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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/09/2022 in all areas

  1. While I'm really down on the Twins and their offseason, I also try not to listen to literally anything Jim Bowden says or writes. It has served me quite well in life.
    6 points
  2. jmlease1

    Sleepin' On Smeltzer

    I think the only way Smeltzer makes it back on the roster is if there's a rash of injuries in the bullpen with at least one serious enough to open a slot on the 40-man. He's just a little too hittable to survive long stints, I think. Maybe the new slider will give him new life as a bullpen option, but he's behind about 8-10 guys for next man up in the rotation.
    5 points
  3. I hope not. Seeing Smeltzer would mean they did nothing to improve the rotation after the lockout. If we see him after the first couple months it would also mean that the the plethora of Twins SP prospects with more upside than Smeltzer are still not ready.
    5 points
  4. Three 4th and 1 and they throw on all three. Wow.
    4 points
  5. The call was brief. Short and sweet. “Mom, I’m going to The Show.” Those were words Twins reliever Taylor Rogers spoke to his mother Amy in 2016 after receiving the news that he would be packing up his bags in Rochester, NY, and heading to Target Field. Coming out of a business meeting, it was a moment that Amy still cherishes like it was yesterday. “I told him to hold on a minute, and then I just yelled in joy,” she recalled. Yet Amy wasn’t the first person that Taylor shared the news with; the lanky lefty kept it to himself for 3-4 hours. The reason why? Taylor’s identical twin brother Tyler was still at practice when Taylor received his call of a lifetime. Taylor and Tyler Rogers have emerged as two of the most prolific relief pitchers in Major League baseball. Taylor was a 2021 All-Star and has earned his stripes as an anchor in the Twins bullpen. Tyler emerged as a breakout star for the San Francisco Giants, garnishing a 7-1 record and 2.22 ERA for the 2021 NL West champion Giants. The best stat? Taylor and Tyler are one of just ten sets of identical twins to play Major League Baseball together at the same time. Amy couldn’t be more proud of her sons. From hours in the backyard to playing at the game’s highest level, one thing has remained constant; their love and support of each other. Linked at the Hip Like many twins, Taylor and Tyler were close from a young age. When Amy wasn’t bussing them to baseball and basketball games the two lived in the family's backyard with a pair of gloves and a ball. “I think they pushed each other's talents,” Amy said. “They complimented each other all the time. They'd come inside, and Taylor would say things like ‘Wow, Ty, you're throwing really hard today,’ and vice versa.” The kindness and love wasn’t just for the brothers, they extended it to their mother too. “I’d get them a new bat and they’d say ‘Thanks Mom, we're gonna hit a home run today,” Amy recalled. “I have a huge bag of 50 baseballs that they signed for me, the only level I don’t have signed by is an MLB ball.” That love extended off the playing field and into the seats. Growing up in Colorado in the late 90’s/early 2000’s, the Rogers’ spent hours at Coors Field as the Rockies franchise grew. And while the high home run rate of the park didn’t scare them away from the mound, neither Taylor nor Tyler were prodigies from a young age. In fact, the two didn’t make the varsity roster until the back half of high school; Taylor his junior year and Tyler his senior year. Yet when Taylor found his stride, he hit the ground running, earning all-state honors his senior year that drew attention from Power Five conferences… and MLB Scouts. Taylor was drafted by the Orioles after his senior high school season in the 37th round of the 2009 Amateur Draft. The excitement was surreal, but it wasn’t his time. Taylor declined and committed to the University of Kentucky. Yet the situation planted a thought for Amy; her son had a chance to ‘make it.’ “He was focused on going to college so he went to Kentucky,” Amy said. “As he progressed through there, we began to realize that (playing professional baseball) was a possibility. Three years later, Taylor was drafted again, this time in the 11th round by the Twins. As a late-blooming right-handed pitcher, Tyler’s journey was a bit different than his brother's. “Tay had different opportunities being a left-handed commodity, Ty didn't have the same opportunities right away,” Amy said. “That was hard to navigate, especially with peer pressure from people who didn't understand it. People would make comments like ‘Why aren't you going to Kentucky?’ to him.” Tyler’s road to The Show went through Junior College in Garden City, Kansas where he developed his submarine delivery. That was followed by two years on the mound at Division I Austin Peay. Just a year after his brother was drafted by the Twins, the Giants selected Tyler in the 10th round of the 2013 draft. Fast-forward seven minor league seasons, Tyler received the call that he had dreamed of; a moment for Amy that was even more emotional than Taylor’s call up. “I'll admit, my reaction to Tyler’s (call up) was more emotional than Taylor’s; he was at the end of his seventh year in the minors and wasn't sure it was gonna happen. It wasn't so much about him going up to the big leagues, it was ‘This is happening for Tyler, he’s finally gotten here and he's living his dream.” Just like Taylor, Tyler made sure the first person to hear the news was his brother. Mother and Fan If there’s anyone that deserves a free subscription to MLB TV, it’s Amy Rogers. When she’s not at Oracle Park or Target Field she can be found glued to her sons’ games that span multiple time zones and start times. “I enjoy watching the dynamics of how the games come together, and then the role that Taylor and Tyler play when they come into the game,” she said. “That’s when I get amped up.” Yet nothing can replace times at the ballpark for Amy. The visual of seeing her sons’ success in the flesh is priceless. “Being in the stands at Target Field when it's the bottom of the 9th with a two-run lead, two outs, two strikes, and everyone is standing and cheering, it’s so surreal to think ‘Everyone is cheering for my son’.” Yet while the cheers are loud, the boos and heckling also loom. Despite the occasional negativity, Amy has learned to persevere. “When you head off to places like Dodger Stadium, people aren't necessarily fans of you," she said. "When those (negative) people say things, I cheer even louder to make it known who I am. It doesn't matter if (Taylor and Tyler) get the save or if they blow it, I’m still standing.” How Far They’ve Come Amy smiles as she reflects on the journeys of her sons. “They really just wanted to have fun,” she said. "Obviously every kid dreams of playing MLB, but that wasn’t their end goal. They just wanted to have fun.” And while she’s proud of their baseball accolades, there’s even greater pride in the relationship that they’ve built. When Taylor was named to the All-Star game in 2021, Tyler was there to watch. The favor was returned at the end of the 2021 season. Since Taylor was on IL, the Twins allowed him to head west to watch his brother pitch for the division-winning Giants. It was Taylor’s first time watching Tyler pitch in the big leagues. “When Taylor saw Tyler enter the game, he was dialed in,” Amy said. “He walked all the way down the concourse and down to the field. He didn’t care who was in front of him.” That brotherly love is nothing new. It’s something that Amy feels lucky to have witnessed and experienced since the boys were young. “What I like is that they share the same values and interests, but they're still their own people,” she said. “Each of them have individual traits that they contribute to the world." From the days of youth to adulthood, she describes Taylor as Type A and organized in contrast to the free-flowing and outgoing personality of Tyler. “Even though they’re twins, there's still that first and second-born child dynamic,” she said. The few minutes of age that Taylor has on Tyler doesn’t halt the potential that both men have on the mound. Taylor looks to forge back to health and dominance in 2022, and Tyler will gun for a stellar follow-up campaign coming off a breakout season. In fact, the two teams are slated to face off from Aug 26-28 at Target Field in 2022. It will be the first time that the Rogers’ twins compete head-to-head at the MLB level. Wins aside, Amy can rest easy at night with the young men that she has raised both on and off the field. “I’m most proud that they remember where they came from, they stay humble, and honor their teammates. I just feel like they're really good people that have grown into their positions and haven't let it go to their head. They're really appreciative of what they've got.” Special thanks to Amy Rogers for taking time for this story and sending some photos.
    3 points
  6. Cody Pirkl

    Sleepin' On Smeltzer

    The main return in the Brian Dozier trade from the Dodgers, Devin Smeltzer quickly worked his way up to the Major League club in 2019 and posted decent results for a division-winning team. Smeltzer totaled 49 innings with a 3.86 ERA even though his indicators didn’t quite back it up. 2020 and 2021 were disappointing for the left hander, as he totaled just 20 2/3 innings combined across nine appearances. His 2020 performance got him demoted to Triple-A by year's end and injuries derailed his 2021 season and eventually led to him being jettisoned off the 40 man roster. Smeltzer, however, passed through waivers and remains a Twin, awaiting 2022 in purgatory with no guaranteed roster spot. It seemed Twins fans soured on a pitcher who was at one time a fan-favorite with a great story. It may have been shinier prospects passing him by or his struggles paired with a lack of exciting stuff. The Twins are not likely to simply let go of the 26 year old so quickly. Successful soft tossers aren’t exactly common in the MLB, and Devin Smeltzer averaged 89 mph on the fastball in his rookie season with a steady decline the following two years. Look no further than right over the border at Milwaukee’s Brent Suter, however, as one example of how a pitcher with Smeltzer’s skillset can be used as a weapon. The left-hander threw 73 innings of a 3.07 ERA for the Brewers and was an important part of a very good bullpen on a playoff team. Suter has averaged anywhere from 84 to 88 mph on his fastball since his debut and has been serviceable in any role he’s found himself in since 2016. He’s well below league average in strikeouts and well above average at avoiding free passes much like Smeltzer. His lack of velocity is rare in today’s MLB and using him in short stints appears to have slowed down the league’s adjustment. The Twins likely had this in mind in 2021 when Smeltzer was buried in the depth chart, but injuries never really gave him a chance. It could also be argued that Smeltzer was on the verge of figuring something out across his last two years in the league. In 2020, he debuted a new slider which posted a whiff rate of over 27%. The result was a much improved K-rate nearing 21%, a manageable number for a pitcher who avoids walks and relies on weak contact. The walk rate increased a bit more than a pitcher of Smeltzer’s plan of attack would like, but it’s certainly something that could have been ironed out as he got more feel for the pitch. As underwhelming as Smeltzer seemed in 2020, his peripherals actually improved across the board from a 2019 debut that so many found encouraging. It’s possible Smeltzer was inching towards a new level that made him a reliable Major League pitcher for the next few years. It’s really discouraging that an elbow injury disrupted what would have been a tremendous opportunity for him at the end of a lost 2021 with so many innings available. It was likely a combination of his injury and the Twins' need for 40 man roster spots that led to Smeltzer being put on waivers. The move itself certainly doesn’t hint at the Twins prioritizing Smeltzer headed into 2022. Still, this is baseball. He’s likely to begin the season as a staple in the Saints rotation and I’d dare to call it likely we see him added back to the 40 man roster and called back up to Minneapolis again at some point. He’s the kind of player you can’t help but pull for, and he does have a respectable skillset to hang around and grab ahold of an opportunity that presents itself. His raw tools may make him a unicorn if he becomes successful, but it’s far from out of the question. Being off the 40 man may not make a comeback sound incredibly likely. For a Twins team that will likely be pitching starved again in 2022, however, it’s near impossible to rule anything out for a pitcher who’s already shown something at the Major League level. The book may not yet be written on Devin Smeltzer. MORE TWINS DAILY CONTENT — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email — Follow Cody Pirkl on Twitter here
    3 points
  7. Taylor and Tyler Rogers have emerged as household names in the MLB world. Their mother, Amy, reflects on the wild journey that has taken her twin sons from the backyard in Colorado to the game's biggest stage. The call was brief. Short and sweet. “Mom, I’m going to The Show.” Those were words Twins reliever Taylor Rogers spoke to his mother Amy in 2016 after receiving the news that he would be packing up his bags in Rochester, NY, and heading to Target Field. Coming out of a business meeting, it was a moment that Amy still cherishes like it was yesterday. “I told him to hold on a minute, and then I just yelled in joy,” she recalled. Yet Amy wasn’t the first person that Taylor shared the news with; the lanky lefty kept it to himself for 3-4 hours. The reason why? Taylor’s identical twin brother Tyler was still at practice when Taylor received his call of a lifetime. Taylor and Tyler Rogers have emerged as two of the most prolific relief pitchers in Major League baseball. Taylor was a 2021 All-Star and has earned his stripes as an anchor in the Twins bullpen. Tyler emerged as a breakout star for the San Francisco Giants, garnishing a 7-1 record and 2.22 ERA for the 2021 NL West champion Giants. The best stat? Taylor and Tyler are one of just ten sets of identical twins to play Major League Baseball together at the same time. Amy couldn’t be more proud of her sons. From hours in the backyard to playing at the game’s highest level, one thing has remained constant; their love and support of each other. Linked at the Hip Like many twins, Taylor and Tyler were close from a young age. When Amy wasn’t bussing them to baseball and basketball games the two lived in the family's backyard with a pair of gloves and a ball. “I think they pushed each other's talents,” Amy said. “They complimented each other all the time. They'd come inside, and Taylor would say things like ‘Wow, Ty, you're throwing really hard today,’ and vice versa.” The kindness and love wasn’t just for the brothers, they extended it to their mother too. “I’d get them a new bat and they’d say ‘Thanks Mom, we're gonna hit a home run today,” Amy recalled. “I have a huge bag of 50 baseballs that they signed for me, the only level I don’t have signed by is an MLB ball.” That love extended off the playing field and into the seats. Growing up in Colorado in the late 90’s/early 2000’s, the Rogers’ spent hours at Coors Field as the Rockies franchise grew. And while the high home run rate of the park didn’t scare them away from the mound, neither Taylor nor Tyler were prodigies from a young age. In fact, the two didn’t make the varsity roster until the back half of high school; Taylor his junior year and Tyler his senior year. Yet when Taylor found his stride, he hit the ground running, earning all-state honors his senior year that drew attention from Power Five conferences… and MLB Scouts. Taylor was drafted by the Orioles after his senior high school season in the 37th round of the 2009 Amateur Draft. The excitement was surreal, but it wasn’t his time. Taylor declined and committed to the University of Kentucky. Yet the situation planted a thought for Amy; her son had a chance to ‘make it.’ “He was focused on going to college so he went to Kentucky,” Amy said. “As he progressed through there, we began to realize that (playing professional baseball) was a possibility. Three years later, Taylor was drafted again, this time in the 11th round by the Twins. As a late-blooming right-handed pitcher, Tyler’s journey was a bit different than his brother's. “Tay had different opportunities being a left-handed commodity, Ty didn't have the same opportunities right away,” Amy said. “That was hard to navigate, especially with peer pressure from people who didn't understand it. People would make comments like ‘Why aren't you going to Kentucky?’ to him.” Tyler’s road to The Show went through Junior College in Garden City, Kansas where he developed his submarine delivery. That was followed by two years on the mound at Division I Austin Peay. Just a year after his brother was drafted by the Twins, the Giants selected Tyler in the 10th round of the 2013 draft. Fast-forward seven minor league seasons, Tyler received the call that he had dreamed of; a moment for Amy that was even more emotional than Taylor’s call up. “I'll admit, my reaction to Tyler’s (call up) was more emotional than Taylor’s; he was at the end of his seventh year in the minors and wasn't sure it was gonna happen. It wasn't so much about him going up to the big leagues, it was ‘This is happening for Tyler, he’s finally gotten here and he's living his dream.” Just like Taylor, Tyler made sure the first person to hear the news was his brother. Mother and Fan If there’s anyone that deserves a free subscription to MLB TV, it’s Amy Rogers. When she’s not at Oracle Park or Target Field she can be found glued to her sons’ games that span multiple time zones and start times. “I enjoy watching the dynamics of how the games come together, and then the role that Taylor and Tyler play when they come into the game,” she said. “That’s when I get amped up.” Yet nothing can replace times at the ballpark for Amy. The visual of seeing her sons’ success in the flesh is priceless. “Being in the stands at Target Field when it's the bottom of the 9th with a two-run lead, two outs, two strikes, and everyone is standing and cheering, it’s so surreal to think ‘Everyone is cheering for my son’.” Yet while the cheers are loud, the boos and heckling also loom. Despite the occasional negativity, Amy has learned to persevere. “When you head off to places like Dodger Stadium, people aren't necessarily fans of you," she said. "When those (negative) people say things, I cheer even louder to make it known who I am. It doesn't matter if (Taylor and Tyler) get the save or if they blow it, I’m still standing.” How Far They’ve Come Amy smiles as she reflects on the journeys of her sons. “They really just wanted to have fun,” she said. "Obviously every kid dreams of playing MLB, but that wasn’t their end goal. They just wanted to have fun.” And while she’s proud of their baseball accolades, there’s even greater pride in the relationship that they’ve built. When Taylor was named to the All-Star game in 2021, Tyler was there to watch. The favor was returned at the end of the 2021 season. Since Taylor was on IL, the Twins allowed him to head west to watch his brother pitch for the division-winning Giants. It was Taylor’s first time watching Tyler pitch in the big leagues. “When Taylor saw Tyler enter the game, he was dialed in,” Amy said. “He walked all the way down the concourse and down to the field. He didn’t care who was in front of him.” That brotherly love is nothing new. It’s something that Amy feels lucky to have witnessed and experienced since the boys were young. “What I like is that they share the same values and interests, but they're still their own people,” she said. “Each of them have individual traits that they contribute to the world." From the days of youth to adulthood, she describes Taylor as Type A and organized in contrast to the free-flowing and outgoing personality of Tyler. “Even though they’re twins, there's still that first and second-born child dynamic,” she said. The few minutes of age that Taylor has on Tyler doesn’t halt the potential that both men have on the mound. Taylor looks to forge back to health and dominance in 2022, and Tyler will gun for a stellar follow-up campaign coming off a breakout season. In fact, the two teams are slated to face off from Aug 26-28 at Target Field in 2022. It will be the first time that the Rogers’ twins compete head-to-head at the MLB level. Wins aside, Amy can rest easy at night with the young men that she has raised both on and off the field. “I’m most proud that they remember where they came from, they stay humble, and honor their teammates. I just feel like they're really good people that have grown into their positions and haven't let it go to their head. They're really appreciative of what they've got.” Special thanks to Amy Rogers for taking time for this story and sending some photos. View full article
    2 points
  8. Lewis, Martin, Kirilof, Polanco, Buxton in some order
    2 points
  9. Nagy should have been fired last year, he’s a total abomination of a coach. That was one of the worst 2nd halves I’ve ever seen.
    2 points
  10. Great story. Both Taylor and Tyler are fun to watch pitch. I hope they can keep their success going this season.
    2 points
  11. Maybe they thumb wrestled in the womb with opposite arms . . . or something. Very nice article. Wouldn't they be a nice 1-2 punch to have in your bullpen.
    2 points
  12. I've seen enough of Smeltzer to want him to be included in a trade package or just released. Not a fan.
    2 points
  13. Nice article, but the thought of Smeltzer back on the club does not give me any hope of developing a quality pitching staff. Thorpe, Smeltzer, and Dobnak all looked like they might be something special, but all fell short. Dobnak got his contract, but when we no longer see him in the rotation or stories it will mean we have moved up a level and we need to.
    2 points
  14. Technically, I believe Ryan will still be a rookie in 2022 so, problem solved....
    1 point
  15. Let's see, how would I order that list... 5. Martin. Least familiar, supposedly ranked up there with Lewis. Sounds like a star defensively, hoping he develops more pop with the bat. Who's a better 4th OF, Martin or Celestino? Can Martin play SS? 4. Lewis. For all I've heard about his limitless potential, I've only seen a few clips of him swinging the bat. So much missed time...! Twins need to get him up early, see what he needs to work on. 3. Polanco. The top three are huge here, but Polanco has the most prospects that could take his place: Lewis, Palacio, Martin, 2. Kirilloff. Twins gotta have that bat in the lineup to compete. Hoping he sticks at 1B. Sano could be going bye-bye with his 300k's and so-so defense. I'll take that same defense at 1B with a guy that bangs it off all walls and hits about .285. What was Killer's KO percentage with runners on base? I figure he'll drive in a few more runs with fly balls instead of K's. 1. Buck. With him, they won. Without him, they lost. That was pretty important in 2021. If nothing else, the Saints should have one hell of a team this year.
    1 point
  16. High heat

    Sleepin' On Smeltzer

    His only hope with the Twins is he can go to the bullpen get a tick or two on his FB and can turn himself into a guy like thielbar.
    1 point
  17. Great story, David. Stories like this and Theo's on Joey Stock are what sets TD apart from so many other sports sites--you cover the human element of the game so very well. It makes our fan experience much richer when we get these backstories. Good work..
    1 point
  18. Couple of fleaflickers would've for sure made up a 20 point deficit.
    1 point
  19. Good thing we didn't play the kids!
    1 point
  20. Nagy is a bad, bad coach.
    1 point
  21. As for free agents, I wouldn't want the team to sign anyone they wouldn't want to trade or cut after May 31. I think 2022, for however many games are played, needs to be a development year. I watch more than 150 games a year in that ball park or on TV and I would much rather see rookies and second year players getting development time than wasting AB's and innings on players that won't be around when the team is relevant. And no, I don't think the team can trade for or sign free agents to put themselves into a contending position.
    1 point
  22. How is it that the NFL was able to convince large market teams to share revenue across the board, but somehow MLB teams would be unable to do so? I recognize the national TV deals is a part of that, but guys like Jerry Jones is giving up millions. I think the NFL has done a better job of recognizing that a rising tide raises all boats, and to allow selfish and rich franchises to outspend and poach players from smaller markets is bad business, and bad for the league as a whole. Wake up MLB!
    1 point
  23. Lovely, thanks! I guess handed-ness is not genetic if identical twins throw with opposite hands.
    1 point
  24. In my experience reading Bowden: (a) he tends to throw "hey, this is a thought I had" at the wall without a lot of big-picture consideration; (b) while I tend to be skeptical of excessive claims of "coast bias" in the media, he really does seem to notice and focus on large markets and large contracts a lot more than everything else. He had an article a few weeks back giving "midseason grades" for the offseason, and he basically entirely based his grade ratings on how many contracts or dollars a team had committed, with little deeper analysis of any moves. If you wanna read transaction speculation and analysis for its own sake (which, in a slow lockout season...why not), Bowden can be worth a read, but he's not a particularly reliable or knowledgeable source.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. The sad thing was that the Twins paid he more money for the year than he had ever earned before, or since. They gave him a fair one year contract.
    1 point
  27. A LOOK BACK AT THE CLEVELAND OWNERSHIP Cleveland had a dynamic decade. Playing them was always a daunting task. They have been blessed with outstanding pitchers such as Shane Bieber, Corey Kluber, Trevor Bauer, and Mike Clevinger. The hitting and defense of players like Francisco Lindor, Jose Ramirez, and Carlos Santana moved them swiftly through the playoffs before losing the 2016 World Series to the Cubs. Terry Francona is still at the helm, and there is still solid pitching and Jose Ramirez, but their payroll has been reduced significantly due to several big trades. The Cleveland ball club has not had payrolls this low for over a decade. Their payroll in 2018 was $134 million, per Cot’s. . A year ago, it was just $49 million. Whether those cuts in payroll are because the Dolan family is tired of investing money, or whether they are trying to make the organization more attractive to investors. It might not matter. Either way, a new investment in the franchise could benefit the fans. And the fans could use a break. One of the biggest examples of payroll cutting was the trade of fan-favorite, Francisco Lindor, to the Mets before the 2021 season. While fans in Cleveland were not surprised, it knocked the wind out of the community. USHERING IN A NEW ERA With all the decisions the Dolan family has made, this deal with David Blitzer to become a minority owner seems to be a good one for the Cleveland fans. While he has not invested in baseball yet, there was a whisper of interest regarding buying the Mets before Steve Cohen purchased them. David Blitzer of HBSE is rumored to have acquired a significant stake in the Guardians; some estimate 35%. It was known that co-owner John Sherman needed to sell his 20% because he took partial ownership of another team, the Kansas City Royals, in 2019. But Sportico is reporting that the deal includes another 15%, and includes a path to majority ownership. HBSE is not new to investing in professional teams. David Blitzer seems to have made it his life's work to take over teams that seem to be falling apart or fading quickly. In fact, he took hold of the 76er's (2011) and the New Jersey Devils (2013), breathing new life into their franchises. Neither team has won a title since their acquisition. Still, both teams have remained intensely competitive because Blitzer realizes the value of good players and does not have any issues paying for them. When HBSE took over, the 76ers were in a meager state. During Sam Hinkie's three seasons as General Manager of the 76ers, he was able to acquire strong players, Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, and Dario Saric, that led them to their first playoff run since Blitzer took over. Blitzer's willingness to sink cash into big names (and more importantly, big talent) creates fan bases that have just as much excitement about their teams as the players. The 76ers are relevant again, and players want to play there because they know they will get paid and play to win. BRING BACK THE COMPETITIVE EDGE Let's admit it. Watching the White-Sox win, the division in 2021 told us a lot about the teams in the Central Division. Cleveland's competitiveness has disappeared along with their roster. But Cleveland has a number of hidden strengths. The Guardians are still a competitive team. In 2021, the Guardians won 80 games last year, despite the fact that most of the veterans had either been traded or spent time on the Injured List. If Blitzer has a say in player acquisition and retention, he could create a dangerous lineup, comparable to what he did with the 76ers and the Devils. A good veteran core, along with the Guardians' coaching staff, could make a team that could stay strong for years. Cleveland has a solid farm system. MLB.com ranked Cleveland as the #13 farm system in MLB this last August, specifically calling out the amount of talent they have age 21 years old and younger. That is rare for an organization nearing the end of their competitive window. It either gives them a head start if they decide to do a full rebuild, or trade assets if they decide to reload. Cleveland could use a culture change. New ownership for the Guardians could bring about a huge culture change. Blitzer's staff is known for shaking things up from coaching to players. The teams Blitzer has invested in ended up producing large fan bases, strong player core, and culture for corporate ownership. The fan base has slowly dwindled over the years as fans lost faith in the front office and, subsequently, the team. If there is one thing about the Ohio fan base, they are loyal, and what teams put into them, they give back ten-fold. The Guardians just got a new name and are proposing a $435 million stadium renovation that would include a new lease for fifteen years. With a complete stadium renovation and re-branding, this is a huge opportunity to get fans back in the seats at Progressive Field. Some empty seats were due to the pandemic, the team ranked 21st this past season in attendance. Corporate ownership, or investment, can have its perks when it comes to ownership: more money, more growth opportunities, and an overall better atmosphere. Given their struggles with payroll, and several other hidden advantages that the Guardians have, bringing Blitzer and his investment team into Cleveland’s ownership group could bring resources and stability the franchise and their fan base has craved. It could be very good news for the Guardians. And bad news for the Twins.
    1 point
  28. My only hope on the availability of Michael Pineda, maybe for even less than the Twins signed him for in seasons past, is the lack of interest they got for him during the trade deadline. That, along, would've made me sign soon and fast once the season ended, if I was Michael. Unless his agent knows something I don't. The Twins also seem to have a dire need for a stopgap at shortstop. I don't see them moving Polanco there at all. Gordon could be a possibility. Wil they trust him? Is Lewis or Martin truly the shortstop of the future and at what point do you play them in 2022. Would you start either at short instead of Gordon out of spring training? Even Palacios hasn't had much AAA experience. The Twins have a lot of prospect rotation arms, but I just don't see any making a major impact in 2022 because al need to get their game up with innings pitched, as well as pushing past the fifth inning. How they do that fighting for time in St. Paul is Wichita will also be a delight to watch. But then, who comes out and pitches in the bigs.
    1 point
  29. It is the Lance Lynn effect. The team is gun shy after the mediocrity and black cloud that Lynn was when he was here.
    1 point
  30. Fascinating conversations, I am thankful sites like TD make possible these discussions, and a community like TD that is invested in making them interesting. I am not able to contribute much to the macroeconmics side of things, but am glad to have a place to make a fool of myself trying. And it says something that discussions about the CBA are more interesting than watching most MLB games. Plenty of problems to address, and you guys are hitting on so many of them. I just found this one small piece of the pie interesting: In 2021, the 50 highest-paid players are getting 33.4% of all salaries, up from 28.6% in 2017, and the 100 highest-paid are receiving 52.4%, an increase from 42.5% in 2017, which is 6% and 12 % respectively of the total MLB roster player pool. (sourced Assoc Press reporting). This is not good for MLB imho. Miggie, Pujols, Strasbourg, et al? So cap the contract length. But pay the younger guys who are producing. Why should a rookie who breaks through not be looking at league median salaries for year 2? Make them arb eligible if necessary. Establish a hard floor for salaries. Is there any franchise that could not manage right now a 125M floor? 150? Redistribute national tv monies., whatever is needed, including contracting non-complying franchises. Do not expand franchises. There are too many marginal players rostered as it is. Diluting the quality of the talent is no way to improve the game. Stop manipulating balls for homeruns, or goo, for spin rates. Just stop. It's just BS. Upgrade MiLB salaries. The enormous bonus discrepancies should be redressed. Why in the name of Thor would a MLB franchise want to sign an 18 year old for multiple millions when the chances of that person actually contributing to the success of your franchise are somewhere on the order of 10 percent at the most? And then pay the 1st year rookie who does break out minimum ? Makes no sense. And if we are talking about fair distribution of revenue for employees, the office and administrative staffing need to be in the conversation as well, and while we are at it, the pension funding for retired MLB players, especially those who played pre-FA years. Lets not pretend today's players are not standing on the shoulders of the previous generations, as are the current owners. MLB is privileged to drive their business on the fumes of the cultural cache that is baseball in America. If the owners and players cant see that I can only say I feel badly for them. Because right now the game they are producing is a tedious borefest. Without the cultural symbols and mythology built up around the sport, MLB would have to compete with other entertainment options solely on the quality of its product. That is to say, not compete at all. Both sides can argue for eons about sharing revenue percentages, but if they refuse to take into account that their product exists largely within the imaginative experience their fanbase, they will never make game itself more accessible and enjoyable for the fans. I used to think that was the bottom line, but these days I am no longer certain.
    1 point
  31. Yes, as I noted initially, the huge market teams are not going to like revenue sharing. Just like the Cowboys lose lots of revenue in the NFL. It is the price to be part of a LEAGUE of competitive teams. Hard cap, hard floor cannot work fairly without full, or nearly full, revenue sharing. I admit that, and yet endorse the move. Will it happen, unlikely. But we were discussing, I think, what would be ideal. I don't think any Royals or Pirates fan goes into a given season with any near the hopes and expectations as a Yankees or Red Sox or Dodgers fan enjoys. Can it happen, sure, but not a fair playing field at all. Not sure why the players would object if they were guaranteed the same amount of salaries/revenue, or an increase each year for inflation or whatever. Might it cost the very elite players some money, possibly, but is that a bad thing overall? Wouldn't the average player enjoy the raise, and wouldn't there be more average players? If you had 10% of players taking a net reduction in future income, and 50% getting a net increase, wouldn't it pass an MLBPA vote quite easily?
    1 point
  32. Well thought out response. I've followed the Twins and MLB for nearly 60 years. Yes that makes me old. But not too old to remember when the game was the number one sport and a pleasure to watch and follow. The game has become nearly unwatchable the past few years. The fact the players and owners knew this was coming a couple of years ago had plenty of time to work out a new deal. Yes it's cliche but true: Billionaire owners arguing with millionaire ballplayers. It's ridiculous. These people think that they are the only thing that matters in our lives. Most people live in the real world. Working for a living for them and their families not living in a fantasy world of professional high priced sports in this case MLB. I may be the only one. But if there is a delay in the season or loss of games due to a work stoppage I think it will never rebound this time. At least they won't have me anymore. These owners and players care ONLY for themselves. Fans? Who cares? We are just used as pawns.
    1 point
  33. If Jax's future is as a reliever, I would hope they start him out in the pen at Rochester.
    1 point
  34. This is not about money for the owners, it is about power. Any owner can produce a budget that reflects income minus costs to leave the bottom line reasonably close to their desired line. If certain owners feel that the business of baseball ownership is not worth their investment they could sell their position in a heartbeat. If the owners feel as a group that there needs to be some sharing of economic resources for a common purpose, they need to work those details out within their consortium of MLB owners. The PA has a concern for those players whose careers are still worthy due to production who are set aside for players working at the minimum salary. The idea of a franchise tanking does not sit well with the PA even as it offers economic benefits and a chance to regroup to an owner. The minimum wage players also offer a chance for improved production in the future, but this comes at a short term cost of less competitive baseball, in some views. Their other concerns are mostly undefined. A shortened time, perhaps small, before arbitration and a year less of control should create some movement in bargaining. I wonder if the PA might consider a significant raise in the initial three years of team control as a benefit for their members. A prolonged work stoppage and the interruption of the MLB season will cost both sides, but be particularly difficult for those players whose careers are short. The system currently in place cannot just be blown up and looking to other professional leagues is problematic at best. The PA should be focused on the average salary rising at a commensurate level with baseball's growth in revenues and owners should be focused on the growth of their investment through attendance and fan participation (media). Currently, it seems, both sides are looking past each other and seem short-sighted in regards to growing baseball as a product. As just one example, I would think that the PA would be interested in seeing MLB expand by two teams in the near future. Two additional markets would also benefit the owners. In any event, if the two sides are actually interested in a quick resolution there is ample time for discussion and a host of ideas to exchange to resolve the current chasm. The importance of peace seems particularly important in light of 2020 and the lost participation of fans due to Covid. Any significant further loss of games will find a wider public populace increasingly comfortable with their own summer activities that do not include MLB. It is much easier to find something to do on a beautiful summer evening than during the cold darkness of a January night.
    1 point
  35. To be fair to Sabato, he has shown very good strike zone recognition, which is a really good skill to have. The question on him after his horrid stretch in low A is will he make enough contact; in high A's small sample size he looked like a serious hitter. But I think the Rooker comp isn't unfair until he shows he can make enough consistent contact on pitches in the zone to really make that prodigious power play
    1 point
  36. Dman

    2022 = Development Year

    Yeah I think I am with you. They need to at least start with some more experienced pitching IMO. I might have a pie in the sky view but I think we can compete while playing some of the younger guys too. Ober and Ryan kept us in games as rookies I think other guys they have can as well. Starting pitching and the pen need a fair bit of work next year to compete. They solve that and I think this team can compete for the division but they need to pitch much, much better than last year. If guys in the minors stay healthy they should have better depth options this year. I don't think this team is that far away so while I wouldn't bring in a ton of guys I also wouldn't just play all the rookie pitchers either. They need to to at least start the season with some experienced pitching. Position player wise you have Buxton and Kepler in the outfield with your choice of Rooker, Larnach, Kirilloff and Celestino in left. One of those guys should be good enough to get the job done. Middle infield is Donaldson, Polanco, Sano with Arraez filling in. They just need to find a Shortstop but should be able to find a stop gap guy somewhere. Catcher is Garver, Rortvedt and Jeffers. Not much is going to change there. Possibly Miranda could fill in somewhere depending on injury and if Lewis starts out hot he could be a guy that helps with his speed and defense. The offense was right around a top ten offense despite the poor play from some rookies and fill in's. I don't think there is too much to worry about there. Pitching needs to improve for the team to improve. Find that and this team is ready to compete IMO.
    1 point
  37. To be fair, a lot has to go right to get 8 or even 9. But yeah, there's some value there, I wouldn't argue that. To me though, it really comes down to how you use a lost game. Do you play the starters and try to win, or do you accept it for what it is and give the younger players some playing time and a chance to develop. That's technically tanking, but I also think it's the right answer and not even close. The draft spot is potentially a consolation prize.
    1 point
  38. I think you need a hard cap and a hard floor along with some sort of revenue sharing to allow the smaller markets to spend at the top of the cap consistently. Minor league wages need to be fixed. Given the way analytics has changed the game, I suspect minimum salaries will need to go up considerably and the time to FA will need to drop a bit. Those are the big ones.
    1 point
  39. I knew I was forgetting something. Yeah, service time manipulation needs to end. It should be easy enough to accomplish in a couple of steps: - Require a minimum call-up time, just as there's a minimum re-call time now. Maybe 10 days? 15? That fixes the reliever and spot starter shuffle problem. Teams can still shuffle rosters but the players are compensated much better and teams must be more mindful of how they're shuffling players and for what reason. - Reduce the number of qualifying days for one season to something like 120 days with no season-to-season carryover. If a player is called up on June 1st but spend the entire rest of the season on the MLB roster, that's roughly a full season of service time. Then it resets the next year and if that player spends another 120 days on an MLB roster, he gets another full season of service time. Front offices would still be able to game the system but it'd be a lot harder and a lot more detrimental to on-field talent to do so.
    1 point
  40. Using percentage of revenue for the spending floor sounds good in theory. The problem is it requires owners to open up their books. I assume many, if not all, will fight tooth and nail to ensure their finances are not public knowledge. They will most likely rather set an arbitrary number like $75 million. In regards to increasing the pre-arb salary, I completely agree. I’m all for getting money to the players earlier in their careers.
    1 point
  41. Players on the 40 person roster are members of the MLBPA, I believe. The 14-15 players on this list who are not on the active MLB roster are seemingly members without benefits. Perhaps someone can correct this perception. I would suggest Year 1 salaries for the first time on the 40 person roster and include these players on the minimum contract. This avoids the misuse of service time, at least in some cases. An increase in years 1-3 would also help to some degree. What that looks like should be negotiated. Would $1 M, $2 M, $3 M be out of bounds? A concern that will be nearly impossible to allay is the loss of contracts in recent years by players in a mid zone salary in favor of minimum salaried players. Perhaps the larger salaries in years 2 and 3 addresses that concern. You raise some interesting points. The PA cannot expect to gain back everything they gave away. The owners cannot gain anything by shutting down the game Hopefully cooler heads will prevail. A floor could be quite low and still work. A floor of $60-70 million averaged over 3 years seems reasonable. A luxury tax at $210 million seems plenty high. Higher salaries in control years may mitigate some concerns by PA. It does seem the years of control before a team must choose to place a player on the 40 person roster should be reduced. Baseball has a host of issues to resolve and there is a massive amount of money being haggled over. I wonder if the anti-trust reserve clause exemption has become an impediment for the sport.
    1 point
  42. Thank god we didn't get our best player a record that was meaningful to him or a higher draft pick! Way more important that we got that meaningless win!
    0 points
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