Jump to content
Twins Daily
  • Create Account

Leaderboard

  1. VivaBomboRivera!

    VivaBomboRivera!

    Verified Member


    • Points

      6

    • Posts

      431


  2. Brock Beauchamp

    Brock Beauchamp

    Administrator


    • Points

      4

    • Posts

      26,938


  3. Dantes929

    Dantes929

    Verified Member


    • Points

      3

    • Posts

      3,063


  4. Benchwarmerjim

    Benchwarmerjim

    Provisional Member


    • Points

      2

    • Posts

      1


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/26/2020 in all areas

  1. What a waste of (virtual) paper and ink. Why do 15 people more than a decade after the events think they know more than the collective opinion of those who were present and voted at the time? Why would the MLB sponsor a "re-vote" and publish this this tripe except to pander to the East Coast fan base? There is no doubt Jeter had a long, storied career and deserved to be league MVP at some point. There is also no doubt that Morneau's career was cut short. No excuse for MLB to trot out a few writers to tell us that everybody got it all wrong back then. Surely they have not run out of real potboiling stories to tell during our enforced leave from the ball parks? Next thing you know a 15-writer committee reviewing controversial calls will tell us Ron Gant was safe.
    3 points
  2. Absurd. Replace Morneau with Jeter and the Twins finish in 2nd place. 71-33 and gaining 12 games when Morneau started hitting was no coincidence. Those were not empty stats for Morneau. He came through time and again. If you are just going to list stats then why involve writers at all? If you go by WAR then Santana beats Jeter anyway. If you go by OPS then Jeter isn't a top guy either. I was a bigger baseball fan back then (more of just a Twins fan now) and watched all those players listed. They were all great but if you want impact on a team it was Morneau all the way. I noticed the article mentioned Jeter's Gold Gloves but didn't call for a revote on those. In fact, there is good argument he should have been penalized for being so poor at a premium position. I tried to attach an article from Bleacher Report about the insanity of giving Jeter any Gold Gloves but could not.
    3 points
  3. Another self-inflicted wound by the MLB owners, who don't have a Commissioner with the cojones to tell them they're wrong. If you want baseball to be the "national pastime," its roots need to go deep down into our soil to reach the bedrock of the country. If you want talent to bubble up to big stadiums where the naming rights are for sale, you have to drill down to find it, then bring it to the surface through training and experience.
    3 points
  4. Sam Dykstra at milb.com had an interesting write up yesterday on Ryan Jeffers. https://www.milb.com/milb/news/toolshed-ryan-jeffers-trying-to-become-minnesota-twins-threat-313325916
    2 points
  5. Are they going to retrogive Johan Santana a Cy Young too?
    2 points
  6. If we were to say who is the best player born in each of the states to ever play for the Twins, who would they be? I decided to do a quick research about this and came up with a rank, based on players’ birthplaces.I tried to choose the most relevant players born in each state to play for the Twins, rather than every single one of them. Because of that, several states will not appear on this list. Also, since these rankings are based only on players’ birthplaces, one very noticeable absence will be Twins great Bert Blyleven, who was born in the Netherlands, to Dutch parents who shortly thereafter moved to the U.S. and raised him in California. Then, I ranked the players of each state by their career bWAR (Wins Above Replacement from Baseball Reference) while with the Twins. The reason for using WAR is solely to simplify things a bit, since it is supposed to be a global metric. I also included some current Twins that I believe have a shot at climbing up their state ranks once their careers are finished. If I perhaps forgot anyone that you consider relevant enough to make one of the lists, please feel encouraged to mention them in the comments section. Also, weigh in on the bigger states discussions, saying who you think is the best. I separated the top five states in number of players, to be discussed. California Roy Smalley - 20.8 WAR Tom Brunansky - 16.1 WAR Rick Aguilera - 15.5 WAR Jacque Jones - 11.9 WAR Jim Merritt - 11.3 WAR Gary Ward - 10.6 WAR Nick Punto - 10.3 WAR Eddie Guardado - 9.5 WAR Trevor Plouffe - 8.0 WAR Dan Gladden - 5.7 WAR Phil Hughes - 5.7 WAR Cali is, by far, the state that has produced the most MLB talent in history. A total of 2,311 Californian ball players made it to the big leagues. Here I found 11 who wore the Twins uniform for a significant amount of time and one thing in particular called my attention the most. How low Gladden’s WAR with the Twins was. Maybe it’s because I didn’t actually see him play on a daily basis, but I always had the impression that this number would be higher. That doesn’t change, at all, his importance in the history of the club. I would give the edge as the best from this list to Aguilera. His first stint with Minnesota was incredibly dominant, resulting in three All-Star Game selections and even MVP votes in 1991. That same year, he was one of the key-factors during the postseason, allowing only one earned run, getting five saves and a crucial game 6 win. Overall, he logged over 500 innings of relief for Minnesota (second most, behind the 579 from fellow Californian Guardado), maintaining a 3.12 ERA. Smalley, Burnansky and Gladden were also invaluable pieces for that 80’s team, but I have the impression that Aguilera’s performance were a bit more impressive. Florida Denard Span - 17.2 bWAR Doug Corbett - 8.3 bWAR Mudcat Grant - 5.9 bWAR Josh Donaldson - has yet to play I believe it’s a given to say that Span was the most relevant player from the Florida list. He was drafted and developed by the Twins, being a part of the organization for nearly ten years. During that time, he lived the final years of the victorious 2000’s team and transitioned into the beginning of the dark years. He was one of the few bright spots of the club in 2011 (cut short due to a concussion) and 2012, relying on his speed and aggressiveness running the bases, combined with a slightly above average hitting (104 wRC+ in Minnesota) and very decent on-base percentage (.357). I added Donaldson to the list because I believe he’s bound to reach at least Corbett, an early 80’s rookie sensation relief pitcher, who made the All-Star Game in his second year, before being involved in a trade with the Angels that would bring Brunansky to Minnesota. Looking back at Donaldson’s past three seasons, he was worth 11.2 WAR. If you include a fourth one to the mix, it goes up to 18.5. And that includes his terrible, injury-plagued 2018. So, expect the Bringer of Rain to climb the ladder. Illinois Kirby Puckett - 51.1 WAR Gary Gaetti - 27.2 WAR John Castino - 15.2 WAR Jake Odorizzi - 4.7 WAR Jim Thome - 4.5 WAR Absolutely nothing to argue about who’s the best here. But my question to you is where can Odorizzi get on that list? Assuming, of course, he signs a longer contract with the Twins, could he surpass Castino? Texas Chuck Knoblauch - 38.0 WAR Joe Nathan - 18.4 WAR Kevin Slowey - 4.4 WAR Ryan Pressly - 3.6 WAR Nathan is a no-brainer here, because of how badly Knoblauch ended his tenure in Minnesota. But, looking at both his performances on the field, I think it’s closer than you might think. Before demanding a trade in 1997 and then , Knoblauch was the ray of sunshine in a very bad team. He was elected Rookie of the Year in 1991 and selected to four All-Star Games through the 90’s. But, yeah, the prize here goes to the best reliever in team history. Minnesota Joe Mauer - 55.3 WAR Kent Hrbek - 38.6 WAR Dave Goltz - 24.5 WAR Jerry Koosman - 11.0 WAR Glen Perkins - 8.9 WAR Paul Molitor - 5.2 WAR Jack Morris - 4.3 WAR I saved the best for last. Just like Illinois, I don’t think there’s much to argue about the top seed. But, boy, can we have fan arguing about the rest! OK, I’ll go out on a limb here and place Morris on second and… Hrbek at third. Morris’s World Series show in 1991, as well as his fantastic regular season, are gold for me. I love Hrbek, obviously, and his career was amazing. But I’ve got to go with Morris’ historical 1991 season. It hurts to not include Perkins in the podium, though. But in my personal ranking, he’s a close fourth. Any surprises so far? Which would be your picks? Have I forgotten anyone important for you? Comment and let us know. Also, here are the other states lists. Alabama Al Worthington - 10.0 WAR Josh Willingham - 4.8 WAR Delmon Young - 1.0 WAR Arizona J.J. Hardy - 1.3 WAR Arkansas Torii Hunter - 26.4 WAR Colorado Taylor Rogers - 6.4 WAR Connecticut Carl Pavano - 5.8 WAR Delaware Randy Bush - 1.4 WAR Georgia Byron Buxton - 9.8 WAR Ben Revere - 3.2 WAR Hawaii Kurt Suzuki - 3.3 WAR Idaho Harmon Killebrew - 60.5 WAR Indiana Kyle Gibson - 9.4 WAR LaTroy Hawkins - 8.1 WAR Iowa Kevin Tapani - 19.1 WAR Kentucky Tyler Clippard - has yet to play Louisiana Scott Baker - 15.8 WAR Massachusetts Greg Gagne - 17.9 WAR Jeff Reardon - 4.2 WAR Steve Lombardozzi - 4.0 WAR Michigan Jim Kaat - 30.6 WAR Joe Mays - 10.7 WAR Mississippi Brian Dozier - 22.7 WAR Missouri Bob Allison - 30.6 WAR Al Newman - 2.1 WAR Nevada Brandon Kintzler - 2.3 WAR New Mexico Mitch Garver - 5.1 WAR New York Frank Viola - 27.0 WAR A.J. Pierzynski - 9.5 WAR North Carolina Jim Perry - 26.3 WAR Tom Hall - 6.7 WAR Zack Littell - 0.4 WAR Ohio Larry Hisle - 17.2 WAR Dean Chance - 13.1 WAR Doug Mientkiewicz - 6.4 WAR Pennsylvania Butch Wynegar - 15.3 WAR Virginia Michael Cuddyer - 12.8 WAR Jake Cave - 2.6 WAR Washington Trevor May - 2.1 WAR Wisconsin Brad Radke - 45.6 WAR MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
    1 point
  7. 7. 2019 W-L record. I think that's the most obvious option. It does give the teams who finished low last year a bit of an advantage in getting the same high picks two years in a row but I don't see any better way to do it.
    1 point
  8. I think he is really only considered one of the worst because he was so highly regarded in the first place. Had the Twins had some 25th round draft pick work his way up and then ended up with 108 saves and a 4.5 era people would probably say we got more out of him than we expected. But since we traded Smalley for him he was expected to be lights out and he was a tick or two below average. So I think his was a case of perspective as there have been a lot of pitchers grace a Twins uniform that were way worse than Davis. The Twins also had Steve Howe in their bullpen alongside RD in 85
    1 point
  9. Cool and inventive post. thanks for that! If using "relevance" specifically, I'd say Mudcat Grant got somewhat ripped off. In 1965, he went 21-7, and pitched 2 complete game victories in the World Series, which the Dodgers won in 7. Even hit a 3 run bomba in game 6. I could barely remember Doug Corbett. To be fair, he was a reliever, and made the all star team in one of his 3 twins seasons. However WAR or no WAR, Grant has way more relevance in Twins history.
    1 point
  10. With no real baseball they have to do SOMETHING to fill up pages. I agree, it's a colossal waste of time. They're just trying to curry favor with all those people in New York. It won't get them any more Electoral College votes come November...
    1 point
  11. This list only counts WAR accumulated in a Twins uniform. Winfield only had .3 WAR over two seasons with the Twins at the end of his career.
    1 point
  12. Let's take a moment to revel in Julio Franco. Unless my math is wrong, he played his final MLB game as a 49 year old. He's Jamie Moyer who hits. He literally played at the highest level until he was almost FIFTY YEARS OLD.
    1 point
  13. Brock Beauchamp

    Coronavirus

    Bolded for emphasis. Do you honestly believe that extending social distancing is prolonging the misery? If yes, why?
    1 point
  14. Brock Beauchamp

    Coronavirus

    Except they're not. You're using small numbers to make them look small without applying scale. .5% is, at minimum, 150% higher than the upper end of flu rates, which you referenced as .2%. Assuming those rates, which you're basically just making up, means that 2.5 people die of COVID-19 for every single person that dies of the flu. And that's your best case scenario. Never mind that infection rates cannot be left out of this conversation because humans have been fighting the flu for millennia. We have natural immunities plus a solid vaccination system that prevents people from getting sick in the first place. Start stacking these things on top of each other and the typical 30,000 flu deaths a year could reach 500,000+ COVID-19 deaths without things even going unexpectedly badly. And that's why I want everyone here, and I mean everyone, to stop equating this virus to the flu. That argument is used solely to minimize the danger of COVID-19. While I welcome discussion about how to move forward, it's time to squash bad, flawed comparisons that do not hold up to what any experts, scientists, or doctors are telling us about this virus.
    1 point
  15. Sconnie

    Coronavirus

    agreed, it's a failure of our economy, leadership, and society that anyone goes hungry, or lives homeless in the strongest economy and wealthiest nation on planet earth. Covid or not, we have the resources to provide an appropriate safety net, and we choose not to exercise those resources. I would rather allow the free market economy to function as it should, but in times of crisis you need to intervene. We've let the economy be broken and now we need to fix it. It's not a passive allowance, but an active repair. The ultimate sacrifice a person can make is their life. Why should someone who works hourly or for themselves in a small business have to pay that price at a higher rate than those who work salaried office jobs? Average monthly rent in the US is over $1400 and during the greatest health crisis in this nation since 1918, we can't even muster one month? Let alone groceries and utilities and it will be weeks or months until many people can even get the money.... We have failed. Failed miserably.... but telling people that they should put their health and lives at risk because of our societal failures exacerbates the failure even greater. And we do need to get back to work, desperately, but we are so far from being able to do that safely in many/most industries and especially services that we need the intervention to give the science and industry institutions time to scale up solutions, and rebuild new infrastructure.
    1 point
  16. Great work I look forward to the next one.
    1 point
  17. According to this article, the Twins have the third best outfield -- https://www.cbssports.com/mlb/news/mlb-power-rankings-a-look-at-the-best-outfields-in-baseball-with-the-dodgers-on-top-thanks-to-their-mvp-duo/ Let's hope that they get to prove it.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to Chicago/GMT-05:00
×
×
  • Create New...