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Seth Stohs

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    Seth Stohs got a reaction from dbminn for an article, Twins Minor League Week in Review: All Four Teams Over .500   
    Be sure to read Nick’s Twins Week in Review from yesterday, and then jump into the minor league week. 
    Transactions 
    Before we get started, let’s check out the Transactions and the FCL Twins game on Monday: 
    With Mitch Garver activated between the Twins doubleheader games, Ben Rortvedt has been optioned to Triple-A St. Paul. That said, Rortvedt is expected to stay close with the team as Garver and his wife are expecting their first child at any time.   
    FCL Twins Talk
    Box Score 
    The FCL Twins scored three runs in the third inning and three more runs in the fifth inning and topped the Pirates Gold squad 8-1 on Monday. 
    Matt Wallner continued his rehab stint. He went 2-for-4 and scored twice. He played in right field. Wander Valdez went 2-for-3 with a walk. Yonardy Soto went 2-for-4 with a walk and his first double. Luis Baez and Kala’i Rosario each went 2-for-5. Rosario notched his third triple. 
    Coming off of his no-hitter last week (5 innings), Giovahniey German gave up only an unearned run on four hits and a walk over 4 2/3 innings. He struck out seven. Danny Moreno returned to the mound for the first time since being injured in his second GCL game in 2021. He recorded four outs. Matt Mullenbach tossed two scoreless innings, before Ramon Pineda finished with a perfect ninth. 
     
    With that, let’s look at Week 11 in the Twins minor leagues: 
    RESULTS
    Triple-A: St. Paul Saints: Week (5-1, hosting Columbus), overall (33-32)
    Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge: Week (4-2, hosting Tulsa), overall (37-29)
    High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels: Week (2-4, @ South Bend), overall (36-30)
    Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels: Week (2-4, hosting Jupiter), overall (36-30) 
    Complex League: FCL Twins are 4-10.

    IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
    Here are the week’s Twins minor league-related articles. 
    Twins Minor League Week in Review: Kernels with the Sweep  Tuesday: Rooker Smashes! And Rookie League No-Hitter* Wednesday: By the Hair of their Chins  Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes  Thursday: Jordy Blazes, Garv Sauce Thrives 2021 has been a Big Year for Twins Draft Pick Noah Miller and Family  Friday: More Late Heartbreak for Kernels   Saturday: Mark Contreras is the Redemption Story we Need in 2021 Sunday: Tomas Telis, Saints Battle Back for Walk-Off Win  Twins Minor League Pitching Report: Notes on Varland, Vallimont and Gore  
    Highlights 
    We will start with the Twins choices for the organizational hitter and pitcher of the week, and then mention several other Twins prospects who had good Week 9 performances
    Twins Player of the Week: Brent Rooker, St. Paul Saints     
    Brent Rooker had a big week for the Saints. In six games, he hit .304/.393/1.000 (1.393) with a double, five home runs and 13 RBI. Three homers and a double came in one game. 
    Rooker hit one home run in eight games with the Twins earlier this season. In 58 games with the Saints, he has eight doubles and 19 homers. His 20 total homers is most in the organization, one ahead of Nelson Cruz. With the Saints, he is hitting .239/.368/.566 (.934).  
    Twins Pitcher of the Week: Jordan Balazovic, Wichita Wind Surge      
    In his start last week, Balazovic was again remarkable. Over seven innings, he gave up just one hit (a single, and the runner was thrown out trying to turn it into a double) and walked one. He struck out 11 batters. He had now tossed 18 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings over his past three starts. In 18 2/3 innings over his first five starts, he had a 5.79 ERA. Now, overall, he is 2-1 with a 2.89 ERA. In 37 1/3 innings, he has nine walks to go with 51 strikeouts. He has certainly reclaimed his spot as the organization’s top pitching prospect. For his efforts, he was also names AA Central Pitcher of the Week. 
    Other Strong Performances this Week
    St. Paul Saints
    Mark Contreras played in four games, and he showed some power too. He hit .385/.556/1.077 (1.632) with three homers. He walked one, and he was hit by four pitches. Keon Broxton played in five games. He hit .357/.500/.643 (1.143) with a double and a homer and three walks. Jose Miranda played in all six games. He hit .385/.448/.692 (1.141) with two doubles and two homers. Jimmy Kerrigan hit .308/.357/.769 (1.126) with two homers. 
    Jovani Moran made his Triple-A debut this week and tossed 2 2/3 scoreless innings. He gave up just one hit, walked one and struck out five batters. Matt Shoemaker tossed five shutout innings in his start. Ian Hamilton pitched twice, once as an opener, and gave up just one run on two hits over five innings. Griffin Jax gave up one run over five innings in his Triple-A start last week.  
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Jordan Gore made his first two Double-A appearances, well, as a pitcher, well, not as a position-player-pitching. In 2019, he pitched twice for Pensacola, a combined one inning, but that was in late-inning blowout situations. Now, he is a full-time pitcher and getting some pretty high-leverage situations. So far, so good. In his two games last week, he worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings. Kody Funderburk also made his first Double-A appearance. He came on in relief of Cole Sands who tossed two innings in his return to the mound. Funderburk gave up only an unearned run over the next five innings.  
    Andrew Bechtold hit .278/.350/.611 (.961) with three doubles and a home run. 
    In 17 games with the Kernels early in the season, Chris Williams went 5-for-50 (.100) with 27 strikeouts. He was promoted to the Wind Surge. In 11 games, he is hitting .313/.476/.594 (1.070) with four doubles, a triple and a home run. He also has nine walks and nine strikeouts in 42 plate appearances. Explain that. This past week, he was 4-for-10 with two doubles and a homer.  
    Also, he is throwing out would-be base stealers left and right.  
    Cedar Rapids Kernels 
    Louie Varland was very impressive in his High-A debut, he tossed six shutout innings in South Bend. He gave up four hits, walked two and struck out five batters. Tyler Watson continues to perform in whatever role he is given. This past week, he was asked to come in after a short start, and the lefty responded with five shutout innings. He gave up just two hits, walked two and struck out nine batters! Likewise, Ben Gross came in after a short start and gave up one run on four hits over 5 1/3 innings. Osiris German also made his first Kernels appearance. In that game, he faced six batters and recorded six outs, three on strikeouts.
    Max Smith filled out the stat sheet quite well last week. In five games, he hit .294/.500/.706 (1.206) with two doubles, a triple and a home run. He also walked seven times. Gabriel Maciel played in all six games. He hit .353/.476/.529 (1.006) with a home run. He walked four times with just three strikeouts. Jair Camargo went 5-for-17 (.294) with a triple and his 12th home run of the season. 
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Denny Bentley continues to dominate the late innings for the Mighty Mussels. Last week, he was 2-for-2 in save opportunities. In three games and 2 2/3 innings, he struck out three batters. Lefty Aaron Rozek has bounced around in his brief time in the Twins organization. He made one start for Ft. Myers last week. He went five scoreless innings. He gave up three hits, walked none and struck out seven batters. Orlando Rodriguez may have had the start of the week. In his first start in the Twins organization, the Cuban right-hander gave up one run over seven innings. He struck out six batters. Rodriguez and Rozek were both signed recently from the independent Schaumburg Boomers. Mighty Mussels hitting coach Derek Shomon had been the Boomers hitting until spring training when he joined the Twins organization.
    Infielder Ruben Santana got a late start, but he had a fantastic week. In five games, he hit. 571/.750/.571 (1.321). He went 4-for-7 but walked five times without striking out at all.   
    FCL Twins 
    Giovahniey German pitched twice. Last week, he tossed five no-hit innings. On Monday, he gave up only an unearned run over 4 2/3 innings. Combined, he gave up four hits, walked three and struck out 11 batters. Landon Leach tossed three scoreless innings. Matt Mullenbach threw 4 2/3 scoreless innings. 
    Wander Valdez has big power potential, and in the last week, he played in six games. He hit .389/.500/.611 (1.111) with four doubles in 18 at-bats. Kala’i Rosario played five games. He hit .353/.400/.529 (.929) with a double and a triple in 17 at-bats. Alexander Pena went 8-for-23 (.348) over six games. 
     
    Lowlights
    We are talking about small samples for these six-game weeks, so it’s important not to make any big decisions or develop a full impression on a player from this small size. It’s just a reminder of the fact that baseball is hard, and all players have good and bad stretches.  
    St. Paul Saints
    Ian Gibaut gave up five runs on 10 hits and a walk over just four innings last week. 
    Wichita Wind Surge
    I am bad luck. Last week, I was writing about how good Zach Neff has been this season. And he has, but last week, he gave up three runs on four hits over two innings of work. Chris Vallimont went just 3 1/3 innings in his start. He gave up five runs on seven hits and three walks (though he did strike out seven batters). Adam Lau pitched two innings over two appearances. He gave up five runs on five hits (3 homers). 
    Jermaine Palacios and Ernie De La Trinidad each went 3-for-18 (.167) on the week. Outfielder DJ Burt went just 1-for-13 (.077) this past week, though he did provide one of the more interesting walk-off winners you’ll see.  
    Cedar Rapids Kernels 
    Melvi Acosta worked just one inning. He gave up three runs on four hits. I had to mention. Osiris German is on this list too. His second appearance didn’t go as well. He gave up four runs on two hits and two walks in just 2/3 of an inning. Interestingly, he did strike out three batters, but one reached base still.   
    Daniel Ozoria and Yeltsin Encarnacion combined to go 0-for-13 on the week. DaShawn Keirsey went 3-for-21 (.143), though he had a big triple .
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Juan Pichardo had a rough game, though not all of his own doing. He recorded just one out. He was charged with seven runs (just two earned) on one hit, one hit batter and three walks. Steven Cruz gave up five runs on three hits and six walks over two innings. Bradley Hanner gave up seven runs on seven hits and four walks over 3 1/3 innings. Matthew Swain gave up four runs on one hit, two hit batters and three walks in 3 1/3 innings.   
    At the beginning of the week, Aaron Sabato was so close to getting his season batting average to .200. However, in six games this week, he went 3-for-21 (.143). Yunior Severino and Jeferson Morales each went 3-for-20 (.150). 
    FCL Twins 
    Elpidio Perez gave up seven runs on five hits, three walks and a hit batter in 2/3 of an inning. Rafael Felix gave up five runs on five hits and three walks in 2 2/3 innings. 
    Carlos Aguiar, another guy with huge power potential, went 0-for-10 with five strikeouts over his first three games of the year. 
     
    Trending Storyline 
    There was a lot of doubt about whether there would be a Dominican Summer League this year. It wasn’t until fairly recently that they decided when the season would start. Well, that date was last week and the DSL Twins have played six games already.
    It is impossible to make too much for six games, of course. I have also been told many times that the further away from the big-leagues a player is, the less important the stats are, and it’s a lot about the tools, skill development and getting some reps. 
    That said, I also like to look at who is getting the most at bats. So far, it should come as no surprise who the top two on the team in plate appearances are. 
    Fredy Michel is another interesting prospect. Last year when the Twins signed him for $1.1 million, he was going by Fredy LaFlor. He was MLB Pipeline’s #28-ranked international free agent. He just turned 17 this month. The switch-hitting infielder leads the team with 23 plate appearances. He is hitting .222/.391/.278 (.669) with a double. He also has four stolen bases.He has four walks and 10 strikeouts. He has split time between the middle infield positions. 
    Just one plate appearance less is Danny De Andrade leads the team with 20 at-bats in six games. He received a $2.2 million signing bonus last year when he signed as a 16-year-old shortstop. Through six games, he is hitting .200 (.4-for-20) with two doubles. He has one walk and two strikeouts. He has been the primary shortstop, but he’s also played a game at third base.  
    The other hitters who have played in all six games: 
    Another January 15, 2021, signing was Junior Del Valle. An outfielder, he has started the season by hitting .471/.500/.588 (1.088) with a triple. Reynaldo Madrigal received a six-figure signing bonus. The Dominican shortstop is 3-for-16 (.188) to start his season. He already has five stolen bases. Luis Rodriguez signed in the same range as Rodriguez. Both are shortstops from the Dominican. He has gone 3-for-14 (.214) through the first six games. Madrigal has played in the outfield. Rodriguez has played the corner spots mostly. 
    As for pitchers, no one has pitched more than three games, or more than six innings. Way too small of a sample to take anything from. 
     
    PROSPECT SUMMARY
    We have now updated this Prospect Summary to show our Midseason Twins Top 20 Prospect Rankings… 
    #1 - Royce Lewis (Wichita) - Out for Season (torn ACL)
    #2 - Jhoan Duran (St. Paul) – 5 G, 4 GS, 16.0 IP, 16 H, 13 BB, 22 K, 5.06 ERA, 1.81 WHIP (on IL with a right forearm strain)  
    #3 - Jordan Balazovic (Wichita) – 8 GS, 37.1 IP, 32 H, 9 BB, 51 K, 2.89 ERA, 1.10 WHIP 
    #4 - Matt Canterino (Cedar Rapids) – 4 GS, 18.0 IP, 10 H, 3 BB, 35 K, 1.00 ERA, 0.72 WHIP (went on the IL with right elbow strain)
    #5 - Jose Miranda (St. Paul) – 65 games, .345/.411/.509 (1.010) with 14 doubles, 18 homers, 54 RBI, 27 BB, 39 K
    #6 - Keoni Cavaco (Ft. Myers) – 38 games, .279/.361/.357 (.718) with 6 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer, 16 RBI, 17 BB, 44 K, 6 SB 
    #7 - Gilberto Celestino (Minnesotal) – Wichita (21 games, .250/.344/.381 (.725) with 5 doubles, 2 homers. 11 BB, 24 K), Minnesota (18 games, .146/.180/.313 (.493) with 2 BB, 9 K)
    #8 - Josh Winder (St. Paul) - 13 GS, 66.2 IP, 49 H, 13 BB, 77 K, 2.30 ERA, 0.93 WHIP 
    #9 - Aaron Sabato (Ft. Myers) – 65 games, .189/.368/.297 (.695) with 12 doubles, 4 homers, 25 RBI, 59 BB, 87 K
    #10 - Matt Wallner (Cedar Rapids) – 17 games, .333/.384/.621 (1.005) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers, 14 RBI, 5 BB, 28 K. (on IL after having hamate bone surgery)
    #11 - Blayne Enlow (Cedar Rapids) – 3 GS, 14.2 IP, 13 H, 6 BB, 23 K, 1.84 ERA, 1.30 WHIP (underwent Tommy John surgery on June 9th) 
    #12 - Bailey Ober (Minnesotal) – St. Paul (4 GS, 16.0 IP, 13 H, 5 BB, 21 K, 2.81 ERA, 1.13 WHIP), Minnesota (8 GS, 33.0 IP, 34 H, 11 BB, 37 K, 5.45 ERA, 1.36 WHIP) 
    #13 - Cole Sands (Wichita) – 8 GS, 33.2 IP, 24 H, 18 BB, 45 K, 2.67 ERA, 1.25 WHIP
     #14 - Brent Rooker (St. Paul) – St. Paul (58 games, .239/.368/.566 (.934) with 8 doubles, 1 triple, 19 homers, 37 BB, 74 K), Minnesota (8 games, .103/.133/.241 (375) with 1 double, 1 homer, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 13 K)
    #15 - Misael Urbina (Ft. Myers) – 58 games, .209/.314/.307 (621) with 6 doubles, 3 triples, 3 homer, 40 RBI, 32 BB, 50 K, 9 SB)
    #16 - Spencer Steer (Wichita) - 62 games, .254/.373/.483 (.856) with 7 doubles, 1 triple, 15 homers, 36 RBI, 42 BB, 51 K) 
    #17 - Wander Javier (Cedar Rapids) - 55 games, .223/.289/.431 (.721) with 10 doubles, 5 triples, 8 homers, 34 RBI, 17 BB, 77 K) 
    #18 - Alerick Soularie (Complex) – N/A (injured - foot)
    #19 - Edwar Colina (Minnesota) - 60-Day IL (had surgery on his right elbow to remove bone chips)
    #20 - Chris Vallimont (Wichita) - 10 GS, 41.2 IP, 36 H, 22 BB, 67 K, 3.67 ERA, 1.39 WHIP

    LOOKING AHEAD
    Daytona @ Ft. Myers (Aaron Rozek, Sawyer Gipson-Long, Brent Headrick, TBD, Orlando Rodriguez, Zarion Sharpe): 
    Beloit @ Cedar Rapids:(Tyler Beck, Louie Varland, Jon Olsen, Tyler Watson, Ben Gross, Luis Rijo)
    Wichita @ Arkansas: (Jordan Balazovic, Cole Sands (followed byBryan Sammons), Chris Vallimont, Austin Schulfer, Kody Funderburk, Jordan Balazovic) 
    St. Paul @ Omaha: (Chandler Shepherd, Josh Winder, TBD, TBD, TBD, TBD): 
     
    Feel free to provide some feedback below regarding these reports. What do you like to read? What types of information would you like added? Also, feel free to ask any questions you like.
  2. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from operation mindcrime for an article, 2021 Has Been a Big Year for Twins Draft PIck Noah Miller and Family   
    On Saturday, May 22, Noah Miller was sitting in his bedroom. He walked into the next room and saw his mom crying.
    “Why are you crying?” He asked.
    She replied, tears in her eyes, “Owen just got called up.” 
    Owen Miller is the older brother of Noah. He was the third-round draft pick of the San Diego Padres in 2018 out of Illinois State. In August of 2020, he was traded to Cleveland in the Mike Clevenger trade. At 24, he found himself in Cleveland, batting sixth and DHing against J.A. Happ and the Twins. Sure, he went 0-for-5 with three strikeouts, but he is a big leaguer. And Noah Miller was there. 
    “I did get to go. Actually, I missed my graduation for that. It was pretty exciting.”
    Yes, Noah was set to graduate on Sunday afternoon. Instead, he said his family got up about 2:30 a.m. and made the trek to Cleveland for a 1:10 game. 
    The Cleveland brass found out that Noah was missing his graduation, so they put a big picture of him on their video board congratulating him on his graduation. 
    “I actually missed it. I was getting hot dogs with my brother’s girlfriend and my cousin.”
    Don’t worry. Miller said that he received his diploma from the school’s principal shortly after. 
    That May game in Cleveland was not his first Twins game of the year. He drove down to Milwaukee for the Opening Day pitcher’s duel between Jose Berrios and Corbin Burnes (and that hard-to-watch first loss of the season for the Twins). 
    It’s been a hectic past couple of months for Noah Miller. Before baseball season began, he finished his senior season of basketball. When asked if he was any good, he sheepishly replied, “I broke our school’s scoring record, so now I’m the all-time leading scorer at our high school.”
    Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer, and scouts didn’t get as many opportunities to see players in 2020 due to the pandemic. He played his high school baseball season, and he continued to play more this summer. 
    Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson said, “We benefited from the later draft this year because normally a kid from Wisconsin, you’re not going to get to until late April or May, which may not have been enough time to get the looks we got on Noah. I saw Noah play three weeks ago for his summer team just east of LaCrosse, did a day trip that day with Deron Johnson. So we got a lot more looks than we normally would in a June 10 draft. So we used the extra month and said, ‘Who’s playing? Who can we go see?’”
    Soon after, Miller was invited to Target Field to participate in a pre-draft workout. Twins area scout Joe Bisenius had been tracking him for quite some time and was in contact with him all year, but when he arrived at Target Field, and there were just three other players, he knew that the Twins had a legitimate interest in him. So he wasn’t totally surprised when the Twins selected him.
    “I talked to him (Bisenius) a good amount. I talked to him, especially in the winter. I had a zoom call with him. I think they told me they had eight or nine guys come to see me play. I wasn’t necessarily surprised. When I went to the pre-draft workout, there were only four of us there, and they told me, ‘you’re kind of our guy here,’ that was pretty cool. I knew that my shot to get into the first round was with the Twins. It was a little bit of a surprise, but at the same time, I wasn’t surprised.”
    So on Sunday night, Day 1 of the draft, Miller knew there was some chance he would be drafted late in the night, maybe by the Twins, but also realized that he could be selected early on Day 2. 
    “It was awesome. I was sitting there, and my agent called me around pick 34, and he was like, ‘Hey man, the Twins might pick you at 36. There’s a chance.’ He said, ‘Just be on the lookout.’ Then he called me again, and he was just like, ‘Again, just kind of be ready if something happens here.’ So I didn’t really know if I was going to or not, and then they picked me, and it was just, I mean, it was unbelievable. It was just me and my family, and we were going crazy.”
    Following Day 1 of the draft, Sean Johnson described Miller’s offense. “Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides.” 
    Miller said he’s been switch-hitting for a long time. He said, “Realistically, it was probably like second or third grade just playing wiffleball in the backyard with my brother and my cousins, and in the basement with tennis balls. Then in fifth grade, I finally just realized that it’s something that I should probably do, and it was something that I enjoyed doing, so I just stuck with it from there. My approach from both, pretty much the same for both ways. I don’t have the same mechanics for both ways, but my end goal is the same, and my thought is the same.”
    He added that he is equally comfortable from both sides of the plate. “I probably get more at-bats lefty in-game, but I’ve done the work outside of games to make it feel the same.”
    Johnson talked about Miller’s defense as well. “He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that he has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super-advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.”
    While Miller acknowledges that he grew up a Brewers fan, he said his favorite player (aside from his brother, of course) is Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford because “he’s such a smooth defender.” 
    He said he had played some second base and some third base on some national teams or in tournaments but spent most of his time at shortstop. 
     
     
    And finally, Johnson talked about Miller’s drive, saying, “Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.”
    Owen Miller went off to Illinois State when Noah was just 12 years old. Noah would hear all of the different things that Owen was working on in college, and he would be sure to work on those things as well. Noah was 15 when Owen was drafted, and he continued to get tips and things to work on and put into his game.
    “Very beneficial for me. It was just awesome to have. (Owen) being such a great hitter. Him being my number one hitting coach was kind of the best thing that he’s ever done for me,”
    Owen has continually provided solid advice for Noah. “He told me about college. He told me about pro ball. He told me the benefits of both, the cons of both. He thought I was ready for pro ball. He thought that was something that I should maybe do if I get the chance. He said maybe I should take that, and I’m glad I did now. He told me about the grind of minor league baseball, everything like that, just working in the offseason with him, working out with him, hitting with him. Everything that improved my game.”
    It certainly isn’t difficult to understand why the Twins are so excited about both Chase Petty and Noah Miller. Soon their long journey up the organizational ladder will begin. It should be fun to watch. 
    Jared Walsh. JP Feyereisen. Daulton Varsho. Jarred Kelenic. Gavin Lux. Alex McRae. Jonathan Stiever. Recently-retired Jordan Zimmerman. Twins catcher Ben Rortvedt. Owen Miller. 
    All of these players have spent time in the big leagues in 2021. All of these players were born and grew up in Wisconsin. Miller hopes to join his brother and these other Wisconsinites in the big leagues one day. Miller gives a lot of credit to RJ Fergus at Hitters Baseball in Caledonia, Wisconsin, for giving Wisconsin kids an indoor facility for the winter. 
     
     
    Next up? The Twins will be talking with Miller and his family and representation and come to terms on a signing bonus. He is likely to sign that contract at Target Field and then head down to Ft. Myers and begin his pro career. If he does get into games, and he should, it will be with the FCL Twins. 
    Let the journey begin. 
  3. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from dbminn for an article, 2021 Has Been a Big Year for Twins Draft PIck Noah Miller and Family   
    On Saturday, May 22, Noah Miller was sitting in his bedroom. He walked into the next room and saw his mom crying.
    “Why are you crying?” He asked.
    She replied, tears in her eyes, “Owen just got called up.” 
    Owen Miller is the older brother of Noah. He was the third-round draft pick of the San Diego Padres in 2018 out of Illinois State. In August of 2020, he was traded to Cleveland in the Mike Clevenger trade. At 24, he found himself in Cleveland, batting sixth and DHing against J.A. Happ and the Twins. Sure, he went 0-for-5 with three strikeouts, but he is a big leaguer. And Noah Miller was there. 
    “I did get to go. Actually, I missed my graduation for that. It was pretty exciting.”
    Yes, Noah was set to graduate on Sunday afternoon. Instead, he said his family got up about 2:30 a.m. and made the trek to Cleveland for a 1:10 game. 
    The Cleveland brass found out that Noah was missing his graduation, so they put a big picture of him on their video board congratulating him on his graduation. 
    “I actually missed it. I was getting hot dogs with my brother’s girlfriend and my cousin.”
    Don’t worry. Miller said that he received his diploma from the school’s principal shortly after. 
    That May game in Cleveland was not his first Twins game of the year. He drove down to Milwaukee for the Opening Day pitcher’s duel between Jose Berrios and Corbin Burnes (and that hard-to-watch first loss of the season for the Twins). 
    It’s been a hectic past couple of months for Noah Miller. Before baseball season began, he finished his senior season of basketball. When asked if he was any good, he sheepishly replied, “I broke our school’s scoring record, so now I’m the all-time leading scorer at our high school.”
    Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer, and scouts didn’t get as many opportunities to see players in 2020 due to the pandemic. He played his high school baseball season, and he continued to play more this summer. 
    Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson said, “We benefited from the later draft this year because normally a kid from Wisconsin, you’re not going to get to until late April or May, which may not have been enough time to get the looks we got on Noah. I saw Noah play three weeks ago for his summer team just east of LaCrosse, did a day trip that day with Deron Johnson. So we got a lot more looks than we normally would in a June 10 draft. So we used the extra month and said, ‘Who’s playing? Who can we go see?’”
    Soon after, Miller was invited to Target Field to participate in a pre-draft workout. Twins area scout Joe Bisenius had been tracking him for quite some time and was in contact with him all year, but when he arrived at Target Field, and there were just three other players, he knew that the Twins had a legitimate interest in him. So he wasn’t totally surprised when the Twins selected him.
    “I talked to him (Bisenius) a good amount. I talked to him, especially in the winter. I had a zoom call with him. I think they told me they had eight or nine guys come to see me play. I wasn’t necessarily surprised. When I went to the pre-draft workout, there were only four of us there, and they told me, ‘you’re kind of our guy here,’ that was pretty cool. I knew that my shot to get into the first round was with the Twins. It was a little bit of a surprise, but at the same time, I wasn’t surprised.”
    So on Sunday night, Day 1 of the draft, Miller knew there was some chance he would be drafted late in the night, maybe by the Twins, but also realized that he could be selected early on Day 2. 
    “It was awesome. I was sitting there, and my agent called me around pick 34, and he was like, ‘Hey man, the Twins might pick you at 36. There’s a chance.’ He said, ‘Just be on the lookout.’ Then he called me again, and he was just like, ‘Again, just kind of be ready if something happens here.’ So I didn’t really know if I was going to or not, and then they picked me, and it was just, I mean, it was unbelievable. It was just me and my family, and we were going crazy.”
    Following Day 1 of the draft, Sean Johnson described Miller’s offense. “Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides.” 
    Miller said he’s been switch-hitting for a long time. He said, “Realistically, it was probably like second or third grade just playing wiffleball in the backyard with my brother and my cousins, and in the basement with tennis balls. Then in fifth grade, I finally just realized that it’s something that I should probably do, and it was something that I enjoyed doing, so I just stuck with it from there. My approach from both, pretty much the same for both ways. I don’t have the same mechanics for both ways, but my end goal is the same, and my thought is the same.”
    He added that he is equally comfortable from both sides of the plate. “I probably get more at-bats lefty in-game, but I’ve done the work outside of games to make it feel the same.”
    Johnson talked about Miller’s defense as well. “He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that he has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super-advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.”
    While Miller acknowledges that he grew up a Brewers fan, he said his favorite player (aside from his brother, of course) is Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford because “he’s such a smooth defender.” 
    He said he had played some second base and some third base on some national teams or in tournaments but spent most of his time at shortstop. 
     
     
    And finally, Johnson talked about Miller’s drive, saying, “Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.”
    Owen Miller went off to Illinois State when Noah was just 12 years old. Noah would hear all of the different things that Owen was working on in college, and he would be sure to work on those things as well. Noah was 15 when Owen was drafted, and he continued to get tips and things to work on and put into his game.
    “Very beneficial for me. It was just awesome to have. (Owen) being such a great hitter. Him being my number one hitting coach was kind of the best thing that he’s ever done for me,”
    Owen has continually provided solid advice for Noah. “He told me about college. He told me about pro ball. He told me the benefits of both, the cons of both. He thought I was ready for pro ball. He thought that was something that I should maybe do if I get the chance. He said maybe I should take that, and I’m glad I did now. He told me about the grind of minor league baseball, everything like that, just working in the offseason with him, working out with him, hitting with him. Everything that improved my game.”
    It certainly isn’t difficult to understand why the Twins are so excited about both Chase Petty and Noah Miller. Soon their long journey up the organizational ladder will begin. It should be fun to watch. 
    Jared Walsh. JP Feyereisen. Daulton Varsho. Jarred Kelenic. Gavin Lux. Alex McRae. Jonathan Stiever. Recently-retired Jordan Zimmerman. Twins catcher Ben Rortvedt. Owen Miller. 
    All of these players have spent time in the big leagues in 2021. All of these players were born and grew up in Wisconsin. Miller hopes to join his brother and these other Wisconsinites in the big leagues one day. Miller gives a lot of credit to RJ Fergus at Hitters Baseball in Caledonia, Wisconsin, for giving Wisconsin kids an indoor facility for the winter. 
     
     
    Next up? The Twins will be talking with Miller and his family and representation and come to terms on a signing bonus. He is likely to sign that contract at Target Field and then head down to Ft. Myers and begin his pro career. If he does get into games, and he should, it will be with the FCL Twins. 
    Let the journey begin. 
  4. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Bertolli39 for an article, 2021 Has Been a Big Year for Twins Draft PIck Noah Miller and Family   
    On Saturday, May 22, Noah Miller was sitting in his bedroom. He walked into the next room and saw his mom crying.
    “Why are you crying?” He asked.
    She replied, tears in her eyes, “Owen just got called up.” 
    Owen Miller is the older brother of Noah. He was the third-round draft pick of the San Diego Padres in 2018 out of Illinois State. In August of 2020, he was traded to Cleveland in the Mike Clevenger trade. At 24, he found himself in Cleveland, batting sixth and DHing against J.A. Happ and the Twins. Sure, he went 0-for-5 with three strikeouts, but he is a big leaguer. And Noah Miller was there. 
    “I did get to go. Actually, I missed my graduation for that. It was pretty exciting.”
    Yes, Noah was set to graduate on Sunday afternoon. Instead, he said his family got up about 2:30 a.m. and made the trek to Cleveland for a 1:10 game. 
    The Cleveland brass found out that Noah was missing his graduation, so they put a big picture of him on their video board congratulating him on his graduation. 
    “I actually missed it. I was getting hot dogs with my brother’s girlfriend and my cousin.”
    Don’t worry. Miller said that he received his diploma from the school’s principal shortly after. 
    That May game in Cleveland was not his first Twins game of the year. He drove down to Milwaukee for the Opening Day pitcher’s duel between Jose Berrios and Corbin Burnes (and that hard-to-watch first loss of the season for the Twins). 
    It’s been a hectic past couple of months for Noah Miller. Before baseball season began, he finished his senior season of basketball. When asked if he was any good, he sheepishly replied, “I broke our school’s scoring record, so now I’m the all-time leading scorer at our high school.”
    Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer, and scouts didn’t get as many opportunities to see players in 2020 due to the pandemic. He played his high school baseball season, and he continued to play more this summer. 
    Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson said, “We benefited from the later draft this year because normally a kid from Wisconsin, you’re not going to get to until late April or May, which may not have been enough time to get the looks we got on Noah. I saw Noah play three weeks ago for his summer team just east of LaCrosse, did a day trip that day with Deron Johnson. So we got a lot more looks than we normally would in a June 10 draft. So we used the extra month and said, ‘Who’s playing? Who can we go see?’”
    Soon after, Miller was invited to Target Field to participate in a pre-draft workout. Twins area scout Joe Bisenius had been tracking him for quite some time and was in contact with him all year, but when he arrived at Target Field, and there were just three other players, he knew that the Twins had a legitimate interest in him. So he wasn’t totally surprised when the Twins selected him.
    “I talked to him (Bisenius) a good amount. I talked to him, especially in the winter. I had a zoom call with him. I think they told me they had eight or nine guys come to see me play. I wasn’t necessarily surprised. When I went to the pre-draft workout, there were only four of us there, and they told me, ‘you’re kind of our guy here,’ that was pretty cool. I knew that my shot to get into the first round was with the Twins. It was a little bit of a surprise, but at the same time, I wasn’t surprised.”
    So on Sunday night, Day 1 of the draft, Miller knew there was some chance he would be drafted late in the night, maybe by the Twins, but also realized that he could be selected early on Day 2. 
    “It was awesome. I was sitting there, and my agent called me around pick 34, and he was like, ‘Hey man, the Twins might pick you at 36. There’s a chance.’ He said, ‘Just be on the lookout.’ Then he called me again, and he was just like, ‘Again, just kind of be ready if something happens here.’ So I didn’t really know if I was going to or not, and then they picked me, and it was just, I mean, it was unbelievable. It was just me and my family, and we were going crazy.”
    Following Day 1 of the draft, Sean Johnson described Miller’s offense. “Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides.” 
    Miller said he’s been switch-hitting for a long time. He said, “Realistically, it was probably like second or third grade just playing wiffleball in the backyard with my brother and my cousins, and in the basement with tennis balls. Then in fifth grade, I finally just realized that it’s something that I should probably do, and it was something that I enjoyed doing, so I just stuck with it from there. My approach from both, pretty much the same for both ways. I don’t have the same mechanics for both ways, but my end goal is the same, and my thought is the same.”
    He added that he is equally comfortable from both sides of the plate. “I probably get more at-bats lefty in-game, but I’ve done the work outside of games to make it feel the same.”
    Johnson talked about Miller’s defense as well. “He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that he has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super-advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.”
    While Miller acknowledges that he grew up a Brewers fan, he said his favorite player (aside from his brother, of course) is Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford because “he’s such a smooth defender.” 
    He said he had played some second base and some third base on some national teams or in tournaments but spent most of his time at shortstop. 
     
     
    And finally, Johnson talked about Miller’s drive, saying, “Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.”
    Owen Miller went off to Illinois State when Noah was just 12 years old. Noah would hear all of the different things that Owen was working on in college, and he would be sure to work on those things as well. Noah was 15 when Owen was drafted, and he continued to get tips and things to work on and put into his game.
    “Very beneficial for me. It was just awesome to have. (Owen) being such a great hitter. Him being my number one hitting coach was kind of the best thing that he’s ever done for me,”
    Owen has continually provided solid advice for Noah. “He told me about college. He told me about pro ball. He told me the benefits of both, the cons of both. He thought I was ready for pro ball. He thought that was something that I should maybe do if I get the chance. He said maybe I should take that, and I’m glad I did now. He told me about the grind of minor league baseball, everything like that, just working in the offseason with him, working out with him, hitting with him. Everything that improved my game.”
    It certainly isn’t difficult to understand why the Twins are so excited about both Chase Petty and Noah Miller. Soon their long journey up the organizational ladder will begin. It should be fun to watch. 
    Jared Walsh. JP Feyereisen. Daulton Varsho. Jarred Kelenic. Gavin Lux. Alex McRae. Jonathan Stiever. Recently-retired Jordan Zimmerman. Twins catcher Ben Rortvedt. Owen Miller. 
    All of these players have spent time in the big leagues in 2021. All of these players were born and grew up in Wisconsin. Miller hopes to join his brother and these other Wisconsinites in the big leagues one day. Miller gives a lot of credit to RJ Fergus at Hitters Baseball in Caledonia, Wisconsin, for giving Wisconsin kids an indoor facility for the winter. 
     
     
    Next up? The Twins will be talking with Miller and his family and representation and come to terms on a signing bonus. He is likely to sign that contract at Target Field and then head down to Ft. Myers and begin his pro career. If he does get into games, and he should, it will be with the FCL Twins. 
    Let the journey begin. 
  5. Haha
    Seth Stohs reacted to RandBalls Stu for an article, Glenwood Man Readies Self For Next Bad Trade   
    With the trade deadline looming, the Minnesota Twins are acknowledged sellers. And for Benjamin Mason, the awful dread of which future former Twin will become an All-Star in 2023 is consuming his every waking moment.
    “I’m resigned to Jose Berrios winning the Cy Young next year for someone else,” said Mason, a Glenwood native and licensed pre-owned pontoon dealer. “But it’s the one you don’t see coming that’s going to hurt more. Who is the Akil Baddoo or LaMonte Wade that we’re going to throw in for three pitching prospects who tear the ulnar nerve in their throwing elbows all at once? That’s the one that keeps me up at night.”
    With a pitching staff in desperate need of, well, everything, Mason is mentally readying himself for the unforeseen kick in the shins that has tormented Twins fans for generations.
    “My grandpa remembers the Graig Nettles deal,” said Mason. “I think the Rod Carew trade is what finally did him in. My dad quit watching baseball after David Ortiz won a World Series and mom left because he wouldn’t stop swearing to himself in the garage. I was minding my own business on Tuesday night, watching the All-Star Game, and there’s Liam Hendriks and Kyle Gibson. It’s the circle of life and you know what, I hate it.”
    While Mason agrees that the team must do something, the fact that everyone knows they’re a seller probably impacts any potential return.
    “We’re not going to get Wander Franco from the Rays,” said Mason. “We’re going to get his roommate. And the Rays will get our 38th best prospect, who will enter Cooperstown in 2047 after leading Tampa to seven straight titles in front of 259 delirious fans at Tropicana Field. He’ll have his own breakfast cereal, videogame, and talk show. I hate baseball, I really do.”
     
     
     
     
     
  6. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from DocBauer for an article, 2021 Has Been a Big Year for Twins Draft PIck Noah Miller and Family   
    On Saturday, May 22, Noah Miller was sitting in his bedroom. He walked into the next room and saw his mom crying.
    “Why are you crying?” He asked.
    She replied, tears in her eyes, “Owen just got called up.” 
    Owen Miller is the older brother of Noah. He was the third-round draft pick of the San Diego Padres in 2018 out of Illinois State. In August of 2020, he was traded to Cleveland in the Mike Clevenger trade. At 24, he found himself in Cleveland, batting sixth and DHing against J.A. Happ and the Twins. Sure, he went 0-for-5 with three strikeouts, but he is a big leaguer. And Noah Miller was there. 
    “I did get to go. Actually, I missed my graduation for that. It was pretty exciting.”
    Yes, Noah was set to graduate on Sunday afternoon. Instead, he said his family got up about 2:30 a.m. and made the trek to Cleveland for a 1:10 game. 
    The Cleveland brass found out that Noah was missing his graduation, so they put a big picture of him on their video board congratulating him on his graduation. 
    “I actually missed it. I was getting hot dogs with my brother’s girlfriend and my cousin.”
    Don’t worry. Miller said that he received his diploma from the school’s principal shortly after. 
    That May game in Cleveland was not his first Twins game of the year. He drove down to Milwaukee for the Opening Day pitcher’s duel between Jose Berrios and Corbin Burnes (and that hard-to-watch first loss of the season for the Twins). 
    It’s been a hectic past couple of months for Noah Miller. Before baseball season began, he finished his senior season of basketball. When asked if he was any good, he sheepishly replied, “I broke our school’s scoring record, so now I’m the all-time leading scorer at our high school.”
    Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer, and scouts didn’t get as many opportunities to see players in 2020 due to the pandemic. He played his high school baseball season, and he continued to play more this summer. 
    Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson said, “We benefited from the later draft this year because normally a kid from Wisconsin, you’re not going to get to until late April or May, which may not have been enough time to get the looks we got on Noah. I saw Noah play three weeks ago for his summer team just east of LaCrosse, did a day trip that day with Deron Johnson. So we got a lot more looks than we normally would in a June 10 draft. So we used the extra month and said, ‘Who’s playing? Who can we go see?’”
    Soon after, Miller was invited to Target Field to participate in a pre-draft workout. Twins area scout Joe Bisenius had been tracking him for quite some time and was in contact with him all year, but when he arrived at Target Field, and there were just three other players, he knew that the Twins had a legitimate interest in him. So he wasn’t totally surprised when the Twins selected him.
    “I talked to him (Bisenius) a good amount. I talked to him, especially in the winter. I had a zoom call with him. I think they told me they had eight or nine guys come to see me play. I wasn’t necessarily surprised. When I went to the pre-draft workout, there were only four of us there, and they told me, ‘you’re kind of our guy here,’ that was pretty cool. I knew that my shot to get into the first round was with the Twins. It was a little bit of a surprise, but at the same time, I wasn’t surprised.”
    So on Sunday night, Day 1 of the draft, Miller knew there was some chance he would be drafted late in the night, maybe by the Twins, but also realized that he could be selected early on Day 2. 
    “It was awesome. I was sitting there, and my agent called me around pick 34, and he was like, ‘Hey man, the Twins might pick you at 36. There’s a chance.’ He said, ‘Just be on the lookout.’ Then he called me again, and he was just like, ‘Again, just kind of be ready if something happens here.’ So I didn’t really know if I was going to or not, and then they picked me, and it was just, I mean, it was unbelievable. It was just me and my family, and we were going crazy.”
    Following Day 1 of the draft, Sean Johnson described Miller’s offense. “Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides.” 
    Miller said he’s been switch-hitting for a long time. He said, “Realistically, it was probably like second or third grade just playing wiffleball in the backyard with my brother and my cousins, and in the basement with tennis balls. Then in fifth grade, I finally just realized that it’s something that I should probably do, and it was something that I enjoyed doing, so I just stuck with it from there. My approach from both, pretty much the same for both ways. I don’t have the same mechanics for both ways, but my end goal is the same, and my thought is the same.”
    He added that he is equally comfortable from both sides of the plate. “I probably get more at-bats lefty in-game, but I’ve done the work outside of games to make it feel the same.”
    Johnson talked about Miller’s defense as well. “He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that he has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super-advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.”
    While Miller acknowledges that he grew up a Brewers fan, he said his favorite player (aside from his brother, of course) is Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford because “he’s such a smooth defender.” 
    He said he had played some second base and some third base on some national teams or in tournaments but spent most of his time at shortstop. 
     
     
    And finally, Johnson talked about Miller’s drive, saying, “Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.”
    Owen Miller went off to Illinois State when Noah was just 12 years old. Noah would hear all of the different things that Owen was working on in college, and he would be sure to work on those things as well. Noah was 15 when Owen was drafted, and he continued to get tips and things to work on and put into his game.
    “Very beneficial for me. It was just awesome to have. (Owen) being such a great hitter. Him being my number one hitting coach was kind of the best thing that he’s ever done for me,”
    Owen has continually provided solid advice for Noah. “He told me about college. He told me about pro ball. He told me the benefits of both, the cons of both. He thought I was ready for pro ball. He thought that was something that I should maybe do if I get the chance. He said maybe I should take that, and I’m glad I did now. He told me about the grind of minor league baseball, everything like that, just working in the offseason with him, working out with him, hitting with him. Everything that improved my game.”
    It certainly isn’t difficult to understand why the Twins are so excited about both Chase Petty and Noah Miller. Soon their long journey up the organizational ladder will begin. It should be fun to watch. 
    Jared Walsh. JP Feyereisen. Daulton Varsho. Jarred Kelenic. Gavin Lux. Alex McRae. Jonathan Stiever. Recently-retired Jordan Zimmerman. Twins catcher Ben Rortvedt. Owen Miller. 
    All of these players have spent time in the big leagues in 2021. All of these players were born and grew up in Wisconsin. Miller hopes to join his brother and these other Wisconsinites in the big leagues one day. Miller gives a lot of credit to RJ Fergus at Hitters Baseball in Caledonia, Wisconsin, for giving Wisconsin kids an indoor facility for the winter. 
     
     
    Next up? The Twins will be talking with Miller and his family and representation and come to terms on a signing bonus. He is likely to sign that contract at Target Field and then head down to Ft. Myers and begin his pro career. If he does get into games, and he should, it will be with the FCL Twins. 
    Let the journey begin. 
  7. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from wabene for an article, Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes   
    In the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft, the Minnesota Twins selected left-handed pitcher Charlie Barnes out of Clemson University. 
    Before that, he was a three-time letter winner in baseball at Sumter (SC) High School. He was twice All-State. As a senior, he was named pitcher of the year in the state. 
    Going to Clemson was an easy decision for him. It was something he had always wanted to do. He went to a lot of Tigers football games as a child. His brother spent a season as a quarterback at Clemson. 
    Barnes worked primarily out of the bullpen as a freshman. As a sophomore, he became a weekend starter and went 6-4 with a 4.66 ERA. In his junior season, the southpaw became the team's Friday night starter. He went 5-5 with a 3.20 ERA. That year, in 101 1/3 innings, he struck out 113 batters and issued just 22 walks. 
    He was drafted in 2017, but it is important and impressive to note that Barnes also graduated from college in just three years. He majored in Management with an emphasis on sports management. 
    Season Stats 
    2017 Elizabethton - 6 G, 22.2 IP, 2-1, 1.19 ERA. 10 walks, 23 strikeouts 2017 Cedar Rapids - 6 G, 25.2 IP, 2-1, 3.86 ERA, 8 walks, 23 strikeouts 2018 Ft. Myers - 23 G, 118.1 IP, 6-6, 2.81 ERA, 44 walks, 84 strikeouts  2019 Ft. Myers - 8 G, 37.1 IP, 3-2, 6.51 ERA, 20 walks, 35 strikeouts 2019 Pensacola - 14 G, 13 GS, 75.0 IP, 3-4, 3.60 ERA, 24 walks, 73 strikeouts  2019 Rochester - 4 G, 18.2 IP, 1-2, 6.75 ERA, 11 walks, 16 strikeouts.  Following the season, Barnes was invited to Twins' big-league spring training in 2020. He wasn't initially at the team's alternate site, though he did join the group in St. Paul later in the summer. 
    This spring, he was again a non-roster invite to spring training and showed some good improvement. 
    He began the 2021 season at Triple-A St. Paul. In 11 starts so far, he is 5-2 with a 3.88 ERA. In 58 innings, he has walked 19 and struck out 50 batters.  
    As you would expect, it hasn't been all smooth throughout the season. In his first six starts, Barnes went 2-0 with a 2.20 ERA. On June 13th, in his third start against the Omaha Storm Chasers, Barnes gave up six earned runs in three innings. Six days later, in his third start against the Iowa Cubs, he tossed five no-hit innings and struck out seven. In his next start, he allowed six earned runs over five innings. In his two most recent starts, he has worked a combined 12 1/3 innings and is 2-0 with a 3.65 ERA. 
    The scouting report on Charlie Barnes reads like that of a typical Twins starter. First, he is left-handed. Second, he relies on mixing his pitches and his pitch velocities to be successful. Of course, that is true of any pitcher, but when he generally sits 88 to 91 mph, it is essential. 
    Barnes throws a lot of sinkers and changeups. The sinker tops out about 91. He was touted as having the best changeup in that 2017 draft, and it continues to be an important pitch for him. He also throws a four-seam fastball up in the zone with a lot of carry, making it a good pitch for him. He also throws both a slider and a curveball. 
    Again, with a fastball around 90, he can't rely on it all the time. Mixing the velocity and the eye level for hitters is crucial. When he uses his slider and his changeup and is able to spot pitches, he can be successful. 
    He will have his first opportunity to show that on Friday night in Detroit. 


     
  8. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from TwerkTwonkTwins for an article, Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes   
    In the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft, the Minnesota Twins selected left-handed pitcher Charlie Barnes out of Clemson University. 
    Before that, he was a three-time letter winner in baseball at Sumter (SC) High School. He was twice All-State. As a senior, he was named pitcher of the year in the state. 
    Going to Clemson was an easy decision for him. It was something he had always wanted to do. He went to a lot of Tigers football games as a child. His brother spent a season as a quarterback at Clemson. 
    Barnes worked primarily out of the bullpen as a freshman. As a sophomore, he became a weekend starter and went 6-4 with a 4.66 ERA. In his junior season, the southpaw became the team's Friday night starter. He went 5-5 with a 3.20 ERA. That year, in 101 1/3 innings, he struck out 113 batters and issued just 22 walks. 
    He was drafted in 2017, but it is important and impressive to note that Barnes also graduated from college in just three years. He majored in Management with an emphasis on sports management. 
    Season Stats 
    2017 Elizabethton - 6 G, 22.2 IP, 2-1, 1.19 ERA. 10 walks, 23 strikeouts 2017 Cedar Rapids - 6 G, 25.2 IP, 2-1, 3.86 ERA, 8 walks, 23 strikeouts 2018 Ft. Myers - 23 G, 118.1 IP, 6-6, 2.81 ERA, 44 walks, 84 strikeouts  2019 Ft. Myers - 8 G, 37.1 IP, 3-2, 6.51 ERA, 20 walks, 35 strikeouts 2019 Pensacola - 14 G, 13 GS, 75.0 IP, 3-4, 3.60 ERA, 24 walks, 73 strikeouts  2019 Rochester - 4 G, 18.2 IP, 1-2, 6.75 ERA, 11 walks, 16 strikeouts.  Following the season, Barnes was invited to Twins' big-league spring training in 2020. He wasn't initially at the team's alternate site, though he did join the group in St. Paul later in the summer. 
    This spring, he was again a non-roster invite to spring training and showed some good improvement. 
    He began the 2021 season at Triple-A St. Paul. In 11 starts so far, he is 5-2 with a 3.88 ERA. In 58 innings, he has walked 19 and struck out 50 batters.  
    As you would expect, it hasn't been all smooth throughout the season. In his first six starts, Barnes went 2-0 with a 2.20 ERA. On June 13th, in his third start against the Omaha Storm Chasers, Barnes gave up six earned runs in three innings. Six days later, in his third start against the Iowa Cubs, he tossed five no-hit innings and struck out seven. In his next start, he allowed six earned runs over five innings. In his two most recent starts, he has worked a combined 12 1/3 innings and is 2-0 with a 3.65 ERA. 
    The scouting report on Charlie Barnes reads like that of a typical Twins starter. First, he is left-handed. Second, he relies on mixing his pitches and his pitch velocities to be successful. Of course, that is true of any pitcher, but when he generally sits 88 to 91 mph, it is essential. 
    Barnes throws a lot of sinkers and changeups. The sinker tops out about 91. He was touted as having the best changeup in that 2017 draft, and it continues to be an important pitch for him. He also throws a four-seam fastball up in the zone with a lot of carry, making it a good pitch for him. He also throws both a slider and a curveball. 
    Again, with a fastball around 90, he can't rely on it all the time. Mixing the velocity and the eye level for hitters is crucial. When he uses his slider and his changeup and is able to spot pitches, he can be successful. 
    He will have his first opportunity to show that on Friday night in Detroit. 


     
  9. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes   
    In the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft, the Minnesota Twins selected left-handed pitcher Charlie Barnes out of Clemson University. 
    Before that, he was a three-time letter winner in baseball at Sumter (SC) High School. He was twice All-State. As a senior, he was named pitcher of the year in the state. 
    Going to Clemson was an easy decision for him. It was something he had always wanted to do. He went to a lot of Tigers football games as a child. His brother spent a season as a quarterback at Clemson. 
    Barnes worked primarily out of the bullpen as a freshman. As a sophomore, he became a weekend starter and went 6-4 with a 4.66 ERA. In his junior season, the southpaw became the team's Friday night starter. He went 5-5 with a 3.20 ERA. That year, in 101 1/3 innings, he struck out 113 batters and issued just 22 walks. 
    He was drafted in 2017, but it is important and impressive to note that Barnes also graduated from college in just three years. He majored in Management with an emphasis on sports management. 
    Season Stats 
    2017 Elizabethton - 6 G, 22.2 IP, 2-1, 1.19 ERA. 10 walks, 23 strikeouts 2017 Cedar Rapids - 6 G, 25.2 IP, 2-1, 3.86 ERA, 8 walks, 23 strikeouts 2018 Ft. Myers - 23 G, 118.1 IP, 6-6, 2.81 ERA, 44 walks, 84 strikeouts  2019 Ft. Myers - 8 G, 37.1 IP, 3-2, 6.51 ERA, 20 walks, 35 strikeouts 2019 Pensacola - 14 G, 13 GS, 75.0 IP, 3-4, 3.60 ERA, 24 walks, 73 strikeouts  2019 Rochester - 4 G, 18.2 IP, 1-2, 6.75 ERA, 11 walks, 16 strikeouts.  Following the season, Barnes was invited to Twins' big-league spring training in 2020. He wasn't initially at the team's alternate site, though he did join the group in St. Paul later in the summer. 
    This spring, he was again a non-roster invite to spring training and showed some good improvement. 
    He began the 2021 season at Triple-A St. Paul. In 11 starts so far, he is 5-2 with a 3.88 ERA. In 58 innings, he has walked 19 and struck out 50 batters.  
    As you would expect, it hasn't been all smooth throughout the season. In his first six starts, Barnes went 2-0 with a 2.20 ERA. On June 13th, in his third start against the Omaha Storm Chasers, Barnes gave up six earned runs in three innings. Six days later, in his third start against the Iowa Cubs, he tossed five no-hit innings and struck out seven. In his next start, he allowed six earned runs over five innings. In his two most recent starts, he has worked a combined 12 1/3 innings and is 2-0 with a 3.65 ERA. 
    The scouting report on Charlie Barnes reads like that of a typical Twins starter. First, he is left-handed. Second, he relies on mixing his pitches and his pitch velocities to be successful. Of course, that is true of any pitcher, but when he generally sits 88 to 91 mph, it is essential. 
    Barnes throws a lot of sinkers and changeups. The sinker tops out about 91. He was touted as having the best changeup in that 2017 draft, and it continues to be an important pitch for him. He also throws a four-seam fastball up in the zone with a lot of carry, making it a good pitch for him. He also throws both a slider and a curveball. 
    Again, with a fastball around 90, he can't rely on it all the time. Mixing the velocity and the eye level for hitters is crucial. When he uses his slider and his changeup and is able to spot pitches, he can be successful. 
    He will have his first opportunity to show that on Friday night in Detroit. 


     
  10. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes   
    In the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft, the Minnesota Twins selected left-handed pitcher Charlie Barnes out of Clemson University. 
    Before that, he was a three-time letter winner in baseball at Sumter (SC) High School. He was twice All-State. As a senior, he was named pitcher of the year in the state. 
    Going to Clemson was an easy decision for him. It was something he had always wanted to do. He went to a lot of Tigers football games as a child. His brother spent a season as a quarterback at Clemson. 
    Barnes worked primarily out of the bullpen as a freshman. As a sophomore, he became a weekend starter and went 6-4 with a 4.66 ERA. In his junior season, the southpaw became the team's Friday night starter. He went 5-5 with a 3.20 ERA. That year, in 101 1/3 innings, he struck out 113 batters and issued just 22 walks. 
    He was drafted in 2017, but it is important and impressive to note that Barnes also graduated from college in just three years. He majored in Management with an emphasis on sports management. 
    Season Stats 
    2017 Elizabethton - 6 G, 22.2 IP, 2-1, 1.19 ERA. 10 walks, 23 strikeouts 2017 Cedar Rapids - 6 G, 25.2 IP, 2-1, 3.86 ERA, 8 walks, 23 strikeouts 2018 Ft. Myers - 23 G, 118.1 IP, 6-6, 2.81 ERA, 44 walks, 84 strikeouts  2019 Ft. Myers - 8 G, 37.1 IP, 3-2, 6.51 ERA, 20 walks, 35 strikeouts 2019 Pensacola - 14 G, 13 GS, 75.0 IP, 3-4, 3.60 ERA, 24 walks, 73 strikeouts  2019 Rochester - 4 G, 18.2 IP, 1-2, 6.75 ERA, 11 walks, 16 strikeouts.  Following the season, Barnes was invited to Twins' big-league spring training in 2020. He wasn't initially at the team's alternate site, though he did join the group in St. Paul later in the summer. 
    This spring, he was again a non-roster invite to spring training and showed some good improvement. 
    He began the 2021 season at Triple-A St. Paul. In 11 starts so far, he is 5-2 with a 3.88 ERA. In 58 innings, he has walked 19 and struck out 50 batters.  
    As you would expect, it hasn't been all smooth throughout the season. In his first six starts, Barnes went 2-0 with a 2.20 ERA. On June 13th, in his third start against the Omaha Storm Chasers, Barnes gave up six earned runs in three innings. Six days later, in his third start against the Iowa Cubs, he tossed five no-hit innings and struck out seven. In his next start, he allowed six earned runs over five innings. In his two most recent starts, he has worked a combined 12 1/3 innings and is 2-0 with a 3.65 ERA. 
    The scouting report on Charlie Barnes reads like that of a typical Twins starter. First, he is left-handed. Second, he relies on mixing his pitches and his pitch velocities to be successful. Of course, that is true of any pitcher, but when he generally sits 88 to 91 mph, it is essential. 
    Barnes throws a lot of sinkers and changeups. The sinker tops out about 91. He was touted as having the best changeup in that 2017 draft, and it continues to be an important pitch for him. He also throws a four-seam fastball up in the zone with a lot of carry, making it a good pitch for him. He also throws both a slider and a curveball. 
    Again, with a fastball around 90, he can't rely on it all the time. Mixing the velocity and the eye level for hitters is crucial. When he uses his slider and his changeup and is able to spot pitches, he can be successful. 
    He will have his first opportunity to show that on Friday night in Detroit. 


     
  11. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Twins Prospect Retrospective: LHP Charlie Barnes   
    In the fourth round of the 2017 MLB Draft, the Minnesota Twins selected left-handed pitcher Charlie Barnes out of Clemson University. 
    Before that, he was a three-time letter winner in baseball at Sumter (SC) High School. He was twice All-State. As a senior, he was named pitcher of the year in the state. 
    Going to Clemson was an easy decision for him. It was something he had always wanted to do. He went to a lot of Tigers football games as a child. His brother spent a season as a quarterback at Clemson. 
    Barnes worked primarily out of the bullpen as a freshman. As a sophomore, he became a weekend starter and went 6-4 with a 4.66 ERA. In his junior season, the southpaw became the team's Friday night starter. He went 5-5 with a 3.20 ERA. That year, in 101 1/3 innings, he struck out 113 batters and issued just 22 walks. 
    He was drafted in 2017, but it is important and impressive to note that Barnes also graduated from college in just three years. He majored in Management with an emphasis on sports management. 
    Season Stats 
    2017 Elizabethton - 6 G, 22.2 IP, 2-1, 1.19 ERA. 10 walks, 23 strikeouts 2017 Cedar Rapids - 6 G, 25.2 IP, 2-1, 3.86 ERA, 8 walks, 23 strikeouts 2018 Ft. Myers - 23 G, 118.1 IP, 6-6, 2.81 ERA, 44 walks, 84 strikeouts  2019 Ft. Myers - 8 G, 37.1 IP, 3-2, 6.51 ERA, 20 walks, 35 strikeouts 2019 Pensacola - 14 G, 13 GS, 75.0 IP, 3-4, 3.60 ERA, 24 walks, 73 strikeouts  2019 Rochester - 4 G, 18.2 IP, 1-2, 6.75 ERA, 11 walks, 16 strikeouts.  Following the season, Barnes was invited to Twins' big-league spring training in 2020. He wasn't initially at the team's alternate site, though he did join the group in St. Paul later in the summer. 
    This spring, he was again a non-roster invite to spring training and showed some good improvement. 
    He began the 2021 season at Triple-A St. Paul. In 11 starts so far, he is 5-2 with a 3.88 ERA. In 58 innings, he has walked 19 and struck out 50 batters.  
    As you would expect, it hasn't been all smooth throughout the season. In his first six starts, Barnes went 2-0 with a 2.20 ERA. On June 13th, in his third start against the Omaha Storm Chasers, Barnes gave up six earned runs in three innings. Six days later, in his third start against the Iowa Cubs, he tossed five no-hit innings and struck out seven. In his next start, he allowed six earned runs over five innings. In his two most recent starts, he has worked a combined 12 1/3 innings and is 2-0 with a 3.65 ERA. 
    The scouting report on Charlie Barnes reads like that of a typical Twins starter. First, he is left-handed. Second, he relies on mixing his pitches and his pitch velocities to be successful. Of course, that is true of any pitcher, but when he generally sits 88 to 91 mph, it is essential. 
    Barnes throws a lot of sinkers and changeups. The sinker tops out about 91. He was touted as having the best changeup in that 2017 draft, and it continues to be an important pitch for him. He also throws a four-seam fastball up in the zone with a lot of carry, making it a good pitch for him. He also throws both a slider and a curveball. 
    Again, with a fastball around 90, he can't rely on it all the time. Mixing the velocity and the eye level for hitters is crucial. When he uses his slider and his changeup and is able to spot pitches, he can be successful. 
    He will have his first opportunity to show that on Friday night in Detroit. 


     
  12. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from DocBauer for an article, Twins Excited About Day 1 Picks, Chase Petty and Noah Miller   
    “We’ve loved Chase Petty for a long time, and we’ve had a crush on Noah Miller for a long time too. Walking out of the (draft) room with two guys that you love is a feeling you want to have after Day 1. Our group in that room is thrilled.” Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson at the end of a long, but exciting first day of the 2021 MLB Draft. 
    For the first time, the MLB Draft took place on All Star weekend in the city of the All Star game, Denver, Colorado. Several of the draft prospects were in attendance including the Twins top pick. 
    When the time came for the Twins’ first pick, the commissioner announced that the Twins selected right-handed pitcher Chase Petty from Mainland Regional High School in New Jersey. Petty is touted for having hit triple-digits with his fastball, but on Sunday night, he displayed plenty of personality too. 
    LaTroy Hawkins represented the Twins in Denver at the draft - after managing the American League team of prospects in the Futures Game earlier in the day. Asked if he approved of the pick, Hawkins said,  “I didn’t have to approve of it. I liked his personality.”
    During Petty’s interview on MLB Network, it was mentioned that he threw a no-hitter this year against Millville High School, Mike Trout’s old stomping grounds. Petty nonchalantly said that he’s been in contact with Trout (who was also taken with the 26th overall pick), and that he had texted with him a couple of hours before the draft. He then pointed out that he is having dinner on Monday night with Fernando Tatis, Jr., and Manny Machado (they belong to the same agency).     
    Petty and fellow draft prospect Joe Mack developed their “bromance” and appear to have named themselves Shake-and-Bake. Mack was selected with the 31st overall pick by the Miami Marlins. His older brother, Charles Mack is a catcher for the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels and was in Denver for the event with his family. Petty said that the two got to know each other. In addition, Petty said that he has trained with Twins 2019 draft pick from St. John’s, RHP Sean Mooney, as well. Last summer, Vanderbilt Jack Leiter texted him and they spent some time working together. Leiter was the second overall pick in the 2021 draft. 
    If there is one knock on Chase Petty that Twins fans may have, it might just be this. “I’m a Yankees fan. My first ever game was at the original Yankees Stadium. It’s by far my favorite stadium I’ve been to.” 
    While Petty has always played middle infield, primarily second base, when he’s not pitching, his favorite players have been a couple of Mets pitchers. “My favorite players, personally, are Marcus Stroman and Jacob de Grom which is funny because they’re on the same team. I’ve talked to Stroman. He and I have developed a little bit of a relationship.” 
      
    Chase Petty has all the connections. 
    In addition to his personality, Johnson noted his arm strength, “spin talent” and a feel for his changeup. Twins area scout John Wilson coached Petty in the East Coast Pro Showcase last summer and got to know him. The two developed a great relationship there. The Twins also had several Zoom meetings with him last winter. They had medical personnel review his video. So did several in the Twins Player Development group. 
    Let’s start with the velocity. It’s hard to ignore. As you have seen, Petty has hit 102 mph on the radar gun. He said that it has been a process to gain velocity. Petty said it really started his sophomore year when he began training at Baseball Performance Center. “I really started seeing improvements in velocity and everything. They put me on a really tough lifting schedule that obviously worked out. Over the years, I’ve put on more weight. I’ve worked on my mechanics a lot, and through that whole process is when I saw the jump.” 
    When was the first time he hit 100 on a radar gun? Petty, who said he is now 6-1 and 200 pounds, said, “It was in July of last summer.” 
    Asked if there is more in the tank? Petty laughed and said, “Oh yeah. Oh yeah!” 
    Petty is both confident and competitive. “I think you (Twins fans) got the strongest competitor in the draft. I’m going to go out there and do everything I can to help my team win, help the organization win, and I’m just going to give it my all.” 
    But as we know, pitchers in today’s game need more than a fastball to sustain long-term success. Petty said, “I throw a four-seam (fastball), a sinker, a slider and a changeup. Right now, I’m really just working on perfecting everything, perfecting my craft, getting bigger, getting stronger still. And really just putting in the work in the weight room and at my training facility.” 
    Johnson thinks that Petty can be much more than a one-pitch pitcher. “We think he has ceiling to all of his pitches. Obviously he doesn’t need to throw any harder. 101 is definitely a good number, to start with. We see a lot of upside to both breaking balls, especially the slider which we think is going to be a really good pitch, as well as the change. He’s had command of those pitches, especially the change. He’s thrown strikes when we’ve seen him.” 
    Johnson pointed out, “I’m not sure it was a real analytical decision that we used to push us over the hump with Chase. It was more of a scouting evaluation. We loved him. We had him in the first round. Our player development people and everyone else that looked at him and got to know Chase were all on board. As a scouting director, you’re looking for confidence from the group to make the selection.”
    Johnson continued, “I would say that with both of our picks tonight, our group loved both players equally. We wanted those players, and it feels good to walk out of that room - and I know we’ve got more work to do the next two days - but getting two guys in the barn that you love is a good feeling.” 
    Ten picks after taking Petty, the Twins selected shortstop Noah Miller with the 36th pick, the final pick of Competitive Balance Round A and the final pick of the night. Miller is a shortstop from Ozaukee High School in Wisconsin. His brother Owen made his MLB debut with Cleveland earlier this year. 
    Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.” 
    Players don’t get selected this high in the draft without incredible baseball tools and talent, but it’s clear that the Twins really the character of both of their Day 1 picks. 
    However, let’s start with Miller’s skill set. Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides. He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.” 
    Johnson added, “I’m glad we got him. One of our favorites. You walk into the draft room and there’s certain guys that you don’t want to miss on. And Noah Miller, after the first round, was a guy we did not want to miss on. To get him today was a great feeling.” 
    Joe Bisenius was the Twins area scout and he got to know him really well. The Twins (and likely other teams) benefited from the draft moving from early June to mid-July. Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer. The Twins were aware of him and liked him, but the extra five to six weeks gave the Twins plenty of time to play catch up. 
    Johnson said, "It doesn't take long to realize that Noah Miller is a rock star." 
    The Twins selected high school players with their first two picks in the draft for the first time since 2016 when the Twins selected four high school hitters with their first four picks in Deron Johnson’s final draft as Scouting Director. Before that, Johnson selected Byron Buxton and Jose Berrios with the team’s first two picks in 2012’s draft. 
    It was a long day for the Twins scouting department. They got to Target Field about noon and then after Day 1 was complete, they continued to work. Starting at noon on Monday, Day 2 begins. Second through tenth round picks will be made. 
    Johnson said, “We’re going to plan scenarios. We’ll come up with some ideas. Some guys may have become signable. Some guys may have fallen short of and decided to go to college, that slipped out of the first round. A lot of conversations with agents, advisors, and with players and get a feel for what our board is going to look like so we are ready to go with our next pick.” 
     
    What will the Twins do on Day 2? Find out throughout the draft and discuss in the Day 2 Thread.
     
  13. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Twins Excited About Day 1 Picks, Chase Petty and Noah Miller   
    “We’ve loved Chase Petty for a long time, and we’ve had a crush on Noah Miller for a long time too. Walking out of the (draft) room with two guys that you love is a feeling you want to have after Day 1. Our group in that room is thrilled.” Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson at the end of a long, but exciting first day of the 2021 MLB Draft. 
    For the first time, the MLB Draft took place on All Star weekend in the city of the All Star game, Denver, Colorado. Several of the draft prospects were in attendance including the Twins top pick. 
    When the time came for the Twins’ first pick, the commissioner announced that the Twins selected right-handed pitcher Chase Petty from Mainland Regional High School in New Jersey. Petty is touted for having hit triple-digits with his fastball, but on Sunday night, he displayed plenty of personality too. 
    LaTroy Hawkins represented the Twins in Denver at the draft - after managing the American League team of prospects in the Futures Game earlier in the day. Asked if he approved of the pick, Hawkins said,  “I didn’t have to approve of it. I liked his personality.”
    During Petty’s interview on MLB Network, it was mentioned that he threw a no-hitter this year against Millville High School, Mike Trout’s old stomping grounds. Petty nonchalantly said that he’s been in contact with Trout (who was also taken with the 26th overall pick), and that he had texted with him a couple of hours before the draft. He then pointed out that he is having dinner on Monday night with Fernando Tatis, Jr., and Manny Machado (they belong to the same agency).     
    Petty and fellow draft prospect Joe Mack developed their “bromance” and appear to have named themselves Shake-and-Bake. Mack was selected with the 31st overall pick by the Miami Marlins. His older brother, Charles Mack is a catcher for the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels and was in Denver for the event with his family. Petty said that the two got to know each other. In addition, Petty said that he has trained with Twins 2019 draft pick from St. John’s, RHP Sean Mooney, as well. Last summer, Vanderbilt Jack Leiter texted him and they spent some time working together. Leiter was the second overall pick in the 2021 draft. 
    If there is one knock on Chase Petty that Twins fans may have, it might just be this. “I’m a Yankees fan. My first ever game was at the original Yankees Stadium. It’s by far my favorite stadium I’ve been to.” 
    While Petty has always played middle infield, primarily second base, when he’s not pitching, his favorite players have been a couple of Mets pitchers. “My favorite players, personally, are Marcus Stroman and Jacob de Grom which is funny because they’re on the same team. I’ve talked to Stroman. He and I have developed a little bit of a relationship.” 
      
    Chase Petty has all the connections. 
    In addition to his personality, Johnson noted his arm strength, “spin talent” and a feel for his changeup. Twins area scout John Wilson coached Petty in the East Coast Pro Showcase last summer and got to know him. The two developed a great relationship there. The Twins also had several Zoom meetings with him last winter. They had medical personnel review his video. So did several in the Twins Player Development group. 
    Let’s start with the velocity. It’s hard to ignore. As you have seen, Petty has hit 102 mph on the radar gun. He said that it has been a process to gain velocity. Petty said it really started his sophomore year when he began training at Baseball Performance Center. “I really started seeing improvements in velocity and everything. They put me on a really tough lifting schedule that obviously worked out. Over the years, I’ve put on more weight. I’ve worked on my mechanics a lot, and through that whole process is when I saw the jump.” 
    When was the first time he hit 100 on a radar gun? Petty, who said he is now 6-1 and 200 pounds, said, “It was in July of last summer.” 
    Asked if there is more in the tank? Petty laughed and said, “Oh yeah. Oh yeah!” 
    Petty is both confident and competitive. “I think you (Twins fans) got the strongest competitor in the draft. I’m going to go out there and do everything I can to help my team win, help the organization win, and I’m just going to give it my all.” 
    But as we know, pitchers in today’s game need more than a fastball to sustain long-term success. Petty said, “I throw a four-seam (fastball), a sinker, a slider and a changeup. Right now, I’m really just working on perfecting everything, perfecting my craft, getting bigger, getting stronger still. And really just putting in the work in the weight room and at my training facility.” 
    Johnson thinks that Petty can be much more than a one-pitch pitcher. “We think he has ceiling to all of his pitches. Obviously he doesn’t need to throw any harder. 101 is definitely a good number, to start with. We see a lot of upside to both breaking balls, especially the slider which we think is going to be a really good pitch, as well as the change. He’s had command of those pitches, especially the change. He’s thrown strikes when we’ve seen him.” 
    Johnson pointed out, “I’m not sure it was a real analytical decision that we used to push us over the hump with Chase. It was more of a scouting evaluation. We loved him. We had him in the first round. Our player development people and everyone else that looked at him and got to know Chase were all on board. As a scouting director, you’re looking for confidence from the group to make the selection.”
    Johnson continued, “I would say that with both of our picks tonight, our group loved both players equally. We wanted those players, and it feels good to walk out of that room - and I know we’ve got more work to do the next two days - but getting two guys in the barn that you love is a good feeling.” 
    Ten picks after taking Petty, the Twins selected shortstop Noah Miller with the 36th pick, the final pick of Competitive Balance Round A and the final pick of the night. Miller is a shortstop from Ozaukee High School in Wisconsin. His brother Owen made his MLB debut with Cleveland earlier this year. 
    Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.” 
    Players don’t get selected this high in the draft without incredible baseball tools and talent, but it’s clear that the Twins really the character of both of their Day 1 picks. 
    However, let’s start with Miller’s skill set. Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides. He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.” 
    Johnson added, “I’m glad we got him. One of our favorites. You walk into the draft room and there’s certain guys that you don’t want to miss on. And Noah Miller, after the first round, was a guy we did not want to miss on. To get him today was a great feeling.” 
    Joe Bisenius was the Twins area scout and he got to know him really well. The Twins (and likely other teams) benefited from the draft moving from early June to mid-July. Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer. The Twins were aware of him and liked him, but the extra five to six weeks gave the Twins plenty of time to play catch up. 
    Johnson said, "It doesn't take long to realize that Noah Miller is a rock star." 
    The Twins selected high school players with their first two picks in the draft for the first time since 2016 when the Twins selected four high school hitters with their first four picks in Deron Johnson’s final draft as Scouting Director. Before that, Johnson selected Byron Buxton and Jose Berrios with the team’s first two picks in 2012’s draft. 
    It was a long day for the Twins scouting department. They got to Target Field about noon and then after Day 1 was complete, they continued to work. Starting at noon on Monday, Day 2 begins. Second through tenth round picks will be made. 
    Johnson said, “We’re going to plan scenarios. We’ll come up with some ideas. Some guys may have become signable. Some guys may have fallen short of and decided to go to college, that slipped out of the first round. A lot of conversations with agents, advisors, and with players and get a feel for what our board is going to look like so we are ready to go with our next pick.” 
     
    What will the Twins do on Day 2? Find out throughout the draft and discuss in the Day 2 Thread.
     
  14. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from operation mindcrime for an article, Twins Excited About Day 1 Picks, Chase Petty and Noah Miller   
    “We’ve loved Chase Petty for a long time, and we’ve had a crush on Noah Miller for a long time too. Walking out of the (draft) room with two guys that you love is a feeling you want to have after Day 1. Our group in that room is thrilled.” Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson at the end of a long, but exciting first day of the 2021 MLB Draft. 
    For the first time, the MLB Draft took place on All Star weekend in the city of the All Star game, Denver, Colorado. Several of the draft prospects were in attendance including the Twins top pick. 
    When the time came for the Twins’ first pick, the commissioner announced that the Twins selected right-handed pitcher Chase Petty from Mainland Regional High School in New Jersey. Petty is touted for having hit triple-digits with his fastball, but on Sunday night, he displayed plenty of personality too. 
    LaTroy Hawkins represented the Twins in Denver at the draft - after managing the American League team of prospects in the Futures Game earlier in the day. Asked if he approved of the pick, Hawkins said,  “I didn’t have to approve of it. I liked his personality.”
    During Petty’s interview on MLB Network, it was mentioned that he threw a no-hitter this year against Millville High School, Mike Trout’s old stomping grounds. Petty nonchalantly said that he’s been in contact with Trout (who was also taken with the 26th overall pick), and that he had texted with him a couple of hours before the draft. He then pointed out that he is having dinner on Monday night with Fernando Tatis, Jr., and Manny Machado (they belong to the same agency).     
    Petty and fellow draft prospect Joe Mack developed their “bromance” and appear to have named themselves Shake-and-Bake. Mack was selected with the 31st overall pick by the Miami Marlins. His older brother, Charles Mack is a catcher for the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels and was in Denver for the event with his family. Petty said that the two got to know each other. In addition, Petty said that he has trained with Twins 2019 draft pick from St. John’s, RHP Sean Mooney, as well. Last summer, Vanderbilt Jack Leiter texted him and they spent some time working together. Leiter was the second overall pick in the 2021 draft. 
    If there is one knock on Chase Petty that Twins fans may have, it might just be this. “I’m a Yankees fan. My first ever game was at the original Yankees Stadium. It’s by far my favorite stadium I’ve been to.” 
    While Petty has always played middle infield, primarily second base, when he’s not pitching, his favorite players have been a couple of Mets pitchers. “My favorite players, personally, are Marcus Stroman and Jacob de Grom which is funny because they’re on the same team. I’ve talked to Stroman. He and I have developed a little bit of a relationship.” 
      
    Chase Petty has all the connections. 
    In addition to his personality, Johnson noted his arm strength, “spin talent” and a feel for his changeup. Twins area scout John Wilson coached Petty in the East Coast Pro Showcase last summer and got to know him. The two developed a great relationship there. The Twins also had several Zoom meetings with him last winter. They had medical personnel review his video. So did several in the Twins Player Development group. 
    Let’s start with the velocity. It’s hard to ignore. As you have seen, Petty has hit 102 mph on the radar gun. He said that it has been a process to gain velocity. Petty said it really started his sophomore year when he began training at Baseball Performance Center. “I really started seeing improvements in velocity and everything. They put me on a really tough lifting schedule that obviously worked out. Over the years, I’ve put on more weight. I’ve worked on my mechanics a lot, and through that whole process is when I saw the jump.” 
    When was the first time he hit 100 on a radar gun? Petty, who said he is now 6-1 and 200 pounds, said, “It was in July of last summer.” 
    Asked if there is more in the tank? Petty laughed and said, “Oh yeah. Oh yeah!” 
    Petty is both confident and competitive. “I think you (Twins fans) got the strongest competitor in the draft. I’m going to go out there and do everything I can to help my team win, help the organization win, and I’m just going to give it my all.” 
    But as we know, pitchers in today’s game need more than a fastball to sustain long-term success. Petty said, “I throw a four-seam (fastball), a sinker, a slider and a changeup. Right now, I’m really just working on perfecting everything, perfecting my craft, getting bigger, getting stronger still. And really just putting in the work in the weight room and at my training facility.” 
    Johnson thinks that Petty can be much more than a one-pitch pitcher. “We think he has ceiling to all of his pitches. Obviously he doesn’t need to throw any harder. 101 is definitely a good number, to start with. We see a lot of upside to both breaking balls, especially the slider which we think is going to be a really good pitch, as well as the change. He’s had command of those pitches, especially the change. He’s thrown strikes when we’ve seen him.” 
    Johnson pointed out, “I’m not sure it was a real analytical decision that we used to push us over the hump with Chase. It was more of a scouting evaluation. We loved him. We had him in the first round. Our player development people and everyone else that looked at him and got to know Chase were all on board. As a scouting director, you’re looking for confidence from the group to make the selection.”
    Johnson continued, “I would say that with both of our picks tonight, our group loved both players equally. We wanted those players, and it feels good to walk out of that room - and I know we’ve got more work to do the next two days - but getting two guys in the barn that you love is a good feeling.” 
    Ten picks after taking Petty, the Twins selected shortstop Noah Miller with the 36th pick, the final pick of Competitive Balance Round A and the final pick of the night. Miller is a shortstop from Ozaukee High School in Wisconsin. His brother Owen made his MLB debut with Cleveland earlier this year. 
    Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.” 
    Players don’t get selected this high in the draft without incredible baseball tools and talent, but it’s clear that the Twins really the character of both of their Day 1 picks. 
    However, let’s start with Miller’s skill set. Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides. He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.” 
    Johnson added, “I’m glad we got him. One of our favorites. You walk into the draft room and there’s certain guys that you don’t want to miss on. And Noah Miller, after the first round, was a guy we did not want to miss on. To get him today was a great feeling.” 
    Joe Bisenius was the Twins area scout and he got to know him really well. The Twins (and likely other teams) benefited from the draft moving from early June to mid-July. Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer. The Twins were aware of him and liked him, but the extra five to six weeks gave the Twins plenty of time to play catch up. 
    Johnson said, "It doesn't take long to realize that Noah Miller is a rock star." 
    The Twins selected high school players with their first two picks in the draft for the first time since 2016 when the Twins selected four high school hitters with their first four picks in Deron Johnson’s final draft as Scouting Director. Before that, Johnson selected Byron Buxton and Jose Berrios with the team’s first two picks in 2012’s draft. 
    It was a long day for the Twins scouting department. They got to Target Field about noon and then after Day 1 was complete, they continued to work. Starting at noon on Monday, Day 2 begins. Second through tenth round picks will be made. 
    Johnson said, “We’re going to plan scenarios. We’ll come up with some ideas. Some guys may have become signable. Some guys may have fallen short of and decided to go to college, that slipped out of the first round. A lot of conversations with agents, advisors, and with players and get a feel for what our board is going to look like so we are ready to go with our next pick.” 
     
    What will the Twins do on Day 2? Find out throughout the draft and discuss in the Day 2 Thread.
     
  15. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Excited About Day 1 Picks, Chase Petty and Noah Miller   
    “We’ve loved Chase Petty for a long time, and we’ve had a crush on Noah Miller for a long time too. Walking out of the (draft) room with two guys that you love is a feeling you want to have after Day 1. Our group in that room is thrilled.” Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson at the end of a long, but exciting first day of the 2021 MLB Draft. 
    For the first time, the MLB Draft took place on All Star weekend in the city of the All Star game, Denver, Colorado. Several of the draft prospects were in attendance including the Twins top pick. 
    When the time came for the Twins’ first pick, the commissioner announced that the Twins selected right-handed pitcher Chase Petty from Mainland Regional High School in New Jersey. Petty is touted for having hit triple-digits with his fastball, but on Sunday night, he displayed plenty of personality too. 
    LaTroy Hawkins represented the Twins in Denver at the draft - after managing the American League team of prospects in the Futures Game earlier in the day. Asked if he approved of the pick, Hawkins said,  “I didn’t have to approve of it. I liked his personality.”
    During Petty’s interview on MLB Network, it was mentioned that he threw a no-hitter this year against Millville High School, Mike Trout’s old stomping grounds. Petty nonchalantly said that he’s been in contact with Trout (who was also taken with the 26th overall pick), and that he had texted with him a couple of hours before the draft. He then pointed out that he is having dinner on Monday night with Fernando Tatis, Jr., and Manny Machado (they belong to the same agency).     
    Petty and fellow draft prospect Joe Mack developed their “bromance” and appear to have named themselves Shake-and-Bake. Mack was selected with the 31st overall pick by the Miami Marlins. His older brother, Charles Mack is a catcher for the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels and was in Denver for the event with his family. Petty said that the two got to know each other. In addition, Petty said that he has trained with Twins 2019 draft pick from St. John’s, RHP Sean Mooney, as well. Last summer, Vanderbilt Jack Leiter texted him and they spent some time working together. Leiter was the second overall pick in the 2021 draft. 
    If there is one knock on Chase Petty that Twins fans may have, it might just be this. “I’m a Yankees fan. My first ever game was at the original Yankees Stadium. It’s by far my favorite stadium I’ve been to.” 
    While Petty has always played middle infield, primarily second base, when he’s not pitching, his favorite players have been a couple of Mets pitchers. “My favorite players, personally, are Marcus Stroman and Jacob de Grom which is funny because they’re on the same team. I’ve talked to Stroman. He and I have developed a little bit of a relationship.” 
      
    Chase Petty has all the connections. 
    In addition to his personality, Johnson noted his arm strength, “spin talent” and a feel for his changeup. Twins area scout John Wilson coached Petty in the East Coast Pro Showcase last summer and got to know him. The two developed a great relationship there. The Twins also had several Zoom meetings with him last winter. They had medical personnel review his video. So did several in the Twins Player Development group. 
    Let’s start with the velocity. It’s hard to ignore. As you have seen, Petty has hit 102 mph on the radar gun. He said that it has been a process to gain velocity. Petty said it really started his sophomore year when he began training at Baseball Performance Center. “I really started seeing improvements in velocity and everything. They put me on a really tough lifting schedule that obviously worked out. Over the years, I’ve put on more weight. I’ve worked on my mechanics a lot, and through that whole process is when I saw the jump.” 
    When was the first time he hit 100 on a radar gun? Petty, who said he is now 6-1 and 200 pounds, said, “It was in July of last summer.” 
    Asked if there is more in the tank? Petty laughed and said, “Oh yeah. Oh yeah!” 
    Petty is both confident and competitive. “I think you (Twins fans) got the strongest competitor in the draft. I’m going to go out there and do everything I can to help my team win, help the organization win, and I’m just going to give it my all.” 
    But as we know, pitchers in today’s game need more than a fastball to sustain long-term success. Petty said, “I throw a four-seam (fastball), a sinker, a slider and a changeup. Right now, I’m really just working on perfecting everything, perfecting my craft, getting bigger, getting stronger still. And really just putting in the work in the weight room and at my training facility.” 
    Johnson thinks that Petty can be much more than a one-pitch pitcher. “We think he has ceiling to all of his pitches. Obviously he doesn’t need to throw any harder. 101 is definitely a good number, to start with. We see a lot of upside to both breaking balls, especially the slider which we think is going to be a really good pitch, as well as the change. He’s had command of those pitches, especially the change. He’s thrown strikes when we’ve seen him.” 
    Johnson pointed out, “I’m not sure it was a real analytical decision that we used to push us over the hump with Chase. It was more of a scouting evaluation. We loved him. We had him in the first round. Our player development people and everyone else that looked at him and got to know Chase were all on board. As a scouting director, you’re looking for confidence from the group to make the selection.”
    Johnson continued, “I would say that with both of our picks tonight, our group loved both players equally. We wanted those players, and it feels good to walk out of that room - and I know we’ve got more work to do the next two days - but getting two guys in the barn that you love is a good feeling.” 
    Ten picks after taking Petty, the Twins selected shortstop Noah Miller with the 36th pick, the final pick of Competitive Balance Round A and the final pick of the night. Miller is a shortstop from Ozaukee High School in Wisconsin. His brother Owen made his MLB debut with Cleveland earlier this year. 
    Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.” 
    Players don’t get selected this high in the draft without incredible baseball tools and talent, but it’s clear that the Twins really the character of both of their Day 1 picks. 
    However, let’s start with Miller’s skill set. Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides. He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.” 
    Johnson added, “I’m glad we got him. One of our favorites. You walk into the draft room and there’s certain guys that you don’t want to miss on. And Noah Miller, after the first round, was a guy we did not want to miss on. To get him today was a great feeling.” 
    Joe Bisenius was the Twins area scout and he got to know him really well. The Twins (and likely other teams) benefited from the draft moving from early June to mid-July. Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer. The Twins were aware of him and liked him, but the extra five to six weeks gave the Twins plenty of time to play catch up. 
    Johnson said, "It doesn't take long to realize that Noah Miller is a rock star." 
    The Twins selected high school players with their first two picks in the draft for the first time since 2016 when the Twins selected four high school hitters with their first four picks in Deron Johnson’s final draft as Scouting Director. Before that, Johnson selected Byron Buxton and Jose Berrios with the team’s first two picks in 2012’s draft. 
    It was a long day for the Twins scouting department. They got to Target Field about noon and then after Day 1 was complete, they continued to work. Starting at noon on Monday, Day 2 begins. Second through tenth round picks will be made. 
    Johnson said, “We’re going to plan scenarios. We’ll come up with some ideas. Some guys may have become signable. Some guys may have fallen short of and decided to go to college, that slipped out of the first round. A lot of conversations with agents, advisors, and with players and get a feel for what our board is going to look like so we are ready to go with our next pick.” 
     
    What will the Twins do on Day 2? Find out throughout the draft and discuss in the Day 2 Thread.
     
  16. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from dbminn for an article, Twins Excited About Day 1 Picks, Chase Petty and Noah Miller   
    “We’ve loved Chase Petty for a long time, and we’ve had a crush on Noah Miller for a long time too. Walking out of the (draft) room with two guys that you love is a feeling you want to have after Day 1. Our group in that room is thrilled.” Twins Scouting Director Sean Johnson at the end of a long, but exciting first day of the 2021 MLB Draft. 
    For the first time, the MLB Draft took place on All Star weekend in the city of the All Star game, Denver, Colorado. Several of the draft prospects were in attendance including the Twins top pick. 
    When the time came for the Twins’ first pick, the commissioner announced that the Twins selected right-handed pitcher Chase Petty from Mainland Regional High School in New Jersey. Petty is touted for having hit triple-digits with his fastball, but on Sunday night, he displayed plenty of personality too. 
    LaTroy Hawkins represented the Twins in Denver at the draft - after managing the American League team of prospects in the Futures Game earlier in the day. Asked if he approved of the pick, Hawkins said,  “I didn’t have to approve of it. I liked his personality.”
    During Petty’s interview on MLB Network, it was mentioned that he threw a no-hitter this year against Millville High School, Mike Trout’s old stomping grounds. Petty nonchalantly said that he’s been in contact with Trout (who was also taken with the 26th overall pick), and that he had texted with him a couple of hours before the draft. He then pointed out that he is having dinner on Monday night with Fernando Tatis, Jr., and Manny Machado (they belong to the same agency).     
    Petty and fellow draft prospect Joe Mack developed their “bromance” and appear to have named themselves Shake-and-Bake. Mack was selected with the 31st overall pick by the Miami Marlins. His older brother, Charles Mack is a catcher for the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels and was in Denver for the event with his family. Petty said that the two got to know each other. In addition, Petty said that he has trained with Twins 2019 draft pick from St. John’s, RHP Sean Mooney, as well. Last summer, Vanderbilt Jack Leiter texted him and they spent some time working together. Leiter was the second overall pick in the 2021 draft. 
    If there is one knock on Chase Petty that Twins fans may have, it might just be this. “I’m a Yankees fan. My first ever game was at the original Yankees Stadium. It’s by far my favorite stadium I’ve been to.” 
    While Petty has always played middle infield, primarily second base, when he’s not pitching, his favorite players have been a couple of Mets pitchers. “My favorite players, personally, are Marcus Stroman and Jacob de Grom which is funny because they’re on the same team. I’ve talked to Stroman. He and I have developed a little bit of a relationship.” 
      
    Chase Petty has all the connections. 
    In addition to his personality, Johnson noted his arm strength, “spin talent” and a feel for his changeup. Twins area scout John Wilson coached Petty in the East Coast Pro Showcase last summer and got to know him. The two developed a great relationship there. The Twins also had several Zoom meetings with him last winter. They had medical personnel review his video. So did several in the Twins Player Development group. 
    Let’s start with the velocity. It’s hard to ignore. As you have seen, Petty has hit 102 mph on the radar gun. He said that it has been a process to gain velocity. Petty said it really started his sophomore year when he began training at Baseball Performance Center. “I really started seeing improvements in velocity and everything. They put me on a really tough lifting schedule that obviously worked out. Over the years, I’ve put on more weight. I’ve worked on my mechanics a lot, and through that whole process is when I saw the jump.” 
    When was the first time he hit 100 on a radar gun? Petty, who said he is now 6-1 and 200 pounds, said, “It was in July of last summer.” 
    Asked if there is more in the tank? Petty laughed and said, “Oh yeah. Oh yeah!” 
    Petty is both confident and competitive. “I think you (Twins fans) got the strongest competitor in the draft. I’m going to go out there and do everything I can to help my team win, help the organization win, and I’m just going to give it my all.” 
    But as we know, pitchers in today’s game need more than a fastball to sustain long-term success. Petty said, “I throw a four-seam (fastball), a sinker, a slider and a changeup. Right now, I’m really just working on perfecting everything, perfecting my craft, getting bigger, getting stronger still. And really just putting in the work in the weight room and at my training facility.” 
    Johnson thinks that Petty can be much more than a one-pitch pitcher. “We think he has ceiling to all of his pitches. Obviously he doesn’t need to throw any harder. 101 is definitely a good number, to start with. We see a lot of upside to both breaking balls, especially the slider which we think is going to be a really good pitch, as well as the change. He’s had command of those pitches, especially the change. He’s thrown strikes when we’ve seen him.” 
    Johnson pointed out, “I’m not sure it was a real analytical decision that we used to push us over the hump with Chase. It was more of a scouting evaluation. We loved him. We had him in the first round. Our player development people and everyone else that looked at him and got to know Chase were all on board. As a scouting director, you’re looking for confidence from the group to make the selection.”
    Johnson continued, “I would say that with both of our picks tonight, our group loved both players equally. We wanted those players, and it feels good to walk out of that room - and I know we’ve got more work to do the next two days - but getting two guys in the barn that you love is a good feeling.” 
    Ten picks after taking Petty, the Twins selected shortstop Noah Miller with the 36th pick, the final pick of Competitive Balance Round A and the final pick of the night. Miller is a shortstop from Ozaukee High School in Wisconsin. His brother Owen made his MLB debut with Cleveland earlier this year. 
    Johnson said, “You can just see the competitiveness in him that he got from his brother, and his family and being in that environment.” 
    Players don’t get selected this high in the draft without incredible baseball tools and talent, but it’s clear that the Twins really the character of both of their Day 1 picks. 
    However, let’s start with Miller’s skill set. Johnson noted, “It’s rare anymore to see a player you believe has hit skills from both sides of the plate. Switch-hitters are pretty rare anymore. He has a great swing from both sides. We think that he will have power from both sides. He’s extremely instinctive as a defender. He’s not the fastest shortstop in the world, but we think that has a chance to stay there for a long time. He’ll profile whether he plays short forever or not. Great hands. Great feet. Great clock. It’s all the things you want to see. He’s super advanced, more advanced than a lot of the college guys you see.” 
    Johnson added, “I’m glad we got him. One of our favorites. You walk into the draft room and there’s certain guys that you don’t want to miss on. And Noah Miller, after the first round, was a guy we did not want to miss on. To get him today was a great feeling.” 
    Joe Bisenius was the Twins area scout and he got to know him really well. The Twins (and likely other teams) benefited from the draft moving from early June to mid-July. Miller didn’t play in the Area Code Games last summer. The Twins were aware of him and liked him, but the extra five to six weeks gave the Twins plenty of time to play catch up. 
    Johnson said, "It doesn't take long to realize that Noah Miller is a rock star." 
    The Twins selected high school players with their first two picks in the draft for the first time since 2016 when the Twins selected four high school hitters with their first four picks in Deron Johnson’s final draft as Scouting Director. Before that, Johnson selected Byron Buxton and Jose Berrios with the team’s first two picks in 2012’s draft. 
    It was a long day for the Twins scouting department. They got to Target Field about noon and then after Day 1 was complete, they continued to work. Starting at noon on Monday, Day 2 begins. Second through tenth round picks will be made. 
    Johnson said, “We’re going to plan scenarios. We’ll come up with some ideas. Some guys may have become signable. Some guys may have fallen short of and decided to go to college, that slipped out of the first round. A lot of conversations with agents, advisors, and with players and get a feel for what our board is going to look like so we are ready to go with our next pick.” 
     
    What will the Twins do on Day 2? Find out throughout the draft and discuss in the Day 2 Thread.
     
  17. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Melissa for an article, Twins Minor League Week in Review: Awards, Rankings, Playoffs and Prospects   
    It’s hard to believe that two months of the minor league season are now complete. You’ll see in the week’s article links that we have named our hitter and pitchers of the month for June as well as updated our Midseason Top 20 Prospect rankings. I also encourage you to read Nick’s Twins Week in Review from yesterday, and then jump into the minor league week. 
     
    Before we get started, let’s check out the Transactions and the FCL Twins game on Monday: 
    RHP Breckin Williams was signed to a minor league contract and assigned to the Cedar Rapids Kernels.   
    FCL Twins Talk
    FCL Twins 3, FCL Pirates Black 6
    Box Score
    The FCL Twins fell to 2-4 on their season with a loss on Monday. Jesus Feliz went 2-for-4. Wilfri Castro went 2-for-2 with an RBI double. Keoni Cavaco went 1-for-3 in his third rehab game. 
    On the mound, Giovahniey German started and gave up three runs on four hits and three walks over 3 1/3 innings. He struck out four batters. Justin Wilson came on. He was also charged with three runs. He gave up four hits. Ramon Pineda came in and gave up a hit before getting the final out. 
     
    With that, let’s look at Week 9 in the Twins minor leagues: 
    RESULTS
    Triple-A: St. Paul Saints: Week (4-2, hosting Omaha), overall (25-28)
    Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge: Week (3-3 at Amarillo), overall (31-23)
    High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels: Week (2-4, @ Quad Cities), overall (28-26)
    Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels: Week (3-3 hosting Bradenton), overall (31-23) 
    Complex League: FCL Twins went 2-4 in their first week.
     
    IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
    Here are the week’s Twins minor league-related articles. 
    Twins Minor League Week in Review: Promotions and FCL Opening Day  Tuesday: It’s Jose Miranda’s World, We’re Just Living in it.  Wednesday: Balazovic Blows them Away  Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Month  Twins Daily Minor League Starting Pitcher of the Month  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 16-20 (plus honorable mentions)  Thursday: Amarillo by Morning, Fun is Good  RBS: Does Jose Miranda’s Rise Mean I have to Listen to Hamilton?  Friday: Winder Dazzles in Saints Debut  Twins Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Month - June 2021 Saturday: No Offense  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 11-15  Sunday: Three Wins on the Fourth  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings: 6-10  Twins Minor League Pitching Report: Jovani Moran   
    Highlights
    We will start with the Twins choices for the organizational hitter and pitcher of the week, and then mention several other Twins prospects who had good Week 9 performances
    Twins Player of the Week: Jose Miranda, Wichita Wind Surge    
    Miranda just continues to rake… wait! I said that last week when he was the player of the week. The difference, of course, is now he is raking in Triple-A. For the week, Miranda hit .385/414/808 (1.221) with two doubles and three home runs. And, what a memorable Triple-A debut last Tuesday when he went 5-for-6 with a double and three home runs.  
     
    Twins Pitcher of the Week: Sawyer Gipson-Long, Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels      
    Gipson-Long has been pretty solid since a rough first few starts. In his start this past week, he gave up two runs (1 earned) on four hits in six innings. He struck out nine batters without issuing a walk. In his past six starts, he has gone 4-0 with a 2.16 ERA in 33 1/3 innings. He has 48 strikeouts and just six walks. 
    Gipson-Long was the Twins sixth-round pick in 2019 out of Mercer University in his home state of Georgia. 
     
    Other Strong Performances this Week
    St. Paul Saints
    In a pretty neat highlight, infielder Drew Stankiewicz became the first player to suit up for the Saints when they were an independent team and now as an affiliate. 
    Josh Winder made his Triple-A debut and was fantastic. He had a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He gave up one run on one hit and two walks over 5 2/3 innings. He struck out eight batters. Also this week, he was named to represent the Twins in the Futures Game in Denver. He will be joined by pitching coach Cibney Bello. 
    Chandler Shepherd put together another terrific start. The veteran tossed five shutout innings. He gave up just two hits and didn’t walk a batter. Charlie Barnes threw seven innings and gave up two runs on six hits and a walk. 
    Ian Hamilton pitched twice. He gave up only one hit, a solo homer over four innings. He walked none and struck out eight. 
    Drew Maggi was named the Triple-A East Player of the Week by MiLB.com. For the week, he went 9-for-21 (.429) with two doubles. He also homered in four consecutive games. In five games, he hit .429/.455/1.095 (1.550). Brent Rooker continues to rake! In six games, he hit .318/.444/.818 (1.263) with a triple and three home runs. Jimmy Kerrigan played in five games and hit .474/.524/.579 (1.103) with two doubles. Damek Tomscha and Mark Contreras each added two home runs last week, and they had OPS over .900. 
    Finally, it has been a rough (couple of) season(s) for outfielder Keon Broxton, but last week, he was quite good. In his five games, he hit .389/.450/.778 (1.228) with a double and two home runs. 
     
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Jordan Balazovic had a nice start this week. He tossed 5 2/3 innings of scoreless, hitless ball in his start. He walked two and struck out six batters. 
    Understandably, Yennier Cano and Jovani Moran got a lot of attention, but others in the Wichita bullpen have been very good too. Ryan Mason worked three games last week. He worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings and struck out four. Zach Neff worked three scoreless innings over three appearances. Alex Phillips tossed  3 2/3 scoreless innings. He struck out five and walked one. 
    Like Jose Miranda in St. Paul, Spencer Steer has transitioned to Double-A quite well, at least through his first week. In six games, he hit .320/.393/.680 (1.073) with three homers.  
     
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    Jon Olsen had a tremendous start last week. He tossed five scoreless innings. He gave up two hits, walked two and struck out two batters. Ben Gross gave up one run on two hits and two walks over five innings. He struck out five batters. Zach Featherstone pitched four innings over three games. He didn’t give up any runs. He allowed just one hit and walked three. He also struck out six batters. 
    Michael Helman had a real good week. In six games, he hit .333/.440/.714 (1.154) with two doubles and two home runs. He also walked four times. Like Miranda and Steer, Edouard Julien is adapting just fine to the High-A competition. In his first week, he played all six games and hit .250/.444/.550 (.994) with two home runs. He also walked seven times. Daniel Ozoria hit .364 (4-11). Among Alex Isola’s four hits this past week, he had a double and two home runs. 
     
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Osiris German and Steven Cruz each threw four scoreless innings over two games. Each walked one and struck out six batters. Matt Swain gave up zero earned runs over four innings over two appearances.  Denny Bentley had three scoreless innings and struck out four without allowing a baserunner. 
    Louis Varland gave up one run on six hits over six innings in his start. He struck out nine and didn’t walk anyone. Zarion Sharpe threw 3 2/3 innings and gave up only two unearned runs on two hits. He struck out three batters.
    Newcomer Nick Anderson had a solid week. He played in five games, though he had just nine plate appearances. He went 2-for-6 with a triple and two walks to post a 1.222 OPS.  
     
    Lowlights
    We are talking about very small samples for these six-game weeks, so it’s important not to make any big decisions or develop a full impression on a player from this small size. It’s just a reminder of the fact that baseball is hard, and all players have good and bad stretches.  
    St. Paul Saints
    The Twins added veteran Joe Harvey to the Saints roster this week. He made his first appearance and gave up four runs on two hits and two walks in just 1/3 of an inning. Another new veteran, Kyle Barraclough gave up three earned runs on four hits (2 homers) in 2 2/3 innings. Robinson Leyer gave up three runs on six hits and two walks in two innings.   
    JT Riddle had a tough week. He hit just .143 (3-for-23). 
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Adam Lau pitched twice and worked just 1 1/3 innings. He gave up six runs on two hits and two walks and two hit batters. 
    Caleb Hamilton went 0-for-9 in three games. Wilbis Santiago went 1-for-12. Andrew Bechtold went 1-for-9. Aaron Whitefield played all six games and hit .167/.259/.167 (.426). Of the 12 Wind Surge hitters with nine or more at bats in Week 9, just three had a batting average above .200. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    The bad news for the Kernels last week was that three position players had to pitch. Yeltsin Encarnacion, Daniel Ozoria and Max Smith each spent time on the mound. Owen Griffith had a tough week. In two outings, he gave up seven runs on 10 hits and a walk over 2 1/3 innings. Melvi Acosta gave up five earned runs on eight hits and two walks in his 2 1/3 innings. Cody Laweryson’s start this week was a struggle. The right-hander gave up five runs on six hits and a walk in three innings. 
    Jair Camargo played in five games, but he had just one hit in 15 at bats (.067). Wander Javier hit just .118 while Seth Gray hit just .125 for the week.   
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Juan Pichardo gave up four runs on four hits in 3 1/3 innings in two games. 
    Wander Valdez returned to the Mussels, but he went 0-for-7. Willie Joe Garry went 1-for-11 (.091), but that one hit was a walk-off hit. Will Holland hit .130 (4-23), though he had a double and a homer.   
     
    Trending Storyline 
    The plan was for there to be no playoffs in 2021. The assumption was that games and series might be lost in the minor leagues (as had happened in the big leagues) due to COVID. And, because of all of the lost development time from a year ago, it would be better for the players and organizations to scrap the playoffs and just have all teams play two or three extra weeks at the end of the season. 
    Well, last week, it was decided that there will be playoffs in 2021.
    In Low-A, High-A and Double-A, the top two teams by record will play a series. That series will begin September 21st. There will be no Triple-A playoffs, presumably because there may be more need at the big-league level and players can only be called up from Triple-A. Instead, those seasons will continue through October third. Teams will get two additional five-game series. 
    My personal opinion is that I would much rather see the Mighty Mussels, Kernels and Wind Surge play ten additional games than not play any playoff games. Obviously if the Twins’ affiliate is in the playoffs, great. If not, it’s two weeks of lost development time. 
    However, from a player’s perspective, and probably from an affiliate’s perspective, it’s probably nice to have a carrot dangling at the end of the season.
     
    PROSPECT SUMMARY
    Here’s a look at how the Twins Daily PRESEASON Top 20 Twins Prospects have performed on the season (as well as too many unfortunate injuries). As you’ve seen, our MIDSEASON Top 20 Prospect rankings are being posted right now, so next week, we will update the below to reflect ‘graduations’ and the new rankings. 
    #1 - Alex Kirilloff (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (2 rehab games, went 3-6 with 2 homers, 2 K), Minnesota (48 games, .263/.300/.447 (.747) with 10 doubles, 1 triple, 7 homers, 29 RBI, 10 BB, 43 K)
    #2 - Royce Lewis (Wichita) - Out for Season (torn ACL)
    #3 - Trevor Larnach (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (3 games, went 3-11 with two homers, two walks, 8 strikeouts), Minnesota (47 games, .263/.359/.436 (.795) with 9 doubles, 6 homers, 17 RBI, 18 BB, 54 K) 
    #4 - Ryan Jeffers (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (24 games, .217/.340/.446 (.786) with four doubles, five homers, 16 BB, 26 K), Minnesota (32 games, .187/.275/.374 (.649) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 5 home runs, 15 RBI, 13 BB, 40 K)
    #5 - Jhoan Duran (St. Paul) – 5 G, 4 GS, 16.0 IP, 16 H, 13 BB, 22 K, 5.06 ERA, 1.81 WHIP (on IL with a right forearm strain)  
    #6 - Jordan Balazovic (Wichita) – 6 GS, 24.1 IP, 26 H, 8 BB, 33 K, 4.44 ERA, 1.40 WHIP 
    #7 - Keoni Cavaco (Ft. Myers) – 28 games, .264/.333/.340 (.673) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer, 11 RBI, 10 BB, 32 K, 4 SB (on Injured List, Concussion, but played 2 rehab games in FCL this week) 
    #8 - Aaron Sabato (Ft. Myers) – 53 games, .184/.373/.291 (.664) with 10 doubles, 3 homers, 18 RBI, 50 BB, 73 K
    #9 - Matt Canterino (Cedar Rapids) – 4 GS, 18.0 IP, 10 H, 3 BB, 35 K, 1.00 ERA, 0.72 WHIP (went on the IL with right elbow strain)
    #10 - Blayne Enlow (Cedar Rapids) – 3 GS, 14.2 IP, 13 H, 6 BB, 23 K, 1.84 ERA, 1.30 WHIP (underwent Tommy John surgery on June 9th) 
    #11 - Gilberto Celestino (Minnesotal) – Wichita (21 games, .250/.344/.381 (.725) with 5 doubles, 2 homers. 11 BB, 24 K), Minnesota (15 games, .163/.200/.349 (.549) with 2 BB, 8 K)
    #12 - Brent Rooker (St. Paul) – St. Paul (46 games, .239/.381/.553 (.934) with 6 doubles, 1 triple, 14 homers, 32 BB, 59 K), Minnesota (8 games, .103/.133/.241 (375) with 1 double, 1 homer, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 13 K)
    #13 - Matt Wallner (Cedar Rapids) – 17 games, .333/.384/.621 (1.005) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers, 14 RBI, 5 BB, 28 K. (on IL after having hamate bone surgery)
    #14 - Misael Urbina (Ft. Myers) – 46 games, .201/.310/.278 (588) with 4 doubles, 3 triples, 1 homer, 27 RBI, 26 BB, 41 K, 9 SB)
    #15 - Cole Sands (Wichita) – 7 GS, 31.2 IP, 22 H, 18 BB, 42 K, 2.84 ERA, 1.26 WHIP (about to go on the IL) 
    #16 - Edwar Colina (Minnesota) - 60-Day IL (had surgery on his right elbow to remove bone chips)
    #17 - Ben Rortvedt (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (5 games, .286/.318/.571 (.890) with 3 doubles, 1 homer, 1 BB, 6 K), Minnesota (23 games, .125/.183/.196 (380) with 1 double, 1 homer, 4 RBI, 3 BB, 20 K)
    #18 - Alerick Soularie (Complex) – N/A (injured)
    #19 - Jose Miranda (St. Paul) – 53 games, .350/.409/.614 (1.023) with 10 doubles, 16 homers, 46 RBI, 19 BB, 31 K
    #20 - Bailey Ober (St. Paul) – St. Paul (4 GS, 16.0 IP, 13 H, 5 BB, 21 K, 2.81 ERA, 1.13 WHIP), Minnesota (6 GS, 24.2 IP, 28 H, 6 BB, 26 K, 5.84 ERA, 1.38 WHIP) 
     
    LOOKING AHEAD
    Ft. Myers @ St. Lucie (TBD, Brent Headrick, Sawyer Gipson-Long; Louie Varland, Bobby Milacki, Miguel Rodriguez): 
    Peoria @ Cedar Rapids:(Ben Gross, Cody Laweryson, Tyler Beck, Kody Funderburk, Jon Olsen, Tyler Watson)
    NW Arkansas @ Wichita: (Bryan Sammons, Chris Vallimont, Austin Schulfer, Jason Garcia, Jordan Balazovic, Bryan Sammons) 
    St. Paul @ Iowa: (Andrew Albers, Josh Winder, Charlie Barnes, Chandler Shepherd, Beau Burrows, Andrew Albers): 

    Feel free to provide some feedback below regarding these reports. What do you like to read? What types of information would you like added? Also, feel free to ask any questions you like.
     
  18. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Kernels' Backstop Alex Isola is Catching On   
    Alex Isola has played catcher most of his ball-playing career. He grew up near Sacramento and attended Jesuit High School where he starred on the ball field and in the classroom. He went to the University of Utah for one season and played in 12 games. The next year, he headed to Arizona where he played for Yavapai College, a junior college. He hit .367 with eight homers and 37 RBI that year which provided him with the opportunity to go to Texas Christian University for his junior season. 
    In 2019, Isola started 49 games for the Horned Frogs, 34 at catcher and 15 at DH. He hit .267/.377/.385 (.762) with seven doubles and five home runs. He also really grew as a catcher. The Twins drafted him in the 29th round in 2019 and sent him to Elizabethton. After just seven games in the Appalachian League, he finished the season with 18 games played for the then Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels. 
    This spring, Isola was invited to participate in the Twins depth camp at big-league spring training. He didn’t get many in-game plate appearances, but he learned a lot. 
    He said in early May, “The experience was one full of learning and a taste of what it’s like to be at that level. Just to see guys go about their business and watch them on an everyday basis allowed me to see what it takes and gave me things to learn about and add to my game.” 
    Isola continued, “I got to talk to Nelson Cruz and Josh Donaldson who were some of my favorite guys to watch in high school, but I tried not to be too in awe because I didn’t want them to feel uncomfortable. They really just showed me how to find a routine and the thing that impressed me the most was their discipline each day about doing the same things over and over with enthusiasm.” 

    He spent a lot of time working with the big-league catchers. “It can be really complicated. Those guys do a good job of doing complicated better and making it as simple as possible. Just watching Garver, Jeffers and others, you find a routine that works for you, like a pregame routine, something that you can go to every day to get better. It was more about the way they approach every day and go about their business. Baseball is repetition. You have to do the same thing every day, and you have to love doing the same stuff every day. You see how they go about it. They don’t cheat themselves. They grind everyday.”  
    Let’s get back to the defensive side of catching where that grind can be tough. I was always too chicken to want to don the tools of ignorance when I was young. I wanted to play shortstop or third base. I didn’t want to wear the gear or take foul tips. However, in summer amateur ball while in college, I agreed to play the position when the team’s catcher (OK, my brother) got hit in the face with a fastball that tailed right into his nose. I’ve got to be honest, I loved it. No, not that my brother had a broken nose and needed surgery. That was scary! But I loved catching. I wish I would have played there all along. You are involved in every pitch. You kind of run the show. 
    What is it about the position that Isola most enjoys? His answer speaks volumes about him as a person and as a teammate. 
    “I think my favorite part is the relationship you form with the pitchers. I take a lot of pride in that. It’s not about me back there. My job is to get the best out of those guys. For me, I try to be there for them if they want me to catch extra. Get to know them off the field. What’s their personality? And most important, what is their stuff like?”
    In addition to building that relationship, Isola has worked hard on other aspects of catching too. “(I want to) Make sure I’m on top of my game calling. That’s been a big thing for me. Such an important part of the game is game calling, but it’s also fun because it’s like solving a problem. You’ve got your guy’s strengths against a hitter's weaknesses. But you’ve got to first focus on your guy’s strengths and then form a plan based on that. Obviously you like throwing out runners. The receiving part is, the Twins are big on that, it took me awhile to learn, and I’m still learning everyday. We’re on the one-knee stance a lot. My favorite part is the relationship part, and then game-calling because that’s where I can solve problems.”
    With Kernels first baseman Gabe Snyder on the Injured List and Trey Cabbage up in Double-A, the team has to play others at first base. Many nights, that is a catcher, and Isola has been able to get extra at bats because of that flexibility. He had played a little bit there in junior college. 
    “It was one of the things I worked on during quarantine. I had so much time. Some of the guys I worked with are infielders, so I figured why not. I got to see Astudillo, and you can create a lot of value for yourself just by playing other positions.” 
    He added, “I’m open to it. I want to learn. You just play wherever the team needs you at this point. We’ve had so many injuries this year. I’m just trying to help where I can. I want to play every day, so whatever “Dink” wants, I can do.”   
    Also during quarantine, Isola was able to rekindle something that will help him through the ups and downs of a long baseball season and career. 
    “My faith is something that I grew up with and when I got to college strayed away from to be honest. This last year during quarantine I rekindled my relationship with God and it’s made me realize how important it is to have a relationship with Him. Early in the year when I was struggling at the plate, I had faith that God would get me through and reading the Bible allowed me to maintain a good perspective on things that normally would have had me panicking. Having that relationship with God is key for me along with my family in getting through the ups and downs of a season.”
    On  Tuesday night in Cedar Rapids, Isola was behind the plate, but at the plate, he went 3-for-5 with two runs and three RBI. He had a single, a double and his seventh home run of the season. No, he didn’t have a triple. He hasn’t had one in his professional career. He didn’t have any in three seasons of college ball. 
    He said, “I think I had one in high school. I’m not a fast runner. I’m a catcher. I’m going to need a deep ballpark.” 

    In 42 games on the season, Isola is now hitting .234/.379/.438 (.817) with seven doubles, seven homers and 20 RBI. He also has 31 walks to go against 36 strikeouts. He is patient at the plate and yet has some really good pop in his bat. 
    A couple of weeks ago, Brian Dinkelman said, “I think his eye and approach have always been there as far as laying off pitches and taking his walks. Now he’s getting stronger and is starting to hit the ball a little harder. The power is starting to come around. So if he can combine the walks with some power also, he can be a good hitter.” 
    “For me as a hitter, I try to go in with an understanding of what I’m going to do. There are times when you are just reacting, but if I can go in with a good plan based on which pitcher we’re facing. The big thing with the walks is you just don’t want to give away at bats. That’s the tough thing about baseball. It’s a long season. You really have to be competitive in there. There are a lot of strikeouts in baseball right now. I choke up with two strikes. I foul off a lot of balls. I work deep in counts so I’ll get some walks.” 
    He gives a lot of credit to Kernels hitting coach Bryce Berg.  “I give it up to him. He does a great job of helping me develop a plan, trying that and executing it.” . 
    Alex Isola used the time off in 2020 to his benefit. “I had a full year to just work on my game. Credit to the Twins. I’ve been working with hitting coaches and catching coaches during quarantine. As much as everyone was down because were weren’t playing, I tried to use it as a positive and try to focus on all aspects of my game.” 
    Manager Brian Dinkelman notes that Isola has really grown as a player since he joined the Kernels late in the 2019 season. “He’s really improved his ABs. He’s really driving the ball a lot more this year in terms of power, which is good to see. He’s improving every day and becoming more of a complete player.” 
    Isola hasn’t shown up on any Twins top prospect ranking articles. However, if he continues to work hard on presenting pitches and working with pitchers, and is able to maintain a solid approach at the plate, he is a guy who could slowly work his way up to the big leagues in time.
     
  19. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from wsnydes for an article, Kernels' Backstop Alex Isola is Catching On   
    Alex Isola has played catcher most of his ball-playing career. He grew up near Sacramento and attended Jesuit High School where he starred on the ball field and in the classroom. He went to the University of Utah for one season and played in 12 games. The next year, he headed to Arizona where he played for Yavapai College, a junior college. He hit .367 with eight homers and 37 RBI that year which provided him with the opportunity to go to Texas Christian University for his junior season. 
    In 2019, Isola started 49 games for the Horned Frogs, 34 at catcher and 15 at DH. He hit .267/.377/.385 (.762) with seven doubles and five home runs. He also really grew as a catcher. The Twins drafted him in the 29th round in 2019 and sent him to Elizabethton. After just seven games in the Appalachian League, he finished the season with 18 games played for the then Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels. 
    This spring, Isola was invited to participate in the Twins depth camp at big-league spring training. He didn’t get many in-game plate appearances, but he learned a lot. 
    He said in early May, “The experience was one full of learning and a taste of what it’s like to be at that level. Just to see guys go about their business and watch them on an everyday basis allowed me to see what it takes and gave me things to learn about and add to my game.” 
    Isola continued, “I got to talk to Nelson Cruz and Josh Donaldson who were some of my favorite guys to watch in high school, but I tried not to be too in awe because I didn’t want them to feel uncomfortable. They really just showed me how to find a routine and the thing that impressed me the most was their discipline each day about doing the same things over and over with enthusiasm.” 

    He spent a lot of time working with the big-league catchers. “It can be really complicated. Those guys do a good job of doing complicated better and making it as simple as possible. Just watching Garver, Jeffers and others, you find a routine that works for you, like a pregame routine, something that you can go to every day to get better. It was more about the way they approach every day and go about their business. Baseball is repetition. You have to do the same thing every day, and you have to love doing the same stuff every day. You see how they go about it. They don’t cheat themselves. They grind everyday.”  
    Let’s get back to the defensive side of catching where that grind can be tough. I was always too chicken to want to don the tools of ignorance when I was young. I wanted to play shortstop or third base. I didn’t want to wear the gear or take foul tips. However, in summer amateur ball while in college, I agreed to play the position when the team’s catcher (OK, my brother) got hit in the face with a fastball that tailed right into his nose. I’ve got to be honest, I loved it. No, not that my brother had a broken nose and needed surgery. That was scary! But I loved catching. I wish I would have played there all along. You are involved in every pitch. You kind of run the show. 
    What is it about the position that Isola most enjoys? His answer speaks volumes about him as a person and as a teammate. 
    “I think my favorite part is the relationship you form with the pitchers. I take a lot of pride in that. It’s not about me back there. My job is to get the best out of those guys. For me, I try to be there for them if they want me to catch extra. Get to know them off the field. What’s their personality? And most important, what is their stuff like?”
    In addition to building that relationship, Isola has worked hard on other aspects of catching too. “(I want to) Make sure I’m on top of my game calling. That’s been a big thing for me. Such an important part of the game is game calling, but it’s also fun because it’s like solving a problem. You’ve got your guy’s strengths against a hitter's weaknesses. But you’ve got to first focus on your guy’s strengths and then form a plan based on that. Obviously you like throwing out runners. The receiving part is, the Twins are big on that, it took me awhile to learn, and I’m still learning everyday. We’re on the one-knee stance a lot. My favorite part is the relationship part, and then game-calling because that’s where I can solve problems.”
    With Kernels first baseman Gabe Snyder on the Injured List and Trey Cabbage up in Double-A, the team has to play others at first base. Many nights, that is a catcher, and Isola has been able to get extra at bats because of that flexibility. He had played a little bit there in junior college. 
    “It was one of the things I worked on during quarantine. I had so much time. Some of the guys I worked with are infielders, so I figured why not. I got to see Astudillo, and you can create a lot of value for yourself just by playing other positions.” 
    He added, “I’m open to it. I want to learn. You just play wherever the team needs you at this point. We’ve had so many injuries this year. I’m just trying to help where I can. I want to play every day, so whatever “Dink” wants, I can do.”   
    Also during quarantine, Isola was able to rekindle something that will help him through the ups and downs of a long baseball season and career. 
    “My faith is something that I grew up with and when I got to college strayed away from to be honest. This last year during quarantine I rekindled my relationship with God and it’s made me realize how important it is to have a relationship with Him. Early in the year when I was struggling at the plate, I had faith that God would get me through and reading the Bible allowed me to maintain a good perspective on things that normally would have had me panicking. Having that relationship with God is key for me along with my family in getting through the ups and downs of a season.”
    On  Tuesday night in Cedar Rapids, Isola was behind the plate, but at the plate, he went 3-for-5 with two runs and three RBI. He had a single, a double and his seventh home run of the season. No, he didn’t have a triple. He hasn’t had one in his professional career. He didn’t have any in three seasons of college ball. 
    He said, “I think I had one in high school. I’m not a fast runner. I’m a catcher. I’m going to need a deep ballpark.” 

    In 42 games on the season, Isola is now hitting .234/.379/.438 (.817) with seven doubles, seven homers and 20 RBI. He also has 31 walks to go against 36 strikeouts. He is patient at the plate and yet has some really good pop in his bat. 
    A couple of weeks ago, Brian Dinkelman said, “I think his eye and approach have always been there as far as laying off pitches and taking his walks. Now he’s getting stronger and is starting to hit the ball a little harder. The power is starting to come around. So if he can combine the walks with some power also, he can be a good hitter.” 
    “For me as a hitter, I try to go in with an understanding of what I’m going to do. There are times when you are just reacting, but if I can go in with a good plan based on which pitcher we’re facing. The big thing with the walks is you just don’t want to give away at bats. That’s the tough thing about baseball. It’s a long season. You really have to be competitive in there. There are a lot of strikeouts in baseball right now. I choke up with two strikes. I foul off a lot of balls. I work deep in counts so I’ll get some walks.” 
    He gives a lot of credit to Kernels hitting coach Bryce Berg.  “I give it up to him. He does a great job of helping me develop a plan, trying that and executing it.” . 
    Alex Isola used the time off in 2020 to his benefit. “I had a full year to just work on my game. Credit to the Twins. I’ve been working with hitting coaches and catching coaches during quarantine. As much as everyone was down because were weren’t playing, I tried to use it as a positive and try to focus on all aspects of my game.” 
    Manager Brian Dinkelman notes that Isola has really grown as a player since he joined the Kernels late in the 2019 season. “He’s really improved his ABs. He’s really driving the ball a lot more this year in terms of power, which is good to see. He’s improving every day and becoming more of a complete player.” 
    Isola hasn’t shown up on any Twins top prospect ranking articles. However, if he continues to work hard on presenting pitches and working with pitchers, and is able to maintain a solid approach at the plate, he is a guy who could slowly work his way up to the big leagues in time.
     
  20. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from dbminn for an article, Kernels' Backstop Alex Isola is Catching On   
    Alex Isola has played catcher most of his ball-playing career. He grew up near Sacramento and attended Jesuit High School where he starred on the ball field and in the classroom. He went to the University of Utah for one season and played in 12 games. The next year, he headed to Arizona where he played for Yavapai College, a junior college. He hit .367 with eight homers and 37 RBI that year which provided him with the opportunity to go to Texas Christian University for his junior season. 
    In 2019, Isola started 49 games for the Horned Frogs, 34 at catcher and 15 at DH. He hit .267/.377/.385 (.762) with seven doubles and five home runs. He also really grew as a catcher. The Twins drafted him in the 29th round in 2019 and sent him to Elizabethton. After just seven games in the Appalachian League, he finished the season with 18 games played for the then Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels. 
    This spring, Isola was invited to participate in the Twins depth camp at big-league spring training. He didn’t get many in-game plate appearances, but he learned a lot. 
    He said in early May, “The experience was one full of learning and a taste of what it’s like to be at that level. Just to see guys go about their business and watch them on an everyday basis allowed me to see what it takes and gave me things to learn about and add to my game.” 
    Isola continued, “I got to talk to Nelson Cruz and Josh Donaldson who were some of my favorite guys to watch in high school, but I tried not to be too in awe because I didn’t want them to feel uncomfortable. They really just showed me how to find a routine and the thing that impressed me the most was their discipline each day about doing the same things over and over with enthusiasm.” 

    He spent a lot of time working with the big-league catchers. “It can be really complicated. Those guys do a good job of doing complicated better and making it as simple as possible. Just watching Garver, Jeffers and others, you find a routine that works for you, like a pregame routine, something that you can go to every day to get better. It was more about the way they approach every day and go about their business. Baseball is repetition. You have to do the same thing every day, and you have to love doing the same stuff every day. You see how they go about it. They don’t cheat themselves. They grind everyday.”  
    Let’s get back to the defensive side of catching where that grind can be tough. I was always too chicken to want to don the tools of ignorance when I was young. I wanted to play shortstop or third base. I didn’t want to wear the gear or take foul tips. However, in summer amateur ball while in college, I agreed to play the position when the team’s catcher (OK, my brother) got hit in the face with a fastball that tailed right into his nose. I’ve got to be honest, I loved it. No, not that my brother had a broken nose and needed surgery. That was scary! But I loved catching. I wish I would have played there all along. You are involved in every pitch. You kind of run the show. 
    What is it about the position that Isola most enjoys? His answer speaks volumes about him as a person and as a teammate. 
    “I think my favorite part is the relationship you form with the pitchers. I take a lot of pride in that. It’s not about me back there. My job is to get the best out of those guys. For me, I try to be there for them if they want me to catch extra. Get to know them off the field. What’s their personality? And most important, what is their stuff like?”
    In addition to building that relationship, Isola has worked hard on other aspects of catching too. “(I want to) Make sure I’m on top of my game calling. That’s been a big thing for me. Such an important part of the game is game calling, but it’s also fun because it’s like solving a problem. You’ve got your guy’s strengths against a hitter's weaknesses. But you’ve got to first focus on your guy’s strengths and then form a plan based on that. Obviously you like throwing out runners. The receiving part is, the Twins are big on that, it took me awhile to learn, and I’m still learning everyday. We’re on the one-knee stance a lot. My favorite part is the relationship part, and then game-calling because that’s where I can solve problems.”
    With Kernels first baseman Gabe Snyder on the Injured List and Trey Cabbage up in Double-A, the team has to play others at first base. Many nights, that is a catcher, and Isola has been able to get extra at bats because of that flexibility. He had played a little bit there in junior college. 
    “It was one of the things I worked on during quarantine. I had so much time. Some of the guys I worked with are infielders, so I figured why not. I got to see Astudillo, and you can create a lot of value for yourself just by playing other positions.” 
    He added, “I’m open to it. I want to learn. You just play wherever the team needs you at this point. We’ve had so many injuries this year. I’m just trying to help where I can. I want to play every day, so whatever “Dink” wants, I can do.”   
    Also during quarantine, Isola was able to rekindle something that will help him through the ups and downs of a long baseball season and career. 
    “My faith is something that I grew up with and when I got to college strayed away from to be honest. This last year during quarantine I rekindled my relationship with God and it’s made me realize how important it is to have a relationship with Him. Early in the year when I was struggling at the plate, I had faith that God would get me through and reading the Bible allowed me to maintain a good perspective on things that normally would have had me panicking. Having that relationship with God is key for me along with my family in getting through the ups and downs of a season.”
    On  Tuesday night in Cedar Rapids, Isola was behind the plate, but at the plate, he went 3-for-5 with two runs and three RBI. He had a single, a double and his seventh home run of the season. No, he didn’t have a triple. He hasn’t had one in his professional career. He didn’t have any in three seasons of college ball. 
    He said, “I think I had one in high school. I’m not a fast runner. I’m a catcher. I’m going to need a deep ballpark.” 

    In 42 games on the season, Isola is now hitting .234/.379/.438 (.817) with seven doubles, seven homers and 20 RBI. He also has 31 walks to go against 36 strikeouts. He is patient at the plate and yet has some really good pop in his bat. 
    A couple of weeks ago, Brian Dinkelman said, “I think his eye and approach have always been there as far as laying off pitches and taking his walks. Now he’s getting stronger and is starting to hit the ball a little harder. The power is starting to come around. So if he can combine the walks with some power also, he can be a good hitter.” 
    “For me as a hitter, I try to go in with an understanding of what I’m going to do. There are times when you are just reacting, but if I can go in with a good plan based on which pitcher we’re facing. The big thing with the walks is you just don’t want to give away at bats. That’s the tough thing about baseball. It’s a long season. You really have to be competitive in there. There are a lot of strikeouts in baseball right now. I choke up with two strikes. I foul off a lot of balls. I work deep in counts so I’ll get some walks.” 
    He gives a lot of credit to Kernels hitting coach Bryce Berg.  “I give it up to him. He does a great job of helping me develop a plan, trying that and executing it.” . 
    Alex Isola used the time off in 2020 to his benefit. “I had a full year to just work on my game. Credit to the Twins. I’ve been working with hitting coaches and catching coaches during quarantine. As much as everyone was down because were weren’t playing, I tried to use it as a positive and try to focus on all aspects of my game.” 
    Manager Brian Dinkelman notes that Isola has really grown as a player since he joined the Kernels late in the 2019 season. “He’s really improved his ABs. He’s really driving the ball a lot more this year in terms of power, which is good to see. He’s improving every day and becoming more of a complete player.” 
    Isola hasn’t shown up on any Twins top prospect ranking articles. However, if he continues to work hard on presenting pitches and working with pitchers, and is able to maintain a solid approach at the plate, he is a guy who could slowly work his way up to the big leagues in time.
     
  21. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Dman for an article, Kernels' Backstop Alex Isola is Catching On   
    Alex Isola has played catcher most of his ball-playing career. He grew up near Sacramento and attended Jesuit High School where he starred on the ball field and in the classroom. He went to the University of Utah for one season and played in 12 games. The next year, he headed to Arizona where he played for Yavapai College, a junior college. He hit .367 with eight homers and 37 RBI that year which provided him with the opportunity to go to Texas Christian University for his junior season. 
    In 2019, Isola started 49 games for the Horned Frogs, 34 at catcher and 15 at DH. He hit .267/.377/.385 (.762) with seven doubles and five home runs. He also really grew as a catcher. The Twins drafted him in the 29th round in 2019 and sent him to Elizabethton. After just seven games in the Appalachian League, he finished the season with 18 games played for the then Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels. 
    This spring, Isola was invited to participate in the Twins depth camp at big-league spring training. He didn’t get many in-game plate appearances, but he learned a lot. 
    He said in early May, “The experience was one full of learning and a taste of what it’s like to be at that level. Just to see guys go about their business and watch them on an everyday basis allowed me to see what it takes and gave me things to learn about and add to my game.” 
    Isola continued, “I got to talk to Nelson Cruz and Josh Donaldson who were some of my favorite guys to watch in high school, but I tried not to be too in awe because I didn’t want them to feel uncomfortable. They really just showed me how to find a routine and the thing that impressed me the most was their discipline each day about doing the same things over and over with enthusiasm.” 

    He spent a lot of time working with the big-league catchers. “It can be really complicated. Those guys do a good job of doing complicated better and making it as simple as possible. Just watching Garver, Jeffers and others, you find a routine that works for you, like a pregame routine, something that you can go to every day to get better. It was more about the way they approach every day and go about their business. Baseball is repetition. You have to do the same thing every day, and you have to love doing the same stuff every day. You see how they go about it. They don’t cheat themselves. They grind everyday.”  
    Let’s get back to the defensive side of catching where that grind can be tough. I was always too chicken to want to don the tools of ignorance when I was young. I wanted to play shortstop or third base. I didn’t want to wear the gear or take foul tips. However, in summer amateur ball while in college, I agreed to play the position when the team’s catcher (OK, my brother) got hit in the face with a fastball that tailed right into his nose. I’ve got to be honest, I loved it. No, not that my brother had a broken nose and needed surgery. That was scary! But I loved catching. I wish I would have played there all along. You are involved in every pitch. You kind of run the show. 
    What is it about the position that Isola most enjoys? His answer speaks volumes about him as a person and as a teammate. 
    “I think my favorite part is the relationship you form with the pitchers. I take a lot of pride in that. It’s not about me back there. My job is to get the best out of those guys. For me, I try to be there for them if they want me to catch extra. Get to know them off the field. What’s their personality? And most important, what is their stuff like?”
    In addition to building that relationship, Isola has worked hard on other aspects of catching too. “(I want to) Make sure I’m on top of my game calling. That’s been a big thing for me. Such an important part of the game is game calling, but it’s also fun because it’s like solving a problem. You’ve got your guy’s strengths against a hitter's weaknesses. But you’ve got to first focus on your guy’s strengths and then form a plan based on that. Obviously you like throwing out runners. The receiving part is, the Twins are big on that, it took me awhile to learn, and I’m still learning everyday. We’re on the one-knee stance a lot. My favorite part is the relationship part, and then game-calling because that’s where I can solve problems.”
    With Kernels first baseman Gabe Snyder on the Injured List and Trey Cabbage up in Double-A, the team has to play others at first base. Many nights, that is a catcher, and Isola has been able to get extra at bats because of that flexibility. He had played a little bit there in junior college. 
    “It was one of the things I worked on during quarantine. I had so much time. Some of the guys I worked with are infielders, so I figured why not. I got to see Astudillo, and you can create a lot of value for yourself just by playing other positions.” 
    He added, “I’m open to it. I want to learn. You just play wherever the team needs you at this point. We’ve had so many injuries this year. I’m just trying to help where I can. I want to play every day, so whatever “Dink” wants, I can do.”   
    Also during quarantine, Isola was able to rekindle something that will help him through the ups and downs of a long baseball season and career. 
    “My faith is something that I grew up with and when I got to college strayed away from to be honest. This last year during quarantine I rekindled my relationship with God and it’s made me realize how important it is to have a relationship with Him. Early in the year when I was struggling at the plate, I had faith that God would get me through and reading the Bible allowed me to maintain a good perspective on things that normally would have had me panicking. Having that relationship with God is key for me along with my family in getting through the ups and downs of a season.”
    On  Tuesday night in Cedar Rapids, Isola was behind the plate, but at the plate, he went 3-for-5 with two runs and three RBI. He had a single, a double and his seventh home run of the season. No, he didn’t have a triple. He hasn’t had one in his professional career. He didn’t have any in three seasons of college ball. 
    He said, “I think I had one in high school. I’m not a fast runner. I’m a catcher. I’m going to need a deep ballpark.” 

    In 42 games on the season, Isola is now hitting .234/.379/.438 (.817) with seven doubles, seven homers and 20 RBI. He also has 31 walks to go against 36 strikeouts. He is patient at the plate and yet has some really good pop in his bat. 
    A couple of weeks ago, Brian Dinkelman said, “I think his eye and approach have always been there as far as laying off pitches and taking his walks. Now he’s getting stronger and is starting to hit the ball a little harder. The power is starting to come around. So if he can combine the walks with some power also, he can be a good hitter.” 
    “For me as a hitter, I try to go in with an understanding of what I’m going to do. There are times when you are just reacting, but if I can go in with a good plan based on which pitcher we’re facing. The big thing with the walks is you just don’t want to give away at bats. That’s the tough thing about baseball. It’s a long season. You really have to be competitive in there. There are a lot of strikeouts in baseball right now. I choke up with two strikes. I foul off a lot of balls. I work deep in counts so I’ll get some walks.” 
    He gives a lot of credit to Kernels hitting coach Bryce Berg.  “I give it up to him. He does a great job of helping me develop a plan, trying that and executing it.” . 
    Alex Isola used the time off in 2020 to his benefit. “I had a full year to just work on my game. Credit to the Twins. I’ve been working with hitting coaches and catching coaches during quarantine. As much as everyone was down because were weren’t playing, I tried to use it as a positive and try to focus on all aspects of my game.” 
    Manager Brian Dinkelman notes that Isola has really grown as a player since he joined the Kernels late in the 2019 season. “He’s really improved his ABs. He’s really driving the ball a lot more this year in terms of power, which is good to see. He’s improving every day and becoming more of a complete player.” 
    Isola hasn’t shown up on any Twins top prospect ranking articles. However, if he continues to work hard on presenting pitches and working with pitchers, and is able to maintain a solid approach at the plate, he is a guy who could slowly work his way up to the big leagues in time.
     
  22. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from operation mindcrime for an article, Kernels' Backstop Alex Isola is Catching On   
    Alex Isola has played catcher most of his ball-playing career. He grew up near Sacramento and attended Jesuit High School where he starred on the ball field and in the classroom. He went to the University of Utah for one season and played in 12 games. The next year, he headed to Arizona where he played for Yavapai College, a junior college. He hit .367 with eight homers and 37 RBI that year which provided him with the opportunity to go to Texas Christian University for his junior season. 
    In 2019, Isola started 49 games for the Horned Frogs, 34 at catcher and 15 at DH. He hit .267/.377/.385 (.762) with seven doubles and five home runs. He also really grew as a catcher. The Twins drafted him in the 29th round in 2019 and sent him to Elizabethton. After just seven games in the Appalachian League, he finished the season with 18 games played for the then Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels. 
    This spring, Isola was invited to participate in the Twins depth camp at big-league spring training. He didn’t get many in-game plate appearances, but he learned a lot. 
    He said in early May, “The experience was one full of learning and a taste of what it’s like to be at that level. Just to see guys go about their business and watch them on an everyday basis allowed me to see what it takes and gave me things to learn about and add to my game.” 
    Isola continued, “I got to talk to Nelson Cruz and Josh Donaldson who were some of my favorite guys to watch in high school, but I tried not to be too in awe because I didn’t want them to feel uncomfortable. They really just showed me how to find a routine and the thing that impressed me the most was their discipline each day about doing the same things over and over with enthusiasm.” 

    He spent a lot of time working with the big-league catchers. “It can be really complicated. Those guys do a good job of doing complicated better and making it as simple as possible. Just watching Garver, Jeffers and others, you find a routine that works for you, like a pregame routine, something that you can go to every day to get better. It was more about the way they approach every day and go about their business. Baseball is repetition. You have to do the same thing every day, and you have to love doing the same stuff every day. You see how they go about it. They don’t cheat themselves. They grind everyday.”  
    Let’s get back to the defensive side of catching where that grind can be tough. I was always too chicken to want to don the tools of ignorance when I was young. I wanted to play shortstop or third base. I didn’t want to wear the gear or take foul tips. However, in summer amateur ball while in college, I agreed to play the position when the team’s catcher (OK, my brother) got hit in the face with a fastball that tailed right into his nose. I’ve got to be honest, I loved it. No, not that my brother had a broken nose and needed surgery. That was scary! But I loved catching. I wish I would have played there all along. You are involved in every pitch. You kind of run the show. 
    What is it about the position that Isola most enjoys? His answer speaks volumes about him as a person and as a teammate. 
    “I think my favorite part is the relationship you form with the pitchers. I take a lot of pride in that. It’s not about me back there. My job is to get the best out of those guys. For me, I try to be there for them if they want me to catch extra. Get to know them off the field. What’s their personality? And most important, what is their stuff like?”
    In addition to building that relationship, Isola has worked hard on other aspects of catching too. “(I want to) Make sure I’m on top of my game calling. That’s been a big thing for me. Such an important part of the game is game calling, but it’s also fun because it’s like solving a problem. You’ve got your guy’s strengths against a hitter's weaknesses. But you’ve got to first focus on your guy’s strengths and then form a plan based on that. Obviously you like throwing out runners. The receiving part is, the Twins are big on that, it took me awhile to learn, and I’m still learning everyday. We’re on the one-knee stance a lot. My favorite part is the relationship part, and then game-calling because that’s where I can solve problems.”
    With Kernels first baseman Gabe Snyder on the Injured List and Trey Cabbage up in Double-A, the team has to play others at first base. Many nights, that is a catcher, and Isola has been able to get extra at bats because of that flexibility. He had played a little bit there in junior college. 
    “It was one of the things I worked on during quarantine. I had so much time. Some of the guys I worked with are infielders, so I figured why not. I got to see Astudillo, and you can create a lot of value for yourself just by playing other positions.” 
    He added, “I’m open to it. I want to learn. You just play wherever the team needs you at this point. We’ve had so many injuries this year. I’m just trying to help where I can. I want to play every day, so whatever “Dink” wants, I can do.”   
    Also during quarantine, Isola was able to rekindle something that will help him through the ups and downs of a long baseball season and career. 
    “My faith is something that I grew up with and when I got to college strayed away from to be honest. This last year during quarantine I rekindled my relationship with God and it’s made me realize how important it is to have a relationship with Him. Early in the year when I was struggling at the plate, I had faith that God would get me through and reading the Bible allowed me to maintain a good perspective on things that normally would have had me panicking. Having that relationship with God is key for me along with my family in getting through the ups and downs of a season.”
    On  Tuesday night in Cedar Rapids, Isola was behind the plate, but at the plate, he went 3-for-5 with two runs and three RBI. He had a single, a double and his seventh home run of the season. No, he didn’t have a triple. He hasn’t had one in his professional career. He didn’t have any in three seasons of college ball. 
    He said, “I think I had one in high school. I’m not a fast runner. I’m a catcher. I’m going to need a deep ballpark.” 

    In 42 games on the season, Isola is now hitting .234/.379/.438 (.817) with seven doubles, seven homers and 20 RBI. He also has 31 walks to go against 36 strikeouts. He is patient at the plate and yet has some really good pop in his bat. 
    A couple of weeks ago, Brian Dinkelman said, “I think his eye and approach have always been there as far as laying off pitches and taking his walks. Now he’s getting stronger and is starting to hit the ball a little harder. The power is starting to come around. So if he can combine the walks with some power also, he can be a good hitter.” 
    “For me as a hitter, I try to go in with an understanding of what I’m going to do. There are times when you are just reacting, but if I can go in with a good plan based on which pitcher we’re facing. The big thing with the walks is you just don’t want to give away at bats. That’s the tough thing about baseball. It’s a long season. You really have to be competitive in there. There are a lot of strikeouts in baseball right now. I choke up with two strikes. I foul off a lot of balls. I work deep in counts so I’ll get some walks.” 
    He gives a lot of credit to Kernels hitting coach Bryce Berg.  “I give it up to him. He does a great job of helping me develop a plan, trying that and executing it.” . 
    Alex Isola used the time off in 2020 to his benefit. “I had a full year to just work on my game. Credit to the Twins. I’ve been working with hitting coaches and catching coaches during quarantine. As much as everyone was down because were weren’t playing, I tried to use it as a positive and try to focus on all aspects of my game.” 
    Manager Brian Dinkelman notes that Isola has really grown as a player since he joined the Kernels late in the 2019 season. “He’s really improved his ABs. He’s really driving the ball a lot more this year in terms of power, which is good to see. He’s improving every day and becoming more of a complete player.” 
    Isola hasn’t shown up on any Twins top prospect ranking articles. However, if he continues to work hard on presenting pitches and working with pitchers, and is able to maintain a solid approach at the plate, he is a guy who could slowly work his way up to the big leagues in time.
     
  23. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Minor League Week in Review: Awards, Rankings, Playoffs and Prospects   
    It’s hard to believe that two months of the minor league season are now complete. You’ll see in the week’s article links that we have named our hitter and pitchers of the month for June as well as updated our Midseason Top 20 Prospect rankings. I also encourage you to read Nick’s Twins Week in Review from yesterday, and then jump into the minor league week. 
     
    Before we get started, let’s check out the Transactions and the FCL Twins game on Monday: 
    RHP Breckin Williams was signed to a minor league contract and assigned to the Cedar Rapids Kernels.   
    FCL Twins Talk
    FCL Twins 3, FCL Pirates Black 6
    Box Score
    The FCL Twins fell to 2-4 on their season with a loss on Monday. Jesus Feliz went 2-for-4. Wilfri Castro went 2-for-2 with an RBI double. Keoni Cavaco went 1-for-3 in his third rehab game. 
    On the mound, Giovahniey German started and gave up three runs on four hits and three walks over 3 1/3 innings. He struck out four batters. Justin Wilson came on. He was also charged with three runs. He gave up four hits. Ramon Pineda came in and gave up a hit before getting the final out. 
     
    With that, let’s look at Week 9 in the Twins minor leagues: 
    RESULTS
    Triple-A: St. Paul Saints: Week (4-2, hosting Omaha), overall (25-28)
    Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge: Week (3-3 at Amarillo), overall (31-23)
    High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels: Week (2-4, @ Quad Cities), overall (28-26)
    Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels: Week (3-3 hosting Bradenton), overall (31-23) 
    Complex League: FCL Twins went 2-4 in their first week.
     
    IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
    Here are the week’s Twins minor league-related articles. 
    Twins Minor League Week in Review: Promotions and FCL Opening Day  Tuesday: It’s Jose Miranda’s World, We’re Just Living in it.  Wednesday: Balazovic Blows them Away  Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Month  Twins Daily Minor League Starting Pitcher of the Month  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 16-20 (plus honorable mentions)  Thursday: Amarillo by Morning, Fun is Good  RBS: Does Jose Miranda’s Rise Mean I have to Listen to Hamilton?  Friday: Winder Dazzles in Saints Debut  Twins Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Month - June 2021 Saturday: No Offense  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 11-15  Sunday: Three Wins on the Fourth  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings: 6-10  Twins Minor League Pitching Report: Jovani Moran   
    Highlights
    We will start with the Twins choices for the organizational hitter and pitcher of the week, and then mention several other Twins prospects who had good Week 9 performances
    Twins Player of the Week: Jose Miranda, Wichita Wind Surge    
    Miranda just continues to rake… wait! I said that last week when he was the player of the week. The difference, of course, is now he is raking in Triple-A. For the week, Miranda hit .385/414/808 (1.221) with two doubles and three home runs. And, what a memorable Triple-A debut last Tuesday when he went 5-for-6 with a double and three home runs.  
     
    Twins Pitcher of the Week: Sawyer Gipson-Long, Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels      
    Gipson-Long has been pretty solid since a rough first few starts. In his start this past week, he gave up two runs (1 earned) on four hits in six innings. He struck out nine batters without issuing a walk. In his past six starts, he has gone 4-0 with a 2.16 ERA in 33 1/3 innings. He has 48 strikeouts and just six walks. 
    Gipson-Long was the Twins sixth-round pick in 2019 out of Mercer University in his home state of Georgia. 
     
    Other Strong Performances this Week
    St. Paul Saints
    In a pretty neat highlight, infielder Drew Stankiewicz became the first player to suit up for the Saints when they were an independent team and now as an affiliate. 
    Josh Winder made his Triple-A debut and was fantastic. He had a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He gave up one run on one hit and two walks over 5 2/3 innings. He struck out eight batters. Also this week, he was named to represent the Twins in the Futures Game in Denver. He will be joined by pitching coach Cibney Bello. 
    Chandler Shepherd put together another terrific start. The veteran tossed five shutout innings. He gave up just two hits and didn’t walk a batter. Charlie Barnes threw seven innings and gave up two runs on six hits and a walk. 
    Ian Hamilton pitched twice. He gave up only one hit, a solo homer over four innings. He walked none and struck out eight. 
    Drew Maggi was named the Triple-A East Player of the Week by MiLB.com. For the week, he went 9-for-21 (.429) with two doubles. He also homered in four consecutive games. In five games, he hit .429/.455/1.095 (1.550). Brent Rooker continues to rake! In six games, he hit .318/.444/.818 (1.263) with a triple and three home runs. Jimmy Kerrigan played in five games and hit .474/.524/.579 (1.103) with two doubles. Damek Tomscha and Mark Contreras each added two home runs last week, and they had OPS over .900. 
    Finally, it has been a rough (couple of) season(s) for outfielder Keon Broxton, but last week, he was quite good. In his five games, he hit .389/.450/.778 (1.228) with a double and two home runs. 
     
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Jordan Balazovic had a nice start this week. He tossed 5 2/3 innings of scoreless, hitless ball in his start. He walked two and struck out six batters. 
    Understandably, Yennier Cano and Jovani Moran got a lot of attention, but others in the Wichita bullpen have been very good too. Ryan Mason worked three games last week. He worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings and struck out four. Zach Neff worked three scoreless innings over three appearances. Alex Phillips tossed  3 2/3 scoreless innings. He struck out five and walked one. 
    Like Jose Miranda in St. Paul, Spencer Steer has transitioned to Double-A quite well, at least through his first week. In six games, he hit .320/.393/.680 (1.073) with three homers.  
     
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    Jon Olsen had a tremendous start last week. He tossed five scoreless innings. He gave up two hits, walked two and struck out two batters. Ben Gross gave up one run on two hits and two walks over five innings. He struck out five batters. Zach Featherstone pitched four innings over three games. He didn’t give up any runs. He allowed just one hit and walked three. He also struck out six batters. 
    Michael Helman had a real good week. In six games, he hit .333/.440/.714 (1.154) with two doubles and two home runs. He also walked four times. Like Miranda and Steer, Edouard Julien is adapting just fine to the High-A competition. In his first week, he played all six games and hit .250/.444/.550 (.994) with two home runs. He also walked seven times. Daniel Ozoria hit .364 (4-11). Among Alex Isola’s four hits this past week, he had a double and two home runs. 
     
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Osiris German and Steven Cruz each threw four scoreless innings over two games. Each walked one and struck out six batters. Matt Swain gave up zero earned runs over four innings over two appearances.  Denny Bentley had three scoreless innings and struck out four without allowing a baserunner. 
    Louis Varland gave up one run on six hits over six innings in his start. He struck out nine and didn’t walk anyone. Zarion Sharpe threw 3 2/3 innings and gave up only two unearned runs on two hits. He struck out three batters.
    Newcomer Nick Anderson had a solid week. He played in five games, though he had just nine plate appearances. He went 2-for-6 with a triple and two walks to post a 1.222 OPS.  
     
    Lowlights
    We are talking about very small samples for these six-game weeks, so it’s important not to make any big decisions or develop a full impression on a player from this small size. It’s just a reminder of the fact that baseball is hard, and all players have good and bad stretches.  
    St. Paul Saints
    The Twins added veteran Joe Harvey to the Saints roster this week. He made his first appearance and gave up four runs on two hits and two walks in just 1/3 of an inning. Another new veteran, Kyle Barraclough gave up three earned runs on four hits (2 homers) in 2 2/3 innings. Robinson Leyer gave up three runs on six hits and two walks in two innings.   
    JT Riddle had a tough week. He hit just .143 (3-for-23). 
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Adam Lau pitched twice and worked just 1 1/3 innings. He gave up six runs on two hits and two walks and two hit batters. 
    Caleb Hamilton went 0-for-9 in three games. Wilbis Santiago went 1-for-12. Andrew Bechtold went 1-for-9. Aaron Whitefield played all six games and hit .167/.259/.167 (.426). Of the 12 Wind Surge hitters with nine or more at bats in Week 9, just three had a batting average above .200. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    The bad news for the Kernels last week was that three position players had to pitch. Yeltsin Encarnacion, Daniel Ozoria and Max Smith each spent time on the mound. Owen Griffith had a tough week. In two outings, he gave up seven runs on 10 hits and a walk over 2 1/3 innings. Melvi Acosta gave up five earned runs on eight hits and two walks in his 2 1/3 innings. Cody Laweryson’s start this week was a struggle. The right-hander gave up five runs on six hits and a walk in three innings. 
    Jair Camargo played in five games, but he had just one hit in 15 at bats (.067). Wander Javier hit just .118 while Seth Gray hit just .125 for the week.   
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Juan Pichardo gave up four runs on four hits in 3 1/3 innings in two games. 
    Wander Valdez returned to the Mussels, but he went 0-for-7. Willie Joe Garry went 1-for-11 (.091), but that one hit was a walk-off hit. Will Holland hit .130 (4-23), though he had a double and a homer.   
     
    Trending Storyline 
    The plan was for there to be no playoffs in 2021. The assumption was that games and series might be lost in the minor leagues (as had happened in the big leagues) due to COVID. And, because of all of the lost development time from a year ago, it would be better for the players and organizations to scrap the playoffs and just have all teams play two or three extra weeks at the end of the season. 
    Well, last week, it was decided that there will be playoffs in 2021.
    In Low-A, High-A and Double-A, the top two teams by record will play a series. That series will begin September 21st. There will be no Triple-A playoffs, presumably because there may be more need at the big-league level and players can only be called up from Triple-A. Instead, those seasons will continue through October third. Teams will get two additional five-game series. 
    My personal opinion is that I would much rather see the Mighty Mussels, Kernels and Wind Surge play ten additional games than not play any playoff games. Obviously if the Twins’ affiliate is in the playoffs, great. If not, it’s two weeks of lost development time. 
    However, from a player’s perspective, and probably from an affiliate’s perspective, it’s probably nice to have a carrot dangling at the end of the season.
     
    PROSPECT SUMMARY
    Here’s a look at how the Twins Daily PRESEASON Top 20 Twins Prospects have performed on the season (as well as too many unfortunate injuries). As you’ve seen, our MIDSEASON Top 20 Prospect rankings are being posted right now, so next week, we will update the below to reflect ‘graduations’ and the new rankings. 
    #1 - Alex Kirilloff (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (2 rehab games, went 3-6 with 2 homers, 2 K), Minnesota (48 games, .263/.300/.447 (.747) with 10 doubles, 1 triple, 7 homers, 29 RBI, 10 BB, 43 K)
    #2 - Royce Lewis (Wichita) - Out for Season (torn ACL)
    #3 - Trevor Larnach (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (3 games, went 3-11 with two homers, two walks, 8 strikeouts), Minnesota (47 games, .263/.359/.436 (.795) with 9 doubles, 6 homers, 17 RBI, 18 BB, 54 K) 
    #4 - Ryan Jeffers (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (24 games, .217/.340/.446 (.786) with four doubles, five homers, 16 BB, 26 K), Minnesota (32 games, .187/.275/.374 (.649) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 5 home runs, 15 RBI, 13 BB, 40 K)
    #5 - Jhoan Duran (St. Paul) – 5 G, 4 GS, 16.0 IP, 16 H, 13 BB, 22 K, 5.06 ERA, 1.81 WHIP (on IL with a right forearm strain)  
    #6 - Jordan Balazovic (Wichita) – 6 GS, 24.1 IP, 26 H, 8 BB, 33 K, 4.44 ERA, 1.40 WHIP 
    #7 - Keoni Cavaco (Ft. Myers) – 28 games, .264/.333/.340 (.673) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer, 11 RBI, 10 BB, 32 K, 4 SB (on Injured List, Concussion, but played 2 rehab games in FCL this week) 
    #8 - Aaron Sabato (Ft. Myers) – 53 games, .184/.373/.291 (.664) with 10 doubles, 3 homers, 18 RBI, 50 BB, 73 K
    #9 - Matt Canterino (Cedar Rapids) – 4 GS, 18.0 IP, 10 H, 3 BB, 35 K, 1.00 ERA, 0.72 WHIP (went on the IL with right elbow strain)
    #10 - Blayne Enlow (Cedar Rapids) – 3 GS, 14.2 IP, 13 H, 6 BB, 23 K, 1.84 ERA, 1.30 WHIP (underwent Tommy John surgery on June 9th) 
    #11 - Gilberto Celestino (Minnesotal) – Wichita (21 games, .250/.344/.381 (.725) with 5 doubles, 2 homers. 11 BB, 24 K), Minnesota (15 games, .163/.200/.349 (.549) with 2 BB, 8 K)
    #12 - Brent Rooker (St. Paul) – St. Paul (46 games, .239/.381/.553 (.934) with 6 doubles, 1 triple, 14 homers, 32 BB, 59 K), Minnesota (8 games, .103/.133/.241 (375) with 1 double, 1 homer, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 13 K)
    #13 - Matt Wallner (Cedar Rapids) – 17 games, .333/.384/.621 (1.005) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers, 14 RBI, 5 BB, 28 K. (on IL after having hamate bone surgery)
    #14 - Misael Urbina (Ft. Myers) – 46 games, .201/.310/.278 (588) with 4 doubles, 3 triples, 1 homer, 27 RBI, 26 BB, 41 K, 9 SB)
    #15 - Cole Sands (Wichita) – 7 GS, 31.2 IP, 22 H, 18 BB, 42 K, 2.84 ERA, 1.26 WHIP (about to go on the IL) 
    #16 - Edwar Colina (Minnesota) - 60-Day IL (had surgery on his right elbow to remove bone chips)
    #17 - Ben Rortvedt (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (5 games, .286/.318/.571 (.890) with 3 doubles, 1 homer, 1 BB, 6 K), Minnesota (23 games, .125/.183/.196 (380) with 1 double, 1 homer, 4 RBI, 3 BB, 20 K)
    #18 - Alerick Soularie (Complex) – N/A (injured)
    #19 - Jose Miranda (St. Paul) – 53 games, .350/.409/.614 (1.023) with 10 doubles, 16 homers, 46 RBI, 19 BB, 31 K
    #20 - Bailey Ober (St. Paul) – St. Paul (4 GS, 16.0 IP, 13 H, 5 BB, 21 K, 2.81 ERA, 1.13 WHIP), Minnesota (6 GS, 24.2 IP, 28 H, 6 BB, 26 K, 5.84 ERA, 1.38 WHIP) 
     
    LOOKING AHEAD
    Ft. Myers @ St. Lucie (TBD, Brent Headrick, Sawyer Gipson-Long; Louie Varland, Bobby Milacki, Miguel Rodriguez): 
    Peoria @ Cedar Rapids:(Ben Gross, Cody Laweryson, Tyler Beck, Kody Funderburk, Jon Olsen, Tyler Watson)
    NW Arkansas @ Wichita: (Bryan Sammons, Chris Vallimont, Austin Schulfer, Jason Garcia, Jordan Balazovic, Bryan Sammons) 
    St. Paul @ Iowa: (Andrew Albers, Josh Winder, Charlie Barnes, Chandler Shepherd, Beau Burrows, Andrew Albers): 

    Feel free to provide some feedback below regarding these reports. What do you like to read? What types of information would you like added? Also, feel free to ask any questions you like.
     
  24. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from DocBauer for an article, Twins Minor League Week in Review: Awards, Rankings, Playoffs and Prospects   
    It’s hard to believe that two months of the minor league season are now complete. You’ll see in the week’s article links that we have named our hitter and pitchers of the month for June as well as updated our Midseason Top 20 Prospect rankings. I also encourage you to read Nick’s Twins Week in Review from yesterday, and then jump into the minor league week. 
     
    Before we get started, let’s check out the Transactions and the FCL Twins game on Monday: 
    RHP Breckin Williams was signed to a minor league contract and assigned to the Cedar Rapids Kernels.   
    FCL Twins Talk
    FCL Twins 3, FCL Pirates Black 6
    Box Score
    The FCL Twins fell to 2-4 on their season with a loss on Monday. Jesus Feliz went 2-for-4. Wilfri Castro went 2-for-2 with an RBI double. Keoni Cavaco went 1-for-3 in his third rehab game. 
    On the mound, Giovahniey German started and gave up three runs on four hits and three walks over 3 1/3 innings. He struck out four batters. Justin Wilson came on. He was also charged with three runs. He gave up four hits. Ramon Pineda came in and gave up a hit before getting the final out. 
     
    With that, let’s look at Week 9 in the Twins minor leagues: 
    RESULTS
    Triple-A: St. Paul Saints: Week (4-2, hosting Omaha), overall (25-28)
    Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge: Week (3-3 at Amarillo), overall (31-23)
    High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels: Week (2-4, @ Quad Cities), overall (28-26)
    Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels: Week (3-3 hosting Bradenton), overall (31-23) 
    Complex League: FCL Twins went 2-4 in their first week.
     
    IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
    Here are the week’s Twins minor league-related articles. 
    Twins Minor League Week in Review: Promotions and FCL Opening Day  Tuesday: It’s Jose Miranda’s World, We’re Just Living in it.  Wednesday: Balazovic Blows them Away  Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Month  Twins Daily Minor League Starting Pitcher of the Month  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 16-20 (plus honorable mentions)  Thursday: Amarillo by Morning, Fun is Good  RBS: Does Jose Miranda’s Rise Mean I have to Listen to Hamilton?  Friday: Winder Dazzles in Saints Debut  Twins Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Month - June 2021 Saturday: No Offense  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 11-15  Sunday: Three Wins on the Fourth  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings: 6-10  Twins Minor League Pitching Report: Jovani Moran   
    Highlights
    We will start with the Twins choices for the organizational hitter and pitcher of the week, and then mention several other Twins prospects who had good Week 9 performances
    Twins Player of the Week: Jose Miranda, Wichita Wind Surge    
    Miranda just continues to rake… wait! I said that last week when he was the player of the week. The difference, of course, is now he is raking in Triple-A. For the week, Miranda hit .385/414/808 (1.221) with two doubles and three home runs. And, what a memorable Triple-A debut last Tuesday when he went 5-for-6 with a double and three home runs.  
     
    Twins Pitcher of the Week: Sawyer Gipson-Long, Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels      
    Gipson-Long has been pretty solid since a rough first few starts. In his start this past week, he gave up two runs (1 earned) on four hits in six innings. He struck out nine batters without issuing a walk. In his past six starts, he has gone 4-0 with a 2.16 ERA in 33 1/3 innings. He has 48 strikeouts and just six walks. 
    Gipson-Long was the Twins sixth-round pick in 2019 out of Mercer University in his home state of Georgia. 
     
    Other Strong Performances this Week
    St. Paul Saints
    In a pretty neat highlight, infielder Drew Stankiewicz became the first player to suit up for the Saints when they were an independent team and now as an affiliate. 
    Josh Winder made his Triple-A debut and was fantastic. He had a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He gave up one run on one hit and two walks over 5 2/3 innings. He struck out eight batters. Also this week, he was named to represent the Twins in the Futures Game in Denver. He will be joined by pitching coach Cibney Bello. 
    Chandler Shepherd put together another terrific start. The veteran tossed five shutout innings. He gave up just two hits and didn’t walk a batter. Charlie Barnes threw seven innings and gave up two runs on six hits and a walk. 
    Ian Hamilton pitched twice. He gave up only one hit, a solo homer over four innings. He walked none and struck out eight. 
    Drew Maggi was named the Triple-A East Player of the Week by MiLB.com. For the week, he went 9-for-21 (.429) with two doubles. He also homered in four consecutive games. In five games, he hit .429/.455/1.095 (1.550). Brent Rooker continues to rake! In six games, he hit .318/.444/.818 (1.263) with a triple and three home runs. Jimmy Kerrigan played in five games and hit .474/.524/.579 (1.103) with two doubles. Damek Tomscha and Mark Contreras each added two home runs last week, and they had OPS over .900. 
    Finally, it has been a rough (couple of) season(s) for outfielder Keon Broxton, but last week, he was quite good. In his five games, he hit .389/.450/.778 (1.228) with a double and two home runs. 
     
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Jordan Balazovic had a nice start this week. He tossed 5 2/3 innings of scoreless, hitless ball in his start. He walked two and struck out six batters. 
    Understandably, Yennier Cano and Jovani Moran got a lot of attention, but others in the Wichita bullpen have been very good too. Ryan Mason worked three games last week. He worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings and struck out four. Zach Neff worked three scoreless innings over three appearances. Alex Phillips tossed  3 2/3 scoreless innings. He struck out five and walked one. 
    Like Jose Miranda in St. Paul, Spencer Steer has transitioned to Double-A quite well, at least through his first week. In six games, he hit .320/.393/.680 (1.073) with three homers.  
     
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    Jon Olsen had a tremendous start last week. He tossed five scoreless innings. He gave up two hits, walked two and struck out two batters. Ben Gross gave up one run on two hits and two walks over five innings. He struck out five batters. Zach Featherstone pitched four innings over three games. He didn’t give up any runs. He allowed just one hit and walked three. He also struck out six batters. 
    Michael Helman had a real good week. In six games, he hit .333/.440/.714 (1.154) with two doubles and two home runs. He also walked four times. Like Miranda and Steer, Edouard Julien is adapting just fine to the High-A competition. In his first week, he played all six games and hit .250/.444/.550 (.994) with two home runs. He also walked seven times. Daniel Ozoria hit .364 (4-11). Among Alex Isola’s four hits this past week, he had a double and two home runs. 
     
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Osiris German and Steven Cruz each threw four scoreless innings over two games. Each walked one and struck out six batters. Matt Swain gave up zero earned runs over four innings over two appearances.  Denny Bentley had three scoreless innings and struck out four without allowing a baserunner. 
    Louis Varland gave up one run on six hits over six innings in his start. He struck out nine and didn’t walk anyone. Zarion Sharpe threw 3 2/3 innings and gave up only two unearned runs on two hits. He struck out three batters.
    Newcomer Nick Anderson had a solid week. He played in five games, though he had just nine plate appearances. He went 2-for-6 with a triple and two walks to post a 1.222 OPS.  
     
    Lowlights
    We are talking about very small samples for these six-game weeks, so it’s important not to make any big decisions or develop a full impression on a player from this small size. It’s just a reminder of the fact that baseball is hard, and all players have good and bad stretches.  
    St. Paul Saints
    The Twins added veteran Joe Harvey to the Saints roster this week. He made his first appearance and gave up four runs on two hits and two walks in just 1/3 of an inning. Another new veteran, Kyle Barraclough gave up three earned runs on four hits (2 homers) in 2 2/3 innings. Robinson Leyer gave up three runs on six hits and two walks in two innings.   
    JT Riddle had a tough week. He hit just .143 (3-for-23). 
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Adam Lau pitched twice and worked just 1 1/3 innings. He gave up six runs on two hits and two walks and two hit batters. 
    Caleb Hamilton went 0-for-9 in three games. Wilbis Santiago went 1-for-12. Andrew Bechtold went 1-for-9. Aaron Whitefield played all six games and hit .167/.259/.167 (.426). Of the 12 Wind Surge hitters with nine or more at bats in Week 9, just three had a batting average above .200. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    The bad news for the Kernels last week was that three position players had to pitch. Yeltsin Encarnacion, Daniel Ozoria and Max Smith each spent time on the mound. Owen Griffith had a tough week. In two outings, he gave up seven runs on 10 hits and a walk over 2 1/3 innings. Melvi Acosta gave up five earned runs on eight hits and two walks in his 2 1/3 innings. Cody Laweryson’s start this week was a struggle. The right-hander gave up five runs on six hits and a walk in three innings. 
    Jair Camargo played in five games, but he had just one hit in 15 at bats (.067). Wander Javier hit just .118 while Seth Gray hit just .125 for the week.   
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Juan Pichardo gave up four runs on four hits in 3 1/3 innings in two games. 
    Wander Valdez returned to the Mussels, but he went 0-for-7. Willie Joe Garry went 1-for-11 (.091), but that one hit was a walk-off hit. Will Holland hit .130 (4-23), though he had a double and a homer.   
     
    Trending Storyline 
    The plan was for there to be no playoffs in 2021. The assumption was that games and series might be lost in the minor leagues (as had happened in the big leagues) due to COVID. And, because of all of the lost development time from a year ago, it would be better for the players and organizations to scrap the playoffs and just have all teams play two or three extra weeks at the end of the season. 
    Well, last week, it was decided that there will be playoffs in 2021.
    In Low-A, High-A and Double-A, the top two teams by record will play a series. That series will begin September 21st. There will be no Triple-A playoffs, presumably because there may be more need at the big-league level and players can only be called up from Triple-A. Instead, those seasons will continue through October third. Teams will get two additional five-game series. 
    My personal opinion is that I would much rather see the Mighty Mussels, Kernels and Wind Surge play ten additional games than not play any playoff games. Obviously if the Twins’ affiliate is in the playoffs, great. If not, it’s two weeks of lost development time. 
    However, from a player’s perspective, and probably from an affiliate’s perspective, it’s probably nice to have a carrot dangling at the end of the season.
     
    PROSPECT SUMMARY
    Here’s a look at how the Twins Daily PRESEASON Top 20 Twins Prospects have performed on the season (as well as too many unfortunate injuries). As you’ve seen, our MIDSEASON Top 20 Prospect rankings are being posted right now, so next week, we will update the below to reflect ‘graduations’ and the new rankings. 
    #1 - Alex Kirilloff (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (2 rehab games, went 3-6 with 2 homers, 2 K), Minnesota (48 games, .263/.300/.447 (.747) with 10 doubles, 1 triple, 7 homers, 29 RBI, 10 BB, 43 K)
    #2 - Royce Lewis (Wichita) - Out for Season (torn ACL)
    #3 - Trevor Larnach (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (3 games, went 3-11 with two homers, two walks, 8 strikeouts), Minnesota (47 games, .263/.359/.436 (.795) with 9 doubles, 6 homers, 17 RBI, 18 BB, 54 K) 
    #4 - Ryan Jeffers (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (24 games, .217/.340/.446 (.786) with four doubles, five homers, 16 BB, 26 K), Minnesota (32 games, .187/.275/.374 (.649) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 5 home runs, 15 RBI, 13 BB, 40 K)
    #5 - Jhoan Duran (St. Paul) – 5 G, 4 GS, 16.0 IP, 16 H, 13 BB, 22 K, 5.06 ERA, 1.81 WHIP (on IL with a right forearm strain)  
    #6 - Jordan Balazovic (Wichita) – 6 GS, 24.1 IP, 26 H, 8 BB, 33 K, 4.44 ERA, 1.40 WHIP 
    #7 - Keoni Cavaco (Ft. Myers) – 28 games, .264/.333/.340 (.673) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer, 11 RBI, 10 BB, 32 K, 4 SB (on Injured List, Concussion, but played 2 rehab games in FCL this week) 
    #8 - Aaron Sabato (Ft. Myers) – 53 games, .184/.373/.291 (.664) with 10 doubles, 3 homers, 18 RBI, 50 BB, 73 K
    #9 - Matt Canterino (Cedar Rapids) – 4 GS, 18.0 IP, 10 H, 3 BB, 35 K, 1.00 ERA, 0.72 WHIP (went on the IL with right elbow strain)
    #10 - Blayne Enlow (Cedar Rapids) – 3 GS, 14.2 IP, 13 H, 6 BB, 23 K, 1.84 ERA, 1.30 WHIP (underwent Tommy John surgery on June 9th) 
    #11 - Gilberto Celestino (Minnesotal) – Wichita (21 games, .250/.344/.381 (.725) with 5 doubles, 2 homers. 11 BB, 24 K), Minnesota (15 games, .163/.200/.349 (.549) with 2 BB, 8 K)
    #12 - Brent Rooker (St. Paul) – St. Paul (46 games, .239/.381/.553 (.934) with 6 doubles, 1 triple, 14 homers, 32 BB, 59 K), Minnesota (8 games, .103/.133/.241 (375) with 1 double, 1 homer, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 13 K)
    #13 - Matt Wallner (Cedar Rapids) – 17 games, .333/.384/.621 (1.005) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers, 14 RBI, 5 BB, 28 K. (on IL after having hamate bone surgery)
    #14 - Misael Urbina (Ft. Myers) – 46 games, .201/.310/.278 (588) with 4 doubles, 3 triples, 1 homer, 27 RBI, 26 BB, 41 K, 9 SB)
    #15 - Cole Sands (Wichita) – 7 GS, 31.2 IP, 22 H, 18 BB, 42 K, 2.84 ERA, 1.26 WHIP (about to go on the IL) 
    #16 - Edwar Colina (Minnesota) - 60-Day IL (had surgery on his right elbow to remove bone chips)
    #17 - Ben Rortvedt (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (5 games, .286/.318/.571 (.890) with 3 doubles, 1 homer, 1 BB, 6 K), Minnesota (23 games, .125/.183/.196 (380) with 1 double, 1 homer, 4 RBI, 3 BB, 20 K)
    #18 - Alerick Soularie (Complex) – N/A (injured)
    #19 - Jose Miranda (St. Paul) – 53 games, .350/.409/.614 (1.023) with 10 doubles, 16 homers, 46 RBI, 19 BB, 31 K
    #20 - Bailey Ober (St. Paul) – St. Paul (4 GS, 16.0 IP, 13 H, 5 BB, 21 K, 2.81 ERA, 1.13 WHIP), Minnesota (6 GS, 24.2 IP, 28 H, 6 BB, 26 K, 5.84 ERA, 1.38 WHIP) 
     
    LOOKING AHEAD
    Ft. Myers @ St. Lucie (TBD, Brent Headrick, Sawyer Gipson-Long; Louie Varland, Bobby Milacki, Miguel Rodriguez): 
    Peoria @ Cedar Rapids:(Ben Gross, Cody Laweryson, Tyler Beck, Kody Funderburk, Jon Olsen, Tyler Watson)
    NW Arkansas @ Wichita: (Bryan Sammons, Chris Vallimont, Austin Schulfer, Jason Garcia, Jordan Balazovic, Bryan Sammons) 
    St. Paul @ Iowa: (Andrew Albers, Josh Winder, Charlie Barnes, Chandler Shepherd, Beau Burrows, Andrew Albers): 

    Feel free to provide some feedback below regarding these reports. What do you like to read? What types of information would you like added? Also, feel free to ask any questions you like.
     
  25. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Twins Minor League Week in Review: Awards, Rankings, Playoffs and Prospects   
    It’s hard to believe that two months of the minor league season are now complete. You’ll see in the week’s article links that we have named our hitter and pitchers of the month for June as well as updated our Midseason Top 20 Prospect rankings. I also encourage you to read Nick’s Twins Week in Review from yesterday, and then jump into the minor league week. 
     
    Before we get started, let’s check out the Transactions and the FCL Twins game on Monday: 
    RHP Breckin Williams was signed to a minor league contract and assigned to the Cedar Rapids Kernels.   
    FCL Twins Talk
    FCL Twins 3, FCL Pirates Black 6
    Box Score
    The FCL Twins fell to 2-4 on their season with a loss on Monday. Jesus Feliz went 2-for-4. Wilfri Castro went 2-for-2 with an RBI double. Keoni Cavaco went 1-for-3 in his third rehab game. 
    On the mound, Giovahniey German started and gave up three runs on four hits and three walks over 3 1/3 innings. He struck out four batters. Justin Wilson came on. He was also charged with three runs. He gave up four hits. Ramon Pineda came in and gave up a hit before getting the final out. 
     
    With that, let’s look at Week 9 in the Twins minor leagues: 
    RESULTS
    Triple-A: St. Paul Saints: Week (4-2, hosting Omaha), overall (25-28)
    Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge: Week (3-3 at Amarillo), overall (31-23)
    High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels: Week (2-4, @ Quad Cities), overall (28-26)
    Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels: Week (3-3 hosting Bradenton), overall (31-23) 
    Complex League: FCL Twins went 2-4 in their first week.
     
    IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
    Here are the week’s Twins minor league-related articles. 
    Twins Minor League Week in Review: Promotions and FCL Opening Day  Tuesday: It’s Jose Miranda’s World, We’re Just Living in it.  Wednesday: Balazovic Blows them Away  Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Month  Twins Daily Minor League Starting Pitcher of the Month  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 16-20 (plus honorable mentions)  Thursday: Amarillo by Morning, Fun is Good  RBS: Does Jose Miranda’s Rise Mean I have to Listen to Hamilton?  Friday: Winder Dazzles in Saints Debut  Twins Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Month - June 2021 Saturday: No Offense  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings 11-15  Sunday: Three Wins on the Fourth  TD Midseason Top 20 Twins Prospect Rankings: 6-10  Twins Minor League Pitching Report: Jovani Moran   
    Highlights
    We will start with the Twins choices for the organizational hitter and pitcher of the week, and then mention several other Twins prospects who had good Week 9 performances
    Twins Player of the Week: Jose Miranda, Wichita Wind Surge    
    Miranda just continues to rake… wait! I said that last week when he was the player of the week. The difference, of course, is now he is raking in Triple-A. For the week, Miranda hit .385/414/808 (1.221) with two doubles and three home runs. And, what a memorable Triple-A debut last Tuesday when he went 5-for-6 with a double and three home runs.  
     
    Twins Pitcher of the Week: Sawyer Gipson-Long, Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels      
    Gipson-Long has been pretty solid since a rough first few starts. In his start this past week, he gave up two runs (1 earned) on four hits in six innings. He struck out nine batters without issuing a walk. In his past six starts, he has gone 4-0 with a 2.16 ERA in 33 1/3 innings. He has 48 strikeouts and just six walks. 
    Gipson-Long was the Twins sixth-round pick in 2019 out of Mercer University in his home state of Georgia. 
     
    Other Strong Performances this Week
    St. Paul Saints
    In a pretty neat highlight, infielder Drew Stankiewicz became the first player to suit up for the Saints when they were an independent team and now as an affiliate. 
    Josh Winder made his Triple-A debut and was fantastic. He had a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He gave up one run on one hit and two walks over 5 2/3 innings. He struck out eight batters. Also this week, he was named to represent the Twins in the Futures Game in Denver. He will be joined by pitching coach Cibney Bello. 
    Chandler Shepherd put together another terrific start. The veteran tossed five shutout innings. He gave up just two hits and didn’t walk a batter. Charlie Barnes threw seven innings and gave up two runs on six hits and a walk. 
    Ian Hamilton pitched twice. He gave up only one hit, a solo homer over four innings. He walked none and struck out eight. 
    Drew Maggi was named the Triple-A East Player of the Week by MiLB.com. For the week, he went 9-for-21 (.429) with two doubles. He also homered in four consecutive games. In five games, he hit .429/.455/1.095 (1.550). Brent Rooker continues to rake! In six games, he hit .318/.444/.818 (1.263) with a triple and three home runs. Jimmy Kerrigan played in five games and hit .474/.524/.579 (1.103) with two doubles. Damek Tomscha and Mark Contreras each added two home runs last week, and they had OPS over .900. 
    Finally, it has been a rough (couple of) season(s) for outfielder Keon Broxton, but last week, he was quite good. In his five games, he hit .389/.450/.778 (1.228) with a double and two home runs. 
     
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Jordan Balazovic had a nice start this week. He tossed 5 2/3 innings of scoreless, hitless ball in his start. He walked two and struck out six batters. 
    Understandably, Yennier Cano and Jovani Moran got a lot of attention, but others in the Wichita bullpen have been very good too. Ryan Mason worked three games last week. He worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings and struck out four. Zach Neff worked three scoreless innings over three appearances. Alex Phillips tossed  3 2/3 scoreless innings. He struck out five and walked one. 
    Like Jose Miranda in St. Paul, Spencer Steer has transitioned to Double-A quite well, at least through his first week. In six games, he hit .320/.393/.680 (1.073) with three homers.  
     
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    Jon Olsen had a tremendous start last week. He tossed five scoreless innings. He gave up two hits, walked two and struck out two batters. Ben Gross gave up one run on two hits and two walks over five innings. He struck out five batters. Zach Featherstone pitched four innings over three games. He didn’t give up any runs. He allowed just one hit and walked three. He also struck out six batters. 
    Michael Helman had a real good week. In six games, he hit .333/.440/.714 (1.154) with two doubles and two home runs. He also walked four times. Like Miranda and Steer, Edouard Julien is adapting just fine to the High-A competition. In his first week, he played all six games and hit .250/.444/.550 (.994) with two home runs. He also walked seven times. Daniel Ozoria hit .364 (4-11). Among Alex Isola’s four hits this past week, he had a double and two home runs. 
     
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Osiris German and Steven Cruz each threw four scoreless innings over two games. Each walked one and struck out six batters. Matt Swain gave up zero earned runs over four innings over two appearances.  Denny Bentley had three scoreless innings and struck out four without allowing a baserunner. 
    Louis Varland gave up one run on six hits over six innings in his start. He struck out nine and didn’t walk anyone. Zarion Sharpe threw 3 2/3 innings and gave up only two unearned runs on two hits. He struck out three batters.
    Newcomer Nick Anderson had a solid week. He played in five games, though he had just nine plate appearances. He went 2-for-6 with a triple and two walks to post a 1.222 OPS.  
     
    Lowlights
    We are talking about very small samples for these six-game weeks, so it’s important not to make any big decisions or develop a full impression on a player from this small size. It’s just a reminder of the fact that baseball is hard, and all players have good and bad stretches.  
    St. Paul Saints
    The Twins added veteran Joe Harvey to the Saints roster this week. He made his first appearance and gave up four runs on two hits and two walks in just 1/3 of an inning. Another new veteran, Kyle Barraclough gave up three earned runs on four hits (2 homers) in 2 2/3 innings. Robinson Leyer gave up three runs on six hits and two walks in two innings.   
    JT Riddle had a tough week. He hit just .143 (3-for-23). 
    Wichita Wind Surge
    Adam Lau pitched twice and worked just 1 1/3 innings. He gave up six runs on two hits and two walks and two hit batters. 
    Caleb Hamilton went 0-for-9 in three games. Wilbis Santiago went 1-for-12. Andrew Bechtold went 1-for-9. Aaron Whitefield played all six games and hit .167/.259/.167 (.426). Of the 12 Wind Surge hitters with nine or more at bats in Week 9, just three had a batting average above .200. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels
    The bad news for the Kernels last week was that three position players had to pitch. Yeltsin Encarnacion, Daniel Ozoria and Max Smith each spent time on the mound. Owen Griffith had a tough week. In two outings, he gave up seven runs on 10 hits and a walk over 2 1/3 innings. Melvi Acosta gave up five earned runs on eight hits and two walks in his 2 1/3 innings. Cody Laweryson’s start this week was a struggle. The right-hander gave up five runs on six hits and a walk in three innings. 
    Jair Camargo played in five games, but he had just one hit in 15 at bats (.067). Wander Javier hit just .118 while Seth Gray hit just .125 for the week.   
    Ft. Myers Might Mussels
    Juan Pichardo gave up four runs on four hits in 3 1/3 innings in two games. 
    Wander Valdez returned to the Mussels, but he went 0-for-7. Willie Joe Garry went 1-for-11 (.091), but that one hit was a walk-off hit. Will Holland hit .130 (4-23), though he had a double and a homer.   
     
    Trending Storyline 
    The plan was for there to be no playoffs in 2021. The assumption was that games and series might be lost in the minor leagues (as had happened in the big leagues) due to COVID. And, because of all of the lost development time from a year ago, it would be better for the players and organizations to scrap the playoffs and just have all teams play two or three extra weeks at the end of the season. 
    Well, last week, it was decided that there will be playoffs in 2021.
    In Low-A, High-A and Double-A, the top two teams by record will play a series. That series will begin September 21st. There will be no Triple-A playoffs, presumably because there may be more need at the big-league level and players can only be called up from Triple-A. Instead, those seasons will continue through October third. Teams will get two additional five-game series. 
    My personal opinion is that I would much rather see the Mighty Mussels, Kernels and Wind Surge play ten additional games than not play any playoff games. Obviously if the Twins’ affiliate is in the playoffs, great. If not, it’s two weeks of lost development time. 
    However, from a player’s perspective, and probably from an affiliate’s perspective, it’s probably nice to have a carrot dangling at the end of the season.
     
    PROSPECT SUMMARY
    Here’s a look at how the Twins Daily PRESEASON Top 20 Twins Prospects have performed on the season (as well as too many unfortunate injuries). As you’ve seen, our MIDSEASON Top 20 Prospect rankings are being posted right now, so next week, we will update the below to reflect ‘graduations’ and the new rankings. 
    #1 - Alex Kirilloff (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (2 rehab games, went 3-6 with 2 homers, 2 K), Minnesota (48 games, .263/.300/.447 (.747) with 10 doubles, 1 triple, 7 homers, 29 RBI, 10 BB, 43 K)
    #2 - Royce Lewis (Wichita) - Out for Season (torn ACL)
    #3 - Trevor Larnach (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (3 games, went 3-11 with two homers, two walks, 8 strikeouts), Minnesota (47 games, .263/.359/.436 (.795) with 9 doubles, 6 homers, 17 RBI, 18 BB, 54 K) 
    #4 - Ryan Jeffers (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (24 games, .217/.340/.446 (.786) with four doubles, five homers, 16 BB, 26 K), Minnesota (32 games, .187/.275/.374 (.649) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 5 home runs, 15 RBI, 13 BB, 40 K)
    #5 - Jhoan Duran (St. Paul) – 5 G, 4 GS, 16.0 IP, 16 H, 13 BB, 22 K, 5.06 ERA, 1.81 WHIP (on IL with a right forearm strain)  
    #6 - Jordan Balazovic (Wichita) – 6 GS, 24.1 IP, 26 H, 8 BB, 33 K, 4.44 ERA, 1.40 WHIP 
    #7 - Keoni Cavaco (Ft. Myers) – 28 games, .264/.333/.340 (.673) with 3 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer, 11 RBI, 10 BB, 32 K, 4 SB (on Injured List, Concussion, but played 2 rehab games in FCL this week) 
    #8 - Aaron Sabato (Ft. Myers) – 53 games, .184/.373/.291 (.664) with 10 doubles, 3 homers, 18 RBI, 50 BB, 73 K
    #9 - Matt Canterino (Cedar Rapids) – 4 GS, 18.0 IP, 10 H, 3 BB, 35 K, 1.00 ERA, 0.72 WHIP (went on the IL with right elbow strain)
    #10 - Blayne Enlow (Cedar Rapids) – 3 GS, 14.2 IP, 13 H, 6 BB, 23 K, 1.84 ERA, 1.30 WHIP (underwent Tommy John surgery on June 9th) 
    #11 - Gilberto Celestino (Minnesotal) – Wichita (21 games, .250/.344/.381 (.725) with 5 doubles, 2 homers. 11 BB, 24 K), Minnesota (15 games, .163/.200/.349 (.549) with 2 BB, 8 K)
    #12 - Brent Rooker (St. Paul) – St. Paul (46 games, .239/.381/.553 (.934) with 6 doubles, 1 triple, 14 homers, 32 BB, 59 K), Minnesota (8 games, .103/.133/.241 (375) with 1 double, 1 homer, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 13 K)
    #13 - Matt Wallner (Cedar Rapids) – 17 games, .333/.384/.621 (1.005) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers, 14 RBI, 5 BB, 28 K. (on IL after having hamate bone surgery)
    #14 - Misael Urbina (Ft. Myers) – 46 games, .201/.310/.278 (588) with 4 doubles, 3 triples, 1 homer, 27 RBI, 26 BB, 41 K, 9 SB)
    #15 - Cole Sands (Wichita) – 7 GS, 31.2 IP, 22 H, 18 BB, 42 K, 2.84 ERA, 1.26 WHIP (about to go on the IL) 
    #16 - Edwar Colina (Minnesota) - 60-Day IL (had surgery on his right elbow to remove bone chips)
    #17 - Ben Rortvedt (Minnesota - Graduated) – St. Paul (5 games, .286/.318/.571 (.890) with 3 doubles, 1 homer, 1 BB, 6 K), Minnesota (23 games, .125/.183/.196 (380) with 1 double, 1 homer, 4 RBI, 3 BB, 20 K)
    #18 - Alerick Soularie (Complex) – N/A (injured)
    #19 - Jose Miranda (St. Paul) – 53 games, .350/.409/.614 (1.023) with 10 doubles, 16 homers, 46 RBI, 19 BB, 31 K
    #20 - Bailey Ober (St. Paul) – St. Paul (4 GS, 16.0 IP, 13 H, 5 BB, 21 K, 2.81 ERA, 1.13 WHIP), Minnesota (6 GS, 24.2 IP, 28 H, 6 BB, 26 K, 5.84 ERA, 1.38 WHIP) 
     
    LOOKING AHEAD
    Ft. Myers @ St. Lucie (TBD, Brent Headrick, Sawyer Gipson-Long; Louie Varland, Bobby Milacki, Miguel Rodriguez): 
    Peoria @ Cedar Rapids:(Ben Gross, Cody Laweryson, Tyler Beck, Kody Funderburk, Jon Olsen, Tyler Watson)
    NW Arkansas @ Wichita: (Bryan Sammons, Chris Vallimont, Austin Schulfer, Jason Garcia, Jordan Balazovic, Bryan Sammons) 
    St. Paul @ Iowa: (Andrew Albers, Josh Winder, Charlie Barnes, Chandler Shepherd, Beau Burrows, Andrew Albers): 

    Feel free to provide some feedback below regarding these reports. What do you like to read? What types of information would you like added? Also, feel free to ask any questions you like.
     
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