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    Mike Sixel

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/02/2021 in all areas

  1. Win win for both teams. Twins got a much needed starter, and the Dodgers won the World Series without needing him on the team. Graterol made an impact on their team during the season and their playoff run.
    7 points
  2. Minnesota, no matter what happens next. They needed him last year, and he was great.
    7 points
  3. If this award is for the Starting Pitcher of the month, why did a reliever get it?
    6 points
  4. There's a Vallimont start for you. Tons of Ks, a bunch of walks, and a start that keeps you thinking, "Man, if he can figure it out..." He's a fascinating case. If his command comes together, he's going to be a beast. Could be a high-end starter, with a floor of high impact reliever. If he can't get his command up to where it needs to be, then he might never see MLB. Got to be one of the biggest boom/bust players in the Twins system. Not great news about Canterino; the talent is there, but the injury is worrisome. Hopefully it is just tendonitis and not a symptom of something more serious. Wonder if he's a candidate for winter ball or the AFL? He needs innings and his lack of innings is why I don't see him as a serious candidate to pitch for the Twins in 2022. As good as he's been, I don't see him jumping from limited innings in A-ball to the majors that quickly. I would love to know what the injury record has been like for the top 20 prospects across all of baseball this year. Twins have had a ton of them, and I'm wondering if they're unlucky, screwing something up, or in the same boat as everyone else...
    6 points
  5. I've said it before, and I'll keep saying it. The notion of a trade having a "winner" and a "loser" is a false dichotomy. Good trades help both teams. If you get a reputation for screwing the other team, you'll never get the opportunity to make another trade. Get the reputation of wanting to help the other team while improving your own, and folks will gladly take your call.
    5 points
  6. Ryan looked promising out there. He clearly had some trouble with his command in the third and put himself in some bad counts...and MLB hitters will generally punish a guy for it. But it was good to see him respond well to giving up the monster dinger by getting back to work. It'll be interesting to see how he does as teams get tape on him and hitter try and prepare specifically for his stuff and approach. I think he's going to need to continue to improve his secondary offerings, but there's good movement and deception on his fastball that should let it play up a little. Solid job in his MLB debut. I know it was frustrating to see so little life from the Twins bats the last two games, and especially last night when the rookie could have really used a lead to pitch with, but overreacting to a couple of games with this lineup is just silly. The Twins are 6th in OPS+ for the year: the lineup is fine. They've probably been a little unlucky (just above league average in runs scored), but the idea that the Twins don't have a good offense is simply wrong. Yes, it's a little frustrating to have so many guys with a low batting average, but BA is down all across baseball and the Twins are still right around average even with guys like Kepler, Rooker, Jeffers, Cave, and Sano flirting with/succumbing to the Mendoza Line. (and Sano has been quite good since the horrific start)
    5 points
  7. Thanks for the report, Steve. Can't recall the last time the Kernels beat Quad City. But with a 68-34 record, they don't lose very often. Wonderful that Miranda keeps hitting and Celestino is also hitting very well after his too soon callup to the Twins. The player I want to see settle in at AAA and start raking is Larnach. Kid is too good. Gotta believe it will happen, hopefully, soon. See that the two 2021 draft picks both had extra base hits again for the Mussels. Fun seeing a couple guys step in and hit like they are.
    5 points
  8. This is correct. Any time you can get 3 years of control on a #2/#3 starter for 6 years of a reliever, you do it.
    5 points
  9. #1. Ober looks to be a solid addition. #2. Free Agency will only work if you sign quality arms. No more Shoemakers or Happs. If ya don't spend here you might as well forget it. #3. Yes, trade where you have extras. Kepler, Sano, Donaldson, consider Arraez if the return is huge. #4. I'm ok with giving Pineda another year. He shouldn't be expensive and he slots in at #4 or #5 easy enough. #5. Seen enough of the Dobnak experiment. Move on please. #6. For heavens sake what are we waiting for. The pitching was atrocious and none of these guys were worth taking a look at before now? Let's see what we have before they die from old age.
    4 points
  10. Below I will outline a plausible path to a good Twins rotation in 2022. Not an elite rotation – that's probably a bridge too far at this point – but a good one with five solid-or-better starters, capable of competing for a postseason spot and maybe more. There is inherently some optimistic thinking involved here, but I don't think any of these scenarios are out of question. 1. Bailey Ober proves to be the real deal Among starting pitchers currently controlled by the Twins, Ober is the only stable fixture looking ahead to 2022. But he's establishing himself as a pretty viable building block. How did the big right-hander go from relative unknown to indispensable rotation cornerstone in one year's time? By adding 3-4 MPH to his fastball and shedding his label as a "soft-tosser." A few extra ticks of velocity have made a world of difference for the rookie, who is now sneaking heaters past MLB hitters and playing up his lesser offspeed stuff. Toss in excellent command, and you've got a good recipe for success. As we've seen. Ober's overall numbers with the Twins this year are good – 3.98 ERA, 1.21 WHIP, 77-to-17 K/BB ratio in 74 ⅔ innings – but even better when you break them down to parse out his progression. His K/BB ratio in the latter sample is legitimately elite (only two qualified MLB starters are averaging more than six strikeouts per walk, and they are Cy Young candidates Corbin Burnes and Gerrit Cole). When you're missing bats, limiting walks, and keeping the hits in check, you're in line for good outcomes. Ober has shown the ability to do all these things, and he's only getting better at each of them. Home runs will be something to monitor, and could sidetrack him if they re-emerge as a weakness, but at this point there's no reason to think a healthy Ober won't be at least a quality #3 or 4 starter in 2022. 2. Twins sign a #2/3 starter in free agency No, they're not going to sign Clayton Kershaw or Max Scherzer. Probably not Noah Syndergaard either. Even someone like Marcus Stroman or Justin Verlander may be a tad too ambitious. But with ample flexibility (should they choose to keep payroll steady or raise it slightly), there are several names in the next tier that should be within range, and it's not that hard to see one of them settling in as a mid-rotation caliber starter or better. Names in this category include Corey Kluber, Charlie Morton, Alex Cobb, Andrew Heaney, and others. 3. Acquire a #2/3 starter via trade Last year, the Twins acquired Maeda and watched him blossom into a Cy Young caliber performer. This year, their division rivals have done the same with Lance Lynn. We don't need to set our sights that high, though it'd be nice. Jameson Taillon is a less idealistic example. He wasn't a star for Pittsburgh, and the Yankees didn't have to part with top-tier prospect talent to acquire him. But he has served as a very solid mid-rotation arm for New York, at a low price and with multiple years of control remaining. The Twins didn't trade away any of their system's depth last winter, and have only added to it this year by selling at the deadline. Additionally, they have a few semi-redundant pieces at the major-league level that could have value to other clubs (Max Kepler, Mitch Garver ... Luis Arraez?) The front office will have assets to deal for pitching if they are so inclined. 4. Re-sign Michael Pineda The door definitely seems wide open for a reunion, as each side has openly expressed affinity for the other, and with Pineda's challenges this year, he should be pretty affordable – maybe $4-5 million. Given those challenges, I'm sure most Twins fans aren't enthused about the idea of bringing back Pineda. But let's look at the big picture here: the 32-year-old has posted a 3.98 ERA, 3.94 FIP, 1.19 WHIP, 8.3 K/9 and 1.8 BB/9 during his time with the Twins. That includes his recent struggles, which can likely be attributed somewhat to health. In his first 36 starts with Minnesota, the team went 24-12. His circumstances, and a theoretical desire to return here, could enable the Twins to score Pineda at the cost of a back-end starter, while hoping an offseason of rest and strengthening returns him to his previous state or close to it. 5. Get Randy Dobnak back on track As with Pineda, it's easy to get caught up in Dobnak's recent struggles while losing sight of his previous success. In fact, it's a lot easier, because Dobnak does not have nearly the track record of Pineda. But through the first 14 outings of his MLB career, the Dobber was simply phenomenal, posting a 1.69 ERA with four home runs allowed over 58 ⅔ innings. This after a tremendous minor-league career that saw him perform well at every level. Dobnak's effectiveness was no accident – the bottom simply fell out on his pitches, making them excruciatingly difficult to lift, and he consistently threw them in the zone. Things went south late in the 2020 season, but Dobnak rebounded with a dominant spring that compelled the Twins to invest with a modest long-term contract. And then the bottom fell out on Dobnak. We all know this season has been a complete and total disaster for the right-hander, but it's unclear to what it extent that owes to injury issues. When you're a slider-reliant sinkerballer who goes from allowing four homers in your first two seasons to allowing 11 in your third, before going on IL for multiple months with a strain in the middle finger that is so crucial in creating that sink ... Well, it points to a natural explanation. There's no guarantee that time off will correct this issue, but we'll at least start to get an idea when Dobnak returns to the rotation on Friday. Regardless of how things go for the rest of this season, he'll most likely get a crack at the 2022 rotation given that he's under guaranteed contract. If he gets back on track and is anywhere close to the version we saw early on in his big-league career, well that's a hell of a good fifth starter. 6. The minors provide depth and jolts Above, we've accounted for all five season-opening rotation spots. And we haven't yet tapped into the impressive minor-league pipeline this front office has built up. Between Joe Ryan, Jordan Balazovic, Jhoan Duran, Simeon Woods-Richardson, Matt Canterino and Josh Winder, you have a bevy of high-upside arms that are all verging on MLB-ready, if not already there. Granted, it's tough to depend on any of these prospects short-term, given that none have yet appeared in the majors (save Ryan, who debuted impressively on Wednesday) and the group is riddled with significant injury concerns. But that's why I'm not penciling them into any of the top five spots. We can account for those otherwise and keep these exciting arms in reserve, while knowing that just about any one of them has the potential to be a game-changing force for the Twins pitching staff if things break right. Look, I get that it's hard to envision multiple positive scenarios playing out in this fashion, especially with the way faith has been understandably eroded in the this front office over the past year. But one thing I find myself frequently reminding others – and myself – is that things change fast in this game. In 2016 and 2018, nobody was foreseeing good things on the near horizon. The Twins made some mistakes last offseason, but have also been the victims of absolutely horrible luck. This front office and coaching staff have proven their mettle in the past. If they can learn from those mistakes and the pendulum of fortune swings in the other direction, it's not all that difficult to envision a pitching staff capable of supporting what could be a very strong offense to push Minnesota back into contender status. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
    4 points
  11. The surgery and repair of the UCL is the same, but with the internal brace used to support the tendon that is used to replace the old UCL. The internal brace reinforces the newly placed tendon, which may improve return time. Arthrex is the company that makes the braided product, and it is fairly new tech and product. The fact the surgeon has used it 50 times is a good thing, and he’s not going to give names. Rich Hill had his elbow “fixed” with the same product, though he had a repair and not replacement surgery. if you’re going to be a jerk, at least be a knowledgeable jerk and not just a reactionary jerk.
    4 points
  12. If I'm remembering correctly Simeon Woods Richardson was also struggling with walks for the first time in his career in Toronto's system early this year. Would be interesting to look at walk, and injury, rates amongst minor league pitchers this year. I feel like somebody around here could find some data.
    4 points
  13. I don't know that the Dodgers philosophy is particularly different, or that Urías is a good example of any differences. First of all, it says Urías is in his first season without any sort of limits -- well, it's his 6th season in MLB! It's taken a long time to get to this point, and the Dodgers have been fairly cautious with him throughout his career. He averaged close to 4 innings per start in the minors, before any surgery. Second, some of those numbers are misleading -- his previous MLB regular-season career high in innings was only 77, but combined MLB + minors + postseason, he actually reached 127 that year (2016). So 2021 is a jump, but not quite as dramatic as this excerpt implies. And the following year (2017), the Dodgers actually left him at extended spring training for the first month of the MLB season, in a further effort to control his innings. He later spent virtually the entire 2019 season on the Dodgers MLB roster, pitching relatively sparingly out of the pen (37 games, 79.2 IP). They were pretty aggressive in promoting Urías before his 20th birthday, but then again, they signed him as a top international prospect on his 16th birthday, and he didn't get hurt until he was almost 21, so he was likely going to debut fairly young.
    4 points
  14. Motivated me to look back at 20 years of Twins pitching. 2020: Berrios (53), Dobnak (45), Maeda (66), Hill (38) and our main arms in the pen: Clippard, Duffey, May, Romo, Rogers and Wisler squeaks in. Before this, let's look at 100+ inning for starters and 50+ games for bullpen. 2019: Berrios (200), Gibson (160), Perez (165), Odorizzi (159), Pineda (146). Bullpen: Duffey, Harper, Rogers, May. 2018: Berrios (192), Gibson (196), Lynn (102), Odorizzi (164). Bullpen: Rogers, Pressly, Addison Reed, Hildenberger. 34 pitchers used in the season. 2017: Berrios (145), Gibson (158), E. Santana (211). Bullpen: Belisle, Duffey, Pressly, Rogers. Team high 36 pitchers on the club that year 2016: Duffey (133), Gibson (147), Nolasco (124), E. Santana (181). Bullpen: Kintzler, Tonkin, Rogers, Pressly. 2015: Gibson (194), Hughes (155), May (114), Milone (126), Pelfrey (164), E. Santana (108). Bullpen: Boyer, Duensing, Fien, Perkins. 2014: Correia (129), Gibson (179), Hughes (209), Milone (118), Nolasco (159). Bullpen: Burton, Fien, Duensing, Perkins, Swarzak, Thielbar. 2013: Correia (185), Deduno (108), Diamond (131). Pelfrey (156). Bullpen: Burton, Fien, Duensing, Roenicke, Thielbar in at 49. 2012: Diamond (173), Liriano (100), Blackburn (98). Swarzak and Duensing (109) both started and relieved. Bullpen: Bennett, Burton, Perkins. A season that might rival 2021...25 arms used of little memory. 2011: Baker (134), Blackburn (148), Duensing (161), Liriano (134), Swarzak (102), Pavano (222). Bullpen: Perkins, Capps, Burnett, Mijares. 2010: Baker (175), Blackburn (161), Liriano (191), Pavano (222), Slowey (155). Bullpen: Crain, Duensing, Guerrier, Rauch. 2009: Baker (200), Blackburn (205), Liriano (136). Bullpen: Crain, Guerrier, Mijares, Nathan. 2008: Baker (172), Blackburn (193), Bonser (118), Perkins (151), Slowey (160), Hernandez (139). Bullpen: Crain, Guerrier, Nathan, Reyes. 2007: Baker (143), Silva (202), Santana (219). Bullpen: Guerrier, Nathan, Neshek, Reyes, Rincon. 2006: Bonser (100), Liriano (121), Radke (152), Santana (233), SIlva (184). Bullpen: Crain, Nathan, Reyes, Rincon. 2005: Lohse (178), Mays (156), Radke (200), Santana (231), Silva (188). Bullpen: Crain, Nathan, Rincon, Romero. 2004: Lohse (194), Silva (203), Mulholland (123), Radke (219), Santana (228). Bullpen: Fultz, Rincon, Nathan, Romero. 2003: Lohse (201), Mays (130), Radke (212), Reed (135), Rogers (195), Santana (158). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, RIncon, Romero. 2002: Lohse (180), Radke (118), Milton (171), Reed (188), Santana (108). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, Jackson, Romero. 2001: Milton (233), Radke (226), Mays (233). Bullpen: Carrasco, Guardado, Wells. 2000: Mays (160), Milton (200), Radke (226), Redman (151). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, Carrasco, Wells, Travis Miller. The days of pitchers hitting 200+ innings seems a far reach, let alone have a rotation that can each pitch 100+ innings (can't wait to see 2021 breakdowns). One more call up and the Twins break the record of number of pitchers used in a season. Hard to think about the early days when the whole season was handled by 1965 (15), 1967 (12), 1968 (14), 1969 (15), 1970 (13), 1971 (14), 1972 (16) pitchers. I guess people didn't get injured, and I also believe was the era of 4-man rotations, and a total staff of 9. Plus the closer pitched multiple innings. And, as Bert will tell us, more complete games!
    4 points
  15. Another inept performance from our hitters tonight in what has become far too common in this train wreck of a season. Despite that, I actually tuned as I'm sure many others did to watch the MLB debut of Joe Ryan. I offer the following observations over his 5.0 IP 1. Albeit facing an offense almost as challenged as ours, Ryan looked excellent over his first 2 shutout innings. Didn't allow a hit and needed only 21 pitches. His 3/4 delivery and lower release point sure looked (at least early) that it will play at this level. 2. Then came the 3rd inning-------I think walked the first guy then proceeded to struggle with his command going to multiple 3 ball counts on hitters that followed. Got within 1 batter of getting out of that inning unscathed, but left a fastball middle in to Schwindel who didn't miss it. 3. Add on to previous struggles in 3rd inning and I know I'm reaching here, but I place 90% of Ryan's 3rd inning struggles--34 pitches on 1 person------FSN media employee Audra Martin. Why did Martin/FSN choose to interrupt Ryan's "mojo" by deciding to interview his mom live as Ryan started the inning?? I'm a big believer in KARMA. I have no issue with the live interview of Ryan's mom, but why not do it in the bottom of the 2nd inning when the Twins were hitting??? Not like viewers of FSN would be distracted by the machine gun fire of our bats. How about letting Ryan's mom ENJOY THE MOMENT and watch her son pitch??? Stressful enough for mom watching Joe pitch without having to be interrupted doing a live interview. 4. Considering the complete horrible performances we've gotten far too many times from SPs this year (Cardinals got the "real" JA Happ tonight), I came away feeling hopeful that Ryan will be a viable, reliable and productive SP in our 2022 rotation.
    4 points
  16. And now, by W-L record, we are even worse than the Cubs. 90 loses here we come. 16 runs in last 7 games. Lucky to win the 3 we did. 2 hits tonight. Pretty damn sad. Ryan was wonderful except for the 3rd. They just had to do that interview with his mom........
    4 points
  17. I don't think this is even a conversation at this point. Even if Maeda is closer to what he was earlier this year then last, he's a 2/3 starter on a team starved of front line starters at the time of the trade for a reliever. Graterol may go on to do great things, but he wasn't what the team needed. That alone makes this a win for the Twins. It's also possible that both teams win in the end. Absolutely nothing wrong with that. That's what virtually every trade strives for.
    4 points
  18. Precisely. The Twins had just won 103 games, but had started Randy Dobnak in a playoff game--they needed frontline starting pitching, but couldn't get it in FA. They went out to get a guy to improve their rotation, and he did just that. If the offense doesn't fall completely asleep at the wheel against Houston, who knows what might have happened?
    4 points
  19. Ober is it, for now. Which is WHY is is important that the Twins also let Strotman and Balazovic also get starts at the major league level in 2021. Gives them a good idea of what to work with over the winter (perhaps in Winetr Ball). And those two are on the 40-man. The killer was that going in 2021 we had Dobnak, Thorpe and Smeltzer as the reserves. Dobnak has a lot to prove this final month. But he is also in the position of being removed from the 40-man, but still kept in the organization and come back in the spring (shades of Perkins, maybe Balckburn and Mays of old). Both Smeltzer and Thorpe could be claimed, or just walk away if moved from the 40-man (unless the Twins care enough to do a Dobnak contract with either of them, too). We have seen Barnes, who is in the mix and a lefty. We have seen Jax and Ryan, both in the mix. We know we can find guys like Albers (and maybe even retain Albers on a minor league contract (you pay them more than 40-man roster contracts, who knows if they will stay). The Twins want to think of Gant as a starter. Going into 2022 they have Strotman on the rise (again, pitch him a few games in September). Balazovic and Duran are on the horizon, but for how many innings. Is Colina a starter or bullpen arm. They elevated Bryan Sammons to AAA to see what he can do as he is Rule 5 eligible and a lefty. Winder is a prospect on the rise. From AA they have Sands (Rule 5 eligible), the recovering Enlow, Simeon, and due for AA ball to start 2022 Canterino. Yes, they need a free agent ace, and another good innings eater. Pineda is a choice? Well the good news is no one kicked in the door to obtain him at the trading deadline, so his stock may have fallen. Cheap is a happy word in front office land. On a side note, on a post about Twins finding too many band-aids for their rotation, I did a quick look at 20 years of top of the rotation (innings) starters, and the 50+ games names of bullpen arms. You gotta love the memories of the name, but you see the same mistakes made over and over and that the Twins develop arms, but since Santana - no to Supermen. We just aren't getting innings, from developed pitcher or high-end rentals. Motivated me to look back at 20 years of Twins pitching. 2020: Berrios (53), Dobnak (45), Maeda (66), Hill (38) and our main arms in the pen: Clippard, Duffey, May, Romo, Rogers and Wisler squeaks in. Before this, let's look at 100+ inning for starters and 50+ games for bullpen. 2019: Berrios (200), Gibson (160), Perez (165), Odorizzi (159), Pineda (146). Bullpen: Duffey, Harper, Rogers, May. 2018: Berrios (192), Gibson (196), Lynn (102), Odorizzi (164). Bullpen: Rogers, Pressly, Addison Reed, Hildenberger. 34 pitchers used in the season. 2017: Berrios (145), Gibson (158), E. Santana (211). Bullpen: Belisle, Duffey, Pressly, Rogers. Team high 36 pitchers on the club that year 2016: Duffey (133), Gibson (147), Nolasco (124), E. Santana (181). Bullpen: Kintzler, Tonkin, Rogers, Pressly. 2015: Gibson (194), Hughes (155), May (114), Milone (126), Pelfrey (164), E. Santana (108). Bullpen: Boyer, Duensing, Fien, Perkins. 2014: Correia (129), Gibson (179), Hughes (209), Milone (118), Nolasco (159). Bullpen: Burton, Fien, Duensing, Perkins, Swarzak, Thielbar. 2013: Correia (185), Deduno (108), Diamond (131). Pelfrey (156). Bullpen: Burton, Fien, Duensing, Roenicke, Thielbar in at 49. 2012: Diamond (173), Liriano (100), Blackburn (98). Swarzak and Duensing (109) both started and relieved. Bullpen: Bennett, Burton, Perkins. A season that might rival 2021...25 arms used of little memory. 2011: Baker (134), Blackburn (148), Duensing (161), Liriano (134), Swarzak (102), Pavano (222). Bullpen: Perkins, Capps, Burnett, Mijares. 2010: Baker (175), Blackburn (161), Liriano (191), Pavano (222), Slowey (155). Bullpen: Crain, Duensing, Guerrier, Rauch. 2009: Baker (200), Blackburn (205), Liriano (136). Bullpen: Crain, Guerrier, Mijares, Nathan. 2008: Baker (172), Blackburn (193), Bonser (118), Perkins (151), Slowey (160), Hernandez (139). Bullpen: Crain, Guerrier, Nathan, Reyes. 2007: Baker (143), Silva (202), Santana (219). Bullpen: Guerrier, Nathan, Neshek, Reyes, Rincon. 2006: Bonser (100), Liriano (121), Radke (152), Santana (233), SIlva (184). Bullpen: Crain, Nathan, Reyes, Rincon. 2005: Lohse (178), Mays (156), Radke (200), Santana (231), Silva (188). Bullpen: Crain, Nathan, Rincon, Romero. 2004: Lohse (194), Silva (203), Mulholland (123), Radke (219), Santana (228). Bullpen: Fultz, Rincon, Nathan, Romero. 2003: Lohse (201), Mays (130), Radke (212), Reed (135), Rogers (195), Santana (158). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, RIncon, Romero. 2002: Lohse (180), Radke (118), Milton (171), Reed (188), Santana (108). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, Jackson, Romero. 2001: Milton (233), Radke (226), Mays (233). Bullpen: Carrasco, Guardado, Wells. 2000: Mays (160), Milton (200), Radke (226), Redman (151). Bullpen: Guardado, Hawkins, Carrasco, Wells, Travis Miller. The days of pitchers hitting 200+ innings seems a far reach, let alone have a rotation that can each pitch 100+ innings (can't wait to see 2021 breakdowns). One more call up and the Twins break the record of number of pitchers used in a season. Hard to think about the early days when the whole season was handled by 1965 (15), 1967 (12), 1968 (14), 1969 (15), 1970 (13), 1971 (14), 1972 (16) pitchers. I guess people didn't get injured, and I also believe was the era of 4-man rotations, and a total staff of 9. Plus the closer pitched multiple innings. And, as Bert will tell us, more complete games!
    3 points
  20. I worry that signing Pineda only fills a rotation spot half the time. Yes, better than filling that spot with a Shoemaker performance, but still, it leaves you having to make another move, and have that work out
    3 points
  21. Vallimont starts can definitely be a roller coaster! I think your take is spot on at this point. Lot to like when you watch, just sometimes can't find the zone. Canterino would be an ideal candidate for the AFL if he's healthy enough when it gets underway. He'd be likely to get 15+ more innings if he was sent there as a starter. He did throw 125+ innings in 2019 so I don't actually consider him that far behind (from an innings standpoint) as far as getting called up if healthy and performing (see Ober, Bailey) as far as 2022 is concerned. If he was healthy this year he surely would have been in double-A months ago at the rate he was going.
    3 points
  22. The most important individual performance in August IMO was Ober establishing his place in rotation for next year. However, the BP in aggregate is looking like we have added some pieces that will help next year. Minaya looks to be part of the future. Garza could do the same with a strong performance the remainder of the season and Griffin Jax will probably end up as part of the BP solution. Coulumbe is serviceable too. Alcala has what it takes and he seems to be putting it together. Get Rodgers back with Alcala performing the way he has recently, put Gant in the BP, replace Colome with a reliable late inning guy and along with these new additions we have reason to be optimistic about the BP next year. Rodgers / FA / Duffey / Alcala / Minaya / Gant / Thielbar / Garza Jr. A LH free agent would be ideal or a RH free agent, Gant starts the year in rotation if he does well the rest of the year. Jax is a depth piece in the rotation or replaces Garza.
    3 points
  23. Ober would be my choice. A SP that does well with this team is something to celebrate and Ober has established that he is going to stay in the starting rotation - if it can even be called a rotation anymore.
    3 points
  24. I don't think trades need to be evaluated as a zero-sum win/loss metric. Both teams can "win" a trade based on their needs. I think this deal was a win for the Twins, because they wanted and needed starting pitching and got a good starter on a contract that was a good fit for the their team. The injury stinks for Maeda and the Twins (especially because they really needed him to hold down the rotation next season) but it doesn't change how good he was last season putting the team into contention. Graterol was a good prospect and has flashes of it as a reliever, but he's not dominating like his velocity might suggest. Did the Dodgers "lose"? Not really: they needed bullpen support, Graterol was solid last year, is fine this year, and they won the title in 2020. I'd say they're pretty happy with the deal too. (Raley was mostly a throw-in) I think both teams would do that deal again. I would.
    3 points
  25. If Graterol really breaks out in the future, then everyone won the trade. Until then, Twins won.
    3 points
  26. Knowing the kind of free agents that the Twins will actually sign (not pipe dreams), my best guess at the 2022 opening rotation would look something like this: Johnny Cueto Eduardo Rodriguez Jose Quintana Bailey Ober Randy Dobnak World Series experience, cherry-picked stat windows and the super-magical abilities of Wes Johnson will be used as selling tools to the fans. By mid-May comments like "DFA Quintana now!" and "Why is Rodriguez still in the rotation? Call up [insert prospect with hot start]!" will litter TD. I'll probably be one of the ones making the comments. Rinse/Repeat.
    3 points
  27. Those Bailey Ober splits look encouraging. Hopefully it continues. Nice find! If you add Ryan that gives you two SP's to start the season. If we've learned anything from the Twins the last few years, they are far more comfortable taking chances on 1 year rentals than long term deals. J.A. Happ, Shoemaker, Homer Bailey, Rich Hill to name the ones most recent. That means they will be shopping in the average/about to retire SP pile come FA time. It looks like there will be plenty to choose from. Twins will need to sign 3 starters and it looks like Charlie Morton would be the best case scenario however he'll probably resign with the Braves or go to a contender. Then it would be on the Twins to sign 3 of the following: Corey Kluber, Mike Minor, James Paxton, Drew Smyly, Anthony DeSclafani, Adam Wainwright, Alex Wood, Martín Pérez All of the other FA SP that are available will most likely get multi-year deals which seems to be something the Twins don't seem willing to spend money on. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, just something that seems to be a trend from the Twins. My guess is the analytics team discovered something. The question will be, what depth will the Twins have when players start getting hurt. Griffin Jax, Dobnak (coming in from the pen) and Charlie Barnes could fill-in, however with the Twins using over 30 pitchers so far in 2021 that might not be enough. In AA the Twins have a little more depth with Balazovic, Sands, and Winder so maybe we'll see them sometime in 2022 once people start getting hurt. Lastly, if the Twins were to trade for someone, they clearly like a player that's under control for several more years. To get a player of this caliber, they would have to part with a high end prospect. This seems like something that they would never do especially for a team that is on the verge of finishing last place in the division.
    2 points
  28. I'd only bring in two from outside the org at this point. Free agent ( a 2/3, not a 5) Trade (a 2/3, not a 4/5) Ober Ryan or someone Someone else from inside the org Lots of guys in AAA that are young for a change..... I think bringing in a third from the outside just means that a lot of high upside arms spend next year in the minors.....rather than getting time in MN.
    2 points
  29. Last night, Happ started his stretch run gauntlet, as I called out above. It did not go well, as Happ had, by game score, his worst start of the entire year. 13 batters faced, only retired 3, gave up 8 hits (2 HR), 2 walks, no strikeouts, and 7 earned runs, for a Game Score of -8.
    2 points
  30. If I were a betting person, I’d put my money on Cole Sands. His increase in walks isn’t as steep as the others, and he keeps the ball in the playing field. There’s a lot to like about him.
    2 points
  31. You talk about significantly increased walk rates as a problem for all three this year. Is it possible this is the result of none of these pitchers pitching in 2020? Would be interesting to see if that is common throughout the minor leagues.
    2 points
  32. In 1978, a couple of second graders walked into the Boondocks bar on Lamar St. in Cottage Grove to buy some candy bars. There was a jukebox which proved far too tempting. Neither of the kids recognized any song on the jukebox, so they just put a quarter in and pushed some buttons. Nothing happened, so they tried again. They were not even sure which songs they were choosing, but they kept on trying, a countless number of times. After a few minutes, they resigned themselves that the machine was broken and were about to leave. Then "Cold as Ice" began blasting, turned up to 11. Then it played again. And again. The kids were not sure what this song was, so they looked closely at the song titles until they recognized the title of what they were hearing. The locals in the bar did not seem to mind that there were two kids in the bar blasting this one song over and over. They were all probably just grateful it wasn't the Bee Gees, who were played constantly everywhere. After that, whenever those kids passed the Boondocks bar, they always stepped in to punch up Cold as Ice.
    2 points
  33. Graterol needs to start pitching A LOT better very quickly if he’s going to top Maeda’s career 13 fWAR. It’s really quite difficult to accumulate value as a reliever. For example, even someone like Craig Kimbrel has only 19 career fWAR.
    2 points
  34. I was impressed with Ryan in his first start. He battled to get through that 3rd inning where he lost his command. I honestly thought the homer pitch was competitive. It was high and tight inside just on or off the upper corner of the zone. I tip my hat to the batter for getting his barrel on it. All the damage Ryan gave up happened over a span of 6 PAs, and then he finished his outing the way he started it. He has more development ahead of him, and I wouldn't be surprised if he has one more stint at AAA sometime next season, but good first impression.
    2 points
  35. I agree that pitchers pitching without the reins of pitch or innings limits is what we want to see. And I see your point that doubling his innings load is different from incrementally raising a pitcher's workload season by season. Urías has been in both the majors and professional ball period longer than Ober - he was pitching in pro ball when Ober was a freshman in college. If this is his first year without any workload limits, then it's safe to say that the Dodgers did have him under several years of workload management to get to this point.
    2 points
  36. Taylor Rogers was the choice for Twins Daily Pitcher of the Month in both May and June, and Kenta Maeda ‘received’ the award in August. Who will take home the prestigious award in their minds (because we haven’t come up with any sort of physical trophy or plaque or piece of paper). Now, before we get too far into this, I will debunk a rumor that was going around the Twitter-sphere on Wednesday afternoon. Sure, he had a 0.00 ERA and just a 1.00 WHIP, and opponents didn’t get a single hit off of him all month, but here are some candidates that finished ahead of La Tortuga in voting. Before even getting to the Honorable Mentions and the Winner, there were several strong pitching performances by the Twins in August, particularly out of the bullpen. Unfortunately, the starting pitching was not as good. First, Andrew Albers posted a 0.96 ERA and a 0.75 WHIP in his two appearances and 9 1/3 innings. Jorge Alcala had a 1.50 ERA and a 0.83 WHIP in August, but he pitched in just five games and spent half of the month on the Injured List. Tyler Duffey had a 2.25 ERA and 12 strikeouts but had just eight innings and a 1.75 WHIP. Caleb Thielbar became one of the most reliable arms out of the team’s bullpen. He had 14 strikeouts in 12 2/3 innings. His WHIP was just 0.95. Without further ado, here are three honorable mentions, followed by the big winner! Honorable Mention #3: RHP Ralph Garza, Jr. The Twins claimed the 27-year-old right-hander after the Astros DFA’d him on August 1st. He was called up to the Twins on August 14th and has been impressive since. In eight games and 10 1/3 innings, he posted a 1.74 ERA and a 0.77 WHIP. He gave up just two earned runs on six hits. He walked two and struck out nine batters. Opponents hit just .167 against him. The Twins have claimed several players off waivers over the past couple of months and signed a few others to minor league deals. Several have already been DFAd and weren’t claimed by another team, hence, they remain in St. Paul (Beau Burrows, Edgar Garcia, Nick Vincent). However, Garza, with his multiple side-winding arm angles and pitch movement, has made a good first impression. Honorable Mention #2: RHP Alexander Colome Colome hasn’t been good in 2021. It would be tough to argue that he has been. However, he was solid in August. Following the trade of Hansel Robles at the July 30th trade deadline and the season-ending injury to Taylor Rogers, Colome has returned to the closer’s role and generally been good. Of his 13 appearances in August, ten of them provided him with a save opportunity. He converted eight of them. And he had a solid month in Alexander Colome fashion. In his 12 2/3 innings, he had a 1.22 WHIP. He gave up some hits, and he issued five walks to go with just five strikeouts. Honorable Mention #1: Bailey Ober Ober made his big-league debut in May. He had some ups and downs along the way, but overall, the Twins have to be thrilled with his performance. In his five August starts, he went 1-1 with a 2.30 ERA and a 1.01 WHIP. In 27 1/3 innings, he gave up 27 hits, walked just three and struck out 26 batters. As important, Ober has been very consistent and reliable over the past month. He pitched at least five innings in all five starts. His ERA dropped from 4.94 to 3.98 over the course of the month. He hasn’t given up more than three earned runs since July 10. The Twins are now 10-6 in games started by Ober in 2021. The only rookie starters whose teams have a better winning percentage in their games started are Alek Manoak of the Blue Jays and Shane McClanahan of the Rays. Twins Starting Pitcher of the Month: Juan Minaya Minaya has been with the Twins since the beginning of the 2020 season. Before that, he had spent much of the previous four seasons in the White Sox bullpen. He had recorded 142 strikeouts over 128 1/3 innings with Chicago. He signed a minor league signed a minor league deal with the Twins and went to spring training 2020. He then participated at the Twins alternate site in St. Paul. In fact, he was called up to the Twins once last year, but a day or two later, he was DFAd without pitching in a game. He went unclaimed and stayed in the organization. He signed back with the Twins in 2021 and began the season in St. Paul. He was called up to the Twins at the end of May and pitched in four games before being DFAd on June 5th to make room for Griffin Jax. He was again unclaimed and returned to St. Paul. However, in mid-July, he was called up one more time, and after sporadic appearances, he got thrown into more proverbial fires following the trade deadline, and he has been very good. In August, Minaya worked in ten games. He went 1-0 with a 1.29 ERA and a 1.21 WHIP. Opponents hit just .180 off of him. He walked eight, but struck out 16 batters in his 14 innings. Still just 30-years-old, Minaya has a chance to keep himself on the 40-man roster throughout the offseason and in the plans for the team’s 2022 bullpen. August was a good month for that endeavor. Congratulations to Juan Minaya on a great month, as well as the other Honorable Mentions. Do you agree that Minaya is the choice? Should Bailey Ober have been the recipient? MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email
    2 points
  37. Ryan did his job pretty nicely. They beat us one good swung to our none. One pitch. One swing. We just didn't get ours. Good job, Joe. Not good enough unfortunately. How about Rooker though? 2 hits. Small victories.
    2 points
  38. I think it's poor training. Why train a young pitcher to an 80 pitch limit when that barely gets you out of the 5th inning? These young pitchers are SOFT. They don't throw baseballs nearly often enough nor far enough. Plus, their bodies aren't tough enough, either. Make them do rock climbing, water polo, mountain biking - stuff that makes the body hard as nails. I'm not saying that every young pitcher should be a cross-fit champion or win American Ninja. I'm just saying that if I hand one a raw potato, he should be able to crush it in his bare hand. Like my buddy, Wolf Larson.
    2 points
  39. Bats disappeared in this short series...wasted some decent pitching. Guess if one doesn't care about wins, this wasn't so bad. But Cubs are as inept as Twins this season. Should have done better, but I guess it doesn't matter.
    2 points
  40. So far, 2 months, 60 days of good Kenta. Nolasco did that. Glad that makes us the winner, "no matter what". I wouldn't make a call yet, myself. Graterol could have a great run in the post season this year (or not). Kenta did pitch 5 shutout innings in game 1 against Houston. I would say the Twins are ahead right now, but that could change soon.
    2 points
  41. 2 points
  42. My guess is that Graterol will have the better career. He's also the better talent. So in that regard, the dodgers probably will "win" the trade. But the trade made sense. Certainly not the worst move the FO made.
    2 points
  43. I tend to agree with Mike that the Twins got what they needed when they needed it with Maeda in 2020. I don't think they win the division without him so that was a big get. As always trades like this take so much time to evaluate for overall value and sometimes a team is willing to lose a trade to try and win a championship so trades can be looked at from different perspectives as to who won and who lost. That being said short term the Twins already got what they needed out of the Maeda trade. He was instrumental in helping them win the division in 2020 and with the performance based salary can't hurt them into the future financially even if he never returns. When he does return he just adds more value. Camargo has been OK at High A but his K rate is a killer. He is also only 22 so has time to straighten that approach out but the bat needs some work and he looks like a backup catcher at this point if he makes it so not much there if you ask me. For the Dodgers Graterol has been nothing special to this point certainly not the dominant reliever we thought he would be. Luke Raley who I thought might be better than Rooker, certainly better in the field, currently has a 483 OPS at the MLB level granted a very SSS but still so far nothing that great. The Dodgers look like they might have gotten a good pitcher with the 2nd round supplemental pick though as Clayton Beeter has a really nice K rate and has pitched himself up to AA already. So that could still turn the tide of this trade. Based on pure value I have the Twins winning this trade at least short term. Graterol still could be a dominant reliever and Beeter could end up being better than Maeda with more years of control so there is still future value out there to be counted. With Maeda hurt and in need of TJ it feels like the Dodgers have a good chance to win this trade on pure player value long term IMO. The Twins needed another starter badly in 2020 and found a way to get one so even if they do ultimately lose the total player value of this trade they got the immediate return they needed to make a difference in 2020 with a team whose window was wide open at the time. I think that is a trade you have to make every time as a team in that position. So I can't fault them even if they might lose out on future value.
    2 points
  44. Thin? They are incredibly deep in prospects....what they are is short of ELITE prospects....or not, not really, not compared to almost every org out there. They have 5 of Fangrpahs top 100 prospects, and another at 104, after graduating Kiriloff and Jeffers. Exactly how many top 100 would they need to have not to be "horribly thin"?
    2 points
  45. Agree with you that hind sight is 20/20 and that our pitching free agent signings were terrible from the start. Although we had hope that Wes Johnson could work his magic on the relief pitchers like in the past but that didn't happen. Even so I don't put a lot of stock in free agency except players like Nelson Cruz. That being said I believe the best route is trading our redundant players and any over rated players to obtain great valued players that fit our needs. I suggested going after under valued pitchers from PIT, Musgrove, Tailon and closer Rodriguez. If we had traded for them instead of the free agents that we signed , we would have been in much better situation, record, financial and 40 man roster (where we lost Akil Baddo and in danger of losing more) Simmons to me was a success. He kept Polanco at 2B, so he could recover and be the great player that he is. Simmons covers a lot of ground, his ankles were healthy and his hitting was better than I expected. Yes, he looked terrible after his bout with covid but I blame that on too much layoff and the home run he hit. Many players have problems after they hit home runs because it goes to their heads. Coaches need to help keep hitters on track. I also think our problems are deeper than players.
    2 points
  46. I get what you are saying, but then you go ahead and list more free agents that are the same types that you said you didn't want? IMO, the only way out of this is to be able to develop your own guys, or get some guts and pull off a couple big time trades. Signing guys in their 30s is a good way to have happen exactly what you described in the first part of your post. Develop, or trade for studs that are either right in their prime or the more preferred about the enter it. And when it comes time to draft again, go after the high upside arms and lots of them. We have enough speedy outfielders and SS that can't hit.
    2 points
  47. I was always hoping for a Robbie Ray signing. I also recall many people pleading for a starting pitcher named Trevor Bauer and a closer named Brad Hand. That would have been a great use of $45M. Hindsight is always easy.
    2 points
  48. Probably true in the case of Ray, but the strategy of late FA signings did backfire on the Twins here, and remains questionable for fielding a playoff team
    2 points
  49. I also recall that the Jays grabbed Ray very early in FA, so it would have been hard for us to have a chance anyways.
    2 points
  50. The one caveat I would throw in is we do not know how either Ray or Rondon would have done here. In particular with Rondon he was with Sox for years and they clearly figured something out with him, we may not have and he would have been as bad with us as he had been for years with the Sox. Ray K numbers have been the same, but his walks have never been this low in the past. For the price I would have went after Ray first over Happ for sure, but he may not have had the same reduction in walks this year with Twins either. In terms of Wong, he was never a thought because of the playing second and we had a second baseman if we were keeping Polonco so only reason to bring in middle infielder was to upgrade defense at SS.
    2 points
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