Jump to content
Twins Daily
  • Create Account

Nash Walker

Verified Member
  • Posts

    592
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Doctor Gast for an article, Twins Bullpen Boost: Let Jhoan Duran Eat   
    My plea to the Twins all winter was to field a team that has a fighting chance. As constructed before the lockout, the Twins were looking at another down year, with speculation looming of a rebuild, retool, or anything in-between.
    They’ve made their decision. After signing Correa to a quasi-one-year deal and trading first-round pick Chase Petty for Sonny Gray, the Twins can't go back now. It’s time to push more chips into the pile. Rumors are swirling about a Frankie Montas addition, and Luis Castillo is still in Cincinnati, where the Reds have told everyone the party is over. 
    The Twins need to supplement a less-than-stellar rotation, but the bullpen is also lacking in the hard-throwing right-hander department. Enter Jhoan Duran, who turned heads Saturday with a truly dazzling spring appearance. Duran threw 19 pitches, with three at 99 mph or more. He struck out two over two perfect innings. 
    Duran has the repertoire to be a dominant starter, with a 70-grade fastball and developing breaking stuff. The hope is he remains a future rotation member, with the Twins crossing their fingers for a healthy summer ahead. He’s thrown only 16 game innings since 2019, so ramping him up in 2022 is critical. 
    It wouldn't be easy to convince me that Duran, 24, couldn’t help the Twins immediately. He’s an electric young arm, similar to former Twins flamethrower Brusdar Graterol. Understanding they needed to help the 2020 team in any possible way, the Twins first decided to move Graterol to a bullpen role, tracking him to make the team on Opening Day.
    Then, further recognizing a need to supplement, the Twins traded Graterol to the Dodgers for Kenta Maeda. The Twins made both decisions knowing they had to aid a preseason American League Central favorite in any way possible. After signing Correa, how is this year any different?
    Duran may be part of a package that returns Montas, Sean Manaea, Castillo, or Tyler Mahle, but that’s not what I’m proposing. Let Duran cook. He’s 24, needs innings, and looks ready to contribute. 
    A bullpen move isn’t a death sentence. White Sox starter Michael Kopech is a great example. A hard-throwing right-hander coming off an injury, the White Sox let him eat out of the bullpen in 2021, and he now resides in their rotation. 
    The Twins’ bullpen consists of Taylor Rogers, Tyler Duffey, Jorge Alcalá, Caleb Thielbar, recently-added Joe Smith, Jharel Cotton, and perhaps Randy Dobnak or Jovani Morán. It’s an OK group but could use a boost. Even if the Twins sign a high-leverage, right-handed reliever, Duran could fill a key role. 
    Duran and Alcalá would form a potentially dominant pairing of right-handed flamethrowers, setting up for Duffey and Rogers. Duran could pitch in low, medium, and high leverage and even open some games. He’d be a swiss-army knife for Rocco Baldelli and a potentially valuable one. 
    The Twins have decided they want to win in 2022. By moving Duran to the bullpen, they’re pushing more chips into the pot, which I’ve been calling for since the offseason commenced. 
    What do you think? Should the Twins move Jhoan Duran to the bullpen for 2022? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
     
  2. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from DannySD for an article, The Twins Have a Yellow Brick Road   
    There’s more than one route for the Twins, who’ve infused the roster with a new look. If you were taken back or even shocked to see Gary Sánchez and Gio Urshela in Twins gear, you aren’t alone. Sunday night’s trade was wild enough to fill an entire month of offseason hunger, but it came after two more huge trades in subsequent days. 
    By trading Josh Donaldson and his contract to New York, the Twins added Sonny Gray’s salary for free. The Twins’ payroll remains at $94 million, even after the trade that sent first-round pick Chase Petty to the Cincinnati Reds. That leaves roughly $30-35 million in spending room for the Twins, with very few viable, high-priced free agents left. 
    As soon as the Donaldson deal broke, the attention seemingly shifted immediately to Trevor Story, the former Rockies star shortstop who remains a free agent. There had been speculation pre-lockout that the Twins could take a run at the two-time All-Star, but it was more hope than reality. That sense is shifted. Dan Hayes reported the Twins have indeed been in contact with Story’s camp and that smoke could trail actual fire. 
    Story is an excellent player with clear question marks, the reason why the Twins have any chance to sign him. Only Xander Bogaerts has a higher OPS than Story (.880) among shortstops who’ve played at least 300 games since 2018. Story produced 19.9 b-Wins Above Replacement in that span, second to Marcus Semien, now a second baseman. 
    Story’s relative down year in 2021 (still above-average), the Coors Field factor, and his defensive inconsistencies are real concerns, but they’re the only reason he’s not signing for $300 million. Since 2018, Story has more bWAR than Francisco Lindor, Nolan Arenado, Manny Machado, and Carlos Correa. 
    The Twins traded two of their three best right-handed hitters, have clean books, and a gaping hole at shortstop. Story fits in a meaningful way. He’s a $30 million player who may sign for closer to $20 million, another attractive proposition for a Twins team that still needs quality starting pitching. 
    In the still unlikely scenario where the Twins sign Story, the pressure increases on more additions. Enter Frankie Montas, the electric and highly sought-after right-hander from the Oakland Athletics. Montas isn’t a household name, primarily because of Oakland’s small market and because he hasn’t completely lived up to his stuff. 
    Montas lives with an upper-90s set of fastballs, his four-seamer performing better than his sinker. Montas’ best pitch is his splitter, a tumbling offering that kept hitters to a .164 wOBA in 2021. His slider has been devastating in the past, but not as much in 2021. Cutting down on the sinker and upping his slider usage could unlock a new weapon.  
    Montas threw 187 innings last year, another important aspect for the Twins. Montas dominated down the stretch, pitching to a 2.17 ERA and a 30% strikeout rate in the second half. 
    If the Twins sign Story, they’re signaling that Royce Lewis is not the shortstop of the future, adding to a glut at third base and in the outfield. Austin Martin and José Miranda already project for a corner, and Luis Arraez’s best defensive position is third base. Oh, and did I mention Urshela, the best defender of the group? There’s an influx. 
    The path is clear. Story, Montas, a reliever or two, and a depth addition of Michael Pineda is the slam-dunk route for the Twins. This team is one I’ve wanted them to assemble since the offseason commenced. It gives them a chance to compete with an expanded playoff field, and it excites fans for what could be an exhilarating team this summer. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  3. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, The Twins Have a Yellow Brick Road   
    There’s more than one route for the Twins, who’ve infused the roster with a new look. If you were taken back or even shocked to see Gary Sánchez and Gio Urshela in Twins gear, you aren’t alone. Sunday night’s trade was wild enough to fill an entire month of offseason hunger, but it came after two more huge trades in subsequent days. 
    By trading Josh Donaldson and his contract to New York, the Twins added Sonny Gray’s salary for free. The Twins’ payroll remains at $94 million, even after the trade that sent first-round pick Chase Petty to the Cincinnati Reds. That leaves roughly $30-35 million in spending room for the Twins, with very few viable, high-priced free agents left. 
    As soon as the Donaldson deal broke, the attention seemingly shifted immediately to Trevor Story, the former Rockies star shortstop who remains a free agent. There had been speculation pre-lockout that the Twins could take a run at the two-time All-Star, but it was more hope than reality. That sense is shifted. Dan Hayes reported the Twins have indeed been in contact with Story’s camp and that smoke could trail actual fire. 
    Story is an excellent player with clear question marks, the reason why the Twins have any chance to sign him. Only Xander Bogaerts has a higher OPS than Story (.880) among shortstops who’ve played at least 300 games since 2018. Story produced 19.9 b-Wins Above Replacement in that span, second to Marcus Semien, now a second baseman. 
    Story’s relative down year in 2021 (still above-average), the Coors Field factor, and his defensive inconsistencies are real concerns, but they’re the only reason he’s not signing for $300 million. Since 2018, Story has more bWAR than Francisco Lindor, Nolan Arenado, Manny Machado, and Carlos Correa. 
    The Twins traded two of their three best right-handed hitters, have clean books, and a gaping hole at shortstop. Story fits in a meaningful way. He’s a $30 million player who may sign for closer to $20 million, another attractive proposition for a Twins team that still needs quality starting pitching. 
    In the still unlikely scenario where the Twins sign Story, the pressure increases on more additions. Enter Frankie Montas, the electric and highly sought-after right-hander from the Oakland Athletics. Montas isn’t a household name, primarily because of Oakland’s small market and because he hasn’t completely lived up to his stuff. 
    Montas lives with an upper-90s set of fastballs, his four-seamer performing better than his sinker. Montas’ best pitch is his splitter, a tumbling offering that kept hitters to a .164 wOBA in 2021. His slider has been devastating in the past, but not as much in 2021. Cutting down on the sinker and upping his slider usage could unlock a new weapon.  
    Montas threw 187 innings last year, another important aspect for the Twins. Montas dominated down the stretch, pitching to a 2.17 ERA and a 30% strikeout rate in the second half. 
    If the Twins sign Story, they’re signaling that Royce Lewis is not the shortstop of the future, adding to a glut at third base and in the outfield. Austin Martin and José Miranda already project for a corner, and Luis Arraez’s best defensive position is third base. Oh, and did I mention Urshela, the best defender of the group? There’s an influx. 
    The path is clear. Story, Montas, a reliever or two, and a depth addition of Michael Pineda is the slam-dunk route for the Twins. This team is one I’ve wanted them to assemble since the offseason commenced. It gives them a chance to compete with an expanded playoff field, and it excites fans for what could be an exhilarating team this summer. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  4. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from The Mad King for an article, The Twins Have a Yellow Brick Road   
    There’s more than one route for the Twins, who’ve infused the roster with a new look. If you were taken back or even shocked to see Gary Sánchez and Gio Urshela in Twins gear, you aren’t alone. Sunday night’s trade was wild enough to fill an entire month of offseason hunger, but it came after two more huge trades in subsequent days. 
    By trading Josh Donaldson and his contract to New York, the Twins added Sonny Gray’s salary for free. The Twins’ payroll remains at $94 million, even after the trade that sent first-round pick Chase Petty to the Cincinnati Reds. That leaves roughly $30-35 million in spending room for the Twins, with very few viable, high-priced free agents left. 
    As soon as the Donaldson deal broke, the attention seemingly shifted immediately to Trevor Story, the former Rockies star shortstop who remains a free agent. There had been speculation pre-lockout that the Twins could take a run at the two-time All-Star, but it was more hope than reality. That sense is shifted. Dan Hayes reported the Twins have indeed been in contact with Story’s camp and that smoke could trail actual fire. 
    Story is an excellent player with clear question marks, the reason why the Twins have any chance to sign him. Only Xander Bogaerts has a higher OPS than Story (.880) among shortstops who’ve played at least 300 games since 2018. Story produced 19.9 b-Wins Above Replacement in that span, second to Marcus Semien, now a second baseman. 
    Story’s relative down year in 2021 (still above-average), the Coors Field factor, and his defensive inconsistencies are real concerns, but they’re the only reason he’s not signing for $300 million. Since 2018, Story has more bWAR than Francisco Lindor, Nolan Arenado, Manny Machado, and Carlos Correa. 
    The Twins traded two of their three best right-handed hitters, have clean books, and a gaping hole at shortstop. Story fits in a meaningful way. He’s a $30 million player who may sign for closer to $20 million, another attractive proposition for a Twins team that still needs quality starting pitching. 
    In the still unlikely scenario where the Twins sign Story, the pressure increases on more additions. Enter Frankie Montas, the electric and highly sought-after right-hander from the Oakland Athletics. Montas isn’t a household name, primarily because of Oakland’s small market and because he hasn’t completely lived up to his stuff. 
    Montas lives with an upper-90s set of fastballs, his four-seamer performing better than his sinker. Montas’ best pitch is his splitter, a tumbling offering that kept hitters to a .164 wOBA in 2021. His slider has been devastating in the past, but not as much in 2021. Cutting down on the sinker and upping his slider usage could unlock a new weapon.  
    Montas threw 187 innings last year, another important aspect for the Twins. Montas dominated down the stretch, pitching to a 2.17 ERA and a 30% strikeout rate in the second half. 
    If the Twins sign Story, they’re signaling that Royce Lewis is not the shortstop of the future, adding to a glut at third base and in the outfield. Austin Martin and José Miranda already project for a corner, and Luis Arraez’s best defensive position is third base. Oh, and did I mention Urshela, the best defender of the group? There’s an influx. 
    The path is clear. Story, Montas, a reliever or two, and a depth addition of Michael Pineda is the slam-dunk route for the Twins. This team is one I’ve wanted them to assemble since the offseason commenced. It gives them a chance to compete with an expanded playoff field, and it excites fans for what could be an exhilarating team this summer. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  5. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from JDubs for an article, Yes, the Twins Plan to Compete in 2022   
    The addition of Sonny Gray is enough to convince even the most skeptical fan that the Twins are looking to compete in 2022. It’s the right plan and one I’ve been screaming for all offseason. The Twins have the offensive pieces in place to score plenty of runs, and while inexperienced, there’s plenty to like about Joe Ryan and Bailey Ober. 
    After the team traded José Berríos to the Blue Jays and followed that by signing approximately zero impact starters before the lockout, many (myself included) wondered if there was a punt coming. All signs pointed toward a weak effort this offseason. 
    There’s no award for compiling the prettiest roster before Opening Day. The San Diego Padres, after trading for Yu Darvish, Blake Snell, and Joe Musgrove, looked like a powerhouse heading into the 2021 season. They won 79 games and fired manager Jayce Tingler, now the bench coach for the Twins. 
    Conversely, the San Francisco Giants were an afterthought in the same division and won 107 games in a truly magnificent season. This is baseball. A team can look outstanding on paper and disappoint. Similarly, a team can look uninspiring on paper and exceed even the most optimistic expectations. 
    There is, however, a fine line between a sleeper and a non-competitor. It’s doubtful the Baltimore Orioles will shock the world and have a winning season. You must have at least some talent, proper roster construction, and, most importantly, performance. My argument has been: the Twins have the bare-bones pieces to build around for this season. 
    There’s a misconception that the Twins can’t conceivably invest in 2022 without hurting the future, specifically 2023 when they should see a plethora of top prospects emerge. What if I told you that they could accomplish both goals with the right moves? By trading Chase Petty, who likely isn't in the Major League plans until at least 2024, the Twins thread that needle. 
    Jorge Polanco is coming off a terrific season and remains one of the more underrated players in MLB. A healthy Byron Buxton is a complete game-changer for the Twins, as is Josh Donaldson. Luis Arraez is an excellent leadoff hitter, and there’s massive offensive upside within Miguel Sanó. Not to mention the potential emergences of Alex Kirilloff, José Miranda, Ryan Jeffers, and or Trevor Larnach. This offense can bang. 
    What the Twins so desperately need is a competent enough pitching staff. A staff that can support a potentially excellent lineup and helps the team make noise. There’s no excuse not to be in the race with an expanded playoff field as the calendar flips to August. That should be the expectation. 
    By acquiring Gray, the Twins are signaling a plan. They have a lot of work left to do, but we’re starting to see the blueprint unfold. They are investing in the 2022 team, and rightly so. Stay tuned. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email 
  6. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Game7-91 for an article, Yes, the Twins Plan to Compete in 2022   
    The addition of Sonny Gray is enough to convince even the most skeptical fan that the Twins are looking to compete in 2022. It’s the right plan and one I’ve been screaming for all offseason. The Twins have the offensive pieces in place to score plenty of runs, and while inexperienced, there’s plenty to like about Joe Ryan and Bailey Ober. 
    After the team traded José Berríos to the Blue Jays and followed that by signing approximately zero impact starters before the lockout, many (myself included) wondered if there was a punt coming. All signs pointed toward a weak effort this offseason. 
    There’s no award for compiling the prettiest roster before Opening Day. The San Diego Padres, after trading for Yu Darvish, Blake Snell, and Joe Musgrove, looked like a powerhouse heading into the 2021 season. They won 79 games and fired manager Jayce Tingler, now the bench coach for the Twins. 
    Conversely, the San Francisco Giants were an afterthought in the same division and won 107 games in a truly magnificent season. This is baseball. A team can look outstanding on paper and disappoint. Similarly, a team can look uninspiring on paper and exceed even the most optimistic expectations. 
    There is, however, a fine line between a sleeper and a non-competitor. It’s doubtful the Baltimore Orioles will shock the world and have a winning season. You must have at least some talent, proper roster construction, and, most importantly, performance. My argument has been: the Twins have the bare-bones pieces to build around for this season. 
    There’s a misconception that the Twins can’t conceivably invest in 2022 without hurting the future, specifically 2023 when they should see a plethora of top prospects emerge. What if I told you that they could accomplish both goals with the right moves? By trading Chase Petty, who likely isn't in the Major League plans until at least 2024, the Twins thread that needle. 
    Jorge Polanco is coming off a terrific season and remains one of the more underrated players in MLB. A healthy Byron Buxton is a complete game-changer for the Twins, as is Josh Donaldson. Luis Arraez is an excellent leadoff hitter, and there’s massive offensive upside within Miguel Sanó. Not to mention the potential emergences of Alex Kirilloff, José Miranda, Ryan Jeffers, and or Trevor Larnach. This offense can bang. 
    What the Twins so desperately need is a competent enough pitching staff. A staff that can support a potentially excellent lineup and helps the team make noise. There’s no excuse not to be in the race with an expanded playoff field as the calendar flips to August. That should be the expectation. 
    By acquiring Gray, the Twins are signaling a plan. They have a lot of work left to do, but we’re starting to see the blueprint unfold. They are investing in the 2022 team, and rightly so. Stay tuned. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email 
  7. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Dman for an article, Yes, the Twins Plan to Compete in 2022   
    The addition of Sonny Gray is enough to convince even the most skeptical fan that the Twins are looking to compete in 2022. It’s the right plan and one I’ve been screaming for all offseason. The Twins have the offensive pieces in place to score plenty of runs, and while inexperienced, there’s plenty to like about Joe Ryan and Bailey Ober. 
    After the team traded José Berríos to the Blue Jays and followed that by signing approximately zero impact starters before the lockout, many (myself included) wondered if there was a punt coming. All signs pointed toward a weak effort this offseason. 
    There’s no award for compiling the prettiest roster before Opening Day. The San Diego Padres, after trading for Yu Darvish, Blake Snell, and Joe Musgrove, looked like a powerhouse heading into the 2021 season. They won 79 games and fired manager Jayce Tingler, now the bench coach for the Twins. 
    Conversely, the San Francisco Giants were an afterthought in the same division and won 107 games in a truly magnificent season. This is baseball. A team can look outstanding on paper and disappoint. Similarly, a team can look uninspiring on paper and exceed even the most optimistic expectations. 
    There is, however, a fine line between a sleeper and a non-competitor. It’s doubtful the Baltimore Orioles will shock the world and have a winning season. You must have at least some talent, proper roster construction, and, most importantly, performance. My argument has been: the Twins have the bare-bones pieces to build around for this season. 
    There’s a misconception that the Twins can’t conceivably invest in 2022 without hurting the future, specifically 2023 when they should see a plethora of top prospects emerge. What if I told you that they could accomplish both goals with the right moves? By trading Chase Petty, who likely isn't in the Major League plans until at least 2024, the Twins thread that needle. 
    Jorge Polanco is coming off a terrific season and remains one of the more underrated players in MLB. A healthy Byron Buxton is a complete game-changer for the Twins, as is Josh Donaldson. Luis Arraez is an excellent leadoff hitter, and there’s massive offensive upside within Miguel Sanó. Not to mention the potential emergences of Alex Kirilloff, José Miranda, Ryan Jeffers, and or Trevor Larnach. This offense can bang. 
    What the Twins so desperately need is a competent enough pitching staff. A staff that can support a potentially excellent lineup and helps the team make noise. There’s no excuse not to be in the race with an expanded playoff field as the calendar flips to August. That should be the expectation. 
    By acquiring Gray, the Twins are signaling a plan. They have a lot of work left to do, but we’re starting to see the blueprint unfold. They are investing in the 2022 team, and rightly so. Stay tuned. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email 
  8. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from The Mad King for an article, Yes, the Twins Plan to Compete in 2022   
    The addition of Sonny Gray is enough to convince even the most skeptical fan that the Twins are looking to compete in 2022. It’s the right plan and one I’ve been screaming for all offseason. The Twins have the offensive pieces in place to score plenty of runs, and while inexperienced, there’s plenty to like about Joe Ryan and Bailey Ober. 
    After the team traded José Berríos to the Blue Jays and followed that by signing approximately zero impact starters before the lockout, many (myself included) wondered if there was a punt coming. All signs pointed toward a weak effort this offseason. 
    There’s no award for compiling the prettiest roster before Opening Day. The San Diego Padres, after trading for Yu Darvish, Blake Snell, and Joe Musgrove, looked like a powerhouse heading into the 2021 season. They won 79 games and fired manager Jayce Tingler, now the bench coach for the Twins. 
    Conversely, the San Francisco Giants were an afterthought in the same division and won 107 games in a truly magnificent season. This is baseball. A team can look outstanding on paper and disappoint. Similarly, a team can look uninspiring on paper and exceed even the most optimistic expectations. 
    There is, however, a fine line between a sleeper and a non-competitor. It’s doubtful the Baltimore Orioles will shock the world and have a winning season. You must have at least some talent, proper roster construction, and, most importantly, performance. My argument has been: the Twins have the bare-bones pieces to build around for this season. 
    There’s a misconception that the Twins can’t conceivably invest in 2022 without hurting the future, specifically 2023 when they should see a plethora of top prospects emerge. What if I told you that they could accomplish both goals with the right moves? By trading Chase Petty, who likely isn't in the Major League plans until at least 2024, the Twins thread that needle. 
    Jorge Polanco is coming off a terrific season and remains one of the more underrated players in MLB. A healthy Byron Buxton is a complete game-changer for the Twins, as is Josh Donaldson. Luis Arraez is an excellent leadoff hitter, and there’s massive offensive upside within Miguel Sanó. Not to mention the potential emergences of Alex Kirilloff, José Miranda, Ryan Jeffers, and or Trevor Larnach. This offense can bang. 
    What the Twins so desperately need is a competent enough pitching staff. A staff that can support a potentially excellent lineup and helps the team make noise. There’s no excuse not to be in the race with an expanded playoff field as the calendar flips to August. That should be the expectation. 
    By acquiring Gray, the Twins are signaling a plan. They have a lot of work left to do, but we’re starting to see the blueprint unfold. They are investing in the 2022 team, and rightly so. Stay tuned. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email 
  9. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Richie the Rally Goat for an article, Yes, the Twins Plan to Compete in 2022   
    The addition of Sonny Gray is enough to convince even the most skeptical fan that the Twins are looking to compete in 2022. It’s the right plan and one I’ve been screaming for all offseason. The Twins have the offensive pieces in place to score plenty of runs, and while inexperienced, there’s plenty to like about Joe Ryan and Bailey Ober. 
    After the team traded José Berríos to the Blue Jays and followed that by signing approximately zero impact starters before the lockout, many (myself included) wondered if there was a punt coming. All signs pointed toward a weak effort this offseason. 
    There’s no award for compiling the prettiest roster before Opening Day. The San Diego Padres, after trading for Yu Darvish, Blake Snell, and Joe Musgrove, looked like a powerhouse heading into the 2021 season. They won 79 games and fired manager Jayce Tingler, now the bench coach for the Twins. 
    Conversely, the San Francisco Giants were an afterthought in the same division and won 107 games in a truly magnificent season. This is baseball. A team can look outstanding on paper and disappoint. Similarly, a team can look uninspiring on paper and exceed even the most optimistic expectations. 
    There is, however, a fine line between a sleeper and a non-competitor. It’s doubtful the Baltimore Orioles will shock the world and have a winning season. You must have at least some talent, proper roster construction, and, most importantly, performance. My argument has been: the Twins have the bare-bones pieces to build around for this season. 
    There’s a misconception that the Twins can’t conceivably invest in 2022 without hurting the future, specifically 2023 when they should see a plethora of top prospects emerge. What if I told you that they could accomplish both goals with the right moves? By trading Chase Petty, who likely isn't in the Major League plans until at least 2024, the Twins thread that needle. 
    Jorge Polanco is coming off a terrific season and remains one of the more underrated players in MLB. A healthy Byron Buxton is a complete game-changer for the Twins, as is Josh Donaldson. Luis Arraez is an excellent leadoff hitter, and there’s massive offensive upside within Miguel Sanó. Not to mention the potential emergences of Alex Kirilloff, José Miranda, Ryan Jeffers, and or Trevor Larnach. This offense can bang. 
    What the Twins so desperately need is a competent enough pitching staff. A staff that can support a potentially excellent lineup and helps the team make noise. There’s no excuse not to be in the race with an expanded playoff field as the calendar flips to August. That should be the expectation. 
    By acquiring Gray, the Twins are signaling a plan. They have a lot of work left to do, but we’re starting to see the blueprint unfold. They are investing in the 2022 team, and rightly so. Stay tuned. 
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email 
  10. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from DocBauer for an article, Playoff Expansion Leaves No Excuses for Twins Front Office   
    Maybe the idea that the Twins had little chance in a five-team American League playoff field was accurate. But if it was, it wasn’t a slam dunk proclamation, and with an extra team (or two) added, there are no excuses left for this front office.
    Derek Falvey and Thad Levine have preached a desire for “sustained success” during their tenure running the Twins. They felt the breeze from a wide-open contention window following a two-year run where the Twins led the American League in regular-season wins. Many believe the team shouldn’t even try to get better one offseason later. 
    It’s an understandable viewpoint. The American League is ratcheting up, even more so than what we’re accustomed to. The East has four legitimate World Series contenders, with the Mariners in the West looking to knock off the powerhouse Astros. In the Central, the White Sox sit at the peak of their powers, with the Tigers and Royals hoping to take steps forward. It won’t be easy.
    The belief that the Twins, coming off a horrifically disappointing 73-win season *can’t* improve enough to win is giving too much slack to this front office. Ownership hired them to build a sustainable winner, a team that would compete every year. They failed in 2021. Does that mean a “punt” in 2022 should be easily forgiven and understood? I’m not convinced. 
    Listen, I understand there's a pitching pipeline coming. I cover the Minor League system on a daily basis, and I'm equally excited. Why does investing in the 2022 team automatically take away from the future? There's a happy medium here. 
    The Twins signed Josh Donaldson to a four-year, $92 million contract to compete for the duration. They traded Brusdar Graterol for Kenta Maeda to solidify a rotation needing assistance. They extended Jorge Polanco, Max Kepler, and Miguel Sanó to build around. Did they really extend Byron Buxton just to waste his age-28 season? Deciding to throw away an entire season by not making impactful additions is not acceptable, especially with an expanded postseason. Why build all of that financial flexibility? For nothing? 
    The Boston Red Sox won 24 out of 60 games in the shortened 2020 season. That followed an incredibly disappointing follow-up to a dominant World Series run, one that looked to set the tone for years to come. Instead of folding for 2021, the team invested by signing Kiké Hernández and Hunter Renfroe and trading for Adam Ottavino. 
    Those moves weren’t earth-shattering, as the Red Sox had the offensive pieces in place to score runs in bunches. The rotation looked bleak, with Eduardo Rodríguez still recovering from myocarditis, Nick Pivetta struggling mightily in 2020, and Nathan Eovaldi throwing just 116 combined innings over the prior two seasons. 
    Boston didn’t throw in the towel. They gave themselves a fighting chance, relied on a potent offense, and eventually appeared in the ALCS. I agree the Twins shouldn’t trade away the entire future, but they can give themselves a chance in a six or seven-team field with the right moves. 
    This current Twins roster has little upside, but the floor is high enough offensively that the team could surprise this summer with substantial additions. It’s disheartening that the pain of the 2021 season eliminated this reality from so many minds. We shouldn’t let it. 
    Don’t let this front office off the hook. They were brought in to build a consistent winner. The jury is out whether they'll stick to their word. 
     
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook , or email 
  11. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Doctor Gast for an article, Playoff Expansion Leaves No Excuses for Twins Front Office   
    Maybe the idea that the Twins had little chance in a five-team American League playoff field was accurate. But if it was, it wasn’t a slam dunk proclamation, and with an extra team (or two) added, there are no excuses left for this front office.
    Derek Falvey and Thad Levine have preached a desire for “sustained success” during their tenure running the Twins. They felt the breeze from a wide-open contention window following a two-year run where the Twins led the American League in regular-season wins. Many believe the team shouldn’t even try to get better one offseason later. 
    It’s an understandable viewpoint. The American League is ratcheting up, even more so than what we’re accustomed to. The East has four legitimate World Series contenders, with the Mariners in the West looking to knock off the powerhouse Astros. In the Central, the White Sox sit at the peak of their powers, with the Tigers and Royals hoping to take steps forward. It won’t be easy.
    The belief that the Twins, coming off a horrifically disappointing 73-win season *can’t* improve enough to win is giving too much slack to this front office. Ownership hired them to build a sustainable winner, a team that would compete every year. They failed in 2021. Does that mean a “punt” in 2022 should be easily forgiven and understood? I’m not convinced. 
    Listen, I understand there's a pitching pipeline coming. I cover the Minor League system on a daily basis, and I'm equally excited. Why does investing in the 2022 team automatically take away from the future? There's a happy medium here. 
    The Twins signed Josh Donaldson to a four-year, $92 million contract to compete for the duration. They traded Brusdar Graterol for Kenta Maeda to solidify a rotation needing assistance. They extended Jorge Polanco, Max Kepler, and Miguel Sanó to build around. Did they really extend Byron Buxton just to waste his age-28 season? Deciding to throw away an entire season by not making impactful additions is not acceptable, especially with an expanded postseason. Why build all of that financial flexibility? For nothing? 
    The Boston Red Sox won 24 out of 60 games in the shortened 2020 season. That followed an incredibly disappointing follow-up to a dominant World Series run, one that looked to set the tone for years to come. Instead of folding for 2021, the team invested by signing Kiké Hernández and Hunter Renfroe and trading for Adam Ottavino. 
    Those moves weren’t earth-shattering, as the Red Sox had the offensive pieces in place to score runs in bunches. The rotation looked bleak, with Eduardo Rodríguez still recovering from myocarditis, Nick Pivetta struggling mightily in 2020, and Nathan Eovaldi throwing just 116 combined innings over the prior two seasons. 
    Boston didn’t throw in the towel. They gave themselves a fighting chance, relied on a potent offense, and eventually appeared in the ALCS. I agree the Twins shouldn’t trade away the entire future, but they can give themselves a chance in a six or seven-team field with the right moves. 
    This current Twins roster has little upside, but the floor is high enough offensively that the team could surprise this summer with substantial additions. It’s disheartening that the pain of the 2021 season eliminated this reality from so many minds. We shouldn’t let it. 
    Don’t let this front office off the hook. They were brought in to build a consistent winner. The jury is out whether they'll stick to their word. 
     
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook , or email 
  12. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Karbo for an article, Playoff Expansion Leaves No Excuses for Twins Front Office   
    Maybe the idea that the Twins had little chance in a five-team American League playoff field was accurate. But if it was, it wasn’t a slam dunk proclamation, and with an extra team (or two) added, there are no excuses left for this front office.
    Derek Falvey and Thad Levine have preached a desire for “sustained success” during their tenure running the Twins. They felt the breeze from a wide-open contention window following a two-year run where the Twins led the American League in regular-season wins. Many believe the team shouldn’t even try to get better one offseason later. 
    It’s an understandable viewpoint. The American League is ratcheting up, even more so than what we’re accustomed to. The East has four legitimate World Series contenders, with the Mariners in the West looking to knock off the powerhouse Astros. In the Central, the White Sox sit at the peak of their powers, with the Tigers and Royals hoping to take steps forward. It won’t be easy.
    The belief that the Twins, coming off a horrifically disappointing 73-win season *can’t* improve enough to win is giving too much slack to this front office. Ownership hired them to build a sustainable winner, a team that would compete every year. They failed in 2021. Does that mean a “punt” in 2022 should be easily forgiven and understood? I’m not convinced. 
    Listen, I understand there's a pitching pipeline coming. I cover the Minor League system on a daily basis, and I'm equally excited. Why does investing in the 2022 team automatically take away from the future? There's a happy medium here. 
    The Twins signed Josh Donaldson to a four-year, $92 million contract to compete for the duration. They traded Brusdar Graterol for Kenta Maeda to solidify a rotation needing assistance. They extended Jorge Polanco, Max Kepler, and Miguel Sanó to build around. Did they really extend Byron Buxton just to waste his age-28 season? Deciding to throw away an entire season by not making impactful additions is not acceptable, especially with an expanded postseason. Why build all of that financial flexibility? For nothing? 
    The Boston Red Sox won 24 out of 60 games in the shortened 2020 season. That followed an incredibly disappointing follow-up to a dominant World Series run, one that looked to set the tone for years to come. Instead of folding for 2021, the team invested by signing Kiké Hernández and Hunter Renfroe and trading for Adam Ottavino. 
    Those moves weren’t earth-shattering, as the Red Sox had the offensive pieces in place to score runs in bunches. The rotation looked bleak, with Eduardo Rodríguez still recovering from myocarditis, Nick Pivetta struggling mightily in 2020, and Nathan Eovaldi throwing just 116 combined innings over the prior two seasons. 
    Boston didn’t throw in the towel. They gave themselves a fighting chance, relied on a potent offense, and eventually appeared in the ALCS. I agree the Twins shouldn’t trade away the entire future, but they can give themselves a chance in a six or seven-team field with the right moves. 
    This current Twins roster has little upside, but the floor is high enough offensively that the team could surprise this summer with substantial additions. It’s disheartening that the pain of the 2021 season eliminated this reality from so many minds. We shouldn’t let it. 
    Don’t let this front office off the hook. They were brought in to build a consistent winner. The jury is out whether they'll stick to their word. 
     
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook , or email 
  13. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from cHawk for an article, Crucial Seasons at Risk for Several Twins   
    BetOnline recently released an over/under of 120.5 games for each team this summer. That means there’s an expectation of at least 40 games lost due to the ongoing lockout. There is no end in sight. That’s a terrible outcome, and the fear of losing half or even the *entire* season is valid. 
    Plenty of Twins are hoping to leave 2021 in the rearview mirror. Unfortunately, they can’t show off their hard work until the season starts. It’s a crucial year for a handful of Major and Minor leaguers, but these five stick out in particular, with futures both with the team and in the league at stake. 
    5. Bailey Ober
    Ober went from a surprise addition to the 40-man roster to a rotation building block in 2021. Ober especially shined over his last ten starts, pitching to a 3.31 ERA with 51 strikeouts and just six walks in 49 innings.
    The 6-foot-9, 260-pound breakout averaged only 73 pitches per outing over his last 12 starts, with the Twins highly cautious of his workload. Ober had never thrown 80 innings in a season before last year. With a lengthy injury history, does a delay benefit Ober’s health, or does the loss of games hurt his chances of building up?
    4. Jhoan Duran
    Speaking of innings, Duran must get a fair amount in 2022. After a solid 115 innings in 2019, Duran has all-of-a-sudden fallen behind, with only 16 game innings on his arm over the last two seasons. This summer, a hybrid Major-League role seemed perfect, but a delay could derail those plans. 
    Ultimately, the Twins need to decide whether Duran is a future starter or reliever. This summer, he must catch up and log at least 60-80 innings to win a job in the Opening Day rotation in 2023. The lockout may dictate otherwise. 
    3. Taylor Rogers
    Contrary to some belief, Rogers had a terrific season before an untimely grand slam and injury threw a wrench in his bounce-back campaign. Rogers boasted a 2.45 ERA and 2.02 FIP with a 35% strikeout rate through July 8th. 
    The Twins tendered Rogers in his final season of arbitration, expressing confidence that his middle-finger injury is in good shape. What the standout lefty needs is a complete and healthy season. The results will be there, but Rogers is likely desperate to show off his health with free agency looming next winter. 
    2. Miguel Sanó
    The Twins extended Sanó after a monstrous 2019 season where he hit .254/.362/.578 with 21 homers in the second half. The story is the same with Sanó: when he’s on, he’s lethal. When he’s off, he’s hardly playable. 2022 is the last guaranteed year on Sanó’s contract, with a $14 million Twins option for 2023.
    Alex Kirilloff looks like the first baseman of the future, and the Twins were not scared to demote Sanó to a platoon role during his first-half struggles in 2021. Sanó was excellent as usual in the second half, but an entire, productive season might be enough for the Twins to invest in his future with the club. 
    1. Royce Lewis
    It’s been a ruthless three years for Lewis, who is ready to go for a critical summer. Lewis’ journey has been anything but linear, with plate struggles in 2019, a canceled 2020, and a season-ending injury in 2021. Now, a lockout that restricts him from playing. 
    There’s a chance Lewis won’t appear in a real game for *three* years because of factors out of his control. It’s a terrible break for a fantastic person, and there’s no question Lewis is the most impacted by this fiasco. 
    What do you think? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  14. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Heiny for an article, Crucial Seasons at Risk for Several Twins   
    BetOnline recently released an over/under of 120.5 games for each team this summer. That means there’s an expectation of at least 40 games lost due to the ongoing lockout. There is no end in sight. That’s a terrible outcome, and the fear of losing half or even the *entire* season is valid. 
    Plenty of Twins are hoping to leave 2021 in the rearview mirror. Unfortunately, they can’t show off their hard work until the season starts. It’s a crucial year for a handful of Major and Minor leaguers, but these five stick out in particular, with futures both with the team and in the league at stake. 
    5. Bailey Ober
    Ober went from a surprise addition to the 40-man roster to a rotation building block in 2021. Ober especially shined over his last ten starts, pitching to a 3.31 ERA with 51 strikeouts and just six walks in 49 innings.
    The 6-foot-9, 260-pound breakout averaged only 73 pitches per outing over his last 12 starts, with the Twins highly cautious of his workload. Ober had never thrown 80 innings in a season before last year. With a lengthy injury history, does a delay benefit Ober’s health, or does the loss of games hurt his chances of building up?
    4. Jhoan Duran
    Speaking of innings, Duran must get a fair amount in 2022. After a solid 115 innings in 2019, Duran has all-of-a-sudden fallen behind, with only 16 game innings on his arm over the last two seasons. This summer, a hybrid Major-League role seemed perfect, but a delay could derail those plans. 
    Ultimately, the Twins need to decide whether Duran is a future starter or reliever. This summer, he must catch up and log at least 60-80 innings to win a job in the Opening Day rotation in 2023. The lockout may dictate otherwise. 
    3. Taylor Rogers
    Contrary to some belief, Rogers had a terrific season before an untimely grand slam and injury threw a wrench in his bounce-back campaign. Rogers boasted a 2.45 ERA and 2.02 FIP with a 35% strikeout rate through July 8th. 
    The Twins tendered Rogers in his final season of arbitration, expressing confidence that his middle-finger injury is in good shape. What the standout lefty needs is a complete and healthy season. The results will be there, but Rogers is likely desperate to show off his health with free agency looming next winter. 
    2. Miguel Sanó
    The Twins extended Sanó after a monstrous 2019 season where he hit .254/.362/.578 with 21 homers in the second half. The story is the same with Sanó: when he’s on, he’s lethal. When he’s off, he’s hardly playable. 2022 is the last guaranteed year on Sanó’s contract, with a $14 million Twins option for 2023.
    Alex Kirilloff looks like the first baseman of the future, and the Twins were not scared to demote Sanó to a platoon role during his first-half struggles in 2021. Sanó was excellent as usual in the second half, but an entire, productive season might be enough for the Twins to invest in his future with the club. 
    1. Royce Lewis
    It’s been a ruthless three years for Lewis, who is ready to go for a critical summer. Lewis’ journey has been anything but linear, with plate struggles in 2019, a canceled 2020, and a season-ending injury in 2021. Now, a lockout that restricts him from playing. 
    There’s a chance Lewis won’t appear in a real game for *three* years because of factors out of his control. It’s a terrible break for a fantastic person, and there’s no question Lewis is the most impacted by this fiasco. 
    What do you think? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  15. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Crucial Seasons at Risk for Several Twins   
    BetOnline recently released an over/under of 120.5 games for each team this summer. That means there’s an expectation of at least 40 games lost due to the ongoing lockout. There is no end in sight. That’s a terrible outcome, and the fear of losing half or even the *entire* season is valid. 
    Plenty of Twins are hoping to leave 2021 in the rearview mirror. Unfortunately, they can’t show off their hard work until the season starts. It’s a crucial year for a handful of Major and Minor leaguers, but these five stick out in particular, with futures both with the team and in the league at stake. 
    5. Bailey Ober
    Ober went from a surprise addition to the 40-man roster to a rotation building block in 2021. Ober especially shined over his last ten starts, pitching to a 3.31 ERA with 51 strikeouts and just six walks in 49 innings.
    The 6-foot-9, 260-pound breakout averaged only 73 pitches per outing over his last 12 starts, with the Twins highly cautious of his workload. Ober had never thrown 80 innings in a season before last year. With a lengthy injury history, does a delay benefit Ober’s health, or does the loss of games hurt his chances of building up?
    4. Jhoan Duran
    Speaking of innings, Duran must get a fair amount in 2022. After a solid 115 innings in 2019, Duran has all-of-a-sudden fallen behind, with only 16 game innings on his arm over the last two seasons. This summer, a hybrid Major-League role seemed perfect, but a delay could derail those plans. 
    Ultimately, the Twins need to decide whether Duran is a future starter or reliever. This summer, he must catch up and log at least 60-80 innings to win a job in the Opening Day rotation in 2023. The lockout may dictate otherwise. 
    3. Taylor Rogers
    Contrary to some belief, Rogers had a terrific season before an untimely grand slam and injury threw a wrench in his bounce-back campaign. Rogers boasted a 2.45 ERA and 2.02 FIP with a 35% strikeout rate through July 8th. 
    The Twins tendered Rogers in his final season of arbitration, expressing confidence that his middle-finger injury is in good shape. What the standout lefty needs is a complete and healthy season. The results will be there, but Rogers is likely desperate to show off his health with free agency looming next winter. 
    2. Miguel Sanó
    The Twins extended Sanó after a monstrous 2019 season where he hit .254/.362/.578 with 21 homers in the second half. The story is the same with Sanó: when he’s on, he’s lethal. When he’s off, he’s hardly playable. 2022 is the last guaranteed year on Sanó’s contract, with a $14 million Twins option for 2023.
    Alex Kirilloff looks like the first baseman of the future, and the Twins were not scared to demote Sanó to a platoon role during his first-half struggles in 2021. Sanó was excellent as usual in the second half, but an entire, productive season might be enough for the Twins to invest in his future with the club. 
    1. Royce Lewis
    It’s been a ruthless three years for Lewis, who is ready to go for a critical summer. Lewis’ journey has been anything but linear, with plate struggles in 2019, a canceled 2020, and a season-ending injury in 2021. Now, a lockout that restricts him from playing. 
    There’s a chance Lewis won’t appear in a real game for *three* years because of factors out of his control. It’s a terrible break for a fantastic person, and there’s no question Lewis is the most impacted by this fiasco. 
    What do you think? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  16. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, Crucial Seasons at Risk for Several Twins   
    BetOnline recently released an over/under of 120.5 games for each team this summer. That means there’s an expectation of at least 40 games lost due to the ongoing lockout. There is no end in sight. That’s a terrible outcome, and the fear of losing half or even the *entire* season is valid. 
    Plenty of Twins are hoping to leave 2021 in the rearview mirror. Unfortunately, they can’t show off their hard work until the season starts. It’s a crucial year for a handful of Major and Minor leaguers, but these five stick out in particular, with futures both with the team and in the league at stake. 
    5. Bailey Ober
    Ober went from a surprise addition to the 40-man roster to a rotation building block in 2021. Ober especially shined over his last ten starts, pitching to a 3.31 ERA with 51 strikeouts and just six walks in 49 innings.
    The 6-foot-9, 260-pound breakout averaged only 73 pitches per outing over his last 12 starts, with the Twins highly cautious of his workload. Ober had never thrown 80 innings in a season before last year. With a lengthy injury history, does a delay benefit Ober’s health, or does the loss of games hurt his chances of building up?
    4. Jhoan Duran
    Speaking of innings, Duran must get a fair amount in 2022. After a solid 115 innings in 2019, Duran has all-of-a-sudden fallen behind, with only 16 game innings on his arm over the last two seasons. This summer, a hybrid Major-League role seemed perfect, but a delay could derail those plans. 
    Ultimately, the Twins need to decide whether Duran is a future starter or reliever. This summer, he must catch up and log at least 60-80 innings to win a job in the Opening Day rotation in 2023. The lockout may dictate otherwise. 
    3. Taylor Rogers
    Contrary to some belief, Rogers had a terrific season before an untimely grand slam and injury threw a wrench in his bounce-back campaign. Rogers boasted a 2.45 ERA and 2.02 FIP with a 35% strikeout rate through July 8th. 
    The Twins tendered Rogers in his final season of arbitration, expressing confidence that his middle-finger injury is in good shape. What the standout lefty needs is a complete and healthy season. The results will be there, but Rogers is likely desperate to show off his health with free agency looming next winter. 
    2. Miguel Sanó
    The Twins extended Sanó after a monstrous 2019 season where he hit .254/.362/.578 with 21 homers in the second half. The story is the same with Sanó: when he’s on, he’s lethal. When he’s off, he’s hardly playable. 2022 is the last guaranteed year on Sanó’s contract, with a $14 million Twins option for 2023.
    Alex Kirilloff looks like the first baseman of the future, and the Twins were not scared to demote Sanó to a platoon role during his first-half struggles in 2021. Sanó was excellent as usual in the second half, but an entire, productive season might be enough for the Twins to invest in his future with the club. 
    1. Royce Lewis
    It’s been a ruthless three years for Lewis, who is ready to go for a critical summer. Lewis’ journey has been anything but linear, with plate struggles in 2019, a canceled 2020, and a season-ending injury in 2021. Now, a lockout that restricts him from playing. 
    There’s a chance Lewis won’t appear in a real game for *three* years because of factors out of his control. It’s a terrible break for a fantastic person, and there’s no question Lewis is the most impacted by this fiasco. 
    What do you think? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Order the Offseason Handbook
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email 
  17. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Minny505 for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  18. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from nclahammer for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  19. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from tarheeltwinsfan for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  20. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Dman for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  21. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from JDubs for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  22. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, PECOTA & Joe Ryan: A Love Story   
    It’s essential to mention right off the bat: your expectations for Joe Ryan should remain in the third or fourth starter range. He’s thrown a total of 26 ⅔ innings in the majors, and it’s unfair to expect the same production as the first four starts of his career.
    Even then, there’s plenty of reason to be excited about the 25-year-old, invisiball-throwing vibe machine. Ryan looks ready to step right into the Twins’ rotation, and at this point, he’s likely to start on Opening Day in Chicago. 
    Many are hesitant to put much stock into PECOTA projections from the esteemed crew at Baseball Prospectus. The system projects the seasons of over 1,600 players, so there are bound to be errors. The projections can be wacky, unpredictable, and, yes, extremely exciting. 
    PECOTA projects Ryan to throw 143 innings with a 2.87 ERA and 153 strikeouts in 2022. They peg him for 2.5 WARP, tied for 20th and ahead of José Berríos, Frankie Montas, Freddy Peralta, and Lucas Giolito. 
    DRA- (deserved run average) is a statistic that measures the rate a pitcher expects to give up runs. PECOTA projects Ryan for a better DRA- than Lance Lynn, Sandy Alcantara, and Shohei Ohtani. The system essentially projects Ryan to be a frontline starter in 2022. 
    Pointing out the gaudy projections for Ryan isn’t an attempt to put lipstick on the pig that is the Twins rotation. On the contrary, this is more reason to win in 2022 with actual, impact moves for starting pitching. 
    If the Twins still had Berríos, the outlook would be incredibly different. They don’t, though, and they need to acquire someone on his level to compete in an improving division. Even if Ryan somehow matches these excellent numbers, the rest of the rotation isn’t strong enough to support them.
    PECOTA also likes Bailey Ober as a solid mid-rotation starter, projecting him for a 3.57 ERA, 3.81 FIP, and a better-than-average DRA- in 124 innings. The Twins have a base to work from, even if it’s not entirely sturdy. Will they add enough to make it matter?
    What do you think of Ryan’s PECOTA projections? Comment below!
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  23. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from MN_ExPat for an article, Twins Daily 2022 Top Prospects: #16-20   
    Twins prospects ranking between 16-20 in our series highlights a dynamic group of players, some brimming with upside and others with higher perceived floors. Let's break it down. 
    20. LHP Steve Hajjar
    Age: 21
    2021 (Michigan): 14 starts, 81 2/3 IP, 3.09 ERA, 32% K, 8.5% BB
    The Twins selected Hajjar with the 61st pick in last June’s draft, expressing serious interest in Massachusetts's 2018 Gatorade Player of the Year. Hajjar is a sizeable lefty with a plus-changeup. Like Bailey Ober and Joe Ryan, Hajjar’s fastball gets on hitters promptly because of his extension. 
    Hajjar was excellent in his two seasons at Michigan, pitching to a 3.01 ERA with a 31% strikeout rate in just over 100 innings. Hajjar has a deceptive delivery, relying primarily on a fastball-changeup combo with a loopy curve. Hajjar has a chance to move quickly up the system.
    19. INF Edouard Julien
    Age: 22
    2021 (A-A+): 112 games, .267/.434/.480, 28 2B, 18 HR, 34/39 SB, 28% K, 21% BB
    Julien had an exciting season last summer. He walked or struck out in nearly half of his plate appearances while nabbing 34 bases in 39 tries. Julien hit .267 but walked 110 times. It was a strong season overall for Julien, but there are some blemishes, especially considering he’s still in the low minors. 
    With a left-handed stroke, Julien reached base in 44% of his appearances against right-handed pitchers. Julien logged 20 starts at first base, 38 at second base, 22 at third, 15 in left field, and 15 at DH. Like many of the other position players in the Twins’ system, Julien will continue to play all over the diamond. 
    18. INF Spencer Steer
    Age: 24
    2021 (A+-AA): 110 games, .254/.348/.484, 18 2B, 3 3B, 24 HR, 21.5% K, 11% BB
    An example of the Twins helping their contact-oriented prospects tap into more power; Steer hit 24 homers in 110 games in 2021. He had never hit more than six homers in a season, dating back to Oregon. Steer broke out at Cedar Rapids before struggling initially in Wichita. He had a 26-game stretch where he hit .307/.371/.634 (1.004 OPS) for the Surge. 
    Steer worked hard to add more pop to his bat, and his progression has significantly improved his ceiling. Instead of a future slap-hitting utility player, Steer now projects as a potential double-digit homer bat. Steer’s development is certainly encouraging. 
    17. RHP Blayne Enlow
    Age: 22
    2021 (A+): 3 starts, 14 2/3 IP, 1.84 ERA, 39% K, 10% BB
    Enlow was off to a terrific start in Cedar Rapids before an elbow injury (and Tommy John surgery) ended his season. Enlow will have thrown just 14 2/3 Minor League innings in over two years when he returns. Even then, the Twins chose to protect him by adding him to the 40-man roster this offseason. 
    The Twins signed Enlow for $2M in the 2017 draft, pulling him away from a commitment to LSU with an over-slot bonus. Enlow’s fastball had ticked up last summer, an encouraging sign after it sat in the low-90s in a mediocre 2019. Enlow is young, talented, and driven and will be right back on the radar when he returns. 
    16. OF Emmanuel Rodríguez
    Age: 18
    2021 (FCL): 37 games, .214/.346/.524, 5 2B, 2 3B, 10 HR, 37% K, 15% BB
    Rodríguez gained considerable buzz after his power-heavy debut for the FCL Twins. 58% of his plate appearances ended in a walk, strikeout, or home run. To slug .524 in his pro debut at 18 years old is reason enough for excitement, but there are things Rodríguez has to work on as he works his way up. 
    Touted for his advanced approach at the plate, Rodríguez is oozing with projection. Scouts have tabbed Rodríguez with above-average speed in centerfield with a chance to stay there permanently. If you’re looking for a talented potential future top prospect for the Twins, Rodríguez is probably your best bet.
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  24. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from Monkeypaws for an article, Twins Daily 2022 Top Prospects: #16-20   
    Twins prospects ranking between 16-20 in our series highlights a dynamic group of players, some brimming with upside and others with higher perceived floors. Let's break it down. 
    20. LHP Steve Hajjar
    Age: 21
    2021 (Michigan): 14 starts, 81 2/3 IP, 3.09 ERA, 32% K, 8.5% BB
    The Twins selected Hajjar with the 61st pick in last June’s draft, expressing serious interest in Massachusetts's 2018 Gatorade Player of the Year. Hajjar is a sizeable lefty with a plus-changeup. Like Bailey Ober and Joe Ryan, Hajjar’s fastball gets on hitters promptly because of his extension. 
    Hajjar was excellent in his two seasons at Michigan, pitching to a 3.01 ERA with a 31% strikeout rate in just over 100 innings. Hajjar has a deceptive delivery, relying primarily on a fastball-changeup combo with a loopy curve. Hajjar has a chance to move quickly up the system.
    19. INF Edouard Julien
    Age: 22
    2021 (A-A+): 112 games, .267/.434/.480, 28 2B, 18 HR, 34/39 SB, 28% K, 21% BB
    Julien had an exciting season last summer. He walked or struck out in nearly half of his plate appearances while nabbing 34 bases in 39 tries. Julien hit .267 but walked 110 times. It was a strong season overall for Julien, but there are some blemishes, especially considering he’s still in the low minors. 
    With a left-handed stroke, Julien reached base in 44% of his appearances against right-handed pitchers. Julien logged 20 starts at first base, 38 at second base, 22 at third, 15 in left field, and 15 at DH. Like many of the other position players in the Twins’ system, Julien will continue to play all over the diamond. 
    18. INF Spencer Steer
    Age: 24
    2021 (A+-AA): 110 games, .254/.348/.484, 18 2B, 3 3B, 24 HR, 21.5% K, 11% BB
    An example of the Twins helping their contact-oriented prospects tap into more power; Steer hit 24 homers in 110 games in 2021. He had never hit more than six homers in a season, dating back to Oregon. Steer broke out at Cedar Rapids before struggling initially in Wichita. He had a 26-game stretch where he hit .307/.371/.634 (1.004 OPS) for the Surge. 
    Steer worked hard to add more pop to his bat, and his progression has significantly improved his ceiling. Instead of a future slap-hitting utility player, Steer now projects as a potential double-digit homer bat. Steer’s development is certainly encouraging. 
    17. RHP Blayne Enlow
    Age: 22
    2021 (A+): 3 starts, 14 2/3 IP, 1.84 ERA, 39% K, 10% BB
    Enlow was off to a terrific start in Cedar Rapids before an elbow injury (and Tommy John surgery) ended his season. Enlow will have thrown just 14 2/3 Minor League innings in over two years when he returns. Even then, the Twins chose to protect him by adding him to the 40-man roster this offseason. 
    The Twins signed Enlow for $2M in the 2017 draft, pulling him away from a commitment to LSU with an over-slot bonus. Enlow’s fastball had ticked up last summer, an encouraging sign after it sat in the low-90s in a mediocre 2019. Enlow is young, talented, and driven and will be right back on the radar when he returns. 
    16. OF Emmanuel Rodríguez
    Age: 18
    2021 (FCL): 37 games, .214/.346/.524, 5 2B, 2 3B, 10 HR, 37% K, 15% BB
    Rodríguez gained considerable buzz after his power-heavy debut for the FCL Twins. 58% of his plate appearances ended in a walk, strikeout, or home run. To slug .524 in his pro debut at 18 years old is reason enough for excitement, but there are things Rodríguez has to work on as he works his way up. 
    Touted for his advanced approach at the plate, Rodríguez is oozing with projection. Scouts have tabbed Rodríguez with above-average speed in centerfield with a chance to stay there permanently. If you’re looking for a talented potential future top prospect for the Twins, Rodríguez is probably your best bet.
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
  25. Like
    Nash Walker got a reaction from mikelink45 for an article, Twins Daily 2022 Top Prospects: #16-20   
    Twins prospects ranking between 16-20 in our series highlights a dynamic group of players, some brimming with upside and others with higher perceived floors. Let's break it down. 
    20. LHP Steve Hajjar
    Age: 21
    2021 (Michigan): 14 starts, 81 2/3 IP, 3.09 ERA, 32% K, 8.5% BB
    The Twins selected Hajjar with the 61st pick in last June’s draft, expressing serious interest in Massachusetts's 2018 Gatorade Player of the Year. Hajjar is a sizeable lefty with a plus-changeup. Like Bailey Ober and Joe Ryan, Hajjar’s fastball gets on hitters promptly because of his extension. 
    Hajjar was excellent in his two seasons at Michigan, pitching to a 3.01 ERA with a 31% strikeout rate in just over 100 innings. Hajjar has a deceptive delivery, relying primarily on a fastball-changeup combo with a loopy curve. Hajjar has a chance to move quickly up the system.
    19. INF Edouard Julien
    Age: 22
    2021 (A-A+): 112 games, .267/.434/.480, 28 2B, 18 HR, 34/39 SB, 28% K, 21% BB
    Julien had an exciting season last summer. He walked or struck out in nearly half of his plate appearances while nabbing 34 bases in 39 tries. Julien hit .267 but walked 110 times. It was a strong season overall for Julien, but there are some blemishes, especially considering he’s still in the low minors. 
    With a left-handed stroke, Julien reached base in 44% of his appearances against right-handed pitchers. Julien logged 20 starts at first base, 38 at second base, 22 at third, 15 in left field, and 15 at DH. Like many of the other position players in the Twins’ system, Julien will continue to play all over the diamond. 
    18. INF Spencer Steer
    Age: 24
    2021 (A+-AA): 110 games, .254/.348/.484, 18 2B, 3 3B, 24 HR, 21.5% K, 11% BB
    An example of the Twins helping their contact-oriented prospects tap into more power; Steer hit 24 homers in 110 games in 2021. He had never hit more than six homers in a season, dating back to Oregon. Steer broke out at Cedar Rapids before struggling initially in Wichita. He had a 26-game stretch where he hit .307/.371/.634 (1.004 OPS) for the Surge. 
    Steer worked hard to add more pop to his bat, and his progression has significantly improved his ceiling. Instead of a future slap-hitting utility player, Steer now projects as a potential double-digit homer bat. Steer’s development is certainly encouraging. 
    17. RHP Blayne Enlow
    Age: 22
    2021 (A+): 3 starts, 14 2/3 IP, 1.84 ERA, 39% K, 10% BB
    Enlow was off to a terrific start in Cedar Rapids before an elbow injury (and Tommy John surgery) ended his season. Enlow will have thrown just 14 2/3 Minor League innings in over two years when he returns. Even then, the Twins chose to protect him by adding him to the 40-man roster this offseason. 
    The Twins signed Enlow for $2M in the 2017 draft, pulling him away from a commitment to LSU with an over-slot bonus. Enlow’s fastball had ticked up last summer, an encouraging sign after it sat in the low-90s in a mediocre 2019. Enlow is young, talented, and driven and will be right back on the radar when he returns. 
    16. OF Emmanuel Rodríguez
    Age: 18
    2021 (FCL): 37 games, .214/.346/.524, 5 2B, 2 3B, 10 HR, 37% K, 15% BB
    Rodríguez gained considerable buzz after his power-heavy debut for the FCL Twins. 58% of his plate appearances ended in a walk, strikeout, or home run. To slug .524 in his pro debut at 18 years old is reason enough for excitement, but there are things Rodríguez has to work on as he works his way up. 
    Touted for his advanced approach at the plate, Rodríguez is oozing with projection. Scouts have tabbed Rodríguez with above-average speed in centerfield with a chance to stay there permanently. If you’re looking for a talented potential future top prospect for the Twins, Rodríguez is probably your best bet.
    MORE FROM TWINS DAILY
    — Latest Twins coverage from our writers
    — Recent Twins discussion in our forums
    — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email
×
×
  • Create New...