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jimbo92107

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  1. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from spinowner in Heyman: Twins may be early buyers   
    I'm just a city boy, but even I know you don't cook eggs by setting fire to the hen house. I also know you don't trust some fast talker named Hay-man to not make hay for no reason. Skinny Willie sez, don't let no East Coast pundit who can't spell Hrbek tell you what your own home town team needs, much less what they're like 'nuff to do.
     
    Dear Terry,
     
    Don't sell the farm before the harvest.
     
    Love,
    Jimbo
  2. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Ncgo4 in Miguel Sano How Soon Is Now?   
    I don't know if we'll see Sano up before the Twins trade Plouffe. Escobar remains the backup infielder.
     
    Buxton's situation is much easier. DFA Robinson, plug Buxton in at CF for the next ten years. Hicks goes to whichever corner OF needs better defense, and the other OF goes to the other corner. Hunter becomes the 4th OF and part time DH. That was supposed to be the plan, right? At the moment I'd keep Rosario as the other OF opposite Hicks, but that could change depending on hitting trends.
     
    The bear in the room is Joe Mauer. It would take soccer balls to DFA him and replace him with a combo of Vargas, Sano and maybe Max Kepler, but that's the future, folks. Mauer's bat doesn't profile at 1B at all, so he doesn't fit the team anymore. What Mauer should do is retire for a year to see if his brain fully heals, and if so, then try coming back about a year from now with a different team at 1B. Maybe then he'll develop that elusive power stroke and have five more years as a power hitting DH/1B with some lucky team.
     
    Meanwhile, the future of this team is about young power bats at every position but shortstop and catcher. Why not start the full youth movement a week or two after the All Star game? It's fun watching them have a good start, but every pundit says this Twins team is an unsustainable statistical mirage. Okay, then let's get a head start on installing the Twins of 2016 and beyond, and that will be enough to keep butts in the seats for the rest of the season.
     
    I'm okay with Sano and Buxton having their cold streaks at the plate. But when Sano catches a mistake hanging, then makes the baseball go far away, I want to see it on MLB.com, not the minor league network. When Buxton steals second and just keeps going to third, safe, I want to see that, too. I want to see Max Kepler doing what Joe Mauer wants to do at 1B - hit about .300 and bust some balls over the wall.
     
    We've been waiting for the new kids for more than four years now. Turn some pages and let's start a big new chapter for the Twins.
  3. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Sweetwater in Article: His Name Is Walker. Adam Brett Walker   
    It's a classic problem for power hitters. A hard swing usually means you have to start it early, so if a pitcher (like Pelfrey) can throw something with late breaking action, they can make you look like a fool.
     
    The problem for Walker is that a lot of major league pitchers can throw a pitch with late breaking action. That's why they're in the majors, they miss bats. The art of hitting at the major league level involves a lot of internal processing of what pitches you're going to look for from a particular pitcher. Brian Dozier has developed a nice formula with the help of Tom Brunanski. He looks for pitches mostly in the middle, trying to drive them flat. But if he sees high and inside, he pounces with those quick hands and bashes it into the left field seats.
     
    Walker needs to develop a more sophisticated plan for pitch recognition. I'm sure he and his coaches already know this. A little more plate discipline is AB Walker's ticket to the majors.
     
    Doesn't it seem like some aspiring old hitters and software programmers could come up with a VR program to train hitters how to recognize what's coming? You could integrate all the pro tips like a couple dozen physical tells from the pitcher, situational analysis, etc. Then see if the player could guess what's coming and who can guess the soonest. I bet Joe Mauer would be good at that.
     
  4. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from twinsnorth49 in Hunter ejected (takes Molly with him)   
    But just imagine if he did start taking it all off? Life copies art! The video of Torii Hunter doing a Ned Braeden on national TV would survive into the next millennium. It might last longer then the memory of baseball itself!
  5. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from formerly33 in Hunter ejected (takes Molly with him)   
    But just imagine if he did start taking it all off? Life copies art! The video of Torii Hunter doing a Ned Braeden on national TV would survive into the next millennium. It might last longer then the memory of baseball itself!
  6. Like
    jimbo92107 reacted to twinsnorth49 in Hunter ejected (takes Molly with him)   
    He's  no Ned Braeden, put it that way.
     

  7. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from blindeke in Adam Brett Walker II - My Case   
    I find your analysis compelling, but then, I just ate some semi-rotten salad from my refrigerator.
     
    Walker looks pretty solid to me. His batting stance and swing were somewhat similar to Chili Davis, and his power looks similar, too. Unlike Davis tho, Walker hasn't developed a top-notch eye for checking his swing on junk pitches. If brought up now, doubtless he will do some flailing, but even clever pitchers will sometimes leave a curve ball hanging or a fastball too much in the middle. Unlike the Twins bench at the  moment, Walker has more than enough power to deposit such mistakes into the second deck. I can see him becoming the fourth outfielder and pinch hitter, and sometimes a DH. It's not so much whether Walker's got a lot higher upside but that Sano is nowhere near ready to play RF, or third base. Walker is ready for RF right now.
  8. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Jerr in Boston Globe article on Hunter and character   
    Terry Ryan brought Torii Hunter here for two reasons: 1) To play solid RF and produce some RBI, and 2) To mentor guys like Aaron Hicks, Eddie Rosario, Danny Santana, Kennys Vargas, and later, Sano and Buxton.
     
    Hunter has delivered more than expected on all counts. He has single-handedly brought a great atmosphere to this team, helping execute Paul Molitor's pressure baseball philosophy. He's showing Hicks and Rosario what mentality will make their baseball careers successful and enjoyable.
     
    Assuming Byron Buxton comes up sometime during the second half, Hunter will become the fourth outfielder, continuing to mentor the young outfielders, contributing wherever he can on the field and at the plate. Hunter's contract with the Twins is working out even better than hoped.
  9. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Danchat in Miguel Sano How Soon Is Now?   
    Oddly enough, it all depends on Miguel Sano's athleticism. He's listed as 6'4", 260 pounds in the Lookouts roster. Can he run faster than Kennys Vargas? Fast enough to make a reasonable corner outfielder? If not, then he'd be a liability at 3rd, where Pouffe is now thriving. He could compete with Vargas as DH, but Vargas has a distinct advantage of more experience, and he's a legit switch hitter.
     
    That mostly leaves 1st base, where Joe Mauer is. Sano's probably got the glove for it, and definitely has the bat for it. When do you want the Twins to bench Joe Mauer? Pinch hitter? DH? Platoon at 1st, along with Sano and Vargas?
     
    Tough decisions indeed.
  10. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from blairpaul715 in Boston Globe article on Hunter and character   
    Terry Ryan brought Torii Hunter here for two reasons: 1) To play solid RF and produce some RBI, and 2) To mentor guys like Aaron Hicks, Eddie Rosario, Danny Santana, Kennys Vargas, and later, Sano and Buxton.
     
    Hunter has delivered more than expected on all counts. He has single-handedly brought a great atmosphere to this team, helping execute Paul Molitor's pressure baseball philosophy. He's showing Hicks and Rosario what mentality will make their baseball careers successful and enjoyable.
     
    Assuming Byron Buxton comes up sometime during the second half, Hunter will become the fourth outfielder, continuing to mentor the young outfielders, contributing wherever he can on the field and at the plate. Hunter's contract with the Twins is working out even better than hoped.
  11. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from glunn in Article: How Is Mike Pelfrey Doing This?   
    Mike Pelfrey has elevated his "floor" value to the Twins immensely. Now, instead of being a dubious over-30 pitcher on his way down, he looks like an inning-eating mid-rotation guy that can win a surprising number of games if he's supported by good defense and a little hitting.
     
    His heater is better, thanks to good movement and better command. He's been keeping it generally down, but clearly he can move it around the zone and avoid the middle, without issuing walks. His slider is nothing amazing, but nobody sits on it, so he can throw it almost any time.
     
    The big news is that splitter. Used to be that hitters could sit on Pelfrey's fastball and expect to get something in the middle part of the zone sometime during an at-bat. Now his heat is around the zone, not down the middle, and if you sit on it, he'll throw that excellent splitter, which he delivers with almost the same arm action as his heater. With its late down-left action, it's extremely hard to judge where that ball is going to be when a hitter initiates his swing. Even if they do make contact, it's going to be a weak grounder or some weird little squibber. More likely a lefty fouls it off his foot, and a rightie just whiffs. Thing is, he throws it with two strikes, and it looks like a BP fastball down the middle, so they can't prevent themselves from swinging.
     
    The last factor is stamina. Dick and Bert both noticed how strong Pelfrey still looked right into the 8th inning. His heat was still 93mph or better, and his command had not degraded to the point where hitters could really take advantage. Granted, they were starting to zone in on his heat, but a couple good catches ended the game. Maybe Pelfrey needs a slightly different pitch pattern for the eighth inning.
  12. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from glunn in Article: How Is Mike Pelfrey Doing This?   
    What a difference in Mike Pelfrey's life from just a couple months ago. Everybody except him thought he was bound for bullpen duty for the rest of his career. He'd spent a couple years working his way back from Tommy John surgery, trying to get his body as strong as possible and his elbow to work right again. Even his "last chance" as a starter came because the Twins were forced into it by Ervin Santana's suspension and Nolasco's stint on the DL.
     
    Now, his command looks great, and his stuff is filthy. Combined with an improved Twins defense, Pelfrey is winning games again. His heater is averaging around 93mph with good movement, and his splitter is embarrassing good hitters.
     
    Are we seeing the best of Mike Pelfrey? A couple aspects of this question intrigue me. First, his command. Obviously, every pitcher knows that you're supposed to avoid the middle of the strike zone, but it seems that only a few really master the art of keeping the ball around the edges. Pelfrey's command during this stretch has been almost impeccable. Why? Is it that years of mechanics drills have finally borne fruit, or is it just that his elbow is finally healthy after years of getting worse? Or is it some combination of the two, or some other factor?
     
    Second, his stuff. In that first clip, you can see that Pedro Alvarez recognizes the initial trajectory of the pitch as it comes out of Pelfrey's hand, which indicates it will be right down the middle of the zone. Only after it's halfway to the plate does the splitter's action take it down and left (out of the zone), inducing an embarrassing whiff. I think the word "filthy" comes not just from the degree of movement, but from the deception. It starts out looking like a sweet, down-the middle BP fastball, then disappears under your bat. Notice also that the ball doesn't duck down until it's over half-way to the plate. By that time, Alvarez has decided to swing at the spot where he expects the ball to be...but then it ain't there. Like a magic trick, his eye has been fooled.
     
    Did Pelfrey's stuff always have this late movement? I mean, earlier in his career, before his elbow problems. If so, you'd expect him to have an ERA that would put him out of Minnesota's price range. I think he's improved.
     
    I have a feeling we're looking at a guy who's had a lot of time to think about and refine his game. What he's doing today doesn't look like an accident, but rather the result of lots of work, and thought, about the most effective way to get guys out. I'm seeing a savvy pitcher with great command, and plenty of gas left in the tank. Mike Pelfrey looks like a damn fine pitcher.
  13. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from kellyvance in Article: How Is Mike Pelfrey Doing This?   
    What a difference in Mike Pelfrey's life from just a couple months ago. Everybody except him thought he was bound for bullpen duty for the rest of his career. He'd spent a couple years working his way back from Tommy John surgery, trying to get his body as strong as possible and his elbow to work right again. Even his "last chance" as a starter came because the Twins were forced into it by Ervin Santana's suspension and Nolasco's stint on the DL.
     
    Now, his command looks great, and his stuff is filthy. Combined with an improved Twins defense, Pelfrey is winning games again. His heater is averaging around 93mph with good movement, and his splitter is embarrassing good hitters.
     
    Are we seeing the best of Mike Pelfrey? A couple aspects of this question intrigue me. First, his command. Obviously, every pitcher knows that you're supposed to avoid the middle of the strike zone, but it seems that only a few really master the art of keeping the ball around the edges. Pelfrey's command during this stretch has been almost impeccable. Why? Is it that years of mechanics drills have finally borne fruit, or is it just that his elbow is finally healthy after years of getting worse? Or is it some combination of the two, or some other factor?
     
    Second, his stuff. In that first clip, you can see that Pedro Alvarez recognizes the initial trajectory of the pitch as it comes out of Pelfrey's hand, which indicates it will be right down the middle of the zone. Only after it's halfway to the plate does the splitter's action take it down and left (out of the zone), inducing an embarrassing whiff. I think the word "filthy" comes not just from the degree of movement, but from the deception. It starts out looking like a sweet, down-the middle BP fastball, then disappears under your bat. Notice also that the ball doesn't duck down until it's over half-way to the plate. By that time, Alvarez has decided to swing at the spot where he expects the ball to be...but then it ain't there. Like a magic trick, his eye has been fooled.
     
    Did Pelfrey's stuff always have this late movement? I mean, earlier in his career, before his elbow problems. If so, you'd expect him to have an ERA that would put him out of Minnesota's price range. I think he's improved.
     
    I have a feeling we're looking at a guy who's had a lot of time to think about and refine his game. What he's doing today doesn't look like an accident, but rather the result of lots of work, and thought, about the most effective way to get guys out. I'm seeing a savvy pitcher with great command, and plenty of gas left in the tank. Mike Pelfrey looks like a damn fine pitcher.
  14. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Andrew in Santana Optioned, Vargas Recalled   
    I'm making this call not just because I like Danny Santana, but because I really believe he's got star talent. He just needs to refine his approach at the plate so that he's not giving away so many outs. He also needs to work on stealing bases - a guy with his quickness and speed should be a threat every time he gets aboard.
     
    Santana has one of the quickest bats in the organization, yet he strikes out a lot. That means he doesn't go up there with a good enough plan, a way of narrowing down the pitches he's going to offer at, a recognition of the situation, etc. With a bat that quick, seems to me he should be taking the Mauer approach, letting the ball get as deep in the zone as possible, then slashing across it to the opposite field. Of course he won't be another Joe Mauer, but being an oppo hitter is a good foundation for a guy like Santana, and it allows him to punch out at some of those outside pitches. Later he can learn to pounce on inside stuff like Dozier.
     
    My drill for teaching the Joe Mauer style: Toss the student a basket of oranges, and he must slice each orange in half with a kitana. Fun and nutritious. Once the student can do this with a grape, he is ready. For what, I cannot say.
  15. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from big dog in Santana Optioned, Vargas Recalled   
    I'm making this call not just because I like Danny Santana, but because I really believe he's got star talent. He just needs to refine his approach at the plate so that he's not giving away so many outs. He also needs to work on stealing bases - a guy with his quickness and speed should be a threat every time he gets aboard.
     
    Santana has one of the quickest bats in the organization, yet he strikes out a lot. That means he doesn't go up there with a good enough plan, a way of narrowing down the pitches he's going to offer at, a recognition of the situation, etc. With a bat that quick, seems to me he should be taking the Mauer approach, letting the ball get as deep in the zone as possible, then slashing across it to the opposite field. Of course he won't be another Joe Mauer, but being an oppo hitter is a good foundation for a guy like Santana, and it allows him to punch out at some of those outside pitches. Later he can learn to pounce on inside stuff like Dozier.
     
    My drill for teaching the Joe Mauer style: Toss the student a basket of oranges, and he must slice each orange in half with a kitana. Fun and nutritious. Once the student can do this with a grape, he is ready. For what, I cannot say.
  16. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Otto von Ballpark in Santana Optioned, Vargas Recalled   
    I'm making this call not just because I like Danny Santana, but because I really believe he's got star talent. He just needs to refine his approach at the plate so that he's not giving away so many outs. He also needs to work on stealing bases - a guy with his quickness and speed should be a threat every time he gets aboard.
     
    Santana has one of the quickest bats in the organization, yet he strikes out a lot. That means he doesn't go up there with a good enough plan, a way of narrowing down the pitches he's going to offer at, a recognition of the situation, etc. With a bat that quick, seems to me he should be taking the Mauer approach, letting the ball get as deep in the zone as possible, then slashing across it to the opposite field. Of course he won't be another Joe Mauer, but being an oppo hitter is a good foundation for a guy like Santana, and it allows him to punch out at some of those outside pitches. Later he can learn to pounce on inside stuff like Dozier.
     
    My drill for teaching the Joe Mauer style: Toss the student a basket of oranges, and he must slice each orange in half with a kitana. Fun and nutritious. Once the student can do this with a grape, he is ready. For what, I cannot say.
  17. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from goulik in Santana Optioned, Vargas Recalled   
    I'm making this call not just because I like Danny Santana, but because I really believe he's got star talent. He just needs to refine his approach at the plate so that he's not giving away so many outs. He also needs to work on stealing bases - a guy with his quickness and speed should be a threat every time he gets aboard.
     
    Santana has one of the quickest bats in the organization, yet he strikes out a lot. That means he doesn't go up there with a good enough plan, a way of narrowing down the pitches he's going to offer at, a recognition of the situation, etc. With a bat that quick, seems to me he should be taking the Mauer approach, letting the ball get as deep in the zone as possible, then slashing across it to the opposite field. Of course he won't be another Joe Mauer, but being an oppo hitter is a good foundation for a guy like Santana, and it allows him to punch out at some of those outside pitches. Later he can learn to pounce on inside stuff like Dozier.
     
    My drill for teaching the Joe Mauer style: Toss the student a basket of oranges, and he must slice each orange in half with a kitana. Fun and nutritious. Once the student can do this with a grape, he is ready. For what, I cannot say.
  18. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from twinsnorth49 in Left Handed Power   
    Kind of a Catch 22. Changing speeds is such an advanced technique, pitchers that are getting guys out by changing speeds effectively get called up to the majors before AAA hitters see them more than a few times. Thus, guys like Vargas don't get to work on keeping their weight back and flicking their wrists to foul off slow stuff.
  19. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from blairpaul715 in Article: When Will Molitor Start Making Adjustments?   
    The one guy people aren't talking about much is Mauer's possible replacement at 1st base. Vargas? No, Max Kepler. Der Kid is hitting about .300 in Chattanooga, lots of doubles, good glove, good arm, great athlete, and his power stroke is legit. Kepler isn't another Joe Mauer, but his skill set is a better match for what the Twins need from a 1st baseman. More power, solid play. I expect to see Kepler and Vargas sharing time at 1st base within a year, and then where do you put Mauer?
     
    Of course, the moment I'm typing this, Mauer pounds a three run homer to tie the game with Milwaukee. RISP!
  20. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from pbrezeasap in Article: Twins Believe Hot Start Is More Than Smoke (Machine) And Mirrors   
    The secret sauce that is making this team win is subtle, and has many different spices in just the right proportion. The luckiest part has already happened - we have a combination of young players on the rise, like Hicks, Rosario, May, and Gibson. We have younger veterans that are nearing their peak potential, like Plouffe and Dozier. We have several solid veterans that hold their own and stabilize the team. We have Torii Hunter, a unique personality that helps pull it all together and inspires everybody to bust their butts. Even struggling Danny Santana is doing everything he can to get better, and it's showing. Oh, and Joe Mauer is hitting about .380 with runners in scoring position.
     
    To that you add a coaching staff that is one of the best in the business. Gene Glynn, Paul Molitor, Neil Allen, Tom Brunansky and Eddie Guardado. Then, to top it off, you've got management that has enough sense to not meddle with a good thing.
     
    The only weakness I've seen in this team so far is, when they face a Cy Young candidate on a good day, they don't do very well. Otherwise, the Twins look like they can beat anybody.
  21. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from brvama in Article: Twins Believe Hot Start Is More Than Smoke (Machine) And Mirrors   
    The secret sauce that is making this team win is subtle, and has many different spices in just the right proportion. The luckiest part has already happened - we have a combination of young players on the rise, like Hicks, Rosario, May, and Gibson. We have younger veterans that are nearing their peak potential, like Plouffe and Dozier. We have several solid veterans that hold their own and stabilize the team. We have Torii Hunter, a unique personality that helps pull it all together and inspires everybody to bust their butts. Even struggling Danny Santana is doing everything he can to get better, and it's showing. Oh, and Joe Mauer is hitting about .380 with runners in scoring position.
     
    To that you add a coaching staff that is one of the best in the business. Gene Glynn, Paul Molitor, Neil Allen, Tom Brunansky and Eddie Guardado. Then, to top it off, you've got management that has enough sense to not meddle with a good thing.
     
    The only weakness I've seen in this team so far is, when they face a Cy Young candidate on a good day, they don't do very well. Otherwise, the Twins look like they can beat anybody.
  22. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from glunn in Article: Twins Believe Hot Start Is More Than Smoke (Machine) And Mirrors   
    The secret sauce that is making this team win is subtle, and has many different spices in just the right proportion. The luckiest part has already happened - we have a combination of young players on the rise, like Hicks, Rosario, May, and Gibson. We have younger veterans that are nearing their peak potential, like Plouffe and Dozier. We have several solid veterans that hold their own and stabilize the team. We have Torii Hunter, a unique personality that helps pull it all together and inspires everybody to bust their butts. Even struggling Danny Santana is doing everything he can to get better, and it's showing. Oh, and Joe Mauer is hitting about .380 with runners in scoring position.
     
    To that you add a coaching staff that is one of the best in the business. Gene Glynn, Paul Molitor, Neil Allen, Tom Brunansky and Eddie Guardado. Then, to top it off, you've got management that has enough sense to not meddle with a good thing.
     
    The only weakness I've seen in this team so far is, when they face a Cy Young candidate on a good day, they don't do very well. Otherwise, the Twins look like they can beat anybody.
  23. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Joe A. Preusser in Article: Twins Believe Hot Start Is More Than Smoke (Machine) And Mirrors   
    The secret sauce that is making this team win is subtle, and has many different spices in just the right proportion. The luckiest part has already happened - we have a combination of young players on the rise, like Hicks, Rosario, May, and Gibson. We have younger veterans that are nearing their peak potential, like Plouffe and Dozier. We have several solid veterans that hold their own and stabilize the team. We have Torii Hunter, a unique personality that helps pull it all together and inspires everybody to bust their butts. Even struggling Danny Santana is doing everything he can to get better, and it's showing. Oh, and Joe Mauer is hitting about .380 with runners in scoring position.
     
    To that you add a coaching staff that is one of the best in the business. Gene Glynn, Paul Molitor, Neil Allen, Tom Brunansky and Eddie Guardado. Then, to top it off, you've got management that has enough sense to not meddle with a good thing.
     
    The only weakness I've seen in this team so far is, when they face a Cy Young candidate on a good day, they don't do very well. Otherwise, the Twins look like they can beat anybody.
  24. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from Richie the Rally Goat in Waivers, Nolasco and too many pitchers   
    It looks like Milone is busy resolving that issue right now. I'm pretty sure he gets free meals anywhere in Boston if he keeps tossing them those sweet sweet cookies.
  25. Like
    jimbo92107 got a reaction from HitInAPinch in Waivers, Nolasco and too many pitchers   
    Trevor May will not be sent down unless he gets hurt or somehow loses his poise on the mound. Right now he's as good as anybody on the staff, and he looks to be improving and solidifying his game over time. May literally out-pitched Rick Porcello last time out. Sending him down now would be totally irresponsible. I can't imagine Paul Molitor would allow it.
     
    This team has been shockingly successful so far. If Milone pitches well in Boston and keeps the team in the game, then he'll stick around for another start. If he gets knocked around, then he goes back down at the earliest opportunity. This is Nolasco versus Milone. It doesn't involve Trevor May.
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