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IndianaTwin

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  1. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Teflon in Who Owned Whom? Notable Opposing Players Versus Twins Greats   
    So from what I can tell, if you take out the stats against Tanana, Kusick’s .235/.342/.392 goes to .230/.334/<=.382. I didn’t track down all of his at bats, so I treated the 12 non-homers as singles. If some of them were extra bases, his slugging percentage is even lower. 
    I’ve never looked at this, but it has to be pretty rare for someone with that many plate appearances to have their stats affected in such a positive way by hitting against a particular pitcher, particularly a good one like Tanana. 
  2. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from 21bdp21 in The Grand "Re-Tool" Experiment   
    "This year has been a complete disaster" is the dominant narrative. I don't completely disagree, but here's a few tidbits I found for perspective:
    While the team is 38-50 with today's win, it's interesting to split that in half. In the first half of the games so far, they were 16-28, followed by 22-22.  In my admittedly cherry-picked sample size, they are 12-9 over the last 21 games. That's not awesome, but it's still 92-win pace for that sample. Buxton has played a little over two games in the last 58. We don't know how much better they would have done, but my hunch is that there's general agreement among us that the record over the last 44 would have been better than 22-22.  A friend is a Sox fan (He'd be a good friend if he wasn't a Sox fan. He claims that this is their worst year for injuries that he's even seen. No doubt it's because they've only had two lineups that they've used more than twice. They have used each five times. However, the only difference between the two is the CF, so for 10 games they have had the same lineup EXCEPT for the CF. In total, they have had 69 different lineups in their 87 games going into today. That's pretty tough. However, the Twins have had 79 different lineups in their 87 games going into today. They have had the same lineup three times and six other lineups have been used twice. To my mind, that's worse. The Sox have missed Robert, but Anderson, Moncada and Abreu have each started at least 72, all in the top four spots in the order.  So with all that, I'm going to upgrade my assessment from "complete disaster" to "massive disappointment, largely driven by injury." I didn't even address the effect of losing Buxton compared to losing Robert and the fact that the Sox have only needed five starts aside from their opening-day rotation compared to the Twins needing 10 different starters so far, with only Berrios not missing at least one start. 

    So put me clearly in the "retool" category.
    I completely agree with the lineup and bench in the OP, down to the SS and DH issues. Here's my short-term planning there: 
    Offer Simmons an extension at $10 million for next year. Do it now. Or better yet, $8M with an extra million each at 100, 115, 130, and 145 games. If he gets that many games, he was worth the extra $2-$4M. With the great class, Simmons probably doesn't want to go back on the market against them. I like that the SS issue is addressed early, relatively inexpensively, with great defense and resulting in potentially just one real offensive hole in the entire lineup.  IF messages from the front office point to an increase in budget, try to negotiate an extension to Cruz, at around this year's $13M. Again, if he likes it here, he may well go for the guarantee of an additional year given the uncertainty of last winter for him, and he effectively has gotten the 2/$26M he was looking for. If I can't get that, I indeed try to trade him, recognizing I won't get much. At that point, I'm probably assuming I'm going for an offseason signing a la Cron from a couple years ago to serve as an additional DH in the mix. And planning on more from Sano and rotations through the position. Since people have been talking about Donaldson, I'll say that I keep him unless there is an established major league 3B option included in the return. That's not likely, but I'll talk. I'm comfortable with a slight MLB downgrade if it saves money, but I'm not comfortable counting on the existing options in the system. If a trade does happen, I use the dollar savings to go harder after Cruz to ensure that we don't lose both bats. In a nutshell, I'd love to have the 2022 position players relatively set by mid-August, allowing myself the ability for minor tinkering in the offseason if there is a deal that make an upgrade or free up a few bucks for pitching.
    Good analysis on the rotation options. Given the health of current minor league guys, I'm not sure that you can trade both Pineda and Happ. There's just too many starts to cover the rest of the year to think of getting up to an additional 25 or so starts from the young guys between now and season's end. The likelihood of injuries points to at least some of the rookies getting some starts the rest from here to yearend, but even if two of them thrive and get 12-15 starts the rest of the way, that's not enough for a contending team to consider starting the rotation with two guys with less than 20 career starts in the majors. Sorry, but neither Jax nor Ober has guaranteed a spot yet, let alone by yearend.
    I'm fine with trading one of them, however, to free up a certain number of starts for rookies, so I trade whichever of Pineda or Happ gets me a better return. That's probably going to be Pineda, but maybe a team is particularly looking for a lefty.  
    In terms of bullpen, however, I'd try to trade both Colome and Robles, putting more effort into getting mid-level guys who have any hope of contributing in 2022 over stronger prospects who are further away. I'm playing for 2022. And realistically, unless you're talking stud starters, teams seem to pursue bullpen help more than starters anyway, since they have to give up too much for starters. 
    For the rest of the year, I'm glad to use the traded Colome and Robles innings for young guys, including some of the young starting candidates listed above. The latter isn't with the view to making them relievers, but rather as a developmental tool for getting MLB innings at various leverage levels without wearing them out. 
    Implied in here is that I don't trade Berrios. With a retool, there's no way you're going to get anything that helps for 2022 that is close to what he is going to do.
    Similarly, I don't trade Rogers, even though he only has 1.5 years of control. Relievers are unpredictable, but he's been as predictable as about anyone over the last few years. I plan to ride him for the remaining 1.5 years, knowing that he's an affordable strong contributor for next year and still a trade chip (though less valuable, obviously) next July if 2022 doesn't play out as we wish.
    This post is too long already. I won't address which starters I plan to target in the offseason, since that will be dependent on how the above plays out. But I think my moves set the course well. 
  3. Like
    IndianaTwin reacted to Cornholio in Who Is Twins Best LF of All Time - Reopened with 3 new choices!!!   
    Harmon Killebrew. He was the everyday LF from’62-64. Played in 470 games as Twins starting LF. Allison started 472. Harmon averaged 47 hr’s as LF. Of those listed, only Rosario and Allison played more LF.
  4. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from DocBauer in Potayto, Potahto. Simmons, Semien. Did the Twins make the correct middle infield acquisition?   
    It's rarely as simple as Choice A vs. Choice B.
    For example, what impact did having an extra $7.5 million have in their ability to sign Cruz a week later? If signing Semien meant settling for Jay Bruce as the DH, it's a much different team.
     
  5. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from mnfireman in Rule Changes: What do we want/not want to see.   
    I've only been somewhat facetious in saying, "Eliminate batting gloves." With no gloves to fiddle with, stepping out of the box wouldn't be any fun. As I watched games from the '60s and '70s being replayed on MLB Network all winter, that was the single thing that stood out the most as a difference compared to today's games.
    (Followed next by the immediate chucking aside of any ball that had hit the dirt.)
  6. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Brock Beauchamp in Rule Changes: What do we want/not want to see.   
    I've only been somewhat facetious in saying, "Eliminate batting gloves." With no gloves to fiddle with, stepping out of the box wouldn't be any fun. As I watched games from the '60s and '70s being replayed on MLB Network all winter, that was the single thing that stood out the most as a difference compared to today's games.
    (Followed next by the immediate chucking aside of any ball that had hit the dirt.)
  7. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from DocBauer in Shoemaker and the Twins Starting Depth   
    You neglected what I see as another plus in the Shoemaker signing -- not having to rush Happ to get ready. 
     
    The Twins COULD skip their No. 5 with a couple early off days, but they don't tend to do that. I especially don't see them doing that this year, with the concern about guys who didn't pitch a full year. So with Shoemaker, they can start Maeda on Thursday (4/1) and then have Berrios-Pineda-Shoemaker-Dodnak-Maeda-Berrios in the six-day stretch before the off day on the 9th. So, they could IL Happ at the beginning of the year, avoiding the need to rush lengthening him out.
     
    Then, on the 10th, they start the stretch with 12 straight days, so they could start Happ then, or wait until as late as the 15th. By that point, they could have all back and make the decision of whether to go with a six-man rotation for a time or move Dobnak to the bullpen or St. Paul. And by then, someone else could have easily gone down, still leaving them with five stretched-out guys and Thorpe stretched out in St. Paul (assuming he gets the extra option). 
  8. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from denarded in Shoemaker and the Twins Starting Depth   
    You neglected what I see as another plus in the Shoemaker signing -- not having to rush Happ to get ready. 
     
    The Twins COULD skip their No. 5 with a couple early off days, but they don't tend to do that. I especially don't see them doing that this year, with the concern about guys who didn't pitch a full year. So with Shoemaker, they can start Maeda on Thursday (4/1) and then have Berrios-Pineda-Shoemaker-Dodnak-Maeda-Berrios in the six-day stretch before the off day on the 9th. So, they could IL Happ at the beginning of the year, avoiding the need to rush lengthening him out.
     
    Then, on the 10th, they start the stretch with 12 straight days, so they could start Happ then, or wait until as late as the 15th. By that point, they could have all back and make the decision of whether to go with a six-man rotation for a time or move Dobnak to the bullpen or St. Paul. And by then, someone else could have easily gone down, still leaving them with five stretched-out guys and Thorpe stretched out in St. Paul (assuming he gets the extra option). 
  9. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Melissa in Shoemaker and the Twins Starting Depth   
    You neglected what I see as another plus in the Shoemaker signing -- not having to rush Happ to get ready. 
     
    The Twins COULD skip their No. 5 with a couple early off days, but they don't tend to do that. I especially don't see them doing that this year, with the concern about guys who didn't pitch a full year. So with Shoemaker, they can start Maeda on Thursday (4/1) and then have Berrios-Pineda-Shoemaker-Dodnak-Maeda-Berrios in the six-day stretch before the off day on the 9th. So, they could IL Happ at the beginning of the year, avoiding the need to rush lengthening him out.
     
    Then, on the 10th, they start the stretch with 12 straight days, so they could start Happ then, or wait until as late as the 15th. By that point, they could have all back and make the decision of whether to go with a six-man rotation for a time or move Dobnak to the bullpen or St. Paul. And by then, someone else could have easily gone down, still leaving them with five stretched-out guys and Thorpe stretched out in St. Paul (assuming he gets the extra option). 
  10. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Danchat in 2021 Minnesota Twins Roster Projection 2.0   
    In the cases of Dobnak and/or Thorpe, I think you need to keep them stretched. With the late start to the AAA season, the question becomes whether it's easier to keep them stretched out while in the bullpen, potentially helping the team, or at the alternate site. 
     
  11. Like
    IndianaTwin reacted to SockNet in Rivalry Defines Twins 2021   
    I love beating the White Sox. Whether the teams are good or bad in a given year, it's still my favorite thing.
  12. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from SweetLou! in Twins Tunes #2: "Kitty Kaat"   
    Very well done! I also enjoyed the Randy Bush song. 
     
    For those interested in baseball-related music, here's a link to an all-baseball show by folksinger John McCutcheon. Included in the show was a lengthy interview with Kaat. 
     
    https://www.facebook.com/166909916655518/videos/232156791448433
     
  13. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from mikelink45 in 1947 - the mechanics of hitting   
    This is great. I could use a Vari-Pitch propeller. 
  14. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Chris Spicer in A Movie That Stand’s On Its Own. Revisiting a Baseball Classic: A League Of Their Own   
    First post? Great job -- you've captured the movie well. 
  15. Like
    IndianaTwin reacted to TopGunn#22 in Baseball has a special connection to Black Lives Matter   
    Good stuff Indiana.  Thanks for researching and sharing.  
  16. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from mikelink45 in Baseball has a special connection to Black Lives Matter   
    I can’t speak to whether or not Robinson considered himself a lifelong Republican or not, but according to this article, he supported Humphrey over Nixon in 1968.
     
    https://web.archive.org/web/20080302110739/http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070603&content_id=2003372&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb
     
    I think it’s pretty hard to know what another person’s politics would be, nearly 50 years after his death, particularly someone as complex and thoughtful as him. Both parties have changed in that time, and one thing that seems consistent in his life was that his political preferences evolved according to the current context.
     
    I’ve not read the book edited by the author of this column, but I also found this column an interesting read.
     
    https://www.chicagotribune.com/opinion/commentary/ct-perspec-jackie-robinson-100-politics-mlk-nixon-0131-20190130-story.html
     
     
  17. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from mikelink45 in Names and players - yes I am bored   
    My son just ordered a copy of "Hall of Name: Baseball's Most Magnificent Monikers," a new book by D.B. Firstman, with the foreward by Jayson Stark. 
     
    It's like an encyclopedia of about 100 of the best names in baseball history. For each player, there's some basic bio information, an etymology of the name, several paragraphs of bio, his pick for the best day of the player's career (by WPA or some other measure), "Not to be confused with" (references to other names from pop culture), anagrams, and an ephemera of tidbits that didn't make the rest of the entry. 
     
    Chapters include: 
    1. Baseball Poets and Men of Few (Different) Letters, led by our own Boof Bonser.
    2. Dirty Names Done Dirt Cheap. Fortunately, this is the shortest section, with just 10 entries. But did you know that, according to the ephemera, Gene Krapp died from an unsuccessful surgery to deal with bowel cancer? 
    3. Sounds Good to Me, chosen for the way the name rolls off the tongue, like Billy Jo Robidoux and Van Lingle Mungo. 
    4. No Focus Group Convened, which is the leftovers chosen just because of being interesting or unusual. I assume that Calvin Coolidge Julius Caesar Tuskahoma McLish was a no-brainer for inclusion. His anagram is "Oh Jesus! Unlavish, tragicomical, social lame duck." 
     
    I haven't read it, but it's been fun to flip through. Though he has fun with it, I didn't find anything mean-spirited in the book. It seems to be very well done. 
     
  18. Like
    IndianaTwin reacted to Parker Hageman in Introducing Twinternationals!   
    Great idea and I am really looking forward to seeing how this grows!
  19. Like
    IndianaTwin reacted to Ted Schwerzler in Twins Rotation Provides Intriguing Depth   
    I'm not sure that either Bailey of Chacin are trending down. Bailey finished 2019 really strong, and Chacin was great in 2018. Given what Minnesota has internally though, they're stacking up pitchers on the back end that should be more than capable of quality innings.
  20. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from mikelink45 in We blew that   
    I was just thinking of Romero the other day, perhaps when I saw that Adalberto Mejia got DFAed this week for the fifth time in five months. Ah, the names we remember. What's up with Mark Funderburk these days? 
     
    I know Romero was used exclusively as a reliever this past year, but given where we are at and that pretty much every pitcher starts spring training by only throwing an inning at a time, I hope he's still at least on the preseason Jim Kaat Award Watch list. Or at least still on the marker board in Wes' office.
     
    The chances are minute, and he's way behind the Dobnaks of the world at this point, but let's at least keep the option open to strike lightning in a bottle with a fresh start. As you note, there was a time he was highly regarded, and he's still pretty young.
     
  21. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Dave Overlund in Did Schoop Work for the 2019 Twins?   
    Context: 
    1. When Schoop was signed in December 2018, Sano had offseason question marks, having had the traffic incident with a cop and had missed the end of the 2018 season.
    2. At the point Schoop was signed, Gordon was not considered ready, and Arraez wasn't generally seen as an option. Without those, Gonzalez was probably their best option at 2B.
    3. Sano would miss the first part of the season, meaning Gonzalez had to fill 3B for the first month and a half.
    4. When Sano returned on May 16, Schoop had started 36 of 42 games at 2B, allowing Gonzalez to start 30 of 42 games at 3B.
    5. Through those 42 games, Schoop's OPS was .823. That's impressive production from (mostly) the 7 hole on a team that would have an .833 OPS for the year in a league where the average OPS was .762.
    6. Though Schoop would only start 64 of the remaining 120 games at 2B, he still ended up with an above-league average .783. His presence allowed Arraez and Gonzalez to move around, spelling others and allowing the team to start someone other than Cave when Buxton got hurt.
     
    So no, Schoop didn't carry the team offensively, but he wasn't asked to. What he did do was fill a significant hole without tying up future money. And from what I can tell, while playing well defensively. I also don't recall hearing anything negative about him as a clubhouse presence.
     
    I don't know what their other options were on the free agent market at the time, but I think it worked out quite well. 
  22. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from adorduan in Did Schoop Work for the 2019 Twins?   
    Context: 
    1. When Schoop was signed in December 2018, Sano had offseason question marks, having had the traffic incident with a cop and had missed the end of the 2018 season.
    2. At the point Schoop was signed, Gordon was not considered ready, and Arraez wasn't generally seen as an option. Without those, Gonzalez was probably their best option at 2B.
    3. Sano would miss the first part of the season, meaning Gonzalez had to fill 3B for the first month and a half.
    4. When Sano returned on May 16, Schoop had started 36 of 42 games at 2B, allowing Gonzalez to start 30 of 42 games at 3B.
    5. Through those 42 games, Schoop's OPS was .823. That's impressive production from (mostly) the 7 hole on a team that would have an .833 OPS for the year in a league where the average OPS was .762.
    6. Though Schoop would only start 64 of the remaining 120 games at 2B, he still ended up with an above-league average .783. His presence allowed Arraez and Gonzalez to move around, spelling others and allowing the team to start someone other than Cave when Buxton got hurt.
     
    So no, Schoop didn't carry the team offensively, but he wasn't asked to. What he did do was fill a significant hole without tying up future money. And from what I can tell, while playing well defensively. I also don't recall hearing anything negative about him as a clubhouse presence.
     
    I don't know what their other options were on the free agent market at the time, but I think it worked out quite well. 
  23. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from bighat in Did Schoop Work for the 2019 Twins?   
    Context: 
    1. When Schoop was signed in December 2018, Sano had offseason question marks, having had the traffic incident with a cop and had missed the end of the 2018 season.
    2. At the point Schoop was signed, Gordon was not considered ready, and Arraez wasn't generally seen as an option. Without those, Gonzalez was probably their best option at 2B.
    3. Sano would miss the first part of the season, meaning Gonzalez had to fill 3B for the first month and a half.
    4. When Sano returned on May 16, Schoop had started 36 of 42 games at 2B, allowing Gonzalez to start 30 of 42 games at 3B.
    5. Through those 42 games, Schoop's OPS was .823. That's impressive production from (mostly) the 7 hole on a team that would have an .833 OPS for the year in a league where the average OPS was .762.
    6. Though Schoop would only start 64 of the remaining 120 games at 2B, he still ended up with an above-league average .783. His presence allowed Arraez and Gonzalez to move around, spelling others and allowing the team to start someone other than Cave when Buxton got hurt.
     
    So no, Schoop didn't carry the team offensively, but he wasn't asked to. What he did do was fill a significant hole without tying up future money. And from what I can tell, while playing well defensively. I also don't recall hearing anything negative about him as a clubhouse presence.
     
    I don't know what their other options were on the free agent market at the time, but I think it worked out quite well. 
  24. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Oldgoat_MN in Did Schoop Work for the 2019 Twins?   
    Context: 
    1. When Schoop was signed in December 2018, Sano had offseason question marks, having had the traffic incident with a cop and had missed the end of the 2018 season.
    2. At the point Schoop was signed, Gordon was not considered ready, and Arraez wasn't generally seen as an option. Without those, Gonzalez was probably their best option at 2B.
    3. Sano would miss the first part of the season, meaning Gonzalez had to fill 3B for the first month and a half.
    4. When Sano returned on May 16, Schoop had started 36 of 42 games at 2B, allowing Gonzalez to start 30 of 42 games at 3B.
    5. Through those 42 games, Schoop's OPS was .823. That's impressive production from (mostly) the 7 hole on a team that would have an .833 OPS for the year in a league where the average OPS was .762.
    6. Though Schoop would only start 64 of the remaining 120 games at 2B, he still ended up with an above-league average .783. His presence allowed Arraez and Gonzalez to move around, spelling others and allowing the team to start someone other than Cave when Buxton got hurt.
     
    So no, Schoop didn't carry the team offensively, but he wasn't asked to. What he did do was fill a significant hole without tying up future money. And from what I can tell, while playing well defensively. I also don't recall hearing anything negative about him as a clubhouse presence.
     
    I don't know what their other options were on the free agent market at the time, but I think it worked out quite well. 
  25. Like
    IndianaTwin got a reaction from Platoon in Did Schoop Work for the 2019 Twins?   
    Context: 
    1. When Schoop was signed in December 2018, Sano had offseason question marks, having had the traffic incident with a cop and had missed the end of the 2018 season.
    2. At the point Schoop was signed, Gordon was not considered ready, and Arraez wasn't generally seen as an option. Without those, Gonzalez was probably their best option at 2B.
    3. Sano would miss the first part of the season, meaning Gonzalez had to fill 3B for the first month and a half.
    4. When Sano returned on May 16, Schoop had started 36 of 42 games at 2B, allowing Gonzalez to start 30 of 42 games at 3B.
    5. Through those 42 games, Schoop's OPS was .823. That's impressive production from (mostly) the 7 hole on a team that would have an .833 OPS for the year in a league where the average OPS was .762.
    6. Though Schoop would only start 64 of the remaining 120 games at 2B, he still ended up with an above-league average .783. His presence allowed Arraez and Gonzalez to move around, spelling others and allowing the team to start someone other than Cave when Buxton got hurt.
     
    So no, Schoop didn't carry the team offensively, but he wasn't asked to. What he did do was fill a significant hole without tying up future money. And from what I can tell, while playing well defensively. I also don't recall hearing anything negative about him as a clubhouse presence.
     
    I don't know what their other options were on the free agent market at the time, but I think it worked out quite well. 
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