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Jon Marthaler

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  1. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from Chris RB in Article: We Have A New (Soccer?) Website!   
    PLEASE start writing about the Bundesliga. I would love that so much.
  2. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from whydidnt in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Forbes.com reported today that Major League Baseball league-wide revenues jumped from $8 billion in 2013 to $9 billion in 2014, mostly due to the league's new national TV contracts and revenue from MLB Advanced Media, the online streaming arm of MLB.
     
    This continues a trend.A look back: In 2001, revenue was $3.6 billion; adjusted for inflation, $4.66 billion in today's dollars, according to Forbes. That year, three MLB teams had payrolls over $100 million; the Yankees led the way with just over $112 million. Sixteen more had more than $50 million in payroll that season.
     
    Since then, revenue has doubled, more or less. The Dodgers had a $235 million payroll last year, and the Yankees nearly cleared the bar to $200 million as well. 14 other teams had payrolls of at least $100 million.
     
    $200 million is the new $100 million, when it comes to payroll. $100 million is the new $50 million.
     
    Since Target Field opened in 2010, the median MLB payroll has gone from $85 million to $107 million - right in line with revenue, which, just like the median payroll, has jumped 25% in that five-year span. During that same period, the Twins' payroll has declined, from $98 million to last year's $85 million. Don't let the Twins fool you; they will try to tell you that they've spent plenty of money. They haven't.
     
    Remember this the next time Terry Ryan or Dave St. Peter talks about being "fiscally responsible." Remember this the next time your neighbor complains about Joe Mauer's contract being the problem with the Twins. Remember that MLB's revenue explosion, and the great gobs of taxpayer money that funded Target Field, mean that the Twins are making more money now than they ever have before - indeed more money than they could ever have dreamed of.
     
    They're just pocketing it, instead of spending it on improving the team.
     
    Click here to view the article
  3. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from joebush44 in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Follow-up, now that I'm a little less peevish today.
     
    I get that the Twins don't want to give out ridiculous Jon Lester-style contracts. There are a ton of examples of terrible long-term deals out there, and giving somebody an eight-year, $200 million contract and then watching him stink from years 3-8 is not great business. And I get that youth development is probably much, much more important than free agent signings.
     
    All I'm asking is for the Twins brass to be honest. Tell us that you didn't see the value of the big signing. Tell us that the plan is to have money available for up-and-coming youngsters that you think are going to break out. Tell us that there's a plan.
     
    Just don't piss on our heads and tell us it's raining. "We made competitive offers, but so and so wanted to sign with a contender." Well, I don't see the Cubs and White Sox struggling to give away money. And worst of all, please don't cite Josh Willingham, Kendrys Morales, or - now - Torii Hunter as evidence that the team is really breaking the bank. Quit trying to tell us that money is actually being spent and "boy, we had a really competitive payroll." It's not. It's really not.
  4. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from sandbun in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Follow-up, now that I'm a little less peevish today.
     
    I get that the Twins don't want to give out ridiculous Jon Lester-style contracts. There are a ton of examples of terrible long-term deals out there, and giving somebody an eight-year, $200 million contract and then watching him stink from years 3-8 is not great business. And I get that youth development is probably much, much more important than free agent signings.
     
    All I'm asking is for the Twins brass to be honest. Tell us that you didn't see the value of the big signing. Tell us that the plan is to have money available for up-and-coming youngsters that you think are going to break out. Tell us that there's a plan.
     
    Just don't piss on our heads and tell us it's raining. "We made competitive offers, but so and so wanted to sign with a contender." Well, I don't see the Cubs and White Sox struggling to give away money. And worst of all, please don't cite Josh Willingham, Kendrys Morales, or - now - Torii Hunter as evidence that the team is really breaking the bank. Quit trying to tell us that money is actually being spent and "boy, we had a really competitive payroll." It's not. It's really not.
  5. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from nicksaviking in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Forbes.com reported today that Major League Baseball league-wide revenues jumped from $8 billion in 2013 to $9 billion in 2014, mostly due to the league's new national TV contracts and revenue from MLB Advanced Media, the online streaming arm of MLB.
     
    This continues a trend.A look back: In 2001, revenue was $3.6 billion; adjusted for inflation, $4.66 billion in today's dollars, according to Forbes. That year, three MLB teams had payrolls over $100 million; the Yankees led the way with just over $112 million. Sixteen more had more than $50 million in payroll that season.
     
    Since then, revenue has doubled, more or less. The Dodgers had a $235 million payroll last year, and the Yankees nearly cleared the bar to $200 million as well. 14 other teams had payrolls of at least $100 million.
     
    $200 million is the new $100 million, when it comes to payroll. $100 million is the new $50 million.
     
    Since Target Field opened in 2010, the median MLB payroll has gone from $85 million to $107 million - right in line with revenue, which, just like the median payroll, has jumped 25% in that five-year span. During that same period, the Twins' payroll has declined, from $98 million to last year's $85 million. Don't let the Twins fool you; they will try to tell you that they've spent plenty of money. They haven't.
     
    Remember this the next time Terry Ryan or Dave St. Peter talks about being "fiscally responsible." Remember this the next time your neighbor complains about Joe Mauer's contract being the problem with the Twins. Remember that MLB's revenue explosion, and the great gobs of taxpayer money that funded Target Field, mean that the Twins are making more money now than they ever have before - indeed more money than they could ever have dreamed of.
     
    They're just pocketing it, instead of spending it on improving the team.
     
    Click here to view the article
  6. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from jokin in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Forbes.com reported today that Major League Baseball league-wide revenues jumped from $8 billion in 2013 to $9 billion in 2014, mostly due to the league's new national TV contracts and revenue from MLB Advanced Media, the online streaming arm of MLB.
     
    This continues a trend.A look back: In 2001, revenue was $3.6 billion; adjusted for inflation, $4.66 billion in today's dollars, according to Forbes. That year, three MLB teams had payrolls over $100 million; the Yankees led the way with just over $112 million. Sixteen more had more than $50 million in payroll that season.
     
    Since then, revenue has doubled, more or less. The Dodgers had a $235 million payroll last year, and the Yankees nearly cleared the bar to $200 million as well. 14 other teams had payrolls of at least $100 million.
     
    $200 million is the new $100 million, when it comes to payroll. $100 million is the new $50 million.
     
    Since Target Field opened in 2010, the median MLB payroll has gone from $85 million to $107 million - right in line with revenue, which, just like the median payroll, has jumped 25% in that five-year span. During that same period, the Twins' payroll has declined, from $98 million to last year's $85 million. Don't let the Twins fool you; they will try to tell you that they've spent plenty of money. They haven't.
     
    Remember this the next time Terry Ryan or Dave St. Peter talks about being "fiscally responsible." Remember this the next time your neighbor complains about Joe Mauer's contract being the problem with the Twins. Remember that MLB's revenue explosion, and the great gobs of taxpayer money that funded Target Field, mean that the Twins are making more money now than they ever have before - indeed more money than they could ever have dreamed of.
     
    They're just pocketing it, instead of spending it on improving the team.
     
    Click here to view the article
  7. Like
    Jon Marthaler got a reaction from Mike Sixel in Article: $200 Million is the New $100 Million   
    Forbes.com reported today that Major League Baseball league-wide revenues jumped from $8 billion in 2013 to $9 billion in 2014, mostly due to the league's new national TV contracts and revenue from MLB Advanced Media, the online streaming arm of MLB.
     
    This continues a trend.A look back: In 2001, revenue was $3.6 billion; adjusted for inflation, $4.66 billion in today's dollars, according to Forbes. That year, three MLB teams had payrolls over $100 million; the Yankees led the way with just over $112 million. Sixteen more had more than $50 million in payroll that season.
     
    Since then, revenue has doubled, more or less. The Dodgers had a $235 million payroll last year, and the Yankees nearly cleared the bar to $200 million as well. 14 other teams had payrolls of at least $100 million.
     
    $200 million is the new $100 million, when it comes to payroll. $100 million is the new $50 million.
     
    Since Target Field opened in 2010, the median MLB payroll has gone from $85 million to $107 million - right in line with revenue, which, just like the median payroll, has jumped 25% in that five-year span. During that same period, the Twins' payroll has declined, from $98 million to last year's $85 million. Don't let the Twins fool you; they will try to tell you that they've spent plenty of money. They haven't.
     
    Remember this the next time Terry Ryan or Dave St. Peter talks about being "fiscally responsible." Remember this the next time your neighbor complains about Joe Mauer's contract being the problem with the Twins. Remember that MLB's revenue explosion, and the great gobs of taxpayer money that funded Target Field, mean that the Twins are making more money now than they ever have before - indeed more money than they could ever have dreamed of.
     
    They're just pocketing it, instead of spending it on improving the team.
     
    Click here to view the article
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