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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/14/2021 in all areas

  1. Ryan was traded for on July 29, pitched in the Olympics and then reported to the Twins on August 15. He’s been a Twin for a month. How much molding and team building happen in a month? he’s 25…
    6 points
  2. My read on the guy is that he's impulsive but humble enough to know it's a problem. I think he'll grow out of this sort of thing.
    6 points
  3. Especially if New York and Boston end up watching the whole postseason on TV.
    6 points
  4. I don't think I'd include any of these three in a list of "underrated." To first determine who is under or over rated, we kind of have to have a ratings system. And, that has to do with how fans perceive a player's value to the team and what it should be and then where that player is. So, here would be my rankings: 1.) Miguel Sano - There are still people who think that he is a terrible player. Meanwhile, in his last 75 games, he has hit .244/.321/.496 (.817) with 16 doubles and 17 home runs. "But he strikes out too much!" Yes, he does, but his 34.7% K% is the lowest of his career, and with today's game, he has played in a career-high games. I get that his defensive metrics haven't been good and his overall numbers still don't look great, I do think he's a bit underrated especially when you look at what he has done during his career, which include a couple of legit good seasons, an All Star appearance and 157 homers. 2.) Josh Donaldson - People continue to talk about all his missed time due to his leg injuries or his lack of production. However, he is behind only Jorge Polanco and Andrelton Simmons in games played. He's second in plate appearances. He's also hitting .249/.348/.470 (.818) with 21 doubles and 22 homers. His defense certainly has taken a step or two backwards due to the lack of speed and range, but his offense has been good. 3.) Mitch Garver - I continue to hear from people asking if Garver is any good or if he'll ever hit again. Yes, last year was a bad year, but he only played like 25 games, and yes, he struggled in April. In his last 44 games of the 2021 season - which was on both sides of a pretty gruesome injury - he has hit .279/.408/.612 (1.020) with 10 doubles and 11 homers. He also returned to having more plate discipline. And, what he did in 2019 was amazing. That would be my three, and I certainly don't expect everyone to agree with it.
    6 points
  5. Where is my love, Ian Gibaut, when he is needed?
    5 points
  6. I’m so ****ing sick and tired of this stupid ****ing baseball season.
    5 points
  7. Or, lets play 1.555... as the case may be.
    5 points
  8. The Hicks and Cave trades are good examples of the differences between a top-tier and second-tier MLB club. In each case, the Yankees assessed areas of organizational strength and used surplus prospects to acquire high-upside players who were sold low. Pretty clear how both of these turned out for the Twins, despite different FO staff at the helm. One wonders why Falvey and Levine can't do the same with Rooker, Jeffers or Larnach, or couldn't have done so with Wade or Baddoo. But it's these kinds of moves that separate the best from the also-rans.
    5 points
  9. Cave has done himself no favors this year by trying to play hurt (if indeed that has been the issue--given the vast difference between his stats in 2019/2020 and this year, I am inclined to believe that). When healthy, I think Jake Cave is a very good 4th outfielder. That said, I don't think 4th outfielders are something a team should have to resort to trades in order to acquire, and they certainly shouldn't give up pitching prospects to do it.
    5 points
  10. Doubleheaders. I love doubleheaders. Except when they're only 7 innings per game; then I only like them. But I digress. I wish MLB would go back to scheduled doubleheaders. It's an easy way to keep the quantity of games and still condense the schedule. As a fan, I imagine that I wouldn't be alone in making a day of it in and around the ballpark. My love for doubleheaders goes back to my playing days as a young lad. What more can a kid want than to play baseball all day long? Traveling and playing doubleheaders was even better. On our way home, we'd often stop at a Zorbaz somewhat on the way and we'd load up on nachos and pizza and hang out by the lake a while. Lots of fond memories from those summer weekend tournaments, nachos and pizza. Oddly enough, perhaps my favorite doubleheader memory is a more recent occurrence that doesn't involve traveling, pizza or playing baseball. Having only known indoor home baseball up to that point in my life, I had never seen a MLB doubleheader in person. As it turned out, neither had my dad. Nor had Target Field. Which all brings me to May 8th, 2010. A Saturday twin bill versus the Orioles of Baltimore. And as fortune would have it, I already had tickets for one of the games. How much more perfect could this opportunity possibly be? I suppose that it could have involved pizza, but one can't have everything? So, I asked my dad if he wanted to partake in the first doubleheader at Target Field. As I recall, it didn't require a lot of arm twisting. Game day arrives. We sojourned downtown for a pre-doubleheader burger and a beer lunch, talking baseball the whole time. Game 1 featured a pitching matchup of Jeremy Guthrie v Francisco Liriano. Not the most exciting pitching matchup, but it was what it was. The hometown 9 dropped the opener 7-3. Local squad scoring provided off homers by Morneausy and Cuddy. Having time to kill, we exited the ballpark and decided to spend the afternoon eating nachos and beer at the Hard Rock Cafe, which was still in the now long defunct Block E across from Target Center. While there, we noticed many other fans doing the same thing and enjoying the nice May day. We were still talking mostly baseball with the occasional detour of jabbing the guys at the next table about how much beer they're drinking and how they're going to have to spend the rest of the afternoon in line for the restroom. There would be some irony there for my dad. I won't go into details... Game 2 featured a Kevin Millwood v Scott Baker dual. Baker tossed 8 innings of 1 R ball to best Millwood's 7 innings while allowing 3 runs himself. Delmon Young had a big night with a 3-hit, 2-RBI night. Drew Butera even chipped in with two RBI himself to help give the Twins a 6-1 W. Full of nachos and to a lesser extent beer, we made our way home after a long, but very enjoyable day of baseball and the memories to go with it. Interestingly enough, both of these games were two and a half hours long. Those were the days! Now to today's doubleheader, the Soon to be Guardians of Cleveland and the Twins of Minnesota square off starting at 2:10 local time! Grab your nachos, pizza and beer! Lineups for Game 1: The Visiting 9: On the bump - Triston McKenzie, RHP CF - Straw, RHB SS - Rosario, RHB DH - Reyes, RHB 1B - Bradley, LHB LF - Ramirez, RHB RF - Zimmer, LHB C - Hedges, RHB 2B - Gimenez, LHB The Hometown 9: On the bump - Joe Ryan, RHP 3B - Arraez, LHB CF - Buxton, RHB DH - Polanco, SHB RF - Kepler, LHB 1B - Sano, RHB 2B - Gordon, LHB LF - Refsnyder, RHB C - Rortvedt, LHB SS - Simmons, RHB Game 2 lineups to follow.
    4 points
  11. Mr Ryan seems a bit high strung and partially full of himself. Didn't even make a reflexive move to make a play. Doesn't wait for the trainer or anyone else, to pull himself from the game. Even if he knew he shattered his wrist, he could have followed a more familiar protocol. I know he's a confident pitcher. I know he knew he wasn't going to be able to continue. But come on, you have to at least act like you are team member. Maybe he's just what we need. soeone to cut through the bulldung.
    4 points
  12. Gil has quite an arm. This kind of arm should not be traded at 19 years old, especially for a 4th outfielder. Not sure any of us needs hindsight to make this claim. Live young arm for a 25 yr old 4th outfielder. Wasn't wise then, and looks worse now.
    4 points
  13. As far as I can tell he’s healthy now and he was healthy in 2020... I don’t see him suddenly turning back into what he was in 2018/19. He’s striking out about as much as Sano this year and has worse plate discipline... and that’s not to mention his frustrating fielding. There will be many superior 4th OF options out there, I see no reason to retain him.
    4 points
  14. Nice to see Miranda bounce back after a mini slump. He got his slugging percentage back up this week. Celestino took some lumps with the big club, but you gotta like the grit he has shown in bouncing back.
    4 points
  15. That's it... I might just bet on a sports game for the first time in 2022 and put money on the Yankees every single time they play the Twins. Either I will make a profit since the Twins are guaranteed to poop themselves every time they play New York, or I will break the Twins' horrible streak by losing money. A win-win, perhaps.
    4 points
  16. Nice that we still got a taste of Twins playoff baseball even in a non-playoff year, That loss would fit right into the streak.
    4 points
  17. Luis Arraez has a career .313 AVG / .376 OBP / .781 OPS, while playing essentially league average defense at multiple positions. He's also 24 years old and under team control until 2026. That seems like a pretty underrated player to me. I truly don't understand how that is overated for the type of player and role he plays.
    4 points
  18. Not only that but he escorted him around.
    3 points
  19. Yeah, the Yankees are not the team I'm going to take culture clues from. Besides, "no beards" is a control over appearance; not a mandate on behavior
    3 points
  20. We got lucky. Hopefully he doesn't even miss a start.
    3 points
  21. That's a relief. Still sucks A LOT, but better than breaking something.
    3 points
  22. I have tried to survive this lost year by focusing my attention on the few bright spots that might mean good things in the season(s) to come. When I learned about Ryan getting hit on the wrist, I thought once again about how snakebitten this team is. Yesterday the Yankees felt so bad about playing the Twins, they spotted us five runs to start the game and the Twins still couldn't win. I'm glad Ryan's x-rays were negative, but I don't know how much more of this I can take.
    3 points
  23. Sure, but if Ryan is legit, that hurts to lose him for a rental who hasn't played particularly well for them. Still, I hope Tampa goes deep into the postseason and faces the Jays in the ALCS. Who wins from there, I don't care.
    3 points
  24. I really like this Joe Ryan guy.
    3 points
  25. Hard to have a good comment here. Nothing against Jake, but he is not what I want in a fourth OF. I will wait to see Gil in the future before saying who won or loss.
    3 points
  26. The electronic zone does change based on the hitter and is not a static zone. It is also used to grade umpires on their calls by MLB. If MLB uses the system to determine if the ump is doing well at calling balls and strikes why do they not use it to actually call balls and strikes? There was a study done several years ago, and it showed that one, umpires got the borderline calls right about 50%, so better than a coin toss. Two, it showed that on those calls if they had called it prior, they were less likely to call it again. Also, more umps were less likely to call them for a third strike. What the study showed was umps would think about the count, the situation, and history to make the calls. It is one of the hardest jobs in the world to do, but the league could take those human elements out of the game and get the right call all the time. It will happen one day, I just hope sooner than later. If it is a strike it should be called that way, no matter the score, the count, home team, the hitter or the pitcher. None of that should influence the call, but studies show it does.
    3 points
  27. So your answer to a post about inherited talent (to which you frequently erred in assessing to add a cherry on top) was to compare 2017 to 2021 when no one is making that argument? The Twins were not left with much talent. What was done to get to 2019 and 2020's significant improvement is owed largely to savvy moves that dramatically improved the team by this FO. The 2021 failure is due to a lot of crappy moves by that same FO that EVERYONE AGREES WERE CRAPPY. I hope the all caps puts that twisted argument to bed. Sarcastic ass memes would be less necessary if we all stayed inside reality. Anyone celebrating the state of the post-2016 Twins on the pitching front isn't doing that. It's the entire point of contention and it is demonstrably nonsensical.
    3 points
  28. In agree. Two truths are at play here: 1) pitchers should not have their livelihoods impacted by human error. Even the best umpires get 5-10% of ball/strike calls wrong. Unacceptable. Baseball is a game of inches (or less), and precision tools are needed. It makes sense that Duffey is angry. 2) for over two decades, the Twins have played with a loser's mentality. It's bigger than Rocco and the current staff. When the pressure is on, the team folds. 0-18 in the playoffs, and a .205 winning percentage in Yankee Stadium is the outcome. They're not a big-boy team, and they need to figure THIS out as they retool the rotation. It seems like part of this is that we fans just don't demand that this change. We accept and excuse poor results, time and time again. We're midwesterners - we're often humble, understanding and we don't expect all that much. And not all that much changes. This was one dumb game in a lost season, sure. But this one pretty much exemplified the fault line of this franchise.
    3 points
  29. Seeing where "Pitch #6" to Gardner was according to the illustration, it doesn't look like such a horrible call... A missed call, but very borderline. It's also OK to then not give up the three-run homer... even though (presumably) everybody knew that's exactly what was going to hit.
    3 points
  30. That would be a hard play for 75% of MLB centerfielders. Buxton made it look boring.
    2 points
  31. It’s still only two pitchers
    2 points
  32. a-wan

    How quickly we Forget

    I am just happy Rob Antony isn’t making decisions anymore.
    2 points
  33. 0-0 after 2. (Circus Boy Update as of old)
    2 points
  34. Low expectations: the secret to meeting them.
    2 points
  35. Dang this kid is something else. Pissed for not protecting himself. I think we got a good one here.
    2 points
  36. Box Score Starting Pitcher: Ryan 5.0 IP, 3 H, 1 R, 1 ER, 1 BB, 5 K Homeruns: None Bottom 3 WPA: Coulombe -.401, Arraez -.147, Buxton -.125 Win Probability Chart (via FanGraphs) After a frustrating loss in the Bronx on Monday, the Twins returned home for a double-header against Cleveland. Anticipation was as high as it could be for a losing team so late in the season, as Joe Ryan looked to follow up his exceptional previous start. Here is how the Twins lined up for game one. Any doubts that seeing him last week would suddenly render Cleveland more able to see Joe Ryan’s fastball were quickly erased by his first two innings of work. Aside from a Harold Ramirez double, Cleveland managed four fly-outs and two strikeouts against Joe Flow, lowering his ERA to 1.93. The Twins, however, established little threat of their own, with a Max Kepler walk providing their only baserunner through two innings (before he was picked off at first base). As Mike Petriello noted, however, Ryan’s pitch mix was significantly different from his last outing. He mixed in more breaking and off-speed pitches, keeping Cleveland’s hitters off balance. After Ben Rortvedt led off the third inning with a single, Andrelton Simmons doubled him home on a line drive to the outfield which was badly misjudged by Harold Ramirez. The Twins took a 1-0 lead after a failed Cleveland challenge. Bradley Zimmer tied the game in the top of the fifth, crushing an off-speed left up over the plate into the second deck in right field. Disaster struck for the Twins in the sixth. Myles Straw hit a 93 mph line drive right back at Joe Ryan, striking him on his pitching hand. Ryan couldn’t field the ball and immediately walked off the mound and field of play. Although Ryan was able to walk off under his own power, he looked visibly frustrated, slamming his glove into the dugout. Twins fans will anxiously await news on a player who has been one of the few bright spots in a season marred by underperformance and injury. Ryan was replaced by Jorge Alcala in the sixth inning. Alcala quickly retired the side, sending the game to the bottom of the sixth. The Twins unraveled defensively in the top of the seventh. Harold Ramirez singled on a ground ball which Jorge Polanco missed. He advanced to second on a passed ball by Ben Rortvedt before an Austin Hedges double and a Luis Arraez error at third base gave Cleveland a 3-1 lead. Emmanuel Clase came on to close the game for Cleveland, dropping the Twins to 63-82. Shortly after the game, Rocco Baldelli that x-rays performed on Joe Ryan came back negative. Bullpen Usage Chart FRI SAT SUN MON TUE TOT Minaya 40 0 17 0 0 57 Coulombe 0 23 0 0 27 50 Duffey 11 0 0 38 0 49 Farrell 0 12 0 34 0 46 Colomé 12 0 0 27 0 39 Moran 0 0 37 0 0 37 Thielbar 0 26 0 11 0 37 Alcalá 9 0 18 0 8 35 Barraclough 0 0 0 23 0 23 Garza Jr. 0 0 11 6 0 17 Next Up Game 2 of the double header begins at 6:40 CST. On Wednesday, the Twins continue their series with Cleveland. Griffin Jax will take on Cal Quantrill. First pitch is at 6:40 CST Postgame Interviews - Coming soon
    2 points
  37. Let's lose two and maintain our draft position!
    2 points
  38. 2 points
  39. No, my argument is pretty pointed so I don't think angst is an app description. Annoyance is more accurate, but I suppose that was the reaction you intended to elicit, so congrats, you win the internet. Why is this hard? It's about the staff this FO rolled out to begin their tenure vs right now. I don't care how many awful TR staffs you lump into this meaningless league average argument. They're straight up lists. Nothing more. Why would I bang the drum for Santiago or Colon? It's a snapshot of where this team is/was at each moment. Remove Berrios from the sure fire major leaguer list and say they only had 2 in the '17 rotation, but that's still 2 more than they currently have. All three of the "good not great," bullpen arms would've been the best arm the current pen has. For those of you who don't believe this FO inherited any talent it should be even less excusable that the current group doesn't stack up. Again, sell me on the future. Who knows maybe some of the wishful thinking comes to fruition; I hope it does. They clearly weren't gifted a championship, and I haven't seen a single post that suggests they were. We can probably put the hyperbolic statements to bed right? Selectively choosing where to attribute developmental success isn't a road worth traveling.
    2 points
  40. Aaron Whitefield didn't play baseball until he was 17. He's now a key contributor to the winningest team in the 2021 Twins' organization and has no plans of stopping there. Dive into the life of an elite teenage baseball prospect, and you'd likely stumble across words like Division One offers, top club programs, and Perfect Game showcases. Perhaps you'd see their name at the top of recruiting websites, videos on Hudl, and maybe even a baseball card or two sprinkled in. For Twins' prospect Aaron Whitefield? Not so much. Born and raised in Brisbane, Australia, baseball wasn't a cornerstone in Whitefield's life the way it is for many boys who grow up to be pro ballplayers in the United States. "Occasionally, I'd watch Yankees and Red Sox when they were on TV when I was younger, but before that, there was nothing, no baseball," Whitefield said. In fact, Whitefield first picked up a baseball at age 17. You read that right. Not seven, but 17. Like many good parents, Whitefield's parents put him in various sports as a child to help him improve as an athlete and find his passion. The result was a young Aussie who played soccer, rugby, and fastpitch softball. The latter of those came as a byproduct of rugby injuries. "I started playing softball when I was going through some rugby injuries at 13 or 14," Whitefield said. "That eventually helped the conversion to baseball, but at the time, I still hadn't touched a baseball." That conversion took place when a Cincinnati Reds scout approached the 17-year-old Whitefield at a national fastpitch softball tournament. "I was at a national fastpitch softball tournament, and a scout who was there told me that I should try playing baseball for a year," Whitefield recalled. "Then I met a guy from my hometown who had already signed to play baseball in the US named Connor MacDonald." MacDonald and his family helped Aaron mold his softball skills to baseball, both on and off the field. "(The MacDonald's) are a beautiful family. They helped me to where I am today," Whitefield said. "Connor's dad helped me with not only the physical side of baseball but the mental side as well." In just a year after learning arguably one of the most complex sports out there, Aaron signed his first professional contract with the Minnesota Twins in 2015 at the ripe age of 18. Ups and Downs After a brief stint of games in 2015, Whitefield played his first full minor league baseball season in 2016 with the Gulf Coast League Twins. Whitefield game out with a bang, posting a .298/.370/.366 (.737) slash line in 51 games. 2017 was no different, with Whitefield slashing .262/.318/.414 (.732) in 151 games for Class A Cedar Rapids. After two successful seasons, Whitefield hit a rut in 2018 and 2019, posting just a .205 batting average with stints in Rookie Ball, Single-A, Double-A, and a brief tenure with the Twins. Not the greatest duo of years for an organization looking for outfielders that can also hit. Yet 2021 has been a beacon of light for Whitefield, who has been consistent at the plate all year. The Aussie slashed .306/.358/.458 in the month of May and,297/.381/.374 in June. The resurgence is something that Aaron credits to finding a routine, something he observed from his peers. "Watching guys that I've played with like (Alex) Kirilloff, (Trevor) Larnach, Travis Blankenhorn, I got to watch what made them successful, and it was sticking with their routine every day, whether they went 0-for-4 or 4-for-4," Whitefield said. "That was something that I hadn't done until this year." It's no secret that baseball is as mental of a sport as it is physical. The ability to stay grounded with a consistent approach to preparation and hitting has kept Whitefield sound through the good and bad. "The last couple of years in the minors, I feel like I'd do really well for a week or two, and then I'd hit a downfall and didn't know how to get out of that," he recalled. "Now, whether I have one, or two bad games, I'm gonna get back in there, reset, but the routine for every game is going to be the same. That's the biggest reason why I've been able to find success and be consistent this year. Baseball is a game of consistency, mental consistency as well." That routine consists of some of the old-fashioned tactics that are commonplace in professional ball; tee work, flips, angled flips, and other cage work. However, one thing differs for Whitefield; he doesn't take on-field batting practice before games unless he's playing at a new ballpark with an unfamiliar batter's eye. "I don't actually hit BP on the field so I can focus more on hitting low line drives," Whitefield said. "If I hit BP on the field, I tend to get a bit pull-happy." After referencing the similarities between his batting practice routine and Shohei Ohtani's, Whitefield chuckled back with, "Hopefully, I can hit as many homers as him someday." Whitefield may not be the Bomba-machine that Shohei is, but the guy knows how to get on base. His 11 doubles, four triples, and 30 stolen bases speak for themselves. Whitefield's commitment to his routine will prove critical as ever as the season nears an end. Despite a recent slump, Whitefield has posted hits in his last two games and looks to finish the season strong. Aussie Brethren Twins' fans know well that Whitefield isn't the only Aussie that has shown success in the organization. Names like Lewis Thorpe, Grant Balfour, Liam Hendricks, and Luke Hughes have become commonplace in recent franchise history. Whitefield credits players like Hughes in helping him develop as a pro ballplayer. Yet in a sport that idolizes names like Mantle, Mays, and Ruth, Whitefield's podium of heroes looks a bit different. Names like former Brewer David Nillson, who coached Whitefield and honed in on his mental game, pop up on his Mount Rushmore. Stefan Welch, a former St. Louis Cardinals organization player, and former Seattle pitcher Ryan Rowland-Smith (a former Twins Rule 5 draft pick) serve as just a few names in Australian baseball lore that have inspired Whitefield. "I came into the game late, and I didn't know anything, so they were like the Derek Jeter's and David Ortiz's for me," Whitefield said. "They helped me become a baseball player a lot earlier than I should have been in the sense that guys begin playing this sport at age five. I was 15 years late." As Wichita dukes their way through the final six games of the year, Whitefield is excited for the Surge's quest towards a division title. Wichita sits three full games ahead of Frisco (Texas Rangers) as they head into their final series against Arkansas. And while the immediate goal revolves around winning games each night, Aaron has his sights set on reaching MLB play again. Whitefield knows that he doesn't have the extensive background that many of his peers have. That doesn't matter to him. "I think a lot of people forget how long that I've played baseball. My first two years, I was getting attention as a notable prospect, yet those were my first two years ever playing the sport," Whitefield said. "Then I had two bad years, and people were like 'ah this guy doesn't have it anymore.' This year is my sixth year of baseball, so kind of like coming out of playing high school and college. I want to show people that I can hit. My defense is there." Whitefield knows that he saw time with the Twins in 2019 because of his skills in the field and on the base path. Aaron knows the next step is proving that he can be a force at the plate, something he's confident he can accomplish through his new tactics. "I got up there because of my ability to base run and play defense; I need to show the Twins that I can be consistent at the plate, and my routine is huge for that." Check out more Twins Daily content on Aaron Whitefield! Get To Know: OF/2B Aaron Whitefield Aaron Whitefield: From Softball Diamonds to Diamond in the Rough Twins Spotlight: Aaron Whitefield View full article
    2 points
  41. I'm excited to see Ryan pitch, of course, but the second game looks... awful, frankly. Ish.
    2 points
  42. The Twins should have never let Robbie Grossman go and kept him instead of Cave, or kept both, as the year they were both on the team Cave had more HR pop but Grossman had a better BA.
    2 points
  43. As far as I'm aware, the Twins have transacted two trades with SF--one sent Davis, Berroa, and Teng for Dyson. While Dyson was a disaster, that was injury related, and none of the players the Twins sent have amounted to much. Davis has a 32 wRC+ in parts of 3 seasons with the Giants, and is 27--we have a better, younger option in Brent Rooker. Berros is 21 in Low A, and has a nice 3.28 ERA, and has struck out 133 in 96 innings--but has also walked 48. Teng is 22 in High A, and has a pedestrian 4.57 ERA, and while he's struck out 130 in 88 innings, he's walked 52. Neither of them look like more than organizational filler at this point (that could obviously change). Hardly a fleecing. The Anderson for Wade trade is clearly a bad one--that happens to even the best FO's (witness the Twins nabbing Odorizzi from the Rays for Palacios). That said--Wade is already 27, there's already some potential erosion in his contact rates. He still only has 300ish PA's on the season because he's completely unusable against lefties (.376 OPS, 32.4% k rate, NINE wRC+--he's been so bad SF has only given him 37 PA's all year against lefties). So essentially you're saying SF fleeced us by getting a 27 year old platoon corner outfielder (he has 13 innings in center this year, with a -117 UZR/150--SSS), at a position group where the Twins should have better options in Kiriloff, Larnach, Celestino, Lewis (maybe), Arraez, and Buxton (hopefully) for the next 3-5 years? The issue isn't that we traded Wade, it's that we didn't identify the right player to get in return.
    2 points
  44. It's stuff like that makes discussions impossible. It's either the Twins had no pitching when the new guys took over or they had a great pitching system. It's either you think the FO is doing well or you think they are clueless idiots. Jesus. Everyone has to go to extremes. No one ever wants to concede or even accept the other side might have a point.
    2 points
  45. Pitchers and Batters DESERVE the border line calls the most! This is what their special talents are for, to descern the small differences. Getting robbed of the close ones - the perfect take because it is just outside the zone, or the great pitch that is just barely touching the zone at some point - is the worst, if you ask me. That is why we can no longer leave it up to the best guess by a too proud person. Donaldson (righty) got called out on a ball 3 to 4 inches outside. The ump was giving Yankee pitchers strikes on balls, and Twins pitchers balls on strikes. Nelson didn't have any problem calling pitch one a strike, as it was (pretty similar to pitch 6 to Gardner (lefty) that he called a ball- both pitches were the inside corner to the batter, with the ump looking right at it over the inside shoulder of the catcher. Gardner's was even more in the zone, but both were strikes) ......... but pitch 7 to Donaldson was clearly outside! It is so past the time to take strikes and balls away from the guessing umpires. It is really not their fault. Humans do the best they can, I guess (- at Yankee stadium this is debatable). It is just impossible for them to do anything but guess the best they can in the split second. There is just a better way to do it now.
    2 points
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