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    Brock Beauchamp

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    Mike Sixel

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    bean5302

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/25/2021 in all areas

  1. Mike Sixel

    How quickly we Forget

    I'm continually confused by statements that the FO has "no idea what it is doing" "they never make good decisions" etc............... They literally won the division the last two years. You can be disappointed in this year, I think everyone is. But .... I think saying they are clueless idiots and we are only ever sold hope for the future....seems to completely ignore the last two years. PS. Before you point out "last year doesn't count".....every team played under the same conditions, and the Twins won. It isn't their fault Covid happened....
    23 points
  2. Minnesota, no matter what happens next. They needed him last year, and he was great.
    21 points
  3. A Celestino/Buxton/Kepler outfield is an amazing defensive outfield that will remain healthy for no fewer than two outs into Opening Day.
    20 points
  4. Torres was just moved back to 2nd base because he isn't a shortstop. Why trade for another 2nd baseman? I don't mind looking beyond the big names in free agency, but the Twins need a glove at shortstop.
    19 points
  5. Weak, man. Get that man a B-Ref page, let him play one game!
    18 points
  6. Great to see Nick Gordon's continued strong bat. He's making a strong case to be a big piece of this team next year. Not going to complain about a Twins win, but saying that it wouldn't break my heart to see Jays rebound to win at least 2 in this series while the Red Sox beat the feathers out of the Yankees. In this train wreck of a season, I would take a lot of personal satisfaction see the Yanks sitting at home when the playoffs start.
    17 points
  7. I'm somewhere in the middle ground, I guess, and would not forecast an abrupt housecleaning at the top. Still, this front office hasn't demonstrated that they have achieved their own benchmark of "sustainable success" on the field, as the current year is not only bad but gives little hope for serious contention in 2022. Maybe next year will surprise me. But the honeymoon is over, and I'm looking for results going forward and not merely hopeful talk about hard work and getting the process right or whatever. I'm not sure I could locate a better slate of executives to lead the team forward than what we've got - but conversely, if it turns out to be so bad that a new 5-year plan is needed, I'm not sure I would assign the same group to plan and execute it again.
    17 points
  8. Seriously? You think Simmons is the worst signing ever, in all of Twins history? That's a pretty sensational proclamation, imo. I think there were worse signings this year alone than Simmons ... and the two other you mentioned I think were far worse.
    15 points
  9. Precisely. The Twins had just won 103 games, but had started Randy Dobnak in a playoff game--they needed frontline starting pitching, but couldn't get it in FA. They went out to get a guy to improve their rotation, and he did just that. If the offense doesn't fall completely asleep at the wheel against Houston, who knows what might have happened?
    15 points
  10. I will consider it a massive failure if they trade Buxton, the kind of thing that would make me want to see this front office dismissed. I don't care if it's the right baseball move or not, I want to see Byron Buxton in a Twins uniform for a very long time. He's the kind of guy a fanbase can rally around, like we SHOULD have rallied around Mauer but didn't.
    15 points
  11. You could write this exact story for a dozen guys from every organization. This is nothing. The question shouldn't even be "did the Twins miss something," it should be "did the Twins, Angels, Dodgers, and Rays miss something." This is the life of fringe MLB players. Sometimes one will hit down the line somewhere, but there are dozens of guys a year who get DFA'd, claimed, DFA'd, claimed, DFA'd, claimed, and on and on until every team who wanted to see him for themselves has done their claiming. This is just click-bait chum in the water for fans already angry with the Twins FO this year.
    15 points
  12. This argument is so wildly inconsistent and one-sided it makes my head spin. The 2016 squad was injured but the 2021 squad is just bad. Here are the five years of winning percentage of the Ryan administration: .407, .407, .432, .512, .364 Here are the five years of winning percentage of the Falvey administration: .525, .481, .623, .600, .443 This "disastrous" 2021 season would have been literally THE SECOND BEST SEASON under Ryan. You're talking about the great young core - and there was a solid young core, no doubt - but the Twins were exiting THEIR WORST SEASON IN HISTORY and fresh off a season where the team fielded players like Byung Ho Park, John Ryan Murphy, Kurt Suzuki, Ricky Nolasco, the desiccated husks of Phil Hughes and Glen Perkins, etc. etc etc. The 2016 squad wasn't "ravaged by injuries", they were simply a terrible ****ing baseball team, one FAR WORSE than the 2021 squad... and that was the fifth year of bad baseball, excepting the decent-but-still-nothing 2015 season. And let's not even get into the draft picks that preceded those seasons where literally a mediocre 11th man was the best outcome out of three consecutive top six picks. Falvey also inherited that complete failure of drafting, one that still reverberates today. You're not even attempting to be objective about this front office, gunnar. Up until about 15 minutes ago, you have referenced 2016 as a "total system failure" more times than I can count but now that it's a conversation about the Falvey front office, that 2016 squad was just injured and had so much potential. I'm not even making excuses for Falvey, I've been particularly disappointed in their pitching development, but let's inject a dose of reality into this situation. Ryan's teams showed little signs of returning to respectability while this front office has won more often than it has lost.
    14 points
  13. I like the idea of using 22 as a year to experiment and develop our young pitchers. Use it so that in 23 we really know what we need. Concentrate on the BP with any signing. The BP has become as significant as the rotation in this era.
    14 points
  14. My fear is that Falvine trades Buxton for pitching. I think the team's first priority should be to sign BB to a long term contract. He's come of age. His last injury was a hit-by-pitch: could happen to anybody. His dazzle will draw fans like me on a regular basis to the stadium. He's worth 15/mil a year, which is what his agents say they want. We haven't won a World Series, or played in one, since 1991; there's a reason for that. Yes, Mauer wasn't worth what he got, and an injury that reduced his effectiveness was one reason, but Buxton can be transformational in the lineup and in center field. Just do it, guys, and figure out the pitching on the fly.
    14 points
  15. Seeing where "Pitch #6" to Gardner was according to the illustration, it doesn't look like such a horrible call... A missed call, but very borderline. It's also OK to then not give up the three-run homer... even though (presumably) everybody knew that's exactly what was going to hit.
    13 points
  16. Luis Arraez has a career .313 AVG / .376 OBP / .781 OPS, while playing essentially league average defense at multiple positions. He's also 24 years old and under team control until 2026. That seems like a pretty underrated player to me. I truly don't understand how that is overated for the type of player and role he plays.
    13 points
  17. So the '16 team gets a break because of injuries, but the 2021 team doesn't and the FO needs to go? Don't follow the logic there. Also, don't agree at all that the core of Buxton, Sano, Kepler, Polanco, Berrios, and Rosario were going to win no matter what. That's 1 good, not great starting pitcher, 1 elite talent who took forever to figure it out and has never stayed healthy for a full season, the streakiest hitter in baseball who doubles as the biggest K machine in the league, a gold glove type RFer who's a slightly above average hitter, a top hitting SS who couldn't field the position, and a below average defensive LFer with a slightly above average bat who was prone to more than his fair share of mental mistakes. Twins win percentages since 2010: .580, .389, .407, .407, .432, .512, .364, .525, .481, .623, .600, .430. Since becoming the Twins in 1961 the team has won fewer than 40% of their games 6 total times. Twice in the last 10 years including the season before Falvine took over. They're going to end around 44 or 45% this year probably. You're so upset about this season that you want the FO fired yet it's better than all but 2 of the 7 years prior to them taking over.
    13 points
  18. While there's a lot of merit to your post, this comment feels really disingenuous. You mention they "nearly" made the playoffs in 2015 but fail to mention that they fielded literally the worst team in Twins history in 2016. Let's not pretend as if they didn't inherit a truly awful baseball team, sporting the worst record the franchise has posted in 60 years of Minnesota baseball.
    13 points
  19. Any list without Jake Cave is incomplete. It’s amazing the number of players that could have been on the list.
    13 points
  20. This is correct. Any time you can get 3 years of control on a #2/#3 starter for 6 years of a reliever, you do it.
    13 points
  21. While working (I'm retired), I made my living dealing in numbers so I have some appreciation for their value as an analytical tool. But as Viola so clearly points out, without baseball fundamentals and a passion for the game, you won't have a winning team. While numbers have their uses, catching, throwing to the correct base, hitting the cutoff man, making contact with your bat, etc. will probably win more games than studying a piece of paper lodged in your cap.
    13 points
  22. He's bounced around enough that I don't really feel like they missed anything. His success could be attributed to taking something from every stop he's had and molding it into his own to great effect. Whatever the reason, I'm glad to see him succeed. Wish it were here, but I don't have any regrets.
    13 points
  23. Frankly, I think it's time to show Thorpe the door unless he walks into his next bullpen session and hits 92mph.
    12 points
  24. No expert or system predicted it would turn out this way. Stuff happens....
    12 points
  25. We've seen what Dobnak is capable of in 2019. We saw it the first 70% of the 2020 season. What happened to him this year was equal parts poor pitching, injury and weird usage. Spent the offseason and spring training starting.. They start him in the bullpen and rarely use him. He not-surprisingly struggled, and then had the injury that cost him 2 1/2 months. No reason to give up on him at this point. I think he needs to go into the offseason knowing his 2022 role (and in my mind, that should be in the rotation), and they should stick with that. The dollars on the extension are so low that even if he's a long-reliever, the Twins won't lose any money on it.
    12 points
  26. No. They do not have the pitching. It would be a mistake to try to sign several guys a bargain prices and hope to squeeze out one more year. Instead they need to sign one pitcher spending in the mid 20s per year. That would have been the cost of Berrios in free agency. They need to find the rest either in-house, in trade or be better than everyone else at finding a Chris Flexen. Someone that comes out of nowhere and is young enough with control to be counted on for a few seasons. I expected Falvey to be the guy that can find those pitchers. No more one year stop gap pitchers. They don’t plug the gap and it only gets bigger the next year.
    12 points
  27. If Colome turns it around in 2022, I hope it’s for a different team. Even when he’s “good” it’s warning track fly balls that if the wrong butterfly flaps it’s wings, would go over the fence. Not sure if rookie struggles count as coming back, but I’d pick Larnach to bounce back next year. I think he’ll adjust to the bigs and improve his k/bb rate.
    11 points
  28. Have no interest in trading with the Yankees as they usually don't work out well for the Twins. Also, have no interest investing prospects to solve the shortstop question which should take care of itself a year later when Lewis/Martin should be ready. Would rather see them do: A) nothing, with Polo/Gordon/Arraez manning the middle infield spots; or .B) signing a veteran to a one year contract.
    11 points
  29. That's it... I might just bet on a sports game for the first time in 2022 and put money on the Yankees every single time they play the Twins. Either I will make a profit since the Twins are guaranteed to poop themselves every time they play New York, or I will break the Twins' horrible streak by losing money. A win-win, perhaps.
    11 points
  30. Gotta love Ryan so far as he has been excellent. But let's not forget he has only started 2 major league games. That's right 2 games. Don't you think it's a little premature to pen him in as a top level starter for the next decade? Give him a chance to be who he is and keep learning before we put him in the hall of Fame.
    11 points
  31. Congratulations to Ryan on his first big league win! Hopefully the first of many in a Twins uni!
    11 points
  32. Gosh I sure hope so. If this all went to plan, I don't even know what to say.
    11 points
  33. I'd only bring in two from outside the org at this point. Free agent ( a 2/3, not a 5) Trade (a 2/3, not a 4/5) Ober Ryan or someone Someone else from inside the org Lots of guys in AAA that are young for a change..... I think bringing in a third from the outside just means that a lot of high upside arms spend next year in the minors.....rather than getting time in MN.
    11 points
  34. Yay!!!!! Guess it's NOT a service time issue! /s
    11 points
  35. Oh god, if Reusse could stop living in 1985 so fervently, he could have real points here. All he could talk about forever is innings pitched by starters and then later he props up Tampa and how great they do with a small payroll. And then LITERALLY IN THE NEXT BREATH he rips the Twins for not letting starters pitch through difficulty, entirely unaware of the irony of that conversation thread. Sigh. He literally does not understand modern baseball. This entire audio clip, while it has some merit superficially, the analysis is pure trash and based in outmoded ideas but then propped up by naming teams who are the MOST against what Reusse is talking about. Blech. Hot take garbage. Which is too bad because if someone approached those same problems without being stuck in the thinking of the mid-80s, there may be some salient points to be gathered there.
    11 points
  36. To be frank, most of it has to do with Cavaco having 92 professional plate appearances before this year and knowing he was a full on project when he was drafted. Cavaco was a surprise and a reach by the Twins as they drafted him purely based on athleticism and projection. Cavaco did not participate in the 2020 alternate site. May - 82 PA .230/.305/.297 OPS .602 Jun - 35 PA .344/.400/.438 OPS .838 went on 10 Day IL Jul - 56 PA .271/.375/.438 OPS .813 came back from IL and 3 game rehab assignment Aug - 78 PA .173/.179/.173 OPS .353 He's only had one absolutely horrible month so far; this one. In June and July, Cavaco was showing a real improvement at the plate. Not sure if he's wearing down. Reports suggested his conditioning coming into the year probably wasn't very good so maybe? Cavaco's struggles at the plate, and even moreso in the field, are concerning. Too early to completely write him off.
    11 points
  37. This is a thread about a game they won, right?
    11 points
  38. Let's begin with a brief anatomy and biomechanics lesson. The ulnar collateral ligament — more frequently referred to as the UCL — is a robust and triangular sheet of tissue that helps support the inner elbow against valgus stress. The elbow experiences the most valgus stress during a baseball game when the arm is driven forward at high rates of speed while throwing a ball. Damage to the UCL occurs when the torque produced as the arm is thrust forward — the technical term is internal rotation — is more significant than what the structure can compensate. Injury can occur chronically as well as acutely and is generally described as a sprain. The degree of damage is graded on a scale of 1-3. Grade 1 sprains are usually minor injuries that heal within a week or two. Grade 2 sprains — also referred to as partial tears — cause instability in the joint as some 50% of the ligament fibers have been damaged; the most frequently reported symptoms are pain and swelling. The recovery timeline for grade 2 sprains generally extends into months. Grade 3 sprains — or ruptures — result in significant instability and require Tommy John surgery to address. Grade 2 sprains are where the best route of treatment is murkiest. As the UCL is technically an extension of the joint capsule — a larger sheet of tissue that envelops a joint and provides stability and nourishment — it has a relatively good blood supply, meaning it is technically capable of healing on its own without surgery. (Side note: This is why ACL injuries require surgery in most instances. Although the ACL is inside the knee, it is technically separate from the joint capsule, and, thus, has almost no blood supply.) However, the UCL does not have the same blood supply throughout its structure. A recent study found evidence to suggest that the blood supply is best nearer where it connects to the upper arm bone — proximal — and decreases as the ligament extends to the forearm — distal. This finding may suggest that grade 2 sprains of the UCL that occur proximally are more likely to heal without surgery than those that are distal (or, read another way, Tommy John surgeries that treat proximal tears are more likely to be "successful" than their distal counterparts.) (Another side note: Interestingly, a study conducted in 2020 found data to suggest the opposite, though it should be noted that the study had a small sample size and was retrospective; both factors limit the findings' strength.) Rest and anti-inflammatory medication are most often the first two steps in treating a grade 2 UCL sprains followed by physical therapy to improve range of motion and increase the strength of the surrounding muscles. While the UCL provides static stability for the inner elbow (i.e., its fibers don't contract and act as a brace), the forearm musculature provides dynamic stability (i.e., its fibers do contract and pull the inner elbow together). Having strong forearm muscles is vital for protecting the healing UCL. Another treatment often reported after an athlete is diagnosed with a UCL sprain is platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The theory behind PRP is sound. The process involves drawing blood into a test tube, spinning it around rapidly in a centrifuge to separate the blood into plasma and red blood cells, sucking the plasma into a syringe, and injecting the plasma into the injured tissue. Plasma contains a variety of cells and other substances, one of which are platelets. Platelets help form the foundation on which new tissue grows and secret substances that help aid the healing process. Again, theoretically. The results surrounding PRP injections and return to play in baseball are … inconclusive, at best. Read one study, and you may come away believing that they work exceptionally well. Read another, and you may think they're just a bunch of hocus pocus. The fact of the matter is this: Despite being relatively well studied, there is little evidence, at this point, to suggest that PRP injections are the medical savior they were once considered to be. So, back to the original question. Why should Maeda and the Twins even pursue a second opinion? Well, the short answer is "Why not?" If the injury Maeda suffered is a UCL sprain, and if he ultimately undergoes surgery, he'll miss the entirety of the 2022 season anyway. Waiting another week or two to gather more information won't prevent him from playing next year. The longer answer is that the most appropriate course of treatment may or may not be surgery, depending on various factors, including grade, location, and, frankly, a specific doctor's training and treatment philosophy. Again, if Maeda is dealing with UCL damage and if it is partial and proximal, it may have a chance to heal on its own. Also, and this bears repeating, what's the harm in trying conservative rehabilitation and waiting on surgery? Best case scenario: Maeda can pitch again in relatively short order and definitely be next season. Worst case scenario: Maeda has to undergo surgery, which, again, would keep him out of 2022 anyway. At this stage, there is minimal downside for the Twins and Maeda in gathering as much information as possible. The team isn't going to the playoffs, he's under contract next year, and he's one of the more critical pitching pieces in the Twins' system. I'll pose the question again. Why should Maeda and the Twins seek a second opinion? Because it's the right thing to do.
    11 points
  39. I've been advocating for a pitch clock for about a decade now and why we don't have a hard pitch clock in MLB continues to baffle me. It fixes a bunch of problems in one fell swoop: pace of play, overall game length, max-effort pitching, increased action, and probably other stuff I'm not thinking of in the moment. Make it happen already, MLB. Stop sitting around, hoping that the game is going to magically fix itself, you ineffectual buffoons. If you don't subscribe to The Athletic, you should probably do so but here's a game length chart from the article. Yikes. 1981 2:33 1991 2:48 2001 2:58 2011 2:51 2021 3:09 https://theathletic.com/2829518/2021/09/17/can-this-minor-league-pitch-clock-solve-all-of-mlbs-problems/?source=user_shared_article&fbclid=IwAR0RwcQsa-gGLdQ75UcduGHVJn09oZ_up1rWr3Bb9LMKfIfuvp2ojTED0SE
    10 points
  40. Okay, this is pretty fun. Here's my takeaway: 1. Front Office: 30% - They chose the wrong horses at nearly every opportunity. Outside of Ober, they failed to protect good players (including Miranda, they were simply lucky no one selected him). They paid all the wrong people. If there was a decision to be made, they made the wrong one (outside of Cruz). 2. Players: 30% - They're the ones who took the field. No one coached Happ into becoming a crap pitcher. No one told Sano to go into his typical early season funk, except moreso this time. No one told basically the entire roster to underperform for two full months. Out of the lists above this one, I find it odd and a little amusing how reluctant anyone is to assign proper blame to the millionaires who go out there and win actual baseball games. 3. Injuries: 20% - On top of many bad decisions, basically everyone, especially the minor leaguers, decided to be injured... basically for the entirety of the first three months of the season. Even guys who should have helped stop the bleeding - like Maeda - only contributed more to it because they faced constant injuries and the resulting bad performance. There was no relenting with this team. The bad decisions were the front office's fault but no quarter was to be found anywhere to cover their mistakes. 4. Colome & Simmons: 15% - It's easy to forget that this team started 5-2 and could easily have started 7-0. It's hard to know how the Twins would have recovered from other players' underperformance had these two meddling kids not done everything in their power to tank the entire team permanently. Tag-teaming on top of the bad front office decisions, these two players, respectively, tried to break the franchise record for negative WPA and tried to knock out half the (already depleted) roster with Covid, all within the first three weeks of the season. Without either or preferably both of them, we may have seen a very different baseball season in 2021. 5. Manager & Coaches: 5% - I don't know where to put them, frankly. Between all of them, maybe they're the biggest problem... but I'm not talking about Rocco here, I'm talking about the coaches. I simply don't see how Rocco has a significant influence on play unless we're talking clubhouse demeanor... but this was a veteran team full of players used to winning. Had there been an easy fix to this mess, any number of veterans could have stepped forward into a leadership role and righted the ship. As for the on-field underperformance, I have no clue. It's hard to judge coaches but it's pretty obvious they didn't do a great job. This number could just as easily be 25%, primarily on the pitching and hitting coaches, as the 5% I gave it.
    10 points
  41. Nice that we still got a taste of Twins playoff baseball even in a non-playoff year, That loss would fit right into the streak.
    10 points
  42. My response in the poll in the Twins Talk forum were that I thought those two would be a lock ... although, a lot of uncertainty around that. Still ... I like what I've seen so far and think they could make the beginnings of a good rotation. Of course, it all depends on who else is with them. But man, really liked Ryan tonight ... I mean, who wouldn't? And I'm not anointing him as anything, because this was just his 2nd major league start, but I like what I see so far.
    10 points
  43. No Baldelli and Twins win again, hmmmm.
    10 points
  44. 4 runs in 7 innings (as my own official score keeper I refuse to charge him with Sano's brain fart) will keep us in most games. We would be happy with this out of most other starters on this club; I am going to be happy with it in September of a lost season. Funny, isn't it, that when Ryan gives up 3 in 5, we give kudos but when Dobnak gives up 4 in 7 (again, Sano gets the 5th) we hesitate. Both had a bad inning and otherwise did great, but one is judged differently. I suspect there is no right or wrong here, just what each person sees for themselves. I love reading the folks here; keeps things in perspective.
    10 points
  45. I don't think this is even a conversation at this point. Even if Maeda is closer to what he was earlier this year then last, he's a 2/3 starter on a team starved of front line starters at the time of the trade for a reliever. Graterol may go on to do great things, but he wasn't what the team needed. That alone makes this a win for the Twins. It's also possible that both teams win in the end. Absolutely nothing wrong with that. That's what virtually every trade strives for.
    10 points
  46. Just for perspective.. Jacob deGrom was older than Ryan when he made his debut. He also wasn’t all that highly regarded. Not saying Ryan will be the next deGrom, just saying that none of us know.
    10 points
  47. Ryan, Miranda, Hamilton and Moran would be up for me... I think I'd keep Strotman at St. Paul. His numbers aren't screaming for a call up, and like Balazovic, he's only on his first option year, so no rush. Keep him down and working on his control/command. Moran and Hamilton because both would become free agents after the season if not called up. Miranda, but only if they're going to play him 4 out of 5 games, otherwise, keep him in St. Paul. I'd keep Albers up just to have a rubber arm that can pitch in a variety of situations and eat innings to help keep the young guys innings under control...
    10 points
  48. Do you think Johnson has anything to do with Ober’s and Jax’s performances over the last month?
    10 points
  49. If the Twins kept every player on the 40 man this site whines about, they'd have around 100000 players on their roster at this point.
    10 points
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