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Seth Stohs

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  1. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from RJA for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Noah Cardenas   
    Noah Cardenas was born and grew up in Southern California. He’s a Twins fan now, but it is understandable that he grew up a Dodgers fan and went to several games at the stadium. He enjoyed watching Yasiel Puig play the game. 
    While he played some football until junior high, some basketball, and even some soccer. It was on the baseball field that he excelled. He attended Bishop Alemany High School in Mission Hills in one of the best prep baseball leagues in the country. In the Mission League, they played against teams like Chaminade and Harvard-Westlake (where Lucas Giolito, Max Fried, and Jack Flaherty played). Notre Dame had Hunter Greene pitching and playing shortstop. There are first-round talents in the conference nearly every year. 
    While there, he was a four-year letter winner. As a junior, he was an honorable-mention All-American. In the summers, he was playing in various national and regional events, such as Perfect Game and the Area Code Games. He was one of the top prospects in his class in California. As a senior, he hit .444/.577/.694 with 15 extra-base hits. 
    He committed to UCLA and was very excited to go there. Cardenas said, “I love UCLA. I think it’s an amazing university. Obviously a diehard Bruin fan now. I grew up a USC fan during the Reggie Bush Era. My brother poisoned me into that thing. I grew up a USC fan, but I was lucky enough for UCLA to recruit me.” 
    In the summer before his freshman year, he played for Portland in the West Coast League and hit .287 with six extra-base hits in 30 games. 
    Cardenas had an incredible freshman season. In 58 games, he hit .375/.476/.500 (.976) with six doubles, a triple, and three homers. He had 17 walks (and was hit 10 times) to go with just 14 strikeouts. He was also an Honorable Mention All-Defensive Team in the Pac-12 that year too. 
    That summer he was scheduled to go play for the Mankato Moondogs of the Northwoods League. Last minute, his coach let him know that he was heading to the Cape Cod League. 
    As a sophomore, he played in just 11 games before Covid hit and ended that season. He did play some summer ball. 
    He has a brother that is a trainer in the Texas Rangers organization, and he helped him out during that lost season. They developed a training schedule for him that included all aspects of the game. 
    In his junior season (2021), he played in 57 games and hit .268/.371/.404 (.774) with 12 doubles, a triple, and five home runs. Behind the plate, he threw out 38% of would-be base stealers. He was named to the Pac-12 All-Conference Team. 
    With that success, he became the Twins eighth-round pick in the 2021 draft. 
    Cardenas noted, “You just sit there and wait. It was an awesome time. I really enjoyed it, but that time just sitting on your couch, I just want to go already. I just want to get picked. Finally, that time came, and it was the right time, and I was lucky enough to get drafted by the Twins.” 
    Seven rounds later, the Twins also selected his UCLA teammate Mikey Perez. “Going to UCLA, we always stayed together in the same apartment. He’s been trying to get away from me for years now, and it’s funny that we were drafted by the same team.” He continued, “Mikey’s just been a great friend to have, and the transition to pro ball has been awesome.” 
    After signing, Cardenas got into 13 games late in the year in the FCL. He hit .300/.400/.500 (.900) with a double and a homer in his 25 plate appearances. 
    He got an offseason to work, and he came into the 2022 season ready to go. He remained in Ft. Myers and spent the season with the Mighty Mussels. In 99 games, he hit .261/.421/.413 (.834) with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He even stole 11 bases. You also can’t help but notice his Isolated Discipline (OBP - BA) of .160. He had 73 walks on the season with just 70 strikeouts. He credits Ft. Myers hitting coach Rayden Sierra with helping him focus on knowing the strike zone, but also knowing which pitches he can do damage in the zone. 
    He came in fourth place in voting for the Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Year Award behind only Matt Wallner, Edouard Julien, and Chris Williams. 
    He played 25 games at first base, but he made 56 starts behind the plate. He threw out 29% of potential base stealers. 
    All that, and he earned the Mighty Mussels’ Harmon Killebrew Award for Community Service for all of the work he did away from the field, time with kids, and visiting hospitals and more. 
    Hear more about: 
    Learning how the Twins used technology and analytics, and how it can help him.  Both of his parents speak Spanish, but he acknowledges that he “can’t speak a lick of it.” So, adjusting to conversations with Spanish-speaking pitchers and teammates. What he enjoys about catching and what he has done to learn more behind the plate. “I was really excited to get a guy like Tucker Frawley who is the catching guy… I felt what he was teaching us was really good stuff.”  His thoughts on the electronic strike zone, and the review process that was used at times in the Florida State League.  Working with rehabbing big leaguers such as Sonny Gray in Ft. Myers. For more Twins Daily content on Noah Cardenas, click here. 
     
     
  2. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from 4twinsJA for an article, Who Will the Twins Add to their 40-Man Roster?   
    Since the end of the season, the Twins' front office has been cleaning up the 40-man roster that, had way more than 40 men on it. When the World Series finished, several players automatically came off the roster and became free agents. Carlos Correa exercised his option and became a free agent. The Twins Designated five players for Assignment early in the offseason. Three of them (Jermaine Palacios, Jake Cave, Caleb Hamilton) were claimed by other teams. Just last week, players still on the 60-Day Injured List were removed from the Injured List. At the same time, Cody Stashak was outrighted from the roster and elected free agency. 
    All that is to say that a lot of roster work has been done already. Some of that is because, on Tuesday, teams have to submit additions to their 40-man rosters by 5:00 central time. 
    The Twins' 40-man roster is currently at 36 players. There are 21 pitchers, one catcher, five infielders, and nine outfielders. The Twins (and other teams) may make a few small trades to clean up a couple more roster spots before the additions. 
    Friday is another key date in the offseason when teams will need to decide which arbitration-eligible players to tender (or non-tender) a 2023 contract. A couple more players could potentially come off of the roster at that time. 
    Before getting into the predictions for which Twins minor leaguers will be added to the team’s 40-man roster, it is important to note that some of these decisions were already made during the season. Louie Varland, Matt Wallner, and Simeon Woods Richardson all were added to the roster in September. If they had not been, they would have been Givens to be added now. Those three put up tremendous 2022 seasons in both Wichita and St. Paul and earned their late-season promotions. 
    Secondly, who is eligible to be selected in the Rule 5 draft if they are not protected? Players who signed when they were 18 or younger in 2018 or earlier. Players who were 19 or older when they signed in 2019 or earlier. The age at signing is the key, but a general rule would be: 
    Players drafted out of high school in 2017 or 2018. (unless they signed when they were 19) Players drafted out of junior college or four-year college in 2017, 2018, or 2019.  International players signed at 16, 17, or 18 years old in 2016, 2017, or 2018.  Finally, players added to the 40-man roster on Tuesday cannot be removed from the 40-man roster until spring training. That is important to remember when the team signs free agents or makes a trade this winter.
    So, here are my quick thoughts on players that should be, or at least should be considered to be, added to the Twins' 40-man roster. 
    THE GIVENS
    1.) 2B Edouard Julien - The 23-year-old from Quebec was the Twins 18th round pick in 2019 out of Auburn. Just this weekend, he was named the Breakout Prospect in the Arizona Fall League after he hit .400/.563/.686 (1.248) with five doubles and five home runs in 21 games. However, you could argue that he broke out during the 2022 regular season in Wichita where he hit .300/.441/.490 (.931) with 19 doubles and 17 home runs in 113 games. He even stole 19 bags. Of course, I would argue that he broke out in 2021, his professional debut after missing 2019 and 2020 due to Tommy John surgery and the Covid pandemic. He split that season between Ft. Myers and Cedar Rapids. In 112 games, he hit .267/.434/.480 (.914) with 28 doubles, 18 home runs, and 34 stolen bases. Where will he play? Well, he spent most of 2022 at second base. He has played first and third base in pro ball. Yes, he played a couple of games in left field in 2021, but that isn’t an option. Regardless, his all-around offensive game makes him a future top-of-the-lineup contributor. 
    2.) RHP Matt Canterino - Maybe not quite as “given” as Julien, but Canterino is absolutely a given to be added. He was the team’s second-round draft pick in 2019 out of Rice University. Since turning pro, two things have been true of the 24-year-old righty. First, when he has pitched, he has been absolutely dominant. In 11 games and 34 1/3 innings for Wichita in 2022, he posted a 1.83 ERA and struck out 50 batters. In 23 innings in 2021, he struck out 45 batters. His stuff is electric. Unfortunately, the second truth is that he has missed a lot of time with injury. He was shut down early in the 2021 season after experiencing some elbow pain. The rest-and-rehab was tried, but in 2022 at Wichita, he was limited to three innings per start and eventually four innings, but as his arm threw more, the pain continued. Finally, in mid-August, he underwent Tommy John surgery in Arlington making his availability to pitch in 2023 unlikely. But again, with this kind of talent, particularly with a pitcher, you keep him around and add him and don’t even give it a second thought. 
    STRONG CONSIDERATIONS
    3.) LHP Brent Headrick - In 2022, Headrick made 15 starts in Cedar Rapids before moving up to Double-A Wichita. In 2021, he was limited in the second half with some shoulder impingement. He stayed healthy throughout the 2022 season and went 10-5 with a 3.32 ERA and a 1.08 WHIP. In 108 1/3 innings, he walked just 25 batters and struck out 136 batters. Now, his Double-A numbers don’t look as good. In 10 games, he went 2-3 with a 4.81 ERA. However, in his first Wind Surge appearance, he gave up seven runs on 10 hits (including five home runs) in 2 1/3 innings. Take away that outing, and he went 2-2 with a 3.54 ERA, and in 40 2/3 innings, he gave up just six more home runs. Headrick was the Twins seventh-round pick in 2019 out of Illinois State. 
    4.) UT Michael Helman - The Twins were excited to select Helman out of Texas A&M in the 11th round of the 2018 draft. After a strong pro debut that year, he really struggled in 2019 at High-A Ft. Myers and ended the season injured. After a lost 2020 season, he hit .246/.336/.462 (.798) with 21 doubles, four triples, and 19 home runs in Cedar Rapids. He added 21 steals. He finished that season by playing in the Arizona Fall League. He began the 2022 season with 39 games at Wichita where he hit .278/.368/.472 (.840) with six doubles, two triples, and six home runs. He finished the season in St. Paul where, in 96 games, he hit .250/.325/.416 (.741) with 17 doubles and 14 home runs. Combined, he ended the season with 23 doubles, 20 home runs, and an impressive 40 stolen bases. He has made himself a solid contributor at the bat. He has also worked very hard to get strong all over the field on defense. Drafted as a middle infielder, he started playing all over the place in 2021. In 2022, he played 43 games in center field, 41 games at second base, 29 games at third base, and 11 games at shortstop. In 2021, he played more in the corner outfield spots than in center field. He legitimately can play seven positions on the field, and maybe I should mention that when he went to junior college, he was a catcher. 
    5.) Misael Urbina - This is the potential upside addition. This is the guy with talent and athleticism and tools. The 20-year-old Urbina signed in July of 2018 out of Venezuela. He spent 2019 in the Dominican Summer League where he posted a solid .825 OPS with 21 extra-base hits and 19 stolen bases in 50 games. After the lost 2020 season, he came to the States in 2021. He didn’t make the Mighty Mussels Opening Day roster, but he was on the roster about a week later. He played 101 games for the Mighty Mussels and hit .191/.299/.286 (.585) with 12 doubles, four triples, five homes, and 16 steals. Unfortunately, Urbina missed about half of the 2022 season due to some visa issues. In 50 games for the Mighty Mussels, he hit .246/.323/.419 (.741) with 16 doubles, five homers, and nine stolen bases. The Twins have added players after they spend a year in Low-A. They did it in November 2013 when they added Jorge Polanco and Max Kepler after they played in Cedar Rapids that season. Of course, they also added Deibinson Romero and Estarlin de Los Santos to the 40-man roster after their Low-A seasons. (I’m sure @Roger will appreciate that reference.) It’s hard for me to believe that Urbina would be able to stick on a big-league roster all season, so this is very borderline.  
    6.) IF Yunior Severino - As you know, Atlanta signed Severino as a 16-year-old in 2016. He spent the following season with the Braves organization until they were deemed to have broken the rules of international signing and a bunch of their recently-signed international players became free agents again. This time, it was the Twins that gave him a big, seven-figure signing bonus. Severino has shown glimpses of talent, but he’s also missed time with injury. He broke out with a strong 35 games at the end of the 2021 season in Cedar Rapids when he hit .321/.414/.493 (.907) with 12 doubles and three homers. He began 2022 with 46 games with the Kernels and hit .283/.398/.572 (.970) with nine doubles, two triples, and 11 homers. He moved up to Wichita and hit .273/.338/.497 (.834) with eight doubles and eight home runs. At Cedar Rapids, he played mostly second base (and DH). With the Wind Surge, he played almost exclusively at third base. He is now 23 and could be a year away from being ready.  
    7.) C/1B Chris Williams - Chris Williams was the Twins' eighth-round pick in 2018 out of Clemson University. In 75 games for Wichita this summer, Williams hit .277/.372/.542 (.915) with 16 doubles and 18 home runs. He finished his season with 42 games in St. Paul. He hit just .192, but he had five doubles and 10 more home runs. This season, he played 83 games at first base and caught 24 games. He will turn 26 this month, but the Twins have a need for right-handed power and currently have just one catcher on their 40-man roster. Now, Williams is not going to do a lot of catching in the big leagues, but he can be a guy who can be a #3 catcher, a backup first base option, and a power bat off the bench might provide some value to the organization. 
    8.) RHP Cody Laweryson - Laweryson (pronounced Lor-ih-sun) was the Twins 14th round draft pick out of the University of Maine in 2019. In 2021, he missed the first two months of the season and then posted a 4.91 ERA and 1.33 WHIP in 15 games for Cedar Rapids. He did have 73 strikeouts and just 19 walks over his 58 2/3 innings. He went to the Arizona Fall League and struck out 18 batters in 14 innings and pitched in the Fall Stars game. He began 2022 in the Kernels' bullpen. In 35 innings, he struck out 42 and walked 12 batters. He posted a 2.57 ERA and a 1.06 WHIP. He moved up to Wichita where after 11 bullpen appearances, he made eight starts. He went 5-0 with a minuscule 1.06 ERA and a 0.94 WHIP. In 59 2/3 innings, he struck out 69 and walked just 15 batters. In the entire season, he gave up just two homers over 94 2/3 innings. He’s got decent stuff and a bit of a funky delivery. Was his half-season in Wichita enough for someone to select him in the Rule 5 draft, or for the Twins to add him? 
    9.) OF DaShawn Keirsey, Jr. - Keirsey was the Twins' fourth-round pick in 2018 out of the University of Utah. He had a brutal injury after crashing into the wall at the end of his sophomore season in college, but inexplicably returned for his junior season and posted an OPS of 1.049. Since the Twins drafted him, his biggest issue has been staying on the field. He was limited to 45 games in Cedar Rapids in 2021 due to leg muscle issues. He never was able to get into a rhythm. In 2022, he was bumped up to Wichita and was on the field for 121 games. He had a solid showing, if not a bit of a breakout season. He hit .271/.329/.395 (.724) with 26 doubles, three triples, and seven home runs. While not a power hitter, at times he can really drive the ball and use the whole field. But his speed is absolutely electric and can be game-changing. He stole 42 bases in 49 attempts this year (86%), but he is an elite defensive center fielder, able to run down almost anything and unafraid to throw his body around to make a catch. His athleticism alone has to get him considered, and in 2022, he stayed on the field and really contributed.
    10.) LHP Kody Funderburk - When the Twins drafted the lefty from Dallas Baptist in the 15th round of the 2018 draft, they had him as a pitcher only. In college, he was a very good hitter as well. Over time, he has worked solely as a pitcher and very quietly has made himself into a prospect to watch. He had a solid 2021 season between Cedar Rapids (where he started) and Wichita (where he was a reliever). He then went and made six starts in the Arizona Fall League. In 2022 at Double-A Wichita, he went 10-5 with a 2.94 ERA. In 107 innings, he had 103 strikeouts to 44 walks. He has a bit of a funky delivery that might make him intriguing to a team in the Rule 5 draft. 
    11.) C/1B Alex Isola - In 2017, Isola and Keirsey were teammates at Utah. Isola transferred a couple of times before the Twins made him their 29th-round pick in 2019 out of Texas Christian University. Isola just completed his six-week stint in the Arizona Fall League where he hit five doubles, and in the semi-final game launched a 420+ foot home run to help send his team to the championship game. Like Williams, part of the allure of Isola is his ability to play behind the plate as needed. With Wichita, he made 17 starts at first base and 17 starts behind the plate. He won’t win any Gold Gloves, but he could be a #3 catcher in the big leagues. His calling card is his bat. In 58 games with the Wind Surge in 2022, he hit .286/.377/.471 (.848) with nine doubles and 10 home runs. He puts together solid plate appearances with a good knowledge of the strike zone. He’s willing to take his walks, but he also can drive the ball to the gaps and over the wall. 
    12.) RHP Austin Schulfer - The 26-year-old was the Twins 19th round pick in 2018 out of UW-Milwaukee. In 2021, he led all Twins minor-league pitchers with 110 innings pitched over 24 starts at Double-A Wichita. In 2022, he returned to the Wind Surge to start the season and worked in 15 games out of the bullpen. He gave up just one earned run over 23 innings (0.39 ERA) and struck out 30 and walked only four batters. He recorded seven saves. He moved up to St. Paul where he went 4-3 with a 5.23 ERA. In 32 2/3 Triple-A innings, he struck out 31 batters and walked 13 batters. Schulfer has always made adjustments and should return to the Saints in 2023. Depending on the injury front in the Twins bullpen, we could see him debut at some point. 
    HAVE TO AT LEAST CONSIDER
    LHP Evan Sisk - Acquired from the Cardinals at the deadline in 2021, he was the 2022 Twins Daily Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Year. 5-1, 2.08 ERA in a combined 63 innings between Wichita and St. Paul. Had 76 strikeouts to go with 29 walks.  
    SS/OF Will Holland - the fastest runner in the Twins minor leagues, he is a great athlete and could provide a team with solid outfield or shortstop defense and pinch-running abilities. He was the team’s 5th-round pick in 2019 from Auburn. 
    LHRP Denny Bentley - Bentley has been very good in the Twins minor leagues and can record a lot of strikeouts, but he does walk a lot of batters, as he did in the Arizona Fall League. 
    RHRP Osiris German - German remains a very intriguing 24-year-old reliever. His best pitch is his changeup. After six games in Cedar Rapids, he worked in 37 games for Wichita. He posted a 3.02 ERA and had 17 walks and 59 strikeouts in 53 2/3 innings. 
    RHRP Hunter McMahon - he was the ninth-round pick by the Nationals in the 2019 draft. The Twins acquired him that offseason for Ryne Harper. He has pitched very little since. In 2021, he pitched in just five games. This year, he began in Ft. Myers (2.23 ERA), moved up to Cedar Rapids (1.19 ERA), and finished with four games in Double-A. In 73 2/3 combined innings. He had 76 strikeouts and just 16 walks.  
    RHP Sean Mooney - The Twins 12th round pick in 2019 from St. John’s had Tommy John surgery that spring. So, he didn’t make his pro debut, officially, until 2021. In 42 innings, he had 71 strikeouts. In 2022 with Cedar Rapids, he posted a 3.30 ERA and had 82 strikeouts in 60 innings. Needs to stay healthy. 
    UT Anthony Prato - 7th round pick in 2019 from UConn, Prato had a nice breakout season in 2022. He was limited in 2021 due to a broken hamate bone. In 2022, he played 45 games in Cedar Rapids before ending with 87 games in Wichita. Combined, he hit .285/.383/.444 (.827) with 30 doubles, eight triples, 10 homers, and 22 stolen bases. He played 60 games in left field, 34 games at second base, and 22 games at third base. 
    RHP Randy Dobnak - Off the 40-man roster, if a team selected Dobnak, they would take on his contract too, so that’s unlikely. But, when he was healthy in 2019 and 2020, he was a solid back-of-rotation starter, and if he is healthy, could be that for a non-contender. 
    RHRP Steven Cruz - MLB Pipeline ranks Cruz 28th in the organization. Ten (or even five) years ago, he would have ranked higher because he is capable of reaching triple-digits with his fastball. At 23, he posted a 5.14 ERA and a 1.59 WHIP in Wichita in 2022. In 56 innings, he had 72 strikeouts, but he also walked 35 batters. Love the arm, but hard to see him sticking in the big leagues. 
    OTHER ELIGIBLE PLAYERS
    Hitters: David Banuelos, Andrew Bechtold, Kyle Schmidt, Seth Gray, Charles Mack, Jeferson Morales, Daniel Ozoria, Willie Joe Garry, Carlos Aguiar, Luis Baez, Wilfri Castro, Alexander Pena. 
    Pitchers: Tyler Beck, Francis Peguero, Jon Olsen, Ryan Shreve, Brock Stewart, Michael Boyle, Jordan Brink, Jordan Gore, Casey Legumina, Alex Phillips, Regi Grace, Bradley Hanner, Derek Molina, Owen Griffith, Tyler Palm, Miguel Rodriguez, Matthew Swain, Zaquiel Puentes, Niklas Rimmel, Elpidio Perez, Wilker Reyes, Rafael Feliz, Danny Moreno, Alex Scherff, Andrew Cabezas, Ben Gross, Zach Neff, Josh Mitchell, Jose Brito.  
    My prediction? This is as tough as I can remember this being. Again, we should be able to assume Canterino and Julien are added. After that, there are at least six to 10 others (and maybe more) where a legitimate case could be made. I am going to officially predict that they will also add Headrick, Helman, and Severino. I think Urbina is just not yet in a spot where he could stick in the big leagues, but I think he is at risk of being taken. He is probably the most interesting case (which is why I found a photo of him for the article). I think Chris Williams and Alex Isola are guys that could be at risk as well. 
    Your turn? How many players will the Twins add to their 40-man roster by Tuesday’s deadline? Make your predictions for which players get added below.
  3. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Dave The Dastardly for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Noah Cardenas   
    Noah Cardenas was born and grew up in Southern California. He’s a Twins fan now, but it is understandable that he grew up a Dodgers fan and went to several games at the stadium. He enjoyed watching Yasiel Puig play the game. 
    While he played some football until junior high, some basketball, and even some soccer. It was on the baseball field that he excelled. He attended Bishop Alemany High School in Mission Hills in one of the best prep baseball leagues in the country. In the Mission League, they played against teams like Chaminade and Harvard-Westlake (where Lucas Giolito, Max Fried, and Jack Flaherty played). Notre Dame had Hunter Greene pitching and playing shortstop. There are first-round talents in the conference nearly every year. 
    While there, he was a four-year letter winner. As a junior, he was an honorable-mention All-American. In the summers, he was playing in various national and regional events, such as Perfect Game and the Area Code Games. He was one of the top prospects in his class in California. As a senior, he hit .444/.577/.694 with 15 extra-base hits. 
    He committed to UCLA and was very excited to go there. Cardenas said, “I love UCLA. I think it’s an amazing university. Obviously a diehard Bruin fan now. I grew up a USC fan during the Reggie Bush Era. My brother poisoned me into that thing. I grew up a USC fan, but I was lucky enough for UCLA to recruit me.” 
    In the summer before his freshman year, he played for Portland in the West Coast League and hit .287 with six extra-base hits in 30 games. 
    Cardenas had an incredible freshman season. In 58 games, he hit .375/.476/.500 (.976) with six doubles, a triple, and three homers. He had 17 walks (and was hit 10 times) to go with just 14 strikeouts. He was also an Honorable Mention All-Defensive Team in the Pac-12 that year too. 
    That summer he was scheduled to go play for the Mankato Moondogs of the Northwoods League. Last minute, his coach let him know that he was heading to the Cape Cod League. 
    As a sophomore, he played in just 11 games before Covid hit and ended that season. He did play some summer ball. 
    He has a brother that is a trainer in the Texas Rangers organization, and he helped him out during that lost season. They developed a training schedule for him that included all aspects of the game. 
    In his junior season (2021), he played in 57 games and hit .268/.371/.404 (.774) with 12 doubles, a triple, and five home runs. Behind the plate, he threw out 38% of would-be base stealers. He was named to the Pac-12 All-Conference Team. 
    With that success, he became the Twins eighth-round pick in the 2021 draft. 
    Cardenas noted, “You just sit there and wait. It was an awesome time. I really enjoyed it, but that time just sitting on your couch, I just want to go already. I just want to get picked. Finally, that time came, and it was the right time, and I was lucky enough to get drafted by the Twins.” 
    Seven rounds later, the Twins also selected his UCLA teammate Mikey Perez. “Going to UCLA, we always stayed together in the same apartment. He’s been trying to get away from me for years now, and it’s funny that we were drafted by the same team.” He continued, “Mikey’s just been a great friend to have, and the transition to pro ball has been awesome.” 
    After signing, Cardenas got into 13 games late in the year in the FCL. He hit .300/.400/.500 (.900) with a double and a homer in his 25 plate appearances. 
    He got an offseason to work, and he came into the 2022 season ready to go. He remained in Ft. Myers and spent the season with the Mighty Mussels. In 99 games, he hit .261/.421/.413 (.834) with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He even stole 11 bases. You also can’t help but notice his Isolated Discipline (OBP - BA) of .160. He had 73 walks on the season with just 70 strikeouts. He credits Ft. Myers hitting coach Rayden Sierra with helping him focus on knowing the strike zone, but also knowing which pitches he can do damage in the zone. 
    He came in fourth place in voting for the Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Year Award behind only Matt Wallner, Edouard Julien, and Chris Williams. 
    He played 25 games at first base, but he made 56 starts behind the plate. He threw out 29% of potential base stealers. 
    All that, and he earned the Mighty Mussels’ Harmon Killebrew Award for Community Service for all of the work he did away from the field, time with kids, and visiting hospitals and more. 
    Hear more about: 
    Learning how the Twins used technology and analytics, and how it can help him.  Both of his parents speak Spanish, but he acknowledges that he “can’t speak a lick of it.” So, adjusting to conversations with Spanish-speaking pitchers and teammates. What he enjoys about catching and what he has done to learn more behind the plate. “I was really excited to get a guy like Tucker Frawley who is the catching guy… I felt what he was teaching us was really good stuff.”  His thoughts on the electronic strike zone, and the review process that was used at times in the Florida State League.  Working with rehabbing big leaguers such as Sonny Gray in Ft. Myers. For more Twins Daily content on Noah Cardenas, click here. 
     
     
  4. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Noah Cardenas   
    Noah Cardenas was born and grew up in Southern California. He’s a Twins fan now, but it is understandable that he grew up a Dodgers fan and went to several games at the stadium. He enjoyed watching Yasiel Puig play the game. 
    While he played some football until junior high, some basketball, and even some soccer. It was on the baseball field that he excelled. He attended Bishop Alemany High School in Mission Hills in one of the best prep baseball leagues in the country. In the Mission League, they played against teams like Chaminade and Harvard-Westlake (where Lucas Giolito, Max Fried, and Jack Flaherty played). Notre Dame had Hunter Greene pitching and playing shortstop. There are first-round talents in the conference nearly every year. 
    While there, he was a four-year letter winner. As a junior, he was an honorable-mention All-American. In the summers, he was playing in various national and regional events, such as Perfect Game and the Area Code Games. He was one of the top prospects in his class in California. As a senior, he hit .444/.577/.694 with 15 extra-base hits. 
    He committed to UCLA and was very excited to go there. Cardenas said, “I love UCLA. I think it’s an amazing university. Obviously a diehard Bruin fan now. I grew up a USC fan during the Reggie Bush Era. My brother poisoned me into that thing. I grew up a USC fan, but I was lucky enough for UCLA to recruit me.” 
    In the summer before his freshman year, he played for Portland in the West Coast League and hit .287 with six extra-base hits in 30 games. 
    Cardenas had an incredible freshman season. In 58 games, he hit .375/.476/.500 (.976) with six doubles, a triple, and three homers. He had 17 walks (and was hit 10 times) to go with just 14 strikeouts. He was also an Honorable Mention All-Defensive Team in the Pac-12 that year too. 
    That summer he was scheduled to go play for the Mankato Moondogs of the Northwoods League. Last minute, his coach let him know that he was heading to the Cape Cod League. 
    As a sophomore, he played in just 11 games before Covid hit and ended that season. He did play some summer ball. 
    He has a brother that is a trainer in the Texas Rangers organization, and he helped him out during that lost season. They developed a training schedule for him that included all aspects of the game. 
    In his junior season (2021), he played in 57 games and hit .268/.371/.404 (.774) with 12 doubles, a triple, and five home runs. Behind the plate, he threw out 38% of would-be base stealers. He was named to the Pac-12 All-Conference Team. 
    With that success, he became the Twins eighth-round pick in the 2021 draft. 
    Cardenas noted, “You just sit there and wait. It was an awesome time. I really enjoyed it, but that time just sitting on your couch, I just want to go already. I just want to get picked. Finally, that time came, and it was the right time, and I was lucky enough to get drafted by the Twins.” 
    Seven rounds later, the Twins also selected his UCLA teammate Mikey Perez. “Going to UCLA, we always stayed together in the same apartment. He’s been trying to get away from me for years now, and it’s funny that we were drafted by the same team.” He continued, “Mikey’s just been a great friend to have, and the transition to pro ball has been awesome.” 
    After signing, Cardenas got into 13 games late in the year in the FCL. He hit .300/.400/.500 (.900) with a double and a homer in his 25 plate appearances. 
    He got an offseason to work, and he came into the 2022 season ready to go. He remained in Ft. Myers and spent the season with the Mighty Mussels. In 99 games, he hit .261/.421/.413 (.834) with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He even stole 11 bases. You also can’t help but notice his Isolated Discipline (OBP - BA) of .160. He had 73 walks on the season with just 70 strikeouts. He credits Ft. Myers hitting coach Rayden Sierra with helping him focus on knowing the strike zone, but also knowing which pitches he can do damage in the zone. 
    He came in fourth place in voting for the Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Year Award behind only Matt Wallner, Edouard Julien, and Chris Williams. 
    He played 25 games at first base, but he made 56 starts behind the plate. He threw out 29% of potential base stealers. 
    All that, and he earned the Mighty Mussels’ Harmon Killebrew Award for Community Service for all of the work he did away from the field, time with kids, and visiting hospitals and more. 
    Hear more about: 
    Learning how the Twins used technology and analytics, and how it can help him.  Both of his parents speak Spanish, but he acknowledges that he “can’t speak a lick of it.” So, adjusting to conversations with Spanish-speaking pitchers and teammates. What he enjoys about catching and what he has done to learn more behind the plate. “I was really excited to get a guy like Tucker Frawley who is the catching guy… I felt what he was teaching us was really good stuff.”  His thoughts on the electronic strike zone, and the review process that was used at times in the Florida State League.  Working with rehabbing big leaguers such as Sonny Gray in Ft. Myers. For more Twins Daily content on Noah Cardenas, click here. 
     
     
  5. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Noah Cardenas   
    Noah Cardenas was born and grew up in Southern California. He’s a Twins fan now, but it is understandable that he grew up a Dodgers fan and went to several games at the stadium. He enjoyed watching Yasiel Puig play the game. 
    While he played some football until junior high, some basketball, and even some soccer. It was on the baseball field that he excelled. He attended Bishop Alemany High School in Mission Hills in one of the best prep baseball leagues in the country. In the Mission League, they played against teams like Chaminade and Harvard-Westlake (where Lucas Giolito, Max Fried, and Jack Flaherty played). Notre Dame had Hunter Greene pitching and playing shortstop. There are first-round talents in the conference nearly every year. 
    While there, he was a four-year letter winner. As a junior, he was an honorable-mention All-American. In the summers, he was playing in various national and regional events, such as Perfect Game and the Area Code Games. He was one of the top prospects in his class in California. As a senior, he hit .444/.577/.694 with 15 extra-base hits. 
    He committed to UCLA and was very excited to go there. Cardenas said, “I love UCLA. I think it’s an amazing university. Obviously a diehard Bruin fan now. I grew up a USC fan during the Reggie Bush Era. My brother poisoned me into that thing. I grew up a USC fan, but I was lucky enough for UCLA to recruit me.” 
    In the summer before his freshman year, he played for Portland in the West Coast League and hit .287 with six extra-base hits in 30 games. 
    Cardenas had an incredible freshman season. In 58 games, he hit .375/.476/.500 (.976) with six doubles, a triple, and three homers. He had 17 walks (and was hit 10 times) to go with just 14 strikeouts. He was also an Honorable Mention All-Defensive Team in the Pac-12 that year too. 
    That summer he was scheduled to go play for the Mankato Moondogs of the Northwoods League. Last minute, his coach let him know that he was heading to the Cape Cod League. 
    As a sophomore, he played in just 11 games before Covid hit and ended that season. He did play some summer ball. 
    He has a brother that is a trainer in the Texas Rangers organization, and he helped him out during that lost season. They developed a training schedule for him that included all aspects of the game. 
    In his junior season (2021), he played in 57 games and hit .268/.371/.404 (.774) with 12 doubles, a triple, and five home runs. Behind the plate, he threw out 38% of would-be base stealers. He was named to the Pac-12 All-Conference Team. 
    With that success, he became the Twins eighth-round pick in the 2021 draft. 
    Cardenas noted, “You just sit there and wait. It was an awesome time. I really enjoyed it, but that time just sitting on your couch, I just want to go already. I just want to get picked. Finally, that time came, and it was the right time, and I was lucky enough to get drafted by the Twins.” 
    Seven rounds later, the Twins also selected his UCLA teammate Mikey Perez. “Going to UCLA, we always stayed together in the same apartment. He’s been trying to get away from me for years now, and it’s funny that we were drafted by the same team.” He continued, “Mikey’s just been a great friend to have, and the transition to pro ball has been awesome.” 
    After signing, Cardenas got into 13 games late in the year in the FCL. He hit .300/.400/.500 (.900) with a double and a homer in his 25 plate appearances. 
    He got an offseason to work, and he came into the 2022 season ready to go. He remained in Ft. Myers and spent the season with the Mighty Mussels. In 99 games, he hit .261/.421/.413 (.834) with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He even stole 11 bases. You also can’t help but notice his Isolated Discipline (OBP - BA) of .160. He had 73 walks on the season with just 70 strikeouts. He credits Ft. Myers hitting coach Rayden Sierra with helping him focus on knowing the strike zone, but also knowing which pitches he can do damage in the zone. 
    He came in fourth place in voting for the Twins Daily Minor League Hitter of the Year Award behind only Matt Wallner, Edouard Julien, and Chris Williams. 
    He played 25 games at first base, but he made 56 starts behind the plate. He threw out 29% of potential base stealers. 
    All that, and he earned the Mighty Mussels’ Harmon Killebrew Award for Community Service for all of the work he did away from the field, time with kids, and visiting hospitals and more. 
    Hear more about: 
    Learning how the Twins used technology and analytics, and how it can help him.  Both of his parents speak Spanish, but he acknowledges that he “can’t speak a lick of it.” So, adjusting to conversations with Spanish-speaking pitchers and teammates. What he enjoys about catching and what he has done to learn more behind the plate. “I was really excited to get a guy like Tucker Frawley who is the catching guy… I felt what he was teaching us was really good stuff.”  His thoughts on the electronic strike zone, and the review process that was used at times in the Florida State League.  Working with rehabbing big leaguers such as Sonny Gray in Ft. Myers. For more Twins Daily content on Noah Cardenas, click here. 
     
     
  6. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from tarheeltwinsfan for an article, Luis Arraez Earned a 2022 Silver Slugger Award   
    Luis Arraez became the fifth Twins player to win an American League batting title when he hit .316 over 144 games in 2022. He joined Hall of Famers Tony Oliva (3), Rod Carew (7) and Kirby Puckett (1), along with future Hall of Famer Joe Mauer as batting champs. He was an All Star in 2022. He was named a finalist for a Gold Glove at first base. 
    Tonight, he becomes the first Twins player since Nelson Cruz took home the Silver Slugger for DH in 2020. The 25-year-old from Venezuela hit .316/.375/.420 (795) with 31 doubles, a triple and eight home runs. He also walked 50 times and struck out just 43 times. His eight home runs are two more than he had hit over his previous three seasons. 
    The Louisville Slugger Silver Slugger Award winners are voted on by MLB managers and coaches. They are based on offensive stats including OBP, OPS, OPS+, home runs, hits, RBI, batting average as well as "managers' and coaches' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value." 
     
  7. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Richie the Rally Goat for an article, Luis Arraez Earned a 2022 Silver Slugger Award   
    Luis Arraez became the fifth Twins player to win an American League batting title when he hit .316 over 144 games in 2022. He joined Hall of Famers Tony Oliva (3), Rod Carew (7) and Kirby Puckett (1), along with future Hall of Famer Joe Mauer as batting champs. He was an All Star in 2022. He was named a finalist for a Gold Glove at first base. 
    Tonight, he becomes the first Twins player since Nelson Cruz took home the Silver Slugger for DH in 2020. The 25-year-old from Venezuela hit .316/.375/.420 (795) with 31 doubles, a triple and eight home runs. He also walked 50 times and struck out just 43 times. His eight home runs are two more than he had hit over his previous three seasons. 
    The Louisville Slugger Silver Slugger Award winners are voted on by MLB managers and coaches. They are based on offensive stats including OBP, OPS, OPS+, home runs, hits, RBI, batting average as well as "managers' and coaches' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value." 
     
  8. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Game7-91 for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Patrick Winkel   
    Patrick Winkel grew up in the New Haven, Connecticut, area. He attended Amity Regional High School in Woodridge. He quickly became one of the top players on his high school team.
    Winkel was an All-State player three times. His team won the state championship in his freshman and sophomore years. He was invited to participate in Perfect Game National and other regional and national events. He twice played in the Area Code games. 
    College recruiters were watching him play early in his high school career. Of course, they were there to watch another player on his high school team. His older brother, Chris, was a star on the team and was recruited by several colleges. He made the decision to go to the University of Connecticut and played their five years. Patrick enjoyed meetings with college coaches when they were talking to his brother. 
    In 2018, Pat Winkel was named the Connecticut Gatorade Player of the Year and received several other awards. He was named a First-Team All-American. That summer, the New York Yankees used their 31st-round pick to draft him. At that point, he knew he was heading to college.
    "It was a phone call. They said we're going to take you just to show you that we like you. We'll three years," said Winkel, who called it a "courtesy pick." 
    He decided to join his brother in Storrs and play for the Huskies. 
    He played in 13 games that summer for the Bristol Blues in the Futures Collegiate Baseball League. It is a college league in New England that allowed incoming freshmen to play. He had a nice showing, hitting .320.
    As a freshman, Winkel played in 49 games and hit .318/.361/.486 (.846) with eight doubles and seven home runs. He spent that summer on Cape Cod playing some summer ball. 
    Unfortunately, as he was set to begin the 2020 season, he was injured and needed Tommy John surgery. After several conversations, he decided to have the surgery before the season with the thought that he would be able to get some at-bats in fall ball and be ready for his junior season. The decision worked out perfectly as the season was cut short by Covid. 
    "It gave me an opportunity to really focus on my rehab, and not feel like I was rushed to get back anywhere, to take it at the pace it was meant to be taken at." 
    In 2021, he returned with no restrictions. He played in 53 games. He hit .279/.353/.515 (.868) with 13 doubles and 11 home runs. He was able to catch and showed off a very strong arm. 
    When the draft came, Winkel heard his name called in the ninth round to the Minnesota Twins. He had eligibility to play two or even three more seasons at UConn, so it wasn't an easy decision for him to sign. It certainly wasn't automatic. The teams went back and forth a couple of times before reaching an agreement well above the slot value. 
    Winkel noted, "It was not an easy decision. They had called me at one point and made an offer that I thought at that point, going back to college would be the best route. We expressed that to them. They were able to come back with a different one that was better, and with that one, we thought it was definitely the best option." 
    Four rounds after drafting Winkel, the Twins drafted his college roommate, outfielder Kyler Fedko, in the 13th round. Also, the Twins had drafted Anthony Prato in the 7th round of the 2019 draft from UConn. Prato had a breakout season in 2022 between Cedar Rapids and Wichita. Prato had been a roommate in college for a couple of years with Patrick's brother Chris. 
    He headed to Ft. Myers to sign and to go through a couple of weeks of, essentially, orientation, adjusting to pro ball, meeting everybody, and more. He also was able to get back into the flow of baseball before he ended the season playing in 21 games for the Mighty Mussels. 
    His 2022 season began a little late because of a lower-back injury. In late May, he joined the Cedar Rapids Kernels. In 54 games, he hit .254/.330/.391 (.721) with nine doubles and six home runs. 
    At one point, for a handful of games, Winkel, Fedko, and Prato were all on the Cedar Rapids roster. 
    The Twins really like Pat Winkel and his abilities behind the plate and at the plate, and when healthy, he is definitely a prospect to watch over the next couple of years. This conversation was a solid 50 minutes, and it went in many directions: 
    How does he see himself as a hitter, and what can he become? I mentioned in the teaser that I love talking to catchers. What are the things that make Winkel love being a catcher? He talked about his strengths and what he is working on behind the plate.  He shares an interesting story about getting to call pitches in a college game, which is unusual, but it went well and he got to keep doing it the rest of the season.  Learning the new catching stance.  Will the new rules change how organizations teach catching and throwing? Spending time in spring training on the big-league side, catching some bullpens, and being able to watch Ryan Jeffers and talk to Hank Conger.  There is a reference to a "Venn Diagram" (a first in Twins Spotlight history!).   Find out what he enjoys doing away from baseball.  This was a very enjoyable conversation, and I think you will enjoy it. 
    For more from Twins Daily on Patrick Winkel, click here. 
    If you're interested in watching Kyler Fedko's interview, click here. 
     
     
  9. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Twins Spotlight: Catcher Patrick Winkel   
    Patrick Winkel grew up in the New Haven, Connecticut, area. He attended Amity Regional High School in Woodridge. He quickly became one of the top players on his high school team.
    Winkel was an All-State player three times. His team won the state championship in his freshman and sophomore years. He was invited to participate in Perfect Game National and other regional and national events. He twice played in the Area Code games. 
    College recruiters were watching him play early in his high school career. Of course, they were there to watch another player on his high school team. His older brother, Chris, was a star on the team and was recruited by several colleges. He made the decision to go to the University of Connecticut and played their five years. Patrick enjoyed meetings with college coaches when they were talking to his brother. 
    In 2018, Pat Winkel was named the Connecticut Gatorade Player of the Year and received several other awards. He was named a First-Team All-American. That summer, the New York Yankees used their 31st-round pick to draft him. At that point, he knew he was heading to college.
    "It was a phone call. They said we're going to take you just to show you that we like you. We'll three years," said Winkel, who called it a "courtesy pick." 
    He decided to join his brother in Storrs and play for the Huskies. 
    He played in 13 games that summer for the Bristol Blues in the Futures Collegiate Baseball League. It is a college league in New England that allowed incoming freshmen to play. He had a nice showing, hitting .320.
    As a freshman, Winkel played in 49 games and hit .318/.361/.486 (.846) with eight doubles and seven home runs. He spent that summer on Cape Cod playing some summer ball. 
    Unfortunately, as he was set to begin the 2020 season, he was injured and needed Tommy John surgery. After several conversations, he decided to have the surgery before the season with the thought that he would be able to get some at-bats in fall ball and be ready for his junior season. The decision worked out perfectly as the season was cut short by Covid. 
    "It gave me an opportunity to really focus on my rehab, and not feel like I was rushed to get back anywhere, to take it at the pace it was meant to be taken at." 
    In 2021, he returned with no restrictions. He played in 53 games. He hit .279/.353/.515 (.868) with 13 doubles and 11 home runs. He was able to catch and showed off a very strong arm. 
    When the draft came, Winkel heard his name called in the ninth round to the Minnesota Twins. He had eligibility to play two or even three more seasons at UConn, so it wasn't an easy decision for him to sign. It certainly wasn't automatic. The teams went back and forth a couple of times before reaching an agreement well above the slot value. 
    Winkel noted, "It was not an easy decision. They had called me at one point and made an offer that I thought at that point, going back to college would be the best route. We expressed that to them. They were able to come back with a different one that was better, and with that one, we thought it was definitely the best option." 
    Four rounds after drafting Winkel, the Twins drafted his college roommate, outfielder Kyler Fedko, in the 13th round. Also, the Twins had drafted Anthony Prato in the 7th round of the 2019 draft from UConn. Prato had a breakout season in 2022 between Cedar Rapids and Wichita. Prato had been a roommate in college for a couple of years with Patrick's brother Chris. 
    He headed to Ft. Myers to sign and to go through a couple of weeks of, essentially, orientation, adjusting to pro ball, meeting everybody, and more. He also was able to get back into the flow of baseball before he ended the season playing in 21 games for the Mighty Mussels. 
    His 2022 season began a little late because of a lower-back injury. In late May, he joined the Cedar Rapids Kernels. In 54 games, he hit .254/.330/.391 (.721) with nine doubles and six home runs. 
    At one point, for a handful of games, Winkel, Fedko, and Prato were all on the Cedar Rapids roster. 
    The Twins really like Pat Winkel and his abilities behind the plate and at the plate, and when healthy, he is definitely a prospect to watch over the next couple of years. This conversation was a solid 50 minutes, and it went in many directions: 
    How does he see himself as a hitter, and what can he become? I mentioned in the teaser that I love talking to catchers. What are the things that make Winkel love being a catcher? He talked about his strengths and what he is working on behind the plate.  He shares an interesting story about getting to call pitches in a college game, which is unusual, but it went well and he got to keep doing it the rest of the season.  Learning the new catching stance.  Will the new rules change how organizations teach catching and throwing? Spending time in spring training on the big-league side, catching some bullpens, and being able to watch Ryan Jeffers and talk to Hank Conger.  There is a reference to a "Venn Diagram" (a first in Twins Spotlight history!).   Find out what he enjoys doing away from baseball.  This was a very enjoyable conversation, and I think you will enjoy it. 
    For more from Twins Daily on Patrick Winkel, click here. 
    If you're interested in watching Kyler Fedko's interview, click here. 
     
     
  10. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Heiny for an article, Twins Spotlight: RHP Andrew Morris   
    Andrew Morris tossed his first college pitches at Division II Mesa State in Colorado as a 16-year-old. As a child, he moved around the country, from New York, Alaska, Oregon, and Colorado. While in Alaska, he was homeschooled for a little while and was able to skip second grade. That certainly created some challenges when he got to Monarch High School in Boulder. 
    “Because of my age, I didn’t even make the C team. I was on the Level 3 team my freshman year which is below the C team somehow. C team was like the freshman team.” He continued. “The next year I made the C team, and then I was on JV the year after that. My senior year was the first that I actually played on varsity.” 
    Looking to grow and mature, he went to Mesa State in Grand Junction, Colorado. Despite his youth, he went 7-1 with a 3.88 ERA during his freshman year. He was able to pitch in the Division II College World Series that year. He was 2-1 over five starts in the Covid-shortened. Then in 2021, he went 9-0 with a 2.19 ERA. After struggling some with his control earlier, he struck out 115 batters and walked just 19 batters in 78 innings. 
    At that point, he was hearing some from scouts, but he decided to enter the transfer portal and ended up at Texas Tech. “I had some draft offers. I just felt like I needed to take the next step without going to the draft yet and face some better lineups and better competition. 
    In his one season in the Big 12, he went 8-2 in 16 games. In 88 1/3 innings, he struck out 91 and walked 28 batters. 
    The Twins drafted him in the fourth round. Trevor Brown is the Twins area scout. “I only talked to him once, and I didn’t really think they were interested. Oddly enough, I didn’t even fill out their questionnaire that you’re supposed to do, so I thought they were probably not going to take me but then they did.” 
    For the draft, his parents rented a hotel suite in Las Vegas. His dad lives in Oregon with his little brothers. His mom lives in Colorado Springs with his stepdad. It was a good place to meet in the middle. His girlfriend and her family were there as well. And some of his high school friends. 
    He was on the phone with Brown when he heard his name called on the television. 
    This summer was more about introductions and physicals and adjusting to pro ball. He’d already thrown a lot of innings in the spring, so he spent time working with the Twins staff on weight training, diet, analytics and technology, and more. There were a lot of meetings on pitching and discussions on what has made them successful. 
    He did pitch one inning in one game in the FCL. Then he joined the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels for their playoff series. He pitched once and worked three scoreless innings. 
    The 48-minute video includes a ton of Morris’s thoughts on a variety of topics. 
    How he feels about how the Twins use analytics and technology.  His time on the Mighty Mussels playoff roster.  Getting to know his 2022 draft class and seeing how much talent there is. For instance, he said, “Ben Rakes!”  The work done at Instructs, workouts, throwing, scrimmaging, and more.  Developing his offseason plan for working out and throwing.  What he does away from baseball.  Bordering the line between ‘routine’ and ‘superstition.’  And much more.  A four-pitch mix (at least) means that he is very likely to spend his time developing as a starting pitcher. Despite playing four college seasons, Morris only turned 21 years old on September 1st. The future is bright. 
    Your turn. Share your thoughts on this Twins prospect as he begins his pro career. And who knows, maybe he’ll check out the Comments, so feel free to ask him questions as well.
     
  11. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Announce Harmon Killebrew Award Winners   
    When Harmon Killebrew passed away in 2011, the Twins developed the Killebrew Award for Outstanding Community Service. The players are nominated by each affiliate's general manager based on how much the players do in the community, whether it is reading for kids at school or participating in special camps or visiting hospitals. 
    St. Paul Saints (Catchers David Banuelos and Frank Nigro)
    Banuelos was the Killebrew Award winner in 2018 when he played with the Kernels as well. In 2022, the Saints recognized him for his work at each of the team's kid baseball camps. He took a strong leadership role in those camps, making sure that the kids were having fun and getting to interact with all the kids. He also participated in the team's annual ACES bowling event. Banuelos has been in big-league spring training the past few years because he is fantastic behind the plate. While he hit just .204, he added seven doubles and eight home runs in 55 games. 
     
    The Saints referred to Frank Nigro as an "unsung hero" involved in community service initiatives. When he was in St. Paul, he was always willing to volunteer his time. He encouraged kids as they headed back to school this fall with a video message. He also spent time visiting kids in the hospital. Nigro, 25, spent time in the FCL, at Ft. Myers, in Cedar Rapids, and with the Saints, and he had just 34 at-bats in 18 games played. 
    Wichita Wind Surge (Catcher/First Baseman Alex Isola) 
    Alex Isola is also now a two-time Killebrew Award recipient. He won the award in 2021 with the Kernels. The Wind Surge recognized Isola for being a "strong advocate for the team, its fans and the entire Wichita community." Isola went to the team's McConnell Air Force Base Nose Art Ceremony. He also helped the team announce their alternate identities, the Turbo Tubs and the Tumba Vacas. He was always signing autographs for Twins before and after home games. 
    Isola is currently playing in the final week of the Arizona Fall League. The 24-year-old played in 58 games for the Surge this year and hit .286 with nine doubles, 10 homers and 40 RBI. He missed nearly two months with an injury. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels (RHP Bradley Hanner) 
    Brad Hanner was the Kernels choice for the Killebrew Award as he kept busy volunteering throughout the 2022 season. He was a "standout" during the Twins' organization-wide Week of Service. He assembled boxes at the local Meals on Wheels location to help pre-package meals. He brought breakfast to the elderly several mornings with his host family. The 23-year-old went above and beyond, always spending talking to the fans and signing autographs. 
    Hanner was one of the Kernels top bullpen arms, especially in the first half. In 39 games, he went 7-4 with a 4.60 ERA. In 58 2/3 innings, he had 65 strikeouts. 
    Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels (Catcher Noah Cardenas) 
    Noah Cardenas spent his first full professional season with the Mighty Mussels. The team's front office recognized Cardenas for "his fantastic participation and engagement  in community events during the season." He was "always courteous to fans, employees, and community members." 
    The 23-year-old backstop hit .261 with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He also walked 73 times and walked 70 times. 
    Past Killebrew Award Winners
    2011: Rochester: Kyle Gibson, New Britain: Bobby Lanigan, Ft. Myers: Reggie Williams, Beloit: Ryan O'Rourke.
    2012: Rochester: JR Towles, New Britain: Shawn Roof, Ft. Myers: Andy Leer, Beloit: Corey Williams. 
    2013: Rochester: Brian Dinkelman, New Britain: Dan Rohlfing, Ft. Myers: Stephen Wickens, Beloit: Niko Goodrum.
    2014: Rochester: Logan Darnell, New Britain: Tony Thomas, Ft. Myers: Tim Shibuya, Cedar Rapids: Tanner Vavra. 
    2015: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: Tim Shibuya, Ft. Myers: Tanner Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Jared Wilson.
    2016: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: David Hurlbut, Ft. Myers: Trey Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Nelson Molina. 
    2017: Rochester: DJ Baxendale, Chattanooga: Travis Harrison, Ft. Myers: Kevin Garcia, Cedar Rapids: Hector Lujan.
    2018: Rochester: Jake Reed, Chattanooga: Chris Paul, Ft. Myers: Tyler Wells, Cedar Rapids: David Banuelos. 
    2019: Rochester: Jake Reed, Pensacola: Hector Lujan, Ft. Myers: Calvin Faucher, Cedar Rapids: Brian Rapp.
    2021: St. Paul: Sherman Johnson, Wichita: Hector Lujan, Cedar Rapids: Alex Isola, Ft. Myers: Jeferson Morales.
  12. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Twins Announce Harmon Killebrew Award Winners   
    When Harmon Killebrew passed away in 2011, the Twins developed the Killebrew Award for Outstanding Community Service. The players are nominated by each affiliate's general manager based on how much the players do in the community, whether it is reading for kids at school or participating in special camps or visiting hospitals. 
    St. Paul Saints (Catchers David Banuelos and Frank Nigro)
    Banuelos was the Killebrew Award winner in 2018 when he played with the Kernels as well. In 2022, the Saints recognized him for his work at each of the team's kid baseball camps. He took a strong leadership role in those camps, making sure that the kids were having fun and getting to interact with all the kids. He also participated in the team's annual ACES bowling event. Banuelos has been in big-league spring training the past few years because he is fantastic behind the plate. While he hit just .204, he added seven doubles and eight home runs in 55 games. 
     
    The Saints referred to Frank Nigro as an "unsung hero" involved in community service initiatives. When he was in St. Paul, he was always willing to volunteer his time. He encouraged kids as they headed back to school this fall with a video message. He also spent time visiting kids in the hospital. Nigro, 25, spent time in the FCL, at Ft. Myers, in Cedar Rapids, and with the Saints, and he had just 34 at-bats in 18 games played. 
    Wichita Wind Surge (Catcher/First Baseman Alex Isola) 
    Alex Isola is also now a two-time Killebrew Award recipient. He won the award in 2021 with the Kernels. The Wind Surge recognized Isola for being a "strong advocate for the team, its fans and the entire Wichita community." Isola went to the team's McConnell Air Force Base Nose Art Ceremony. He also helped the team announce their alternate identities, the Turbo Tubs and the Tumba Vacas. He was always signing autographs for Twins before and after home games. 
    Isola is currently playing in the final week of the Arizona Fall League. The 24-year-old played in 58 games for the Surge this year and hit .286 with nine doubles, 10 homers and 40 RBI. He missed nearly two months with an injury. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels (RHP Bradley Hanner) 
    Brad Hanner was the Kernels choice for the Killebrew Award as he kept busy volunteering throughout the 2022 season. He was a "standout" during the Twins' organization-wide Week of Service. He assembled boxes at the local Meals on Wheels location to help pre-package meals. He brought breakfast to the elderly several mornings with his host family. The 23-year-old went above and beyond, always spending talking to the fans and signing autographs. 
    Hanner was one of the Kernels top bullpen arms, especially in the first half. In 39 games, he went 7-4 with a 4.60 ERA. In 58 2/3 innings, he had 65 strikeouts. 
    Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels (Catcher Noah Cardenas) 
    Noah Cardenas spent his first full professional season with the Mighty Mussels. The team's front office recognized Cardenas for "his fantastic participation and engagement  in community events during the season." He was "always courteous to fans, employees, and community members." 
    The 23-year-old backstop hit .261 with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He also walked 73 times and walked 70 times. 
    Past Killebrew Award Winners
    2011: Rochester: Kyle Gibson, New Britain: Bobby Lanigan, Ft. Myers: Reggie Williams, Beloit: Ryan O'Rourke.
    2012: Rochester: JR Towles, New Britain: Shawn Roof, Ft. Myers: Andy Leer, Beloit: Corey Williams. 
    2013: Rochester: Brian Dinkelman, New Britain: Dan Rohlfing, Ft. Myers: Stephen Wickens, Beloit: Niko Goodrum.
    2014: Rochester: Logan Darnell, New Britain: Tony Thomas, Ft. Myers: Tim Shibuya, Cedar Rapids: Tanner Vavra. 
    2015: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: Tim Shibuya, Ft. Myers: Tanner Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Jared Wilson.
    2016: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: David Hurlbut, Ft. Myers: Trey Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Nelson Molina. 
    2017: Rochester: DJ Baxendale, Chattanooga: Travis Harrison, Ft. Myers: Kevin Garcia, Cedar Rapids: Hector Lujan.
    2018: Rochester: Jake Reed, Chattanooga: Chris Paul, Ft. Myers: Tyler Wells, Cedar Rapids: David Banuelos. 
    2019: Rochester: Jake Reed, Pensacola: Hector Lujan, Ft. Myers: Calvin Faucher, Cedar Rapids: Brian Rapp.
    2021: St. Paul: Sherman Johnson, Wichita: Hector Lujan, Cedar Rapids: Alex Isola, Ft. Myers: Jeferson Morales.
  13. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Richie the Rally Goat for an article, Twins Spotlight: RHP Andrew Morris   
    Andrew Morris tossed his first college pitches at Division II Mesa State in Colorado as a 16-year-old. As a child, he moved around the country, from New York, Alaska, Oregon, and Colorado. While in Alaska, he was homeschooled for a little while and was able to skip second grade. That certainly created some challenges when he got to Monarch High School in Boulder. 
    “Because of my age, I didn’t even make the C team. I was on the Level 3 team my freshman year which is below the C team somehow. C team was like the freshman team.” He continued. “The next year I made the C team, and then I was on JV the year after that. My senior year was the first that I actually played on varsity.” 
    Looking to grow and mature, he went to Mesa State in Grand Junction, Colorado. Despite his youth, he went 7-1 with a 3.88 ERA during his freshman year. He was able to pitch in the Division II College World Series that year. He was 2-1 over five starts in the Covid-shortened. Then in 2021, he went 9-0 with a 2.19 ERA. After struggling some with his control earlier, he struck out 115 batters and walked just 19 batters in 78 innings. 
    At that point, he was hearing some from scouts, but he decided to enter the transfer portal and ended up at Texas Tech. “I had some draft offers. I just felt like I needed to take the next step without going to the draft yet and face some better lineups and better competition. 
    In his one season in the Big 12, he went 8-2 in 16 games. In 88 1/3 innings, he struck out 91 and walked 28 batters. 
    The Twins drafted him in the fourth round. Trevor Brown is the Twins area scout. “I only talked to him once, and I didn’t really think they were interested. Oddly enough, I didn’t even fill out their questionnaire that you’re supposed to do, so I thought they were probably not going to take me but then they did.” 
    For the draft, his parents rented a hotel suite in Las Vegas. His dad lives in Oregon with his little brothers. His mom lives in Colorado Springs with his stepdad. It was a good place to meet in the middle. His girlfriend and her family were there as well. And some of his high school friends. 
    He was on the phone with Brown when he heard his name called on the television. 
    This summer was more about introductions and physicals and adjusting to pro ball. He’d already thrown a lot of innings in the spring, so he spent time working with the Twins staff on weight training, diet, analytics and technology, and more. There were a lot of meetings on pitching and discussions on what has made them successful. 
    He did pitch one inning in one game in the FCL. Then he joined the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels for their playoff series. He pitched once and worked three scoreless innings. 
    The 48-minute video includes a ton of Morris’s thoughts on a variety of topics. 
    How he feels about how the Twins use analytics and technology.  His time on the Mighty Mussels playoff roster.  Getting to know his 2022 draft class and seeing how much talent there is. For instance, he said, “Ben Rakes!”  The work done at Instructs, workouts, throwing, scrimmaging, and more.  Developing his offseason plan for working out and throwing.  What he does away from baseball.  Bordering the line between ‘routine’ and ‘superstition.’  And much more.  A four-pitch mix (at least) means that he is very likely to spend his time developing as a starting pitcher. Despite playing four college seasons, Morris only turned 21 years old on September 1st. The future is bright. 
    Your turn. Share your thoughts on this Twins prospect as he begins his pro career. And who knows, maybe he’ll check out the Comments, so feel free to ask him questions as well.
     
  14. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Game7-91 for an article, Twins Announce Harmon Killebrew Award Winners   
    When Harmon Killebrew passed away in 2011, the Twins developed the Killebrew Award for Outstanding Community Service. The players are nominated by each affiliate's general manager based on how much the players do in the community, whether it is reading for kids at school or participating in special camps or visiting hospitals. 
    St. Paul Saints (Catchers David Banuelos and Frank Nigro)
    Banuelos was the Killebrew Award winner in 2018 when he played with the Kernels as well. In 2022, the Saints recognized him for his work at each of the team's kid baseball camps. He took a strong leadership role in those camps, making sure that the kids were having fun and getting to interact with all the kids. He also participated in the team's annual ACES bowling event. Banuelos has been in big-league spring training the past few years because he is fantastic behind the plate. While he hit just .204, he added seven doubles and eight home runs in 55 games. 
     
    The Saints referred to Frank Nigro as an "unsung hero" involved in community service initiatives. When he was in St. Paul, he was always willing to volunteer his time. He encouraged kids as they headed back to school this fall with a video message. He also spent time visiting kids in the hospital. Nigro, 25, spent time in the FCL, at Ft. Myers, in Cedar Rapids, and with the Saints, and he had just 34 at-bats in 18 games played. 
    Wichita Wind Surge (Catcher/First Baseman Alex Isola) 
    Alex Isola is also now a two-time Killebrew Award recipient. He won the award in 2021 with the Kernels. The Wind Surge recognized Isola for being a "strong advocate for the team, its fans and the entire Wichita community." Isola went to the team's McConnell Air Force Base Nose Art Ceremony. He also helped the team announce their alternate identities, the Turbo Tubs and the Tumba Vacas. He was always signing autographs for Twins before and after home games. 
    Isola is currently playing in the final week of the Arizona Fall League. The 24-year-old played in 58 games for the Surge this year and hit .286 with nine doubles, 10 homers and 40 RBI. He missed nearly two months with an injury. 
    Cedar Rapids Kernels (RHP Bradley Hanner) 
    Brad Hanner was the Kernels choice for the Killebrew Award as he kept busy volunteering throughout the 2022 season. He was a "standout" during the Twins' organization-wide Week of Service. He assembled boxes at the local Meals on Wheels location to help pre-package meals. He brought breakfast to the elderly several mornings with his host family. The 23-year-old went above and beyond, always spending talking to the fans and signing autographs. 
    Hanner was one of the Kernels top bullpen arms, especially in the first half. In 39 games, he went 7-4 with a 4.60 ERA. In 58 2/3 innings, he had 65 strikeouts. 
    Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels (Catcher Noah Cardenas) 
    Noah Cardenas spent his first full professional season with the Mighty Mussels. The team's front office recognized Cardenas for "his fantastic participation and engagement  in community events during the season." He was "always courteous to fans, employees, and community members." 
    The 23-year-old backstop hit .261 with 18 doubles and nine home runs. He also walked 73 times and walked 70 times. 
    Past Killebrew Award Winners
    2011: Rochester: Kyle Gibson, New Britain: Bobby Lanigan, Ft. Myers: Reggie Williams, Beloit: Ryan O'Rourke.
    2012: Rochester: JR Towles, New Britain: Shawn Roof, Ft. Myers: Andy Leer, Beloit: Corey Williams. 
    2013: Rochester: Brian Dinkelman, New Britain: Dan Rohlfing, Ft. Myers: Stephen Wickens, Beloit: Niko Goodrum.
    2014: Rochester: Logan Darnell, New Britain: Tony Thomas, Ft. Myers: Tim Shibuya, Cedar Rapids: Tanner Vavra. 
    2015: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: Tim Shibuya, Ft. Myers: Tanner Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Jared Wilson.
    2016: Rochester: Logan Darnell, Chattanooga: David Hurlbut, Ft. Myers: Trey Vavra, Cedar Rapids: Nelson Molina. 
    2017: Rochester: DJ Baxendale, Chattanooga: Travis Harrison, Ft. Myers: Kevin Garcia, Cedar Rapids: Hector Lujan.
    2018: Rochester: Jake Reed, Chattanooga: Chris Paul, Ft. Myers: Tyler Wells, Cedar Rapids: David Banuelos. 
    2019: Rochester: Jake Reed, Pensacola: Hector Lujan, Ft. Myers: Calvin Faucher, Cedar Rapids: Brian Rapp.
    2021: St. Paul: Sherman Johnson, Wichita: Hector Lujan, Cedar Rapids: Alex Isola, Ft. Myers: Jeferson Morales.
  15. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from tarheeltwinsfan for an article, Twins Spotlight: RHP Andrew Morris   
    Andrew Morris tossed his first college pitches at Division II Mesa State in Colorado as a 16-year-old. As a child, he moved around the country, from New York, Alaska, Oregon, and Colorado. While in Alaska, he was homeschooled for a little while and was able to skip second grade. That certainly created some challenges when he got to Monarch High School in Boulder. 
    “Because of my age, I didn’t even make the C team. I was on the Level 3 team my freshman year which is below the C team somehow. C team was like the freshman team.” He continued. “The next year I made the C team, and then I was on JV the year after that. My senior year was the first that I actually played on varsity.” 
    Looking to grow and mature, he went to Mesa State in Grand Junction, Colorado. Despite his youth, he went 7-1 with a 3.88 ERA during his freshman year. He was able to pitch in the Division II College World Series that year. He was 2-1 over five starts in the Covid-shortened. Then in 2021, he went 9-0 with a 2.19 ERA. After struggling some with his control earlier, he struck out 115 batters and walked just 19 batters in 78 innings. 
    At that point, he was hearing some from scouts, but he decided to enter the transfer portal and ended up at Texas Tech. “I had some draft offers. I just felt like I needed to take the next step without going to the draft yet and face some better lineups and better competition. 
    In his one season in the Big 12, he went 8-2 in 16 games. In 88 1/3 innings, he struck out 91 and walked 28 batters. 
    The Twins drafted him in the fourth round. Trevor Brown is the Twins area scout. “I only talked to him once, and I didn’t really think they were interested. Oddly enough, I didn’t even fill out their questionnaire that you’re supposed to do, so I thought they were probably not going to take me but then they did.” 
    For the draft, his parents rented a hotel suite in Las Vegas. His dad lives in Oregon with his little brothers. His mom lives in Colorado Springs with his stepdad. It was a good place to meet in the middle. His girlfriend and her family were there as well. And some of his high school friends. 
    He was on the phone with Brown when he heard his name called on the television. 
    This summer was more about introductions and physicals and adjusting to pro ball. He’d already thrown a lot of innings in the spring, so he spent time working with the Twins staff on weight training, diet, analytics and technology, and more. There were a lot of meetings on pitching and discussions on what has made them successful. 
    He did pitch one inning in one game in the FCL. Then he joined the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels for their playoff series. He pitched once and worked three scoreless innings. 
    The 48-minute video includes a ton of Morris’s thoughts on a variety of topics. 
    How he feels about how the Twins use analytics and technology.  His time on the Mighty Mussels playoff roster.  Getting to know his 2022 draft class and seeing how much talent there is. For instance, he said, “Ben Rakes!”  The work done at Instructs, workouts, throwing, scrimmaging, and more.  Developing his offseason plan for working out and throwing.  What he does away from baseball.  Bordering the line between ‘routine’ and ‘superstition.’  And much more.  A four-pitch mix (at least) means that he is very likely to spend his time developing as a starting pitcher. Despite playing four college seasons, Morris only turned 21 years old on September 1st. The future is bright. 
    Your turn. Share your thoughts on this Twins prospect as he begins his pro career. And who knows, maybe he’ll check out the Comments, so feel free to ask him questions as well.
     
  16. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Spotlight: RHP Andrew Morris   
    Andrew Morris tossed his first college pitches at Division II Mesa State in Colorado as a 16-year-old. As a child, he moved around the country, from New York, Alaska, Oregon, and Colorado. While in Alaska, he was homeschooled for a little while and was able to skip second grade. That certainly created some challenges when he got to Monarch High School in Boulder. 
    “Because of my age, I didn’t even make the C team. I was on the Level 3 team my freshman year which is below the C team somehow. C team was like the freshman team.” He continued. “The next year I made the C team, and then I was on JV the year after that. My senior year was the first that I actually played on varsity.” 
    Looking to grow and mature, he went to Mesa State in Grand Junction, Colorado. Despite his youth, he went 7-1 with a 3.88 ERA during his freshman year. He was able to pitch in the Division II College World Series that year. He was 2-1 over five starts in the Covid-shortened. Then in 2021, he went 9-0 with a 2.19 ERA. After struggling some with his control earlier, he struck out 115 batters and walked just 19 batters in 78 innings. 
    At that point, he was hearing some from scouts, but he decided to enter the transfer portal and ended up at Texas Tech. “I had some draft offers. I just felt like I needed to take the next step without going to the draft yet and face some better lineups and better competition. 
    In his one season in the Big 12, he went 8-2 in 16 games. In 88 1/3 innings, he struck out 91 and walked 28 batters. 
    The Twins drafted him in the fourth round. Trevor Brown is the Twins area scout. “I only talked to him once, and I didn’t really think they were interested. Oddly enough, I didn’t even fill out their questionnaire that you’re supposed to do, so I thought they were probably not going to take me but then they did.” 
    For the draft, his parents rented a hotel suite in Las Vegas. His dad lives in Oregon with his little brothers. His mom lives in Colorado Springs with his stepdad. It was a good place to meet in the middle. His girlfriend and her family were there as well. And some of his high school friends. 
    He was on the phone with Brown when he heard his name called on the television. 
    This summer was more about introductions and physicals and adjusting to pro ball. He’d already thrown a lot of innings in the spring, so he spent time working with the Twins staff on weight training, diet, analytics and technology, and more. There were a lot of meetings on pitching and discussions on what has made them successful. 
    He did pitch one inning in one game in the FCL. Then he joined the Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels for their playoff series. He pitched once and worked three scoreless innings. 
    The 48-minute video includes a ton of Morris’s thoughts on a variety of topics. 
    How he feels about how the Twins use analytics and technology.  His time on the Mighty Mussels playoff roster.  Getting to know his 2022 draft class and seeing how much talent there is. For instance, he said, “Ben Rakes!”  The work done at Instructs, workouts, throwing, scrimmaging, and more.  Developing his offseason plan for working out and throwing.  What he does away from baseball.  Bordering the line between ‘routine’ and ‘superstition.’  And much more.  A four-pitch mix (at least) means that he is very likely to spend his time developing as a starting pitcher. Despite playing four college seasons, Morris only turned 21 years old on September 1st. The future is bright. 
    Your turn. Share your thoughts on this Twins prospect as he begins his pro career. And who knows, maybe he’ll check out the Comments, so feel free to ask him questions as well.
     
  17. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Swiper, No Swiping: Will Bigger Bases Alter Offseason Planning?   
    In 2022, the Minnesota Twins went 38-for-55 in stolen base attempts. Those numbers are, by far, the lowest in Major League Baseball. In the AL Central, the Tigers had 47 steals, the third-lowest in MLB, but they were caught 24 times. The White Sox ranked 24th with 58 steals, but they were only caught 10 times. 
    On the other side of the spectrum, the Cleveland Guardians ranked third in baseball with 119 steals, and the Kansas City Royals tied for sixth with 104 steals. 
    The question now becomes, how will the new rules – specifically the larger bases – alter how the Twins manage the running game, if at all? Will the team suddenly start attempting a lot of stolen bases? Could they steal more, but remain behind other organizations that already incorporated a running game into their strategy? 
    There are several reasons that the Twins don’t run a lot. First and foremost, their 2022 roster did not include much speed or certainly many base stealers. While Byron Buxton and Nick Gordon have tremendous speed, they also don’t run a lot. The two were tied for the team lead with... six stolen bases. The idea is that they can score from first base on a double, so why risk getting thrown out on a stolen base attempt? Buxton has stolen bases at a high percentage over his career. However, with his leg issues in 2022, it made little sense for him to run. And now, with his recent arthroscopic knee surgery, it’s hard to imagine that he will do a ton of running moving forward. 
    What happened in the Twins minor leagues, where the larger bases have already been utilized? Here is a quick look at where the Twins affiliate ranks relative to their minor-league level: 
        Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels - 179 SB, 67 CS (Ranked 13th of 30 teams) 
        High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels - 143 SB, 44 CS (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge - 170 SB, 50 CS (Ranked 7th of 30 teams) 
        Triple-A: St. Paul Saints - 136 SB, 29 CS. (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        MLB: Minnesota Twins - 38 SB, 17 CS. (Ranked 30th of 30 teams) 
    So as you can see, the Twins affiliates all attempted a lot of stolen bases throughout the year. So was that just a player or two on each affiliate that accounted for a big chunk of his team’s steals? Let’s take a look at the organizational leaders in stolen bases, noting which leagues they played in during the course of the year. 
        Mikey Perez 48/55 (Ft. Myers, St. Paul, Cedar Rapids)     DaShawn Keirsey 42/49 (Wichita)     Michael Helman 40/45 (Wichita, St. Paul)     Austin Martin 35/41 (Wichita)     Will Holland 32/38 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Yasser Mercedes 30/35 (DSL Twins)     Mark Contreras 23/25 (St. Paul)     Noah Miller 23/30 (Ft. Myers)     Anthony Prato 22/28 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Luis Baez 20/23 (Ft. Myers)     Daniel Ozoria 20/25 (all over)     Edouard Julien 19/26 (Wichita)     Jake Rucker 19/31 (Ft. Myers, Cedar Rapids, St. Paul)     Alerick Soularie 18/23 (Cedar Rapids)     Willie Joe Garry 17/21 (Cedar Rapids)  It is noteworthy that three individuals stole 40 or more bases. Three others had 30 or more, including Yasser Mercedes who stole 30 bags in just 41 games in the Dominican Summer League. A total of 11 players had 20 or more steals on the season. Whether it was simply situational or if it was an intentional effort to better understand the effect of larger bases, the Twins had a lot of players running often in the minors. 
    It certainly appears that organizationally the Twins aren’t against stealing bases. It’s really just clear that the big-league club was made up of players that didn’t really work to be a running team. Over time, as the composition of the roster changes, they certainly could run more. 
    As a rookie in 2003, Rocco Baldelli stole 27 bases and was caught ten times. The following year, he went 17-for-21 in stolen base attempts. 
    Jon Berti of the Marlins led baseball with 41 stolen bases. Jorge Mateo led the American League with 35 steals, one more than his Orioles teammate Cedric Mullins. Trea Turner stole 27 bases for the Dodgers this year, the most by an impending free agent. 
    On the other side, Twins catchers did not have a very good year in terms of throwing out would-be base stealers. The Twins allowed 92 stolen bases and threw out just 23 runners. Their 20% caught stealing was tied for 26th in the league. That certainly is not a good number, but it is important to note that the league average was just 25% 
    Did teams run against the Twins more than average? Technically, yes. There were 115 stolen base attempts against the Twins in 2022. The average was 110, so negligible. 
    As the Twins look for a catcher, the ability to throw out base stealers should be one consideration, but it shouldn’t be among the top considerations. It can be worked on, to some degree (footwork, transition, release time, pop times), but it is just as important, and I might argue more important, for the Twins to have their pitchers focus a little bit more on trying to give their catchers a chance (change pitch timing, slide steps, etc.). Of those 92 stolen bases, how many times were we able to say “The catcher didn’t have a chance.” 
     
    So as the offseason approaches, how do you think that the larger bases will factor into decisions? Will the team add some speed to the roster in an attempt to steal more bases? As they look for a #2 catcher, how important will (or should) their ability to throw out would-be base stealers? Share your thoughts below, and make sure to check out our Offseason Handbook content to identify targets who could improve the team's overall speed and base-stealing proficiency.
  18. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from DocBauer for an article, Swiper, No Swiping: Will Bigger Bases Alter Offseason Planning?   
    In 2022, the Minnesota Twins went 38-for-55 in stolen base attempts. Those numbers are, by far, the lowest in Major League Baseball. In the AL Central, the Tigers had 47 steals, the third-lowest in MLB, but they were caught 24 times. The White Sox ranked 24th with 58 steals, but they were only caught 10 times. 
    On the other side of the spectrum, the Cleveland Guardians ranked third in baseball with 119 steals, and the Kansas City Royals tied for sixth with 104 steals. 
    The question now becomes, how will the new rules – specifically the larger bases – alter how the Twins manage the running game, if at all? Will the team suddenly start attempting a lot of stolen bases? Could they steal more, but remain behind other organizations that already incorporated a running game into their strategy? 
    There are several reasons that the Twins don’t run a lot. First and foremost, their 2022 roster did not include much speed or certainly many base stealers. While Byron Buxton and Nick Gordon have tremendous speed, they also don’t run a lot. The two were tied for the team lead with... six stolen bases. The idea is that they can score from first base on a double, so why risk getting thrown out on a stolen base attempt? Buxton has stolen bases at a high percentage over his career. However, with his leg issues in 2022, it made little sense for him to run. And now, with his recent arthroscopic knee surgery, it’s hard to imagine that he will do a ton of running moving forward. 
    What happened in the Twins minor leagues, where the larger bases have already been utilized? Here is a quick look at where the Twins affiliate ranks relative to their minor-league level: 
        Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels - 179 SB, 67 CS (Ranked 13th of 30 teams) 
        High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels - 143 SB, 44 CS (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge - 170 SB, 50 CS (Ranked 7th of 30 teams) 
        Triple-A: St. Paul Saints - 136 SB, 29 CS. (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        MLB: Minnesota Twins - 38 SB, 17 CS. (Ranked 30th of 30 teams) 
    So as you can see, the Twins affiliates all attempted a lot of stolen bases throughout the year. So was that just a player or two on each affiliate that accounted for a big chunk of his team’s steals? Let’s take a look at the organizational leaders in stolen bases, noting which leagues they played in during the course of the year. 
        Mikey Perez 48/55 (Ft. Myers, St. Paul, Cedar Rapids)     DaShawn Keirsey 42/49 (Wichita)     Michael Helman 40/45 (Wichita, St. Paul)     Austin Martin 35/41 (Wichita)     Will Holland 32/38 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Yasser Mercedes 30/35 (DSL Twins)     Mark Contreras 23/25 (St. Paul)     Noah Miller 23/30 (Ft. Myers)     Anthony Prato 22/28 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Luis Baez 20/23 (Ft. Myers)     Daniel Ozoria 20/25 (all over)     Edouard Julien 19/26 (Wichita)     Jake Rucker 19/31 (Ft. Myers, Cedar Rapids, St. Paul)     Alerick Soularie 18/23 (Cedar Rapids)     Willie Joe Garry 17/21 (Cedar Rapids)  It is noteworthy that three individuals stole 40 or more bases. Three others had 30 or more, including Yasser Mercedes who stole 30 bags in just 41 games in the Dominican Summer League. A total of 11 players had 20 or more steals on the season. Whether it was simply situational or if it was an intentional effort to better understand the effect of larger bases, the Twins had a lot of players running often in the minors. 
    It certainly appears that organizationally the Twins aren’t against stealing bases. It’s really just clear that the big-league club was made up of players that didn’t really work to be a running team. Over time, as the composition of the roster changes, they certainly could run more. 
    As a rookie in 2003, Rocco Baldelli stole 27 bases and was caught ten times. The following year, he went 17-for-21 in stolen base attempts. 
    Jon Berti of the Marlins led baseball with 41 stolen bases. Jorge Mateo led the American League with 35 steals, one more than his Orioles teammate Cedric Mullins. Trea Turner stole 27 bases for the Dodgers this year, the most by an impending free agent. 
    On the other side, Twins catchers did not have a very good year in terms of throwing out would-be base stealers. The Twins allowed 92 stolen bases and threw out just 23 runners. Their 20% caught stealing was tied for 26th in the league. That certainly is not a good number, but it is important to note that the league average was just 25% 
    Did teams run against the Twins more than average? Technically, yes. There were 115 stolen base attempts against the Twins in 2022. The average was 110, so negligible. 
    As the Twins look for a catcher, the ability to throw out base stealers should be one consideration, but it shouldn’t be among the top considerations. It can be worked on, to some degree (footwork, transition, release time, pop times), but it is just as important, and I might argue more important, for the Twins to have their pitchers focus a little bit more on trying to give their catchers a chance (change pitch timing, slide steps, etc.). Of those 92 stolen bases, how many times were we able to say “The catcher didn’t have a chance.” 
     
    So as the offseason approaches, how do you think that the larger bases will factor into decisions? Will the team add some speed to the roster in an attempt to steal more bases? As they look for a #2 catcher, how important will (or should) their ability to throw out would-be base stealers? Share your thoughts below, and make sure to check out our Offseason Handbook content to identify targets who could improve the team's overall speed and base-stealing proficiency.
  19. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Game7-91 for an article, Looking Back: Ryan Pressly Excited To Be with the Twins on Opening Day   
    Target Field - Phenom Aaron Hicks is not the only Minnesota Twins player who will be making the jump from AA to the big leagues in 2013. Rule 5 pick Ryan Pressly is also making that jump, and he’s admittedly, and understandably, “pretty nervous right now” as the Twins and Tigers are preparing to open their 2013 seasons at Target Field this afternoon.
    Aaron Hicks spent the entire 2012 season in New Britain. Ryan Pressly didn’t make his AA debut until mid-July, shortly after making the transition from being a starting pitcher to his new role in the bullpen. Pressly pitched very well in the Arizona Fall League in 2012 and impressed the Twins brass enough to make him their Rule 5 selection in December. By rules, the Twins are required to keep Pressly on the big league roster for the entire 2013 season or would have to offer him back to the Red Sox.

    Pressly is hoping to stick around with the Twins for a while. Twins Daily had the opportunity to talk to the hard-throwing, 24-year-old right-hander from Dallas before batting practice today. It wasn’t hard to tell that Pressly is thrilled to be with the Twins and in the big leagues. His ear-to-ear smile tells that story clearly.
    “I’m pretty nervous right now. I wouldn’t say nervous, more anxious than anything, because it’s Opening Day. A lot of these guys have gone through it, but some of us haven’t and it’s pretty fun, pretty entertaining.”
    He found spring training to be even more than he was anticipating this spring. “(I) never realized how the competition was there, and it just kind of shocked me. I was more in shock when I got there, seeing all the guys in camp, everybody competing. It was fun though.”
    It was fun, in part, because he pitched incredibly well. In 13 1/3 innings over 10 spring training games, he gave up just one run on nine hits. He posted a 0.66 ERA and opponents hit just .191 off of him. What did he credit for his success?
    “Just attacking hitters. I was just going after them. I didn’t really try to get too cute with anything. I just wanted to throw all my stuff for strikes and try to get people out. That’s really all you can do.”
    It was really just a continuation of his successful AFL stint where he walked just one and struck out 18 in 14 innings. The righty throws 95 with a good, power curveball.
    “I guess at the AFL and the end of AA season, it all just kind of clicked. I really can’t explain it. I can’t explain what I have done, but it’s just clicked. I guess moving to the bullpen, a new role it’s just helped a lot. ”
    Having come from the Red Sox organization, he already was familiar with the city of Ft. Myers. The Red Sox spring training facilities are just across town. The two teams played several times throughout spring training. It was after an appearance against the Red Sox when Pressly was told the news he had hoped for all spring training, that he would make the Twins Opening Day roster.
    “I got done throwing, and I wasn’t even two steps into the dugout and (Ron) Gardenhire shook my hand and said ‘Congratulations, You made the team.’ I was just in shock, and I didn’t even know what to say or do. I just shook his hand and said, ‘OK.’”
    His dad was in a business meeting at the time, but he still called home. “I called my mom, and she was ecstatic. Screaming. I think she was crying a little bit, but it was an awesome feeling. I don’t think I was even out of my cleats yet.”
    Pressly played most of the 2012 season with Jackie Bradley, Jr. who made his major league debut today as the Red Sox left fielder after splitting the 2012 season between A ball and AA ball.
    Pressly is excited for his first Opening Day, as he should be. He’s even excited to get to partake in the Twins bullpen tradition. How does he feel about carrying out the pink backpack full of treats? He’s excited. “I’ve got everything organized in there already. I just have to take some drink requests after we get done throwing.”
    Pressly isn’t completely certain what role or what types of situations he’ll be put into. He couldn’t stop smiling during a pre-batting practice interview. It’s a great story. As Twins fans, let’s hope that he pitches well and keeps on smiling throughout the season.
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Ten Seasons. A couple of All Star games. A World Series ring, and working on a second one. Last night, Ryan Pressly recorded the final three outs of an Astros combined no-hitter, just the second no-hitter in World Series history. 
     
     
     
     
  20. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Dave Overlund for an article, Swiper, No Swiping: Will Bigger Bases Alter Offseason Planning?   
    In 2022, the Minnesota Twins went 38-for-55 in stolen base attempts. Those numbers are, by far, the lowest in Major League Baseball. In the AL Central, the Tigers had 47 steals, the third-lowest in MLB, but they were caught 24 times. The White Sox ranked 24th with 58 steals, but they were only caught 10 times. 
    On the other side of the spectrum, the Cleveland Guardians ranked third in baseball with 119 steals, and the Kansas City Royals tied for sixth with 104 steals. 
    The question now becomes, how will the new rules – specifically the larger bases – alter how the Twins manage the running game, if at all? Will the team suddenly start attempting a lot of stolen bases? Could they steal more, but remain behind other organizations that already incorporated a running game into their strategy? 
    There are several reasons that the Twins don’t run a lot. First and foremost, their 2022 roster did not include much speed or certainly many base stealers. While Byron Buxton and Nick Gordon have tremendous speed, they also don’t run a lot. The two were tied for the team lead with... six stolen bases. The idea is that they can score from first base on a double, so why risk getting thrown out on a stolen base attempt? Buxton has stolen bases at a high percentage over his career. However, with his leg issues in 2022, it made little sense for him to run. And now, with his recent arthroscopic knee surgery, it’s hard to imagine that he will do a ton of running moving forward. 
    What happened in the Twins minor leagues, where the larger bases have already been utilized? Here is a quick look at where the Twins affiliate ranks relative to their minor-league level: 
        Low-A: Ft. Myers Mighty Mussels - 179 SB, 67 CS (Ranked 13th of 30 teams) 
        High-A: Cedar Rapids Kernels - 143 SB, 44 CS (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        Double-A: Wichita Wind Surge - 170 SB, 50 CS (Ranked 7th of 30 teams) 
        Triple-A: St. Paul Saints - 136 SB, 29 CS. (Ranked 15th of 30 teams) 
        MLB: Minnesota Twins - 38 SB, 17 CS. (Ranked 30th of 30 teams) 
    So as you can see, the Twins affiliates all attempted a lot of stolen bases throughout the year. So was that just a player or two on each affiliate that accounted for a big chunk of his team’s steals? Let’s take a look at the organizational leaders in stolen bases, noting which leagues they played in during the course of the year. 
        Mikey Perez 48/55 (Ft. Myers, St. Paul, Cedar Rapids)     DaShawn Keirsey 42/49 (Wichita)     Michael Helman 40/45 (Wichita, St. Paul)     Austin Martin 35/41 (Wichita)     Will Holland 32/38 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Yasser Mercedes 30/35 (DSL Twins)     Mark Contreras 23/25 (St. Paul)     Noah Miller 23/30 (Ft. Myers)     Anthony Prato 22/28 (Cedar Rapids, Wichita)     Luis Baez 20/23 (Ft. Myers)     Daniel Ozoria 20/25 (all over)     Edouard Julien 19/26 (Wichita)     Jake Rucker 19/31 (Ft. Myers, Cedar Rapids, St. Paul)     Alerick Soularie 18/23 (Cedar Rapids)     Willie Joe Garry 17/21 (Cedar Rapids)  It is noteworthy that three individuals stole 40 or more bases. Three others had 30 or more, including Yasser Mercedes who stole 30 bags in just 41 games in the Dominican Summer League. A total of 11 players had 20 or more steals on the season. Whether it was simply situational or if it was an intentional effort to better understand the effect of larger bases, the Twins had a lot of players running often in the minors. 
    It certainly appears that organizationally the Twins aren’t against stealing bases. It’s really just clear that the big-league club was made up of players that didn’t really work to be a running team. Over time, as the composition of the roster changes, they certainly could run more. 
    As a rookie in 2003, Rocco Baldelli stole 27 bases and was caught ten times. The following year, he went 17-for-21 in stolen base attempts. 
    Jon Berti of the Marlins led baseball with 41 stolen bases. Jorge Mateo led the American League with 35 steals, one more than his Orioles teammate Cedric Mullins. Trea Turner stole 27 bases for the Dodgers this year, the most by an impending free agent. 
    On the other side, Twins catchers did not have a very good year in terms of throwing out would-be base stealers. The Twins allowed 92 stolen bases and threw out just 23 runners. Their 20% caught stealing was tied for 26th in the league. That certainly is not a good number, but it is important to note that the league average was just 25% 
    Did teams run against the Twins more than average? Technically, yes. There were 115 stolen base attempts against the Twins in 2022. The average was 110, so negligible. 
    As the Twins look for a catcher, the ability to throw out base stealers should be one consideration, but it shouldn’t be among the top considerations. It can be worked on, to some degree (footwork, transition, release time, pop times), but it is just as important, and I might argue more important, for the Twins to have their pitchers focus a little bit more on trying to give their catchers a chance (change pitch timing, slide steps, etc.). Of those 92 stolen bases, how many times were we able to say “The catcher didn’t have a chance.” 
     
    So as the offseason approaches, how do you think that the larger bases will factor into decisions? Will the team add some speed to the roster in an attempt to steal more bases? As they look for a #2 catcher, how important will (or should) their ability to throw out would-be base stealers? Share your thoughts below, and make sure to check out our Offseason Handbook content to identify targets who could improve the team's overall speed and base-stealing proficiency.
  21. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Doctor Gast for an article, Looking Back: Ryan Pressly Excited To Be with the Twins on Opening Day   
    Target Field - Phenom Aaron Hicks is not the only Minnesota Twins player who will be making the jump from AA to the big leagues in 2013. Rule 5 pick Ryan Pressly is also making that jump, and he’s admittedly, and understandably, “pretty nervous right now” as the Twins and Tigers are preparing to open their 2013 seasons at Target Field this afternoon.
    Aaron Hicks spent the entire 2012 season in New Britain. Ryan Pressly didn’t make his AA debut until mid-July, shortly after making the transition from being a starting pitcher to his new role in the bullpen. Pressly pitched very well in the Arizona Fall League in 2012 and impressed the Twins brass enough to make him their Rule 5 selection in December. By rules, the Twins are required to keep Pressly on the big league roster for the entire 2013 season or would have to offer him back to the Red Sox.

    Pressly is hoping to stick around with the Twins for a while. Twins Daily had the opportunity to talk to the hard-throwing, 24-year-old right-hander from Dallas before batting practice today. It wasn’t hard to tell that Pressly is thrilled to be with the Twins and in the big leagues. His ear-to-ear smile tells that story clearly.
    “I’m pretty nervous right now. I wouldn’t say nervous, more anxious than anything, because it’s Opening Day. A lot of these guys have gone through it, but some of us haven’t and it’s pretty fun, pretty entertaining.”
    He found spring training to be even more than he was anticipating this spring. “(I) never realized how the competition was there, and it just kind of shocked me. I was more in shock when I got there, seeing all the guys in camp, everybody competing. It was fun though.”
    It was fun, in part, because he pitched incredibly well. In 13 1/3 innings over 10 spring training games, he gave up just one run on nine hits. He posted a 0.66 ERA and opponents hit just .191 off of him. What did he credit for his success?
    “Just attacking hitters. I was just going after them. I didn’t really try to get too cute with anything. I just wanted to throw all my stuff for strikes and try to get people out. That’s really all you can do.”
    It was really just a continuation of his successful AFL stint where he walked just one and struck out 18 in 14 innings. The righty throws 95 with a good, power curveball.
    “I guess at the AFL and the end of AA season, it all just kind of clicked. I really can’t explain it. I can’t explain what I have done, but it’s just clicked. I guess moving to the bullpen, a new role it’s just helped a lot. ”
    Having come from the Red Sox organization, he already was familiar with the city of Ft. Myers. The Red Sox spring training facilities are just across town. The two teams played several times throughout spring training. It was after an appearance against the Red Sox when Pressly was told the news he had hoped for all spring training, that he would make the Twins Opening Day roster.
    “I got done throwing, and I wasn’t even two steps into the dugout and (Ron) Gardenhire shook my hand and said ‘Congratulations, You made the team.’ I was just in shock, and I didn’t even know what to say or do. I just shook his hand and said, ‘OK.’”
    His dad was in a business meeting at the time, but he still called home. “I called my mom, and she was ecstatic. Screaming. I think she was crying a little bit, but it was an awesome feeling. I don’t think I was even out of my cleats yet.”
    Pressly played most of the 2012 season with Jackie Bradley, Jr. who made his major league debut today as the Red Sox left fielder after splitting the 2012 season between A ball and AA ball.
    Pressly is excited for his first Opening Day, as he should be. He’s even excited to get to partake in the Twins bullpen tradition. How does he feel about carrying out the pink backpack full of treats? He’s excited. “I’ve got everything organized in there already. I just have to take some drink requests after we get done throwing.”
    Pressly isn’t completely certain what role or what types of situations he’ll be put into. He couldn’t stop smiling during a pre-batting practice interview. It’s a great story. As Twins fans, let’s hope that he pitches well and keeps on smiling throughout the season.
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Ten Seasons. A couple of All Star games. A World Series ring, and working on a second one. Last night, Ryan Pressly recorded the final three outs of an Astros combined no-hitter, just the second no-hitter in World Series history. 
     
     
     
     
  22. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from TwinsAce for an article, Twins Hire Nick Paparesta as New Head Athletic Trainer   
    The Twins have found their Injured List to be as full as their Active Roster a lot the last few years. Whether it was his fault or not, Michael Salazar took the hit for the injuries when the Twins fired him after the season. 
    On Thursday, Nick Paparesta, who has been the Oakland A's Head Athletic Trainer for the past 12 seasons, was hired in the same role for the Twins. Before getting that job, he had spent three seasons as an Assistant Athletic Trainer with the Tampa Bay Rays. He had spent two years in their minor league system. And before that, he spent 11 seasons in the Cleveland organization, including four at Triple-A Buffalo. 

    1996 Watertown card. 
    It appears to be a lateral move for the veteran trainer, and yet, he grew up in North Ft. Myers, so at least for spring training and the offseason, it's a chance to return home. 
    Did you know that each year MLB recognizes the "Major League Athletic Training Staff of the Year" with an award. His training staffs won the award in 2009 (with the Rays) and in 2018 (with the A's). Paparesta has even been selected as an All Star when he served as the head athletic trainer for the American League in the 2017 All Star game. 
    The 49-year-old comes to the Twins organization hoping to find ways to keep the Twins players off of the Injured List and on the field. For much more on Paparesta, check out this 12+ minute interview from about a year ago. 
     
  23. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Twins Hire Nick Paparesta as New Head Athletic Trainer   
    The Twins have found their Injured List to be as full as their Active Roster a lot the last few years. Whether it was his fault or not, Michael Salazar took the hit for the injuries when the Twins fired him after the season. 
    On Thursday, Nick Paparesta, who has been the Oakland A's Head Athletic Trainer for the past 12 seasons, was hired in the same role for the Twins. Before getting that job, he had spent three seasons as an Assistant Athletic Trainer with the Tampa Bay Rays. He had spent two years in their minor league system. And before that, he spent 11 seasons in the Cleveland organization, including four at Triple-A Buffalo. 

    1996 Watertown card. 
    It appears to be a lateral move for the veteran trainer, and yet, he grew up in North Ft. Myers, so at least for spring training and the offseason, it's a chance to return home. 
    Did you know that each year MLB recognizes the "Major League Athletic Training Staff of the Year" with an award. His training staffs won the award in 2009 (with the Rays) and in 2018 (with the A's). Paparesta has even been selected as an All Star when he served as the head athletic trainer for the American League in the 2017 All Star game. 
    The 49-year-old comes to the Twins organization hoping to find ways to keep the Twins players off of the Injured List and on the field. For much more on Paparesta, check out this 12+ minute interview from about a year ago. 
     
  24. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from Minny505 for an article, Luis Arraez, Carlos Correa, and Max Kepler Named Gold Glove Finalists   
    Keep up with which Twins, if any, are named 2022 Rawlings Gold Glove finalists. The finalists are being announced by Rawlings, approximately 5 minutes apart, so this article will be updated over the next hour. So check back often. 
    In September, Cody Christie looked at which Twins players were on pace to be a Gold Glove finalist. Today, we find out which players are finalists. 
    NL Pitchers: Tyler Anderson (Dodgers), Corbin Burnes (Brewers), Max Fried (Braves)
    AL Pitchers: Jose Berrios (Blue Jays), Shane Bieber (Guardians), Jameson Taillon (Yankees)
    Twins fans got to see the incredible athleticism that Berrios brought to the mound during his years with the Twins. It wasn't until after last season that he was first names a finalist. Can he win his first Gold Glove this year?
    NL Catchers: Travis d'Arnaud (Braves), Tomas Nido (Mets), JT Realmuto (Phillies)
    AL Catchers: Sean Murphy (A's), Cal Raleigh (Mariners), Jose Trevino (Yankees) 
    NL First Base: Paul Goldschmidt (Cardinals), Matt Olson (Braves), Christian Walker (Diamondbacks) 
    AL First Base: Luis Arraez (Twins), Vladimir Guerrero Jr.(Blue Jays), Anthony Rizzo (Yankees). 
    Luis!! Coming into the season, Luis Arraez didn't have a full-time position. In fact, he wasn't in the Opening Day lineup. Since then, he has been named an All Star, won the Rod Carew American League Batting Championship, and now he has been named a finalist for Gold Glove at first base. 
    NL Second Base: Jake Cronenworth (Padres), Tommy Edman (Cardinals), Brendan Rodgers (Rockies)
    AL Second Base: Andres Gimenez (Guardians), Jonathan Schoop (Tigers), Marcus Semien (Rangers) 
    Jonathan Schoop has always been a solid defensive player, at least when he has played second base. The former Twins' defense has been acknowledged as a Gold Glove finalist. 
    NL Shortstop: Ha-Seong Kim (Padres), Miguel Rojas (Marlins), Dansby Swanson (Braves)
    AL Shortstop: Xander Bogaerts (Red Sox), Carlos Correa (Twins), Jeremy Pena (Astros)
    The Twins star was a Gold Glove and the Platinum Glove winner a year ago. Can he repeat? Or will the kid who took his spot in Houston surpass him?
    NL Third Base: Nolan Arenado (Cardinals), Ke'Bryan Hayes (Pirates), Ryan McMahon (Rockies) 
    AL Third Base: Matt Chapman (Blue Jays), Ramon Urias (Orioles), Jose Ramirez (Guardians)
    Twins fans may be a little surprised not to see Gio Urshela on this list. While he made a lot of very memorable, incredible plays, the defensive metrics are not quite as high on him. 
    NL Left Field: Ian Happ (Cubs), David Peralta (Diamondbacks), Christian Yelich (Brewers).
    AL Left Field: Andrew Benintendi (Royals/Yankees), Steven Kwan (Guardians), Brandon Marsh (Angels)
    No Nick Gordon!?
    NL Center Field: Trent Grisham (Padres), Victor Robles (Nationals), Alek Thomas (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Center Field: Cedric Mullins (Orioles), Myles Straw (Guardians), Michael A. Taylor (Royals) 
    Again, it's a case of too few games and too few innings in center field for Byron Buxton. If he qualified, he would likely win every year. Maybe. 
    NL Right Field: Mookie Betts (Dodgers), Juan Soto (Nationals/Padres), Daulton Varsho (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Right Field: Jackie Bradley, Jr (Red Sox/Blue Jays), Max Kepler (Twins), Kyle Tucker (Astros). 
    #MightyMax! After his defense has been snubbed in recent years, Max Kepler has been named a finalist for the AL Right Field Gold Glove. While he was unable to run during September, the defense he provided in right remained fantastic! 
    NL Utility: Brendan Donovan (Cardinals), Tommy Edman (Cardinals), Daulton Varsho (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Utility: DJ LeMahieu (Yankees), Whit Merrifield (Royals/Blue Jays), Luis Rengifo (Angels)
    Daulton Varsho was named a finalist for the Gold Glove at two positions on the same day that the Twins named him the Dick Siebert Award winner for the Upper Midwest Player of the Year. 
    There you have it. The finalists for 2022 Gold Glove Awards. 
    The Twins have three Gold Glove finalists, Luis Arraez, Carlos Correa, and Max Kepler. How do you feel about that? Should others have been finalists? Should those three have been finalists? Share your thoughts below. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  25. Like
    Seth Stohs got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Luis Arraez, Carlos Correa, and Max Kepler Named Gold Glove Finalists   
    Keep up with which Twins, if any, are named 2022 Rawlings Gold Glove finalists. The finalists are being announced by Rawlings, approximately 5 minutes apart, so this article will be updated over the next hour. So check back often. 
    In September, Cody Christie looked at which Twins players were on pace to be a Gold Glove finalist. Today, we find out which players are finalists. 
    NL Pitchers: Tyler Anderson (Dodgers), Corbin Burnes (Brewers), Max Fried (Braves)
    AL Pitchers: Jose Berrios (Blue Jays), Shane Bieber (Guardians), Jameson Taillon (Yankees)
    Twins fans got to see the incredible athleticism that Berrios brought to the mound during his years with the Twins. It wasn't until after last season that he was first names a finalist. Can he win his first Gold Glove this year?
    NL Catchers: Travis d'Arnaud (Braves), Tomas Nido (Mets), JT Realmuto (Phillies)
    AL Catchers: Sean Murphy (A's), Cal Raleigh (Mariners), Jose Trevino (Yankees) 
    NL First Base: Paul Goldschmidt (Cardinals), Matt Olson (Braves), Christian Walker (Diamondbacks) 
    AL First Base: Luis Arraez (Twins), Vladimir Guerrero Jr.(Blue Jays), Anthony Rizzo (Yankees). 
    Luis!! Coming into the season, Luis Arraez didn't have a full-time position. In fact, he wasn't in the Opening Day lineup. Since then, he has been named an All Star, won the Rod Carew American League Batting Championship, and now he has been named a finalist for Gold Glove at first base. 
    NL Second Base: Jake Cronenworth (Padres), Tommy Edman (Cardinals), Brendan Rodgers (Rockies)
    AL Second Base: Andres Gimenez (Guardians), Jonathan Schoop (Tigers), Marcus Semien (Rangers) 
    Jonathan Schoop has always been a solid defensive player, at least when he has played second base. The former Twins' defense has been acknowledged as a Gold Glove finalist. 
    NL Shortstop: Ha-Seong Kim (Padres), Miguel Rojas (Marlins), Dansby Swanson (Braves)
    AL Shortstop: Xander Bogaerts (Red Sox), Carlos Correa (Twins), Jeremy Pena (Astros)
    The Twins star was a Gold Glove and the Platinum Glove winner a year ago. Can he repeat? Or will the kid who took his spot in Houston surpass him?
    NL Third Base: Nolan Arenado (Cardinals), Ke'Bryan Hayes (Pirates), Ryan McMahon (Rockies) 
    AL Third Base: Matt Chapman (Blue Jays), Ramon Urias (Orioles), Jose Ramirez (Guardians)
    Twins fans may be a little surprised not to see Gio Urshela on this list. While he made a lot of very memorable, incredible plays, the defensive metrics are not quite as high on him. 
    NL Left Field: Ian Happ (Cubs), David Peralta (Diamondbacks), Christian Yelich (Brewers).
    AL Left Field: Andrew Benintendi (Royals/Yankees), Steven Kwan (Guardians), Brandon Marsh (Angels)
    No Nick Gordon!?
    NL Center Field: Trent Grisham (Padres), Victor Robles (Nationals), Alek Thomas (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Center Field: Cedric Mullins (Orioles), Myles Straw (Guardians), Michael A. Taylor (Royals) 
    Again, it's a case of too few games and too few innings in center field for Byron Buxton. If he qualified, he would likely win every year. Maybe. 
    NL Right Field: Mookie Betts (Dodgers), Juan Soto (Nationals/Padres), Daulton Varsho (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Right Field: Jackie Bradley, Jr (Red Sox/Blue Jays), Max Kepler (Twins), Kyle Tucker (Astros). 
    #MightyMax! After his defense has been snubbed in recent years, Max Kepler has been named a finalist for the AL Right Field Gold Glove. While he was unable to run during September, the defense he provided in right remained fantastic! 
    NL Utility: Brendan Donovan (Cardinals), Tommy Edman (Cardinals), Daulton Varsho (Diamondbacks) 
    AL Utility: DJ LeMahieu (Yankees), Whit Merrifield (Royals/Blue Jays), Luis Rengifo (Angels)
    Daulton Varsho was named a finalist for the Gold Glove at two positions on the same day that the Twins named him the Dick Siebert Award winner for the Upper Midwest Player of the Year. 
    There you have it. The finalists for 2022 Gold Glove Awards. 
    The Twins have three Gold Glove finalists, Luis Arraez, Carlos Correa, and Max Kepler. How do you feel about that? Should others have been finalists? Should those three have been finalists? Share your thoughts below. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
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