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  1. Brock Beauchamp

    Brock Beauchamp

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    chpettit19

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/27/2022 in all areas

  1. If this post gets 30 likes Twins Daily buys doc a new pennant. Who’s in? (ps. the post you’re reading, no double-dipping on doc’s posts, you miscreants)
    27 points
  2. Throwing in a couple of cents. I'm a hang a zero guy. For a reliever... Hanging a zero is doing your job. If you give up a run, you did not do your job. How many times did you do your job and how many times did you not. ERA is such a misleading stat for relievers because if you hang a 6. It will take you 12 appearances hanging a zero before you stop getting hate mail from the ERA obsessed. So I look at appearances and how many times they did the job we want them to do which is hang a zero. Pre Cleveland 4 blown game nightmare. Emilio appeared in 22 games. He Hung Zeroes in 16 of those games. 73% Good or 27% Bad Use the Good or the Bad depending on how you like your water glasses. Post Cleveland 4 blown game nightmare. Emilio Appeared in 32 Games. He Hung Zeroes in 21 of those games. 65% Good or 35% Bad. So I got him as worse post Cleveland Nightmare in my world. Let's add in the Cleveland 4 blown game nightmare for fun (which included a hung zero against Denver in the middle of the carnage) and his hung zero season totals were: 59 appearances. 38 Zeros hung. 64% For peer comparison Duran: 57 Appearance - 47 Zeros hung - 82% Thielbar: 67 Appearances - 54 Zeros Hung - 81% Moran: 31 Appearances - 25 Zeros Hung - 81% Smith: 34 Appearances - 26 Zeroes Hung - 76% (Note: Smith didn't allow an earned run over his first 17 Appearances. He was 52% after that) Jax: 65 Appearances - 48 Zeroes Hung - 74% Duffey: 40 Appearances - 29 Zeroes Hung - 73% (Duffey tended to give up crooked numbers when he couldn't hang the zero) Pagan: 59 Appearances - 38 Zeros hung - 64% Megill: 39 Appearances - 25 Zeros hung - 64% I present this as just another way to show that Pagan wasn't very good.
    22 points
  3. I may be in the minority here, but I like the signing for basically every reason outlined above. Doesn't at all prevent them from signing a better SS, but is also a fine half-season fill in while we wait for Lewis. Or maybe we just have a decent and cheap SS while signing a major front-line starter, which would also be pretty great.
    18 points
  4. Imo...starter until proven otherwise. Except for Ryan, pretty much every starting pitcher we have on the roster has had injury concerns in one way or another. Maeda's velo was down in 2021 due to the elbow. If he's fully recovered from the TJ surgery, there's no reason he can't be as effective as he was in 2020 and before.
    17 points
  5. How I wish MLB had better revenue sharing...
    17 points
  6. I think he's earned the respect to be considered a starter until he's not. While I get that his innings may need to be managed, it will be 18 months post-surgery by the time ST rolls around.
    16 points
  7. I'll be quite angry if Option A ends up being their plan. I'm completely down with this move so long as it's meant to be Option B or C as outlined in this story. A team like the Twins will not win with Kyle Farmer as their Opening Day shortstop.
    16 points
  8. There's a lot of money off the books right now and a front office that hasn't impressed me with an aggressiveness to go get "their guy". Color me skeptical. While in a vacuum trading Urshela isn't a terrible idea, I would have rather seen Kepler head out of Minnesota.
    16 points
  9. You'd.....let Jorge Alcala go instead of pay him $800K? I don't even know where to start with that....
    16 points
  10. I take the Green Line to work every day between the Twin Cities. Light rail gets a bad rap from guys in Elk River who think cowering in fear of Minneapolis is something to brag about, but it’s 20 minutes there, 20 minutes back, and I can listen to podcasts about war or baseball. Recently, while waiting for my train at the Prospect Park station, something caught my eye. Was it a food wrapper? No. An empty tallboy? No. It was a by god $10 bill. I picked it up, put it in my pocket, and tried to think of something I could do with it. As tempting as a fistful of Beef-and-Chedds from Arby’s is, this is found money. I do OK, it should go to a good cause. In the end, there was only one right answer. Carlos Correa , if you return to the Minnesota Twins, I will give you ten American dollars. Now, I’m aware that your asking price is quite a bit steeper. I’ve read the interviews with Scott Boras and the copious hot stove analyses that say Minnesota is in play, but still an unlikely destination for your long-term services. One thing I’ve also noticed: not a single GD one of them mentions paper money. This $10 bill I found? Cold hard cash. By the time you get to the end of this sentence, it’ll be worth more than every crypto scam and Twitter combined. And I’m telling you right now: You can have it. Just sign with the Twins. I’ve watched enough bad shortstops over the years to know that your services are needed, especially with Royce Lewis’ health in question. The Boy Geniuses clearly agree and have already put together a competitive offer for your services. I’m putting $10 on top of what they’re already prepared to give you. Talk to Boras. Mull it over with your family. Take some time. I think you’ll agree this offer is fair, sound, and selfless. I thank you for your consideration. (We can do the handoff at Arby's, too. First Beef-and-Chedd? On me.) Regards, Stu
    16 points
  11. Better than I thought they were at this point last year... Meaning, I still think it's doubtful, but they HAVE pulled off surprises. Few of us expected Correa. Few of us expected Donaldson. I don't remember back that far, but how many of us expected Cruz the first time? Not sure how many of us expected them to come through with seven years on Buxton.
    16 points
  12. Wasn't Buxton's 2022 basically defined by the knee injury he suffered sliding into second base? Moving him out of CF won't accomplish what people hope, and the cost of doing that is high in terms of the value he can deliver.
    16 points
  13. I continued to be shocked there is even a discussion of whether Urshela will be tendered a contract. In what world would the Twins just throw away a player who was one of their better offensive players last year, that plays a position of need in the system, and that has a relatively cost controlled contract on a one-year deal. On a larger note, looking through your list, all of these decisions are easy tenders. They all get offered. $35M for 8 players that should be positive contributors next year? Why is this even a discussion? Amazing...
    15 points
  14. I lost a ten spot recently, pretty sure it was at the Prospect Park Station on the Green Line. Anybody finds it, PM me at TwinsDaily.
    15 points
  15. I think realistically is 0% … that’s what I think of the FO with the ‘We’re on board’ which will become, ‘We tried’
    15 points
  16. This is the kind of statistical analysis that just drives me bonkers. It's a long season full of ups and downs. If you cherry pick away a portion of the season that was bad, then I want to see a remaining ERA down in the 2's for a reliever. There was still a lot of baseball for Colomé after April 2021, still with ups and downs, so a 3.51 ERA is going to contain a lot of downs mixed with the ups. And was there any useful predictive power from that 3.51 ERA to finish 2021? Not really. Colomé's ERA this past season was in the high 5's. "Ah, but he pitched for the Rockies." Yes, but his ERA on the road was worse than at Coors. So, please don't show me a 3.67 ERA for a cherry picked portion of the season for Emilio, and expect me to buy in. That 3.67 contains some ups and downs (otherwise it would be 0.00), after a bunch of the egregious downs are already removed. If you can't make a better case for him than that, there isn't a case to be made, statistically. Except, roster filler, and we shouldn't pay millions for that. The rest of the article? The nuts and bolts of his game? It's interesting to know that he's working on something - better results will have to come from some kind of change, after all. Baseball played at a high level is a cat-and-mouse game, between pitchers adjusting to what batters do, and batters adjusting to what pitchers do. Baseball's also a game of mistakes - you try to make fewer than your adversary - and a small sample may not show that the mistakes are gone, merely in hiding. A few games with a new toy in Emilio's arsenal are all well and good, but the batters get to adjust. Surely this isn't the first time he's tinkered. I don't see him turning some corner, at age 32 next May. Anything's possible though and if he's still with the team I'll be rooting for him when he's out there, in whatever role. I'd love to eat crow.
    14 points
  17. Is this insurance if we strike out on Correa, or the plan to man SS without spending big money? The trade itself seems fine, but if the Twins don't spend real money this off-season then the front office will come under withering fire...and deserve it. If this move means we lock down someone like Rodon, then great. If it means we have a bridge SS and don't spend real money on top end talent this off-season, then the front office has failed. Watch this space, I guess?
    14 points
  18. Richie the Rally Goat

    Thank You

    As today is Thanksgiving, I’d like to share my appreciation. I’m eternally grateful for TD and all the work to deliver content and platform that the owners, John, Nick, Seth, Parker and Brock, content creators, and my fellow moderators/community leaders do. This great group of people keep TD going strong after all these years. Most of all, I’m grateful for our community members. All the posters with their passion for the Twins and their minor league affiliates, with their respectful differing opinions makes this a great place to talk Twins. Thank you all so much!
    13 points
  19. As with most of the moves being made right now, it is impossible to get a read on everything until we start Spring Training and have a more holistic view. That being said, not sure why anybody would argue about a team building cheap depth. The Twins rest people all of the time, this is a decent move for your 5th infielder, and a also provides a decent stopgap until they are ready to move up one of the younger players. I really like this move.
    13 points
  20. It is the holiday season - all is good. The Twins injury list will be purged and we will be surprised by the strength of the team. I see the current group looking like the Hrbek led young bucks that Kelly led to the series. I am ready to believe until New Years!
    12 points
  21. Maeda should really be the driving force here on the decision, probably 80% his call. I believe that he and Twins have already have decided what the are going to do, with the only hiccup being a setback in his rehab. Personally I think he will be a SP with probably a somewhat stricter pitch count his first 7-10 times through the rotation. He isn't a young kid, he knows his body and what it can/can't do. He is too important to be put in the BP, especially if they are trying to stretch him out.
    12 points
  22. I would rather see Maeda get a look in the back end of the rotation unless serious upgrades are made there (Maeda instead of the bargain bin starters the Twins typically sign) to start the season. If he fails then shift him to the bullpen.
    12 points
  23. Personally I think you're gonna end up being angry, because if they don't sign one of the top 4 SS options (which I expect they won't), this is probably what's going to happen. I get the frustration but to me it just depends on what they do elsewhere.
    12 points
  24. I believe Farmer is the insurance policy at ss. If they can't sign one of the big $$ guys. Otherwise he can be a Garlick type with a better glove.
    12 points
  25. 12 points
  26. Interesting, very! Count me among those who's eyes told me he was better defensively than some of the new numbers suggest. I thought he was fantastic. Also was pleasantly surprised at how well he hit. But this trade accomplishes a lot: 1) opens third base for Miranda, full time; 2) takes Miranda out of the mix at first, clearing it for Arraez, full time, or in some type of platoon with AK; 3) Takes another $9+M off the books; and 4) returns a young prospect who it appears doesn't require a 40-man spot, ie, opening another spot on the roster. That's the type of move many here appear to like, I sure as heck do. Should Miranda not be adequate at third, the Twins have both Lewis and Lee on the verge of taking that final step. Sure seems responsible for management to have one penciled in at short and the other at third, should Miranda not be entrenched there. I don't know what the future holds for the kid coming back. But he is young and hopefully, will contend for a spot in the rotation three or so years from now. Ranked at #22 at his young age must mean that he has some promise. But we Twins fans should also BEWARE! This is the type of move one would expect should the Front Office have decided to rebuild.
    12 points
  27. Tough to see Gio go as he was definitely one of their top players last year, but keeping him means you have to put Miranda at first, and then you've got a log jam with Arraez, Kiriloff, and others. Probably a smart move to clear a bit of space, now let's get Correa back at short.
    12 points
  28. Don't care how. Figure out a way to sign the man. I've been watching the Timberwolves play 14 games and all I keep hearing is that they lack heart. I've also watched the Twins let their "heart" guys walk. Rosario, Nelson Cruz. 2021 they have no heart and the only guys with heart in 2022 were Correa and Urshela. Heart. Can't measure it. Can't compete without it. Can't let those guys walk.
    12 points
  29. I think it was Bill James where I first read... Good speed, good arm = CF Good speed, bad arm = LF Bad speed, good arm = RF Bad speed, bad arm = 1B There's exceptions, but I've generally found that an accurate take. Buxton equals the first.
    12 points
  30. How I wish MLB had a salary cap...
    12 points
  31. Interesting idea. I would do package 2 in a heartbeat.
    12 points
  32. When you look at data around aging curves for major-league pitchers, it matches up to what you'd expect: as a group, they are most effective between the ages of roughly 24 to 28 before inevitably experiencing decline at varying scales. This makes sense, of course. As pitchers get older, their innings mount, their bodies wear down, and the league gets wise to all of their tricks. We see the cycle play out time and time again. Sure, there are some pitchers who manage to evade the ravages of age, but they are rare and beyond prized. For every Jacob deGrom, who keeps chugging along into his mid-30s, or even every Justin Verlander, who's on top of his game at age 40, there are many examples of fleeting greatness. Sometimes the drop-off is quite sudden. Madison Bumgarner was one of the game's greats throughout his 20s as a Giant but completely unraveled at age 30 after signing with Arizona. Hyun-Jin Ryu had a brief run of pure excellence for the Dodgers but has wilted in his mid-30s in Toronto. The Twins have been thankful to avoid free agent landmines like these – pitchers who entered the market with relatively high stocks and cashed in, only to fall victim to the curve, leaving their new clubs in a tough spot with lingering implications. (The D-backs owe Bumgarner $23 million next year coming off a 4.88 ERA; the Blue Jays owe Ryu $20 million after he posted a 5.67 ERA in 27 innings.) Slam-dunk pitchers like deGrom and Verlander do pop up in free agency, but because of their rarity they have their pick of big-market titans who can outflex the field. These guys are simply out of range for the Twins, and most other teams. The more common and accessible free agents are those like Bumgarner and Ryu types: pitchers in the early stage of the aging curve's declining trendline, looking to get paid off what they did in their prime. Robbie Ray is a perfectly good example from one year ago. He was the definition of a buy-high candidate, coming off a breakout age-29 season where he won the Cy Young while leading the league in ERA and strikeouts. The Mariners bought high with a $115 million contract that was eclipsed only Max Scherzer's $130 million deal with the Mets. During his first year in Seattle, Ray was ... meh. Certainly not a disaster, but a shining example of the dangers in overpaying for assets that are likely to depreciate quickly. Ray posted a 3.71 ERA, 4.16 FIP, and 1.8 fWAR in 189 innings. He was an average-ish mid-rotation starter making $21 million, and slated to make $44 million over the next two years. What's more, Ray's player-friendly contract includes an opt-out after 2024, meaning that if his performance continues to trend this way, Seattle will owe him another $50 million for his age 33 and 34 seasons. But if he returns to form, he can re-enter the market after two more years. Seattle's already been robbed of much of this deal's upside due to Ray's mediocre first season. The fact that Ray procured such a favorable contract coming off his only great season speaks to the leverage higher-end free agent pitchers enjoy during Hot Stove negotiations. Which brings our attention to the focus of today's discussion: Carlos Rodón. The parallels between Ray's situation last year and Rodón's this year are unmissable. Both are left-handers entering the market at age 30, coming off career seasons. Both had extremely suspect track records prior to their star turns, which came during short-term deals for that reason. The uncertainties shrouding these two players weren't of the same exact ilk – Ray's more performance-based, Rodón's more health-related – but both players carried obvious and notable risk. Last offseason, Ray wasn't the best free agent starter. Not in a class that featured future Hall of Famers like Scherzer, Verlander, and Clayton Kershaw. But he was the arguably the best starter who felt realistically available to mid-market teams like Seattle or Minnesota. And this year Rodón is in a similar position, albeit with sparser competition at the top tier. (Chris Bassitt is a far cry from Kevin Gausman.) Rodón has been one of the best starting pitchers in baseball over the past two seasons, a true ace in every sense of the word. He's been mostly healthy, with the exception of a shoulder scare in late 2021. There's much to like. But the magnitude of risk in handing out a mega-deal to Rodón weighs very heavily on a team with spending constraints (self-imposed as they might be). The shoulder woes have surfaced time and again, wiping out most of his ostensible prime years. He's coming off a career-high workload and heading into his 30s. As Twins fans know all too well, shoulder injuries are pernicious. The downside with Rodón isn't that he'll follow Ray's route and revert to middling performance levels, but that he won't be able to pitch at all. Or he'll become entangled in lengthy cycles of starts, stops, and setbacks, all while accounting for about one-fifth of the payroll year after year. That's undeniably a scary specter, and knowing what we know about the Twins front office and their particular aversion to these kinds of flexibility-inhibiting scenarios, it's easy to see why they've tended to stay away. But this offseason is different. If the Twins miss out on Carlos Correa, it almost feels like they HAVE to find a way to sign Rodón in order for the winter to be considered a resounding success, and to build widespread excitement for the 2023 product. Most other big-splash type moves that are within their range would be somewhat underwhelming as marquee headliner, at a time where they just lost a premier superstar, and had unprecedented spending power as a result. This is not just a matter of optics and PR. It's hard to imagine any singular move, outside of signing one of the top four shortstops, capable of making such a massive impact on the team's quality and upside. Adding Rodón atop the rotation would transform the outlook for that unit and the pitching staff as a whole. Coming off back-to-back Cy Young-caliber seasons, Rodón would be a worthy centerpiece of the offseason from any vantage. So how much would this gamble cost? If we suppose that Rodón is open-minded and simply looking for the best deal, it becomes a straightforward bidding war – albeit one with high stakes and some imposing competition. The left-hander is reportedly receiving early interest from the Dodgers, Mets, and Rangers, among others. The Rangers are said to be one of his most serious suitors, and they exemplify the type of uphill battle Minnesota's front office faces in this pursuit. Texas spent more than half a billion in free agency last offseason alone. With such a free-wheeling mindset, made possible by operating in a top-five market, they can more easily sink big money into shaky investments – like, say, signing Corey Seager for $32 million annually through age 37 – and worry about the repercussions later. For the Twins, it's a different ballgame. The stakes are graver, the downside greater. And depending on Rodón's personal preferences, it might take a significant outbid to woo him from more attractive destinations. It's hard to know exactly where the southpaw's contract figure might land, when you factor in all the risk and all the reward. One article in The Athletic projected five years and $160 million, which is higher than I've seen elsewhere but certainly within reason. For the Twins to make it happen, they might need to get creative with a contract framework that leans strongly in the player's favor – a Scott Boras specialty. Again, you can make a good case to say "screw it, just make the deal happen, whatever it takes." But then, I come back to this front office and what we know about them. As much as they might like Rodón and the fit, it would be very uncharacteristic to outslug a bunch of heavy-hitters in an all-out auction for a peaking asset. What seems much more likely is that they'll turn to other pitchers near the top of the remaining free agent starter pool in search of real upside without the extreme "buy-high" dynamic. One name that really stands out in this group is Nathan Eovaldi. He's got the credentials, the big stage experience, the power fastball. In 2021 he finished fourth in the Cy Young voting with 5.7 fWAR, placing him at the premier class of MLB starters. In 2022 he took a step back, with production that was more or less Robbie Ray-esque. Unlike Rodón and Ray, Eovaldi is not a buy-high target. Unfortunately for him, the right-hander's date with free agency came a year too late for that. He'll still get paid handsomely but the proposition should be much less daunting for a team like the Twins. How much less realistic upside does Eovaldi bring to the table compared to Rodón and Ray, relative to the chasmic difference in cost? If you look at 2022 in isolation, far less, but results aren't that dependably consistent from year to year. To prove that, look no further than all of the dudes we're talking about here. Signing Rodón feels, in some ways, like a move the Twins need to make, should they miss out on Correa. But turning away from the feeding frenzy and focusing on an arm like Eovaldi would be much more on-brand, while still showing a touch of boldness. He would very likely be the most expensive free agent pitcher signing in franchise history, and a plausible upgrade from Sonny Gray in the #1 rotation spot. This course would also allow the Twins to save some coin and spread more of it to other needs, while still addressing the rotation in a meaningful, emphatic way.
    11 points
  33. Setting a price on a luxury item, which a jersey is, is not price gouging. High priced? Certainly. So don't buy it. I won't. But that's not what price gouging is. Now, charging exorbitant prices on necessity items, like insulin, that's gouging.
    11 points
  34. A live 19-year old arm in return. Probably a good trade. #22 on MLB.com's prospect list for the Angels; at the moment probably a bullpen candidate. We knew Urshela wasn't without value; the question was whether he was more valuable to the Twins as insurance at 3B if Miranda doesn't make strides, versus prospect capital. / edit - on re-reading, I mean he probably has a live arm. I didn't mean to damn with faint praise by suggesting he's 19 and alive. Nor to imply his arm might be of a different age than the rest of him.
    11 points
  35. Fools and their money are soon parted. Great coaching needed in both cases, and the Twins aren't long on great coaching.
    11 points
  36. I like the new script, other than the fact I just bought a Twins pennant for my family room on my 1st trip to Target Field in August that suddenly feels dated. (Sigh). The script looks perfect to me and I don't see what others do. The white home uniforms are EXCELLENT. They are reminiscent of the old school whites worn until the mid 80's but much better and updated. I don't mind the blue top. It's fine. But it's missing something. And I'm not sure what. Are the sleeves that bare? Or do we yet get to see some patches? And does the whole jersey look better with the back on display, which we can't see? Something like a Mini and Paul patch and a white outline of the number on the back of the jersey might "complete" the look.
    11 points
  37. I'll take the under on that
    11 points
  38. Except that most other teams are in similar positions roster wise as the Twins. Not saying that there won't be a single player taken in the V, but it will probably not be the bloodletting predicted by some .
    11 points
  39. Linus

    Bloat in the FO

    I think I now understand why Celestino was so poor running the bases. He was being coached by the run prevention coordinator
    11 points
  40. You know, I keep hearing people say "we have other needs" beyond catcher, and I understand that, but for the life of me, I can't think of one more pressing in the here and now. One injury prone .200 - .210 hitting catcher on the entire 40 man? And no one in the near future of the organization ready to move up? Picture only having one of any other position, much less a position you can't just slot someone into in an emergency; they kind of have to be a catcher, you know? What ever direction they go, defense first or offense, framer or good arm, etc., they better do it PDQ, or the league will make the decision for them by snarfing up everyone worth anything. We have at least some depth at every other position on the field; this may very well not be our only need, but it is the most pressing at the moment.
    11 points
  41. They tried hard for Darvish. For every Scherzer that continues on pitching well for a new team there seems to be the Zimmermans, Corbins and Mad Bum who diminish. The successes are easily remembered, the failures not so much
    11 points
  42. I’m of the opinion that a good way to regret something is to sign a 30+ year old sketchy defensive catcher to a long term deal. I’m a solid pass on Contreras, especially given the fact he’s literally the only good catching option this off-season. Someone is going to overpay for his services because he’s the only legit option and I hope it’s not the Twins. Jeffers and someone like Narvaez is fine for 2023.
    10 points
  43. Lets be honest - The Twins didn't win with C4 as our Opening Day shortstop either. One stud is not enough to win in baseball.
    10 points
  44. Acquired in exchange for minor-league pitcher Casey Legumina last week, Kyle Farmer has followed an interesting career path in terms of defensive development. Formerly a star high school baseball star and quarterback (he made a cameo in The Blind Side!), he played shortstop at the University of Georgia before being drafted as a catcher by Los Angeles in the 13th round in 2013. Farmer had never played catcher, but the Dodgers and other teams liked him at the position because of his big frame and strong arm. He split time between there and at third while working his way up to the majors, where it took him four years to get his long-coveted chance at a return to shortstop. "Farmer didn’t receive an opportunity to play shortstop regularly until he met with Reds manager David Bell in spring training before the 2020 season and told him that he could do it," wrote Bobby Nightingale for the Cincinnati Enquirer. Farmer has since made 234 starts over three seasons at the position, after totaling NINE – majors and minors – through his first seven years as a pro. Farmer has made 81% of his 289 starts since 2020 at shortstop, impressing enough with the glove to keep getting nods there from Bell and Co. in Cincy, and now to be targeted by the Twins largely for his SS ability. But there are other skills in Farmer's defensive toolkit that make the versatile infielder a player who fits under several different scenarios. Which is exactly what the front office liked about him. Scenario A: Farmer is the interim starting shortstop until Royce Lewis or Brooks Lee is ready. If the Twins believe that Lewis is on track to fully recover and take over as long-term starting shortstop midway through the season, then this will be the course of action. In fact, to be honest, this will very likely be the course of action unless they can sign one of the top four (highly coveted) shortstops on the market, which means it's probably just going to happen. It's not the worst thing in the world! Depending on your view of Lewis. Farmer is far from a top-tier starter at shortstop but he's perfectly adequate, with a solid glove and a bit of pop at the plate. He's really rough against right-handed pitching, which limits his appeal as a regular at any position, but the Twins could theoretically rotate in Jorge Polanco or Nick Gordon occasionally. If Lewis can return in May or June and pick up where he left off, then Farmer shifts into the role outlined in Scenario B at that point. Meanwhile, the Twins have conserved tens of millions of dollars to spend elsewhere while maintaining flexibility to usher in Lewis or Lee as the shortstop of the future. Scenario B: Farmer is a semi-regular at third base who fills in around the infield. What if the Twins manage to land Carlos Correa, or another top shortstop via free agency or trade? In this case, Farmer can still fill a valuable role, albeit it with a less intensive workload. In this scenario, he fills a lesser version of the role Gio Urshela after Miranda came up in 2022, starting a couple times a week at third while Miranda rests, or slides to first base or DH. Farmer is the steadier and more reliable glove at third base, and frankly the book is still out on Miranda's defense. There's great value in dependable veteran depth. Farmer can make himself useful on days where Miranda is at third by stepping in at short, second or first. He's even a viable DH option against southpaws thanks to his .837 career OPS vs. LHP. Scenario C: Farmer is a super-utility backup who plugs in all around the field. Let's say the Twins are more committed to Miranda at third than I think they are, or should be. And let's also say they find another superior player to start at shortstop. In this case, Farmer probably becomes more of a true utilityman, making starts all over the field to spell starters and backfill injuries. "When the Reds acquired him from the Los Angeles Dodgers," notes Nightingale, "he was viewed as a utility guy with extra value as a third catcher." This could be the role Minnesota envisions for him, with his bat platooning around the field against lefties. In addition to shortstop, catcher, and third, Farmer has experience at second, first, and left field. His viability at shortstop can make him the top backup at that position (they currently have none, with Jermaine Palacios gone), and he can also serve as third-string catcher, which figures to be a need since they're currently without even Caleb Hamilton-caliber secondary depth. As mentioned, the ultimate role for Farmer in 2023 will be dictated by what the Twins do elsewhere. But unless they turn around and trade him a la Isiah Kiner-Falefa (who, incidentally, was a trade target to fill almost the exact same role), he'll almost certainly end up being used in one of these three capacities.
    10 points
  45. If you are going to use Miranda, it will be at 3B with Arraez at 1st. This lets you rotate players thru the DH. I feel that this deal was agreed to before Urshala was traded and only made after the spot was cleared. That is why Legumina was added to the 40 man. Farmer was brought in to help against left handers (he is almost useless against rightes), and to cover SS if no other SS is signed. Gordon is not an infielder any more and I think the Twins have figured this out, I expect Gorden or another outfielder to be traded before spring training to clear the logjam. Or maybe late in spring training after the Twins figure out if Kirlloff is ok or Laurnach is ready to step up. Still lots of moving parts here. I expect a lot more action.
    10 points
  46. The risk is he's bad and they don't move on, not the money. You know, like not moving on after three years. It's the opportunity cost.
    10 points
  47. I understand Pagan has velocity and high K numbers. I understand he was working on a different pitch, or a variation of an existing one, and posted better numbers over the last couple of months when in lower pressure situations. But he remains, at best, a 1-2 inning middle reliever who has some of MLB WORST performance numbers for 4yrs running! I would have let him loose last July. Right now, I'd move him for anything I could get, if that's possible. $3M plus for a live but poorly performing arm in middle relief? Come on FO! Stop being stubborn! You should be smarter than this. Move him or cut him and use his $3M towards a better ballplayer and use your system and FA to fill the middle inning role. An expensive middle reliever who K's batters but still allows a HR virtually every other time out just isn't valuable.
    10 points
  48. I put their chances at maybe 5%. Remote to the point of not being a real consideration but also not impossible.
    10 points
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