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misaan

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  1. Like
    misaan got a reaction from dcswede in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  2. Like
    misaan got a reaction from twinssporto in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  3. Like
    misaan got a reaction from Lefty74 in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  4. Like
    misaan got a reaction from Dave Overlund in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  5. Like
    misaan got a reaction from Karbo in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  6. Like
    misaan got a reaction from ashbury in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  7. Like
    misaan got a reaction from cHawk in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  8. Like
    misaan got a reaction from LastOnePicked in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
  9. Like
    misaan got a reaction from Hosken Bombo Disco in Why Winning Matters   
    Absolutely incredible blog.  Thank you for clearly articulating why I have nearly given up on my beloved team after similarly rooting for them for nearly 40 years.  in addition to all of your stellar assessments, I believe the hyper focus on analytics is actually eroding our Twins ability to win in big moments.  Let me explain. 
    In an ironic twist, I own a data analytics firm of my own (specializing in private higher education enrollment).  Analytics are designed to allow the decision makers the ability to make decisions without emotion clouding their judgement.  Great.  Wonderful concept.  But, if all that was needed to run or manage a team was analytics, we wouldn't need a front office or even a manager.  We would just need a data analyst to text an operations director in the dugout what they should do.  When every single decision is made without emotion, eventually, the players who are generating that analytical data will similarly become conditioned to play with less emotion...and that's the rub. 
    Baseball, nay, sports in general, are designed to be emotional!  That's the attraction - both as a player and especially as a fan.  I don't want to always see 'the right thing'....I want to see 'the thing that moves me'.  I yearn to see the underdog surpass expectations.  I hunger to see a manager assess the player at the moment - does he have it right now?  Do I leave him in to face the order again?  Do I allow a rookie to try to throw a no-hitter?!?!?!?  
    Analytics creates a plan....but no plan is perfect.  As I have learned in my business, courageous leadership is about learning how and when to deviate from the plan and how and when to stick to it.  Look at Tito Francona, Dave Roberts, Tony LaRussa, Brian Snitker.  These guys understand how to manage the emotional side of the game...and their teams have been winners in the clutch.  I'm not knocking Rocco.  I just think he needs to learn there is an art to leading a team that far beyond what analytics tell you to do in every, stinking, moment.
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