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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/20/2020 in all areas

  1. Love this idea, especially for Odorizzi and Bailey. Dobnak/Thorpe would be 4/5 in a lot of teams rotations so the Twins are in a great spot.
    3 points
  2. The honors just keep piling up for Minnesota Twins Designated Hitter Nelson Cruz. Last month, he was named a finalist for the Muhammad Ali Sports Humanitarian Award. Tonight at the ESPYs, he was named the winner. (Story updated from the original to remind people of many of the good things that Nelson Cruz has done in the Dominican Republic and throughout the cities that he has played in.)The below is from the article in May when Cruz was named a finalist for the Ali Humanitarian Award. At Twins Daily, we congratulate Cruz on this great honor! The Muhammad Ali Sports Humanitarian Award is given to an athlete whose continuous, demonstrated leadership has created a measured positive impact on their community through sports. Muhammad Ali was well known for his core principals including confidence, conviction, dedication, giving and respect. Candidates for this award embody those principals as well. There are a couple of other Twin Cities connections among the nominees this year. Former Timberwolves All Star Kevin Love, now with the Cleveland Cavaliers, is a nominee. So is former Minnesota Lynx star Maya Moore. The other nominees are Devin and Jason McCourty of the New England Patriots and Titus O’Neil of WWE fame. By being a nominee for this award, Cruz’s Boomstick23 Foundation will receive a $25,000 grant. The winner, which will be announced July 21st at The 2020 ESPYs, will have $100,000 grant awarded to his or her charity. Each of the nominees will be featured on ESPN studio shows the week of June 15th. Roots in Giving Back Where did Nelson Cruz learn or develop the will to give back? The slugger said, "I think everything starts with my dad. He's the one who taught me the importance of giving back." Growing up in the Dominican, not everyone is able to give back financially to their communities, but Cruz's father, Nelson Cruz, Sr., was able to show his drive to help his community in other ways. "He wasn't able to give back (monetarily), but he was involved in any activities in the community."He continued, "My dad was always working with groups to develop the community. He created the first basketball tournament. He created the first community party. We saw him going to meetings just to create better atmosphere for kids and families and the community." In addition, as he grew as a ballplayer, signed and eventually became a big leaguer, he was able to work with several current and former players from the Dominican Republic on giving back. "We have a lot of good players that are doing a lot of great things for our country." He specifically mentioned players like Pedro Martinez, David Ortiz, and Robinson Cano as players that were leading the way in developing foundations to give back in their country. Going Forward When baseball starts again, there will be many requirements and restrictions for players on the field and in the clubhouse due to COVID-19. Things like social distancing and safe practices will also affect how work in the community will be going forward. "It's going to be difficult, but I think at this time more than ever, people need other people. So we will have to deal with that, the distance and how we take care of each other. But definitely, some way or another, we will have to go out there and be with kids, be with fans. You have to reach those people because they need joy. They need to see their heroes. They need to see the players, and need something to be happy about. I don't know how we'll do it, but we will come up with some ideas and we will get it done." In the short-term, he wants to make sure the clinics in the Dominican are getting what they need to help fight the Corona Virus, including needed tests. He wants to help in providing gloves, masks and other necessities for safety. He also wants to make sure doctors and nurses are provided with all the tools and equipment they may need. Join us in congratulating Nelson Cruz on being a finalist for the Muhammad Ali Sports Humanitarian Award. Click here to view the article
    2 points
  3. I can understand cutting the draft back, but I'm having trouble understanding why they're going down to only 5 rounds. seems excessive to me.
    2 points
  4. It still makes me sick to see the Pohlad statue by Target Field for what they tried to do, or at least were willing to go along and claim they were trying to do. I will never be ok with that family owning the Twins. Meanwhile I feel like the '2002 Team' should be inducted into the Twins HOF as a group for all that that team meant to the history of the franchise. Arguably the most important team in its history considering there's a good chance the team doesn't exist, or at least doesn't exist in MN, if that team doesn't spark an interest in the franchise again and help them get that new field. I think honoring that team as a team needs to be done somehow, either as a group induction (to be clear, I'm not talking about electing each of them, just the '2002 Team' itself) or some other way.
    2 points
  5. How is it that Snell isn't making it about dollars and cents when he explictly mentioned "half salary" It's even more annoying to hear him http://www.espn.com/video/clip?id=29175677 I understand this place likes to keep things simpatico with the ballplayers. I get that. Isn't it also for the fans, though? I live about 90 miles up the line from NYC, The school district I work in is less than 60 miles from NYC. I know colleagues and students that have family and first responders working in and around NYC. This guy is trying to sell this "risking my life" baloney? I surely hope he doesn't get a cent from the Rays this year
    2 points
  6. Baseball America takes a look at what is happening in the minors, a season that would now have been a couple of weeks old. https://www.baseballamerica.com/stories/a-2020-minor-league-baseball-season-grows-more-and-more-unlikely/ Besides the issues of travel and housing, we get a good idea on how minor league operations do make revenue and how much of that will basically roll over into 2021 or be refunded. Plus interesting that uniforms have been purchased, a lot of stuff printed, and multiple promotions will have to be cancelled. If major league teams are confined to their training centers, than that eliminates those facilities being used for minor league teams. At best, a major league team needs to give 50-70 games, even if intrasquad, to their top 100 prospects to keep them viable in the system. Doesn't leave a lot of hope for minor league free agents, as guys who ARE the future of the team, especially in a short season where all players get another year in service time as well as age, is going to create some chaos next season. And the major league operations still have to figure out how to pay these players something, anything. Especially with no revenue coming in.
    1 point
  7. There is no way 2020 will resemble a normal baseball season. Half the games, half the divisions, changing the rules, changing the playoff landscape, no fans, changing how umps/player/coaches interact, how can we call that another baseball season? How can we call the 2020 champ just as important as other season winners like the 2017 Astros? Since there isn't a way to redeem the season, lets make it a once in a lifetime event. I'm thinking a very short season to establish seeding, then we do a full 30 team playoff. Have all the games on a small tropical island or something, get weird with it and make the best out of what is already a lost cause. I won't take the results of whatever they manage to put together this season seriously anyway. Just make it as entertaining as possible. What are your ideas for an alternate baseball season?
    1 point
  8. We’re less than a month away from the 2020 Major League Baseball Amateur Draft. This year it’s going to be a very different event being stripped down to just five rounds. All teams will absolutely need to get it right, but that’s been a strength for the Minnesota Twins.Derek Falvey and Thad Levine took over the top of the front office prior to the 2017 season. While a substantial part of the scouting and draft focused contingent remained in the organization, the overall infrastructure has changed. Falvey and Levine have instituted a significant expansion of analytical models, as well as people to cultivate those initiatives. Developmental staff has been brought in across the farm, and voices through the system seem more aligned than ever. Although the post-draft process of skill development and progression remains the most vital piece in generating a big leaguer, it’s also very much about nailing the makeup and tools of each guy selected. With just five rounds to get it right this year, it’s worth looking at how the last three tries in that same space have gone. 2017 Picks: Royce Lewis (1, 1), Brent Rooker (1, 35), Landon Leach (2, 37), Blayne Enlow (3, 76), Charlie Barnes (4, 106), Andrew Bechtold (5, 136) In their very first draft Falvine went big on upside. Royce Lewis was selected over players like Hunter Greene and Kyle Wright. He’s got the makeup of a star player and still trends towards being a difference maker up the middle for the Twins. Rooker was a bat only prospect, but it’s played as expected at every level thus far. The power is real and he’s near Major League ready. In going after Leach, Minnesota was able to bank some money to entice Enlow. Landon hasn’t established himself much in pro ball yet, but Enlow looks to be one of the better arms in the entire system. Barnes has been a consistent lefty without much flash. He reached Triple-A last year and could project as a back-end starter. While Bechtold was seen as a very nice JUCO get he’s still waiting to establish himself. The Appy League debut was a good one but a .738 OPS at Single-A, where he was old for both leagues, didn’t light the world on fire. Overall, this group looks to have two guaranteed Major League talents, and one that could absolutely be a star. Throw in Enlow’s upside and another potential lottery pick on one of the remaining to call it a very solid first showing for the front office. 2018 Picks: Trevor Larnach (1, 20), Ryan Jeffers (2, 59), DaShawn Keirsey (4, 124), Cole Sands (5, 154) Just four picks in the top five rounds this year, Minnesota had to do more with less. Larnach was a College World Series star and brings exit velocity in spades. He’s since become a very similar comp to another Twins prospect, Alex Kirilloff. That’s great company and there’s a significant ceiling to be fulfilled. Jeffers is the best catching prospect in the organization, and while touted for his offense, he’s transformed into more of a complete player. Until now Keirsey hasn’t yet taken hold. He posted a .798 OPS in his pro debut but owned just a .436 OPS last year playing 43 games. Cole Sands looked like a gem when he did debut last year. He made it all the way to Double-A and dominated to the tune of a 2.68 ERA with a 10.0 K/9 and 1.8 BB/9. Once again, this looks like a strong core group. Larnach and Jeffers are great headliners with Sands trending way upwards. Keirsey could be a miss, but three of four looking like Major League assets this early is a solid set of circumstances. A smaller group, but a good one here. 2019 Picks: Keoni Cavaco (1, 13), Matt Wallner (1, 39), Matt Canterino (2, 54), Spencer Steer (3, 90), Seth Gray (4, 119), Will Holland (5, 149) The Twins went with the helium to start last year’s draft. Cavaco vaulted up boards but was not necessarily expected to go this high. He really struggled from the get-go but showed up to Spring Training looking very strong. Wallner is a local product and was a standout at Southern Miss. Both he and Matt Canterino looked like tested amateurs that can contribute at a very high level. Adding infield talent was the theme of a run in rounds three through five. Steer made quick work of the Appy League and held his own for the Kernels. Gray showed well for Elizabethton and made a brief cameo with Cedar Rapids. Holland was the pride of a very good Auburn squad and is seen as a very good defender. The bat didn’t play in year one but it’s far too early to make assessments there. Lots of uncertainty in regards to trend lines for this group at an early stage, but I think it’s fair to say both Wallner and Canterino impressed. Looking back at the last three drafts Derek Falvey and Thad Levine have shown there’s people in all of the right places across the Twins organization. It’s hard not to be excited about the top of any of these groups, and even moreso considering the futility the previous regime showed in regards to recent top picks. Minnesota only has four picks (27, 59, 99, and 125) to make in June and they’ll need to supplement the system as best they can. With an unlimited number of undrafted signees also on the docket, enticing amateurs with the revamped development infrastructure should be a selling point as well. Before we’ll get any live action in 2020 the draft is going to take place, and thankfully for Twins fans, there’s a group in place capable of hitting a home run. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
    1 point
  9. I mean, investment "experts" thought the market was over valued historically BEFORE 20 million people lost their jobs.....so I am unsure what to think at this point.
    1 point
  10. While the news that Rich Hill will likely be ready to start the season certainly qualifies as good news, at some point the Twins may run into a numbers problem, with more starters than rotation spots. Could piggy-backing starters be a good solution to a welcome problem?If Hill is indeed ready to start the season in July, that would presumably leave a rotation of Jose Berrios, Jake Odorizzi, Kenta Maeda, Hill, and Homer Bailey. That might mean the end of Jhoulys Chacín (or possibly a bullpen role) and would leave young, but ready starters like Randy Dobnak and Lewis Thorpe on the outside looking in (either in the ‘pen or on the taxi squad). Then there’s Michael Pineda who has 39 remaining games out of a 60-game suspension to serve. He’s all but guaranteed a rotation spot once he’s eligible to return and it’s still possible that the MLB might reduce the length of suspensions to correspond to the shortened season. Regardless of how it all shakes out it seems that Minnesota will have more starters than rotation spots. There are numerous ways around this “problem” as guys like Dobnak and Thorpe can still be optioned or would probably be content with bullpen roles as long as it meant making the team. However, with Odorizzi, Hill, and Bailey becoming free agents after the season the Twins may want to get additional looks at their young starters. And if everyone stays healthy up until Pineda’s return, there’s going to be a crunch anyway. While the Twins have done a great job of putting together a collection of quality arms, none of the starters are without their flaws. One potential solution to the quantity problem could also improve the quality of the rotation. By pairing or piggy-backing certain pitchers in the rotation, Minnesota could improve the overall strength of the rotation by reducing the third time through the order “penalty” that haunts many starters. If we take a closer look at the Twins rotation there are several candidates who would likely benefit from shorter outings. Here’s each potential starter’s career OPS against for their first, second, and third times through the batting order: Download attachment: Piggy-backing chart pic.png Both Berrios and Hill have remained solid the third time through the order over the duration of their careers. As the “staff ace” it makes sense to let Berrios be. With Hill one could make an argument for limiting his innings due to his injury history, but his innings will be limited by the short season anyway, so he could easily be left in his traditional role. The remainder of the rotation make good piggy-back candidates. Odorizzi has been terrible the third time through and tends to work up high pitch counts anyway, so he’s a no-brainer. Maeda’s a good fit as well as he tends to fall victim to the long-ball the later he pitches into games. Bailey’s strong finish after making adjustments in 2019 give reason for optimism, but he’s still the weakest link of this group, so getting him out of games sooner rather than later seems wise. Whenever Pineda makes it back from his suspension he could also benefit from avoiding a third trip through the order. So what would a piggy-back rotation look like? If the Twins should opt to go this route it’s likely to fluctuate based on performance and health, but for fun let’s assume everyone is healthy. The rotation could look something like this: SP1: Berrios SP2: Hill SP3: Maeda/Thorpe SP4: Odorizzi/Dobnak SP5: Pineda/Bailey The combinations could obviously be altered in whatever fashion the coaching staff/front office deems appropriate, but assuming health, the bodies are there (just to a lesser extent before Pineda’s return). Again, a lot could change based on performance and injuries but piggy-backing to some degree would seem to mitigate the third-time penalty while helping the bullpen to remain fresh and effective as well. Rocco Baldelli would also have the pieces in place to make quick pitching changes if any of the starting pitchers are ineffective. What do you think? Is piggy-backing an effective way to use the plentitude of starters the Twins possess or is there a better way? Please leave your comments below! MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
    1 point
  11. Killer 3

    The stock market

    Bought bitcoin when it was down to 3900 a coin. Reached up to a little over 10 grand and sold out. Easy money. Keeping my eye on it to see if crashes again then buy again
    1 point
  12. Catch-up If you were checking track at home, yesterday's game ended in very *Mark Buerhle-*esk action as the game only lasted 1hr and 20min. But with that pitcher's duel the Twins came out on top courtesy of the American League leader in ERA, Homer Bailey (1.63). The final game of the series tonight with the Twins going for the sweep. Pre-game 6:50pmCT Where to watch. Virtual Twins Network AL Central Standings 1. Twins 30-19 2. Indians 27-24 3. Royals 25-24 4. White Sox 21-28 5. Tigers 19-30 Starting Pitchers Baltimore: Keegan Akin 3-5, 4.81 ERA, 48.2 IP, 37 K'sMinnesota: Kenta Maeda 1-2, 3.46 ERA, 39.0 IP, 61 K'sBaltimore Batting Order 2B Andrew Velzquez .300 BA, 3 HR, 6 RBI LF Anthony Santander .233 BA, 5 HR, 18 RBI DH Renato Nunez .250 BA, 5 HR, 25 RBI CF Austin Hays .248 BA, 4 HR, 7 RBI 3B Rio Ruiz .316 BA, 0 HR, 0 RBI 1B Chris Davis* .163 BA, 3 HR, 10 RBI RF Dwight Smith Jr. .267 BA, 4 HR, 14 RBI SS Jose Iglesias .226 BA, 1 HR, 12 RBI C Austin Wynns .216 BA, 4 HR, 11 RBI*Chris Davis: Milestone Watch, #298 Career HR Minnesota Batting Order LF Eddie Rosario .256 BA, 9 HR, 23 RBI SS Jorge Polanco .280 BA, 7 HR, 35 RBI C Mitch Garver .329 BA, 17 HR, 34 RBI DH Nelson Cruz .256 BA, 8 HR, 27 RBI 3B Josh Donaldson .232 BA, 3 HR, 14 RBI RF Max Kepler .223 BA, 10 HR, 19 RBI 1B Willians Astudillo .161 BA, 0 HR, 1 RBI 2B Ehire Adrianza .306 BA, 1 HR, 8 RBI CF Byron Buxton .226 BA, 6 HR, 17 RBI*= Mitch Garver: 1st among Catchers in BA,HR,RBI,OBP,SLG,OPS (.325/17/33/.411//.695/1.106) Bomba Tracker - 2020: 81 - 2019 through 49 games: 96 (8HR day for 2019 Twins against LAA in a 16-7 win on May 23rd.) Storylines 1. The Twins will turn from their most reliable starter in Homer Bailey to their most questionable one in Kenta Maeda. Maeda is averaging 4 1/3IP per outing this year and those numbers has crunched even more in the month of May. The Twins are hoping the Kenta of April can return to his "ace," form (23.1IP, 10H, 4ER, 8BB, 42K's with a 1-1 record in 5 starts in May). 2. The recipe for success for Baltimore will be to work Kenta early and often and try to get another early exit and try and take getaway day. The O's are now 0-8 in their last meetings with Minnesota from 2019-2020 and will try and steal a game tonight.
    1 point
  13. But that meltdown in Anaheim. I actually skipped that paragraph here. Still can't read it.
    1 point
  14. When did AJ copyright his name?
    1 point
  15. The outliers I was more referring to was the more modern guys like Ryan, who had the velocity that is sought now a days and still threw a ton. I was also more referring them to the outliers as they could handle the load that was asked of them, but you do not take too much note of the guys that could not, because they could not. However, in the recent 30 years we tend to try to point to instances were an injury altered a career. Also, prior to tommy john, when someone tore their UCL career over and we never would hear much about work load ect. So working off of a skewed data set will skew it. I agree each team had work horses that would pitch much more than what players now are asked. Back then velocity was much lower too. I remember even as not so long as early 2000's when 95 was considered high velocity and the very very rare would throw much more than that. Now, 95 is close to league average. 90 was the goal and if you could top that great, if not you better have movement. I totally support increasing innings pitched and getting pitchers ready for that. I was never a fan of holding guys to strict pitch and inning counts in minors, only to then expect they can throw 100 plus pitches and many innings in MLB. They never were asked to do that before, so why would they be successful now? I believe many pitchers could throw more per start and more innings per season. Not every pitch is equal wear and tear on arm. So where along the line someone said pitch count is what leads to injuries, maybe they had the data to back it up or not. So teams decided they did not want big injuries to their star pitchers and were willing to let them pitch less per start to increase chance they would start more. They balance the hope of more starts to reduce risk of major injury. You cannot weed out the ones that will have the injuries as well, and you do not get the full possible player either. I am a fan of going back to 9 inning starts and let them throw over 100 pitches. Now though teams look less at pitches but times through order regardless of pitches.
    1 point
  16. He's also involved in ocean cleanup projects, from what I see on his Instagram page
    1 point
  17. I still tend to think both sides are in the wrong here. I can definitely see the owners not wanting to lose money, but I also to think to some extent that making sure that the players are getting as much of their salaries as possible is the way to go... There's a thread on this in the other baseball forum... much like our society, there's a pretty big divide between the owners and players that will likely lead to a work stoppage in 2022... I don't think baseball can afford that, and this is not the time for either side to be having that fight.
    1 point
  18. I don't think it is realistic to say that the Falvey regime has made great and wonderful picks in 2017-2019. None of these players have even played one day in the big leagues and that is the only true way to measure them.
    1 point
  19. The reason for 5 rounds is MLB is losing a ton of money every day they do not have games. They have 0 money coming in right now, save a few apparel items that are being sold most likely. I read it is expected as a whole, MLB is losing about 74 million a day no games are happening. So dropping the draft to 5 rounds allows teams to save on costs of signing bonuses of players. Also, with no minor leagues happening these guys will have no where to go if they had full draft. Even if you move to 10 that is still paying 10 guys signing bonus to most likely go to FL to work out at team facilities, where they already will have many of lower level prospects doing the same.
    1 point
  20. Just to play devils advocate, it is what I do, these guys were the outliers of the spectrum of pitching. Ryan one of the most, as he had crazy high velocity for his time. So to point to a few guys that manged to not follow the norm of the bell curve is not the most effective way to point to pitch count having a counter to intended. That being said, clearly some can be outside the norm and pitch more, but how do you figure that out without doing it? Then if you are wrong you risk injuries. I believe the increased velocity is what leads to more injuries than anything these days. I am no doctor, have taken some classes on sports injuries, but I strongly believe that throwing as hard as most do now a days will lead to more injuries because of the strain in the elbow. I remember watching Zumia tear the tip of his elbow right off from how hard he threw, never to return again. I strongly believe in the past the great pitchers would pitch well, hitting spots and working around the zone keeping hitters off balanced, changing speeds even with their fastball. This would mean they were not throwing 100% all game long. Now I think pitchers have to throw 100% while out there because if they lose some velo they lose prospect rankings and teams look at that for contract and expected regression. If velo drops then it is assumed their effectiveness will drop so money drops. Players know this so they throw max all the time. I also feel many pitchers growing up are not taught that legs drive velocity more than arms. The arm is just what releases the ball, but the legs and core is what gets you the kinetic energy to run through the arm. It seems to many people, who have not studied it, counter to logic. However, the science is there that building up leg and core strength will help so much more than arm and elbow strength. This needs to get passed down to little league coaches and up to high school coaches. Teach the kids young how to use legs and core better. This will reduce the stress on the arm over all the years.
    1 point
  21. Couldn`t agree w/ you more! But it still would have been nice to have an extra draft pick. Being the way things are, it probably hurts less. It`ll be interesting to see how thing works out after round 5. We`re in a strange territory.
    1 point
  22. An 82 game season may end up being no off days and double headers where a 6-7 man rotation is all but required for some stretches. No such thing as too much pitching, even in a short season. Abbreviated Spring Training might have an impact on being stretched out on opening day too.
    1 point
  23. "Ryan, 69, has been outspoken against the idea that pitch counts and innings limits are a deterrent to injuries. “I’m not a doctor and I’m not a scientist. All I am is a guy who threw over 5,000 innings,’’ he said. “I know what pitchers go through and I know what it takes to do that and I real ly believe we don’t condition our pitchers for what they are asked to do. And because of that, I think we increase our chances of injury on them. “I believe when an organization puts those kind of random restrictions on their pitching staff, they don’t take advantage and utilize the talent that they have. I think everybody has a pitch limit, but I think also you can tell when a guy’s reached his pitch limit by watching him. That’s what pitching coaches used to do. Now they look at the number of pitches and at around 100, they get somebody up and that pitcher comes out of the game no matter whether he’s having an exceptionally good game or if he struggled. Obviously, they put pitch limits to try to protect people, but I think it’s worked just the opposite.’’ Ryan is fifth on the all-time list of innings pitched with 5,386. Asked if his record seven no-hitters would have occurred under the current climate of safeguards, Ryan said: “I used to average 150 to 160 pitches a game because of the nature of pitcher I was. Would it have impacted my effectiveness? Yes. I think it probably would.’’ "Cardinals broadcaster Tim McCarver, who caught Hall of Fame pitchers Bob Gibson and Steve Carlton, has railed against pitch counts. “How can people be so sure it’s the same for Don Drysdale and Chris Short?’’ he said. “How do people throw these numbers around like it’s wisdom? It’s not wisdom, it’s foolish. Who’s to say it’s 120 pitches, 140 pitches. Juan Marichal in 1963 in that famous game against Warren Spahn threw pitches’’ in 16 innings." Most career innings pitched, with seasons played in parentheses 1.Cy Young (22)7,356.0 2.Pud Galvin (15)6,003.1 3.Walter Johnson (21)5,914.1 4.Phil Niekro (24)5,404.0 5.Nolan Ryan (27)5,386.0 6.Gaylord Perry (22)5,350.0 7.Don Sutton (23)5,282.1 8.Warren Spahn (21)5,243.2 9.Steve Carlton (24)5,217.2 10.Grover Alexander (20)5,190.0 https://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/IP_leagues.shtml The record of the annual most innings pitched really calls to question the durability of pitchers and todays theory on limited innings.
    1 point
  24. I know we need to be safe. Players need to be safe. The public needs to be safe. I get it....but jeez. Players sitting 6 feet away from each other, in the stands, with no high-fives, no touching....that's unrealistic and frankly just plain stupid. Sounds good on paper, but just picture it in your head for a minute. How are the players going to get up to the stands? Gonna build steps above the dugout? Or are they all going to sit behind the plate? How long will it take for a guy to get back up to the stands after a ground out? And with all those measures in place, they completely go out the window the second the pitcher touches the baseball. Because the catcher will also touch the baseball, the shortstop will touch the baseball, the first baseman will touch the baseball, and the ump will touch the baseball. They're going to be touching the same surfaces. So why do all that BS above? Just to somehow signal to the public that you're "doing the right thing?" I'm 100% for having baseball this year, if it can resemble the game we know. I was feeling hopeful a few weeks ago, but with the owner/player clash and these awful new rules...ugh. I never thought I'd say this, but I'm beginning to side with the folks who say they'd prefer to have no season.
    1 point
  25. Sconnie

    The stock market

    Fed Chair Jerome Powell on 60 minutes. Lots of mixed messages, just like the stock markets https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/coronavirus-economy-jerome-powell-federal-reserve-chairman-60-minutes/?__twitter_impression=true#app
    1 point
  26. During this global pandemic one thing that has seen a massive boost in the sports world is collectibles, or trading cards, affectionately categorized as The Hobby. With something for everyone, and fans of every sport, your bound to find a way to pique your interest. In the modern baseball world, the Angels outfielder is king, and Mike Trout did it again over the weekend. As the unquestioned best player in the game today, Trout holds a special place at the top of the modern baseball card collecting ranks. His base cards transcend “common” status, and his rarer pieces fetch exorbitant prices. It’s the 2011 Topps Update that has become his iconic rookie issue, but some of the prospect cards, namely the 2009 Bowman Chrome Autograph, have driven the market bonkers. Back in 2018 the eccentric Dave “Vegas Dave” Oancea grabbed Mike Trout’s 2009 Bowman Chrome Superfractor 1/1 autograph for a cool $400,000. He noted having turned down offers near $1 million and said he was sitting on it until a $5 million offer came through. You’ll have to excuse his crass nature in the video, but it appears his statements aren’t nearly as outlandish as one may have assumed. On Sunday night a 2009 Bowman Chrome Red /5 Autograph of Trout’s wrapped up through Ken Goldin’s auction house. That card brought in $525,000 and obviously doesn’t reach the same height as a 1/1. Assuming the red that was sold wasn’t Oancea’s, he too owns one of those cards as well as a handful of the orange version numbered to 25. To say the man is sitting on a mountain of Mike Trout moola is probably putting it lightly. This explosion isn’t just in a single card though. ESPN’s The Last Dance brought tons of buyers for Michael Jordan cards out of the woodwork. Trout’s standard base issue 2011 Update has gone from a $500 card last February to a $3,000 card today. Topps has been rolling out limited print to order Project 2020 cards with different artists and the early offerings are now in such demand the price exponentially multiples on the secondary market before each card even gets into the hands of collectors. You should never view pieces of cardboard as an investment similar to that of a stock or bond. However, classifying trading cards as pieces of cardboard is also severely missing the point if you know what you’re looking for. The return is not there for every purchase, but it’s become more than clear the hobby has a place in today’s current culture and it certainly looks like it will be here to stay. Only a select few people are interested in buying a baseball card selling for north of $500,000, but you can bet that number grows in multiples as you back off the buy in, and there’s lots of fun to be had at any level. Mike Trout, Michael Jordan, or whoever is the next big thing, you can bet their faces on cardboard will attract plenty of fans. For more from Off The Baggy, click here. Follow @tlschwerz
    1 point
  27. I'm not quite sure this is fair take... that agreement was based on no fans in stands and a relatively full season. That has changed... It also provided a loss cap if baseball was never played in 2020 as I understand it... Now that said, I'm really not a fan of how either side is handling this at the moment. I think baseball being played is good for the game and good for a distraction that we all so desperately need. Greed is getting in the way of that though, and from my view it looks like it's on both sides. I can understand owners not wanting to lose money.. I'm not quite as thrilled about squeezing players so as to make money.. if there was a time to open the books, do a temporary revenue share for the sake of the sport, and simply break even in 2020 for the owners... now is the time to do that. Instead, everyone's playing hardball. Baseball is dying sport. Any kind of work stoppage is a bad thing, and it's looking more and more like we'll see another one in a couple years too.
    1 point
  28. I am NOT talking only about money. Snell wants guaranteed wellness and safety. What a foolish demand to make right now. He's "risking his life" Give me a break
    1 point
  29. They could push back all they want. As fans we could push back so much harder. We outnumber them and in the long run we can live without them. They can't live with out us.
    1 point
  30. One last thing..... If we learn anything from this pandemic it is that safety and wellness isn't something that can be guaranteed. I don't know how Snell makes such a demand knowing full well that there are nurses, doctors, emergency workers, food service people, warehouse people, etc....etc.....forging forward through all of this. It reflects poorly on every other player. If I am a major league player and I read what Snell said I am furious
    1 point
  31. Why should they get anything more than a pro-rated salary? 1. They don't work from home 2. They are not an essential business 3. The lowest paid employee is going to be salaried at slightly over $277,000 Put all that against the current backdrop where over 30 million people are unemployed. Fans who loyally support baseball are the only reason why players make so much money. How about 33% for the players 33% for the owners and 33% reinvestment in the municipality? If Ian Snell decides he doesn't want to play baseball then maybe he shouldn't have a job in baseball? Give a young guy his spot.
    1 point
  32. Trov is right--Blake Snell's comments published on ESPN this morning, wherein he says making multiple millions of dollars to "risk his life", are not going to play well with the grocery store clerk working far harder, for more hours, with much higher risk, all for $10 an hour. Things like this are part of why the owners generally beat the players in negotiations; the owners understand (or at least employ people who do) optics.
    1 point
  33. As it is correct, if the players go public like Blake Snell, that it is about the money, they will look bad. They will bicker over a little bit of money, as one ESPN article pointed out, they could actually earn more this year under a 50/50 split depending on playoff tv contracts. But the players do not want to cap their earning potential with a 50/50 split and do not want the precedent of agreeing to do so. However, when millions are out of work standing in lines for food shelfs and begging to go back to work, the players are going to complain over money? They owners are offering a job for still large amounts of money and the players will want more money, without even really looking into how it could break down. This would also cost other their jobs. Sure they could try to shift this on the owners, but the owners made first offer and so they look like they are trying and the players look like the greedy people costing thousands in baseball jobs, and costing America baseball to watch. To many 50/50 sounds reasonable, each side gets their share. Really, the owners are taking all the risk because they will still have to pay out of their 50 other salaries, ballpark costs, travel costs ect. It is not a 50/50 split of profit, but of all revenue. The players are only taking a risk they may earn a little less than they would with a pro rata payment, with possible of more. However, if the players make a strong front and say this is about safety of our self and family with having to interact at higher levels with people. Since what has been leaked to press has little to no details on the safety part of the plan, this could help get player support if season does not happen. It is the players hands on how to approach this. Regardless, if a season is not played, many will believe it was money based, and that just does not sit well with anyone that is wishing they would be offered to work again. Now of course in a normal union job if the offer was to return to work at a lower wage many would balk at that idea, but if you were earning 50K a year asking to earn 40K that is harder pill to swallow for a person, than 5 million to 4 million. Sure, the percentage is the same, but with cost of living being nearly the same, sure the 5 million earner could have higher living standards, but it does not change how much food, phone, internet, and other utilities will cost. No matter what happens this year, I will be watching on TV again when I can, adding to the value the players will get. However, if attendance and ratings drop, the players should think about how that will affect their bottom line, even without a 50/50 split. As much as I am pro labor, if the players want to fight over this tooth and nail and strike for this, I would side with owners. Owners do not run a charity to have baseball, they do it to earn money. If they are losing money they should not run a team, just because they could lose money, this is not a business model to follow.
    1 point
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