough for 22ndin all of major league baseball. The muffin-like design created an intimidate view of the players and field for the fans. For Santee’s craft, he was awarded the 2010 Star Tribune’s Sportsperson of the Year. All of these characteristics should make Target Field an urban hitters park. But after the first couple of seasons they formed Target Field into a pitchers park. Below, is a graphic taken from BallparkMagic.com. The numbers on the green field are the current Target Field dimensions and the numbers in the black are the old Metrodome Dimensions. The left field foul line is now at 339 feet from 343. The left center gap is now at 377 feet from 385. Dead center is now at 404 feet from 408. The wall from left field foul pole to the right field gap is now at 8 feet from 7.1. The wall from right center to the right field foul pole is at 21 feet from 17. The right field wall sadly reminds fans of the Metrodome infamous right field baggie, has the out of town scoreboard and an awkward Kasota overhang. With the increase of the wall in right field and the so-called left center gap called Death Valley, Target field now slightly favors right-hander hitters instead of left-hander hitters. Left handed hitting first baseman Justin Morneau complained about hitting at Target Field because of the wall in the right field. "Right-center to left-center is ridiculous," Morneau said in an e-mail to the Minneapolis Star Tribune. "[it's] almost impossible for a right-handed hitter to [homer to the] opposite field and very difficult for lefties. It affects the hitters a lot, and you start to develop bad habits as a hitter when you feel like you can only pull the ball to hit it over the fence. You take those habits on the road." The inaugural season impersonated Target Field as a pitchers park and probably failed to meet Jerry Bell’s fair ballpark satisfaction. Hitters from the Twins and other teams complained about the14 black spruce trees in center field because it was hard to see the ball and dangerous. In the daytime and in the breeze the ball became hard to pick up from the batters back. Then manager Ron Gardenhire joked he would chainsaw the trees on his own. At the end of the 2015 season, the 14 black spruce trees were removed. Hitters also had a hard time picking up the ball from the green batter's eye. At the start of the 2014 season, the Twins painted the green backdrop black to reduce glare from the sun. Then Detroit Tiger and now current Twin Tori Hunter, was quoted by Pat Borzi in a Sport on Earth Article. "For me, a good park to hit in is a batter's eye that's all black," said Torii Hunter. "Minnesota is all black. Seattle is all black. At our park (Comerica), it's dark green and some black, so you can kind of pick up this little white ball.” At the end of 2014 Season Bryz a fellow writer at Twinkie town said that Target field is getting more hitter’s friendly and the narrative is changing. http://www.twinkietown.com/2014/12/17/7406221/is-target-field-a-pitchers-park-or-hitters-park According to ESPN Stats and Info with the two statistics Park Factors and Average Home runs agree." Park Factor compares the rate of stats at home vs. the rate of stats on the road. A rate higher than 1.000 favors the hitter and below 1.000 favors the pitcher. Teams with home games in multiple stadiums list aggregate Park Factors. " If you really want to get in-depth with park Factors read this http://gosu02.tripod.com/id103.html Basically, this quantifies how much the park factors in producing runs.<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/130618419@N08/18678682113" title="Screen Shot 2015-06-30 at 11.02.44 AM by Scott Cummings, on Flickr">< img src="https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/342/18678682113_300e63ff3a.jpg" width="500" height="208" alt="Screen Shot 2015-06-30 at 11.02.44 AM"></a> Clearly Target Field is playing more fair, but favoring hitters only slightly. Nonetheless, it will be interesting to see Target Field fallsin the end of the season for Park Factors and Home Runs Per Game. Will 2014 be a fluke? Or will 2015 show that it really is a fair ballpark that Former Twins executive Jerry Bell wanted?
  22. The Minnesota Twins’ attendance, not surprisingly, has reflected the struggles of the team. That creates a unique challenge, a challenge that must be addressed before a single game is played, since attendance is almost completely determined by ticket sales in the offseason. Last year, 83% of the Twins ticket sales were bought prior to Opening Day. So the Twins talked to their customers. “We did a deep dive this offseason on customer behavior and what we found is that when we moved to Target Field, we opened ourselves to a lot of new customers,” says Mike Clough the Minnesota Twins Vice President of Ticket Sales & Service. The deep dive revealed that when the Twins played in the Metrodome, there wasn’t a lot of reason to attend a game if you didn’t really love baseball.However, Target Field is a different animal. “We have people that come to the game and barely watch the game but have a great time,” continues Clough. This is the super-casual fan. Baseball wasn’t on their radar five years ago, but is now because Target Field is a destination. In many ways it is the quintessential Minnesotan urban summer experience: a way to be outdoors with friends and meet new people with a shared rooting interest. It’s become a community gathering place. That was particularly true on weekends. “Looking at the games that that segment attended, it was primarily Friday and Saturday games,” reveals Clough. So the Twins put together two season ticket packages that cover their thirteen Friday (mostly night) home games or their thirteen Saturday home games. Then they added a final package that covers the 13 Sunday (mostly afternoon) games. ”We added Sundays primarily for families,” says Clough. This is a unique package born out of researching who attends Target Field games. To Clough’s knowledge, no other teams have created similar packages. (You can find more details by clicking on the ads in the right margin of Twins Daily.) The offer is unique in other ways, too. First, there is a level of consistency that is absent from other season ticket packages. Looking at the Twins 20-game package, the games jump from one day to another, which can cause problems for those who might have regularly scheduled activities or commitments. The Weekend Warrior packages simplify scheduling by targeting one day per week, including a Sunday option for people coming home from weekends away. It’s also unique in how the tickets are delivered. The tickets are only delivered digitally, so fans can either print them off or show them on their smartphone using the “At The Ballpark” app. The industry is evolving towards electronic-only delivery of tickets. “We want to understand what that experience is like,” explains Clough. By limiting the delivery of these tickets, the Twins gain insight on issues that might result from moving all season ticket holders to electronic-only tickets. Last year’s attendance at Target Field sank to 27,785 per game, the lowest mark for the Twins since 2005, which was before a new ballpark was announced. Of course, that was also after three straight postseason appearances. Less frequent victories for the team have resulted in more creative offers. This latest promises a summer full of weekend baseball, starting at $350. That doesn’t sound like a bad way to spend a Minnesota summer. Click here to view the article
  23. However, Target Field is a different animal. “We have people that come to the game and barely watch the game but have a great time,” continues Clough. This is the super-casual fan. Baseball wasn’t on their radar five years ago, but is now because Target Field is a destination. In many ways it is the quintessential Minnesotan urban summer experience: a way to be outdoors with friends and meet new people with a shared rooting interest. It’s become a community gathering place. That was particularly true on weekends. “Looking at the games that that segment attended, it was primarily Friday and Saturday games,” reveals Clough. So the Twins put together two season ticket packages that cover their thirteen Friday (mostly night) home games or their thirteen Saturday home games. Then they added a final package that covers the 13 Sunday (mostly afternoon) games. ”We added Sundays primarily for families,” says Clough. This is a unique package born out of researching who attends Target Field games. To Clough’s knowledge, no other teams have created similar packages. (You can find more details by clicking on the ads in the right margin of Twins Daily.) The offer is unique in other ways, too. First, there is a level of consistency that is absent from other season ticket packages. Looking at the Twins 20-game package, the games jump from one day to another, which can cause problems for those who might have regularly scheduled activities or commitments. The Weekend Warrior packages simplify scheduling by targeting one day per week, including a Sunday option for people coming home from weekends away. It’s also unique in how the tickets are delivered. The tickets are only delivered digitally, so fans can either print them off or show them on their smartphone using the “At The Ballpark” app. The industry is evolving towards electronic-only delivery of tickets. “We want to understand what that experience is like,” explains Clough. By limiting the delivery of these tickets, the Twins gain insight on issues that might result from moving all season ticket holders to electronic-only tickets. Last year’s attendance at Target Field sank to 27,785 per game, the lowest mark for the Twins since 2005, which was before a new ballpark was announced. Of course, that was also after three straight postseason appearances. Less frequent victories for the team have resulted in more creative offers. This latest promises a summer full of weekend baseball, starting at $350. That doesn’t sound like a bad way to spend a Minnesota summer.
  24. The Twins have played 72 games. They are doing a bit better than (4 more wins) than at this point last year. I am looking for reasons why they are better (how is that for positive?) and noticed that despite the second least homers in the American League, they have outhomered their opponents by two (68-66). Willingham leads the team with 10 homers which projects to only 25 for the full season, but the Twins have eight guys with more than five homers, which would project to double digits over an entire season. The pitchers have done a pretty good job limiting the long ball, which seems to be the least sustainable component of the positive home run differential going forward. Particularly, the bullpen has yielded only 16 homers in 254 innings. I would guess that the number of runs from homers is higher for opponents than for the Twins, but it is promising that they are reaching the seats marginally more than their opponents. The lineup does have more power sprinkled from top to bottom than they have in past years.
  25. In the offseason, the Twins traded two low-power regular outfielders, Denard Span and Ben Revere, and declined to find an alternative for Trevor Plouffe. The two new regulars figured to be Chris Parmelee and Aaron Hicks, both of whom would figure to have more power than the duo of Span/Revere. My thought was that at least the Twins will hit more homers, even though a lot of balls that Revere and Span would have caught will fall. After Justin Morneau had a healthy spring training and Joe Mauer declared himself as healthy as he had been in years, I thought there was potential for more power from the two former MVPs. Josh Willingham and Ryan Doumit were returning, coming off career highs in homers, combined with a full season of Plouffe, Parmelee, and Hicks along with the healthy M & M boys would figure to be a sizeable increase in long balls. So, at the quarter pole, not a one of the players I have mentioned is hitting homers at their projected level. Mauer and Morneau have two each. Hicks, Parmelee and Doumit have three apiece. Plouffe has four long balls and Willingham has five. Multiply those numbers by four and that will total 88 homers from seven starters. Osvaldo Arcia has knocked three homers in limited ABs and Twins shortstops--Florimon and Escobar have poked four long balls. At the rate these guys are going, they will barely hit 100 home runs and most likely finish last (again) in the AL in circuit clouts. What happened? I guess we can blame the weather for early suppression of homers, but it has warmed up and the Twins haven't increased their homer output substantially. Maybe things will start changing today. I hope so, because I'll be at Target Field witnessing tonight's event.
×
×
  • Create New...