Jump to content
Twins Daily
  • Create Account

Leaderboard

  1. Dantes929

    Dantes929

    Verified Member


    • Points

      5

    • Posts

      3,077


  2. yarnivek1972

    yarnivek1972

    Provisional Member


    • Points

      5

    • Posts

      6,683


  3. Heezy1323

    Heezy1323

    Verified Member


    • Points

      4

    • Posts

      235


  4. Trov

    Trov

    Verified Member


    • Points

      4

    • Posts

      1,205


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/10/2020 in all areas

  1. Tom Verducci posted an article today on SI.com about Noah Syndergaard and the relationship between velocity and elbow injury. I thought it was pretty good. Also, feel free to check out my blog posts about TJ surgery decision-making and techniques, if you're interested.
    4 points
  2. Brant Alyea 1970 comes to mind. As I recall, he got off to a torrid start and ended up hitting around .290 with around 20 home runs. He was out of MLB a couple of years later.
    4 points
  3. To me for one-hit-wonders, I am would think of Scott Diamond, in 2012, who had 12-9 record with 3.54 era, 2.6 war. Rest of his career was pretty much 1 full season after that where he produced negative war. After that 1 inning three years later at MLB level. That is a true one-hit-wonder. The list you put together, I would not even consider Phil Hughes as a one. If you mean for the Twins, then yes, but he had a productive career before the Twins, not to level of that one season but he was productive. Cordova, Punto, Jones, and Guzman I would not consider them one hit wonders either. Yes, they had outlier seasons that had peak value, but they still played several years in the majors. Lew Ford I would put on the list, because he pretty much came out of nowhere and returned to nowhere. Else we could put Jack Morris on Twins one hit wonder. He had 1 season with Twins and helped them win a WS, sure he was career HOF pitcher, but 1 season with Twins. Scott Diamond is my number one. Super flash in the pan to never be heard from again after he fell back to his norm. I see one-hit-wonders as coming out of no where, having big value, then nothing after that.
    3 points
  4. I stopped about half-way through, but after reading your comment I went back and finished the video. A few things I noticed: - Most of the homers were really walloped, not close to the fence. With a "normal" ball like in 2018, you could subtract maybe ten percent, tops. - Garver's swing most resembles Cruz's. That guy will hit tons of homers. - Rosario is a legit home run hitter. - Kepler's swing reminds me a little of Justin Morneau's. - Cron could really drill line drives. - Schoop had immense power, but only in streaks. - Sano just flips his wrists, ball goes 380. - Cruz finishes beautifully on balance. - Gonzalez has explosive power on both sides. - So does Polanco. - Buxton hits fewer home runs, but seems to reach the 3rd deck with ease. - Arraez is going to surprise people with his power in a couple years. This Twins team will continue to pile up home runs for the foreseeable future. Only viral pandemics can prevent it.
    3 points
  5. Looking to kill some time? Here's the ultimate bomba squad highlight reel. Enjoy!
    2 points
  6. The more they talk about warping the very fabric of the league to try and manufacture a season, the more I wonder if a season's worth having at all
    2 points
  7. He makes a very interesting case. I still believe that poor or improper/inconsistent mechanics exacerbate the potential for injury, especially in "max-effort" guys, but you can't really argue against those numbers too much. Although I think you would also have to look at the motion and mechanics of all those pitchers on that list as well. It's a conversation I had a lot over that last few years with my son. He was always worried/bummed that he didn't throw hard enough, and he felt at times that made him less effective as a pitcher (the numbers would disagree though ). While some of his current teammates do throw harder than him, his velocity is pretty much on par with his age group (he was routinely touching 80 this year on his FB at 16). I've always stressed to him that velocity is useful, but throwing good strikes/hitting your spots and mixing your pitches are far more important, don't stress your arm too much.
    2 points
  8. And still no one talking about minor leagues. I have a hard time believing that these guys are dumb. So, they have to know that a 30 man roster isn’t going to last some teams 4 weeks, let alone 4 months. And of course there is the giant elephant in the room. Let’s say they set all this up and they have 15 MLB teams each with 4 milb teams playing. They manage to find housing, catering, etc for everyone involved. Let’s say we’re talking about 3000 people in Arizona and Florida. All effectively quarantined for 4 months. Every thing is going smooth. Then one day, the truck driver who delivers food to one of the residences gets sick because he also delivers to a senior living center where there is an outbreak. But, of course, he didn’t know that because no one was sick yet. Now, this driver infected the receiving crew. They infect food preparers who infect players. How’s that going to play on the evening news?
    2 points
  9. The Rutherford Elementary student who pitched the “everyone goes to Arizona for the summer” idea says he will consider new initiatives after snack time.Major League Baseball’s proposal to start the season in May in front of empty Arizona stadiums received a mixed response earlier this week. Some, understandably desperate for baseball/any kind of sports, were enthusiastic. Others, including players themselves, were much more skeptical, citing issues from lack of medical testing to players abandoning their families for four months during a pandemic to support staff logistics to the fact that Arizona is 400 degrees in the summer. Now, the child who hatched the initial plan is being asked to keep the idea train rolling. “I like baseball,” said Timmy Tompkins, age 8. “OK, string cheese time.” The Stillwater 2nd-grader’s initial pitch was part of a creative writing exercise during his class’ distance learning. The crayon-drenched missive found its way to MLB headquarters, where it soon caught on with the Commissioner’s office and some team owners. League sources say they did not know the age of the proposal’s author (“We thought a Canseco brother sent it,” said one executive) or his characterization of PBS’ Daniel Tiger as “kind of lame.” “All options are on the table for the 2020 season,” said a source familiar with Commissioner Rob Manfred’s thinking. “The Arizona proposal is one of a number of alternatives under consideration, and we’re asking stakeholders and people with the game’s best interests at heart to keep brainstorming, regardless of bedtime.” Tompkins’ parents say that his proposals for Home Run Karate, Christmas Every Month, and Pudding Wednesdays have not received as much traction. For his part, Tompkins is enthusiastic about getting back to the drawing board. “I bet they could play on the moon,” mused Tompkins. “Astronaut dingers!” Image license here. Click here to view the article
    2 points
  10. Video game season. At least until Grandpa Columbo comes over to read a book...
    2 points
  11. First person I thought of. I guess also Bobby Darwin.
    2 points
  12. I am hoping the Twins saw something in Wisler that can help become a little more consistent. He has the pitches to be an above average asset in the pen.
    2 points
  13. I have less optimism about this group than you do, but I enjoyed your essay. Wisler is a question mark, Duffey or May could regress and we are counting heavily on them. Littell could be a regress or continue to step up. Mr Slowball Romo is good for laughs, but is this the year that they really clobber his stuff? I am hoping you are right and my concerns are a waste of energy.
    2 points
  14. Know what I’m not seeing in this “plan” for games in Arizona? Any mention of minor league baseball. There is no way they can conduct even an abbreviated MLB season without a feeder system of potential replacements available. And they can’t just be sitting around. They would have to be playing. At the bare minimum, I think they would need to carry a 28-30 man MLB roster, possibly with 26 active for a particular game with the rest as a “taxi squad”. Add to that probably 35-40 AA/AAA players on teams with 25 active for a game. I’m not even sure that would be enough players. Guys get hurt. A lot. Even with 70 guys available, an injury riddled team could find itself short staffed pretty quickly. Then what? Throw some guy into a pro baseball game that hasn’t played in 5 months? Honestly, I think every team would need all affiliates playing. And there is no way that Arizona could host all those games.
    2 points
  15. I'm old school, so gotta go with Hoyt and Wilbur. Geez, the longevity of those guys. In my 40's I had moved from Chicago to LA, and lived across from a high school where I saw a bunch of similar vintage dudes playing ball. I went over and soon joined up with one of the over 40 leagues there. Went to the cage, tuned up on the hitting- and by golly, I got some of the old stroke back- or so I thought. There were a couple of exhibition-type games before the season started, and I was stinging the ball. The mgr batted me leadoff in the first game. On the mound was this fireplug of an old guy, probably pushing 60 at the point, who threw a knuckler. The other guys were saying that he was a nightmare to hit, and I had never faced one before, but thought, what's the big deal? Never even came close to touching the ball in 5 trips. Never saw the top half of the batting order again, either...
    2 points
  16. Ball Four is to baseball literature what Spinal Tap is to film. There are more memorable quotes and scenes that I still remember 40 years after reading it than any book I have read since.
    2 points
  17. While we don’t presently have baseball, this sport is one of previous analysis anyways. Without the opportunity to dissect the action currently taking place, it seemed there may be no better time to look back. Some guys are great, and others are great sometimes. Here’s a look at some of the greatest outlier seasons in recent Twins history.When attempting to compile names for this list I couldn’t help but enjoy the trip down memory lane. I’m not big on re-watching previously completed sporting contests. The idea of the already known result isn’t all that exciting to me. Specific plays or portions can be fun, but much of the programming we’re being delivered doesn’t hit home here. Without needing to relive a full season, these snapshots provide pop up excellence amidst otherwise static careers. There really aren’t any specific parameters other than the season in question truly had to be an outlier. I utilized fWAR to designate that, but a bar to clear wasn’t a hard and fast rule. Before getting into the top five here’s a relatively recent honorable mention: 2014 Phil Hughes 6.3 fWAR (17.7 career) The first season in a Twins uniform was one for the ages when it comes to Hughes. The former Yankees top prospect and World Series winner entered Twins Territory and went on to set the All-Time MLB single-season strikeout-to-walk record. It was the only time he surpassed 200 innings in his career, and he posted a career best 3.52 ERA. With a 2.65 FIP Hughes was every bit as dominant as could be hoped for. The team wasn’t any good, but that didn’t stop him from getting serious steam in terms of Cy Young consideration. 5. 1995 Marty Cordova 3.6 fWAR (6.5 career) It’s not surprising that a Rookie of the Year winner would put up a good season, and it’s also not unfathomable they’d fall off from there. Cordova wasn’t otherworldly in his debut, but he was better than he’d ever be again and that’s why he makes this list. He trumped the 114 wRC+ in 2001 with the Indians, but the 24 longballs always remained a high-water mark. Within two years Cordova had turned into a negative asset for the Twins and he lasted just five with the big-league club. Bouncing around between three organizations in his final four major league seasons, the magic of that debut was never recaptured. 4. 2006 Nick Punto 3.6 fWAR (15.1 career) There has never been a team that Nick Punto was on and he didn’t provide value. The light hitting utility man was a swiss army knife that did little at the dish but was exceptional in the field. For a guy that owned a career .646 OPS and .245 average, the .725 and .290 marks in 2006 were amazing. He played five different positions that year and helped to propel Minnesota to a 96-win season capped off with an AL Central division title. More of a complimentary asset throughout his 14 years in the majors, Punto was absolutely a strong contributor on that Ron Gardenhire squad. 3. 2001 Cristian Guzman 3.9 fWAR (8.2 career) Debuting in 1999, things didn’t go well for the Twins new shortstop. He contributed -3.1 fWAR and there wasn’t value on either side of the diamond. Fast forward two years and the script had flipped entirely. Guzman made his first All-Star Game appearance and owned a .302/.337/.477 slash line. He led the league in triples (14) for the second straight season and launched a career best 10 dingers. He wouldn’t again eclipse 2.0 fWAR in his career until 2008 with the Nationals at the age of 30 and had made a career of being slightly above replacement level by then. The 2001 Twins paved the way for a great 2002 club, and Guzman’s performance arrived just a year too soon. 2. 2004 Lew Ford 3.4 fWAR (5.9 career) Owner of arguably the most interesting career in recently memory, Lew Ford just misses out on the top spot for this list. He played in the big leagues for just six years but had a five-year gap between year five and six. On top of that, the now 43-year-old is still playing professional ball with the Long Island Ducks and has 21 years under his belt. 2004 was Ford’s first full major league season and he contributed in a big way. The .299/.381/.446 slash line was easily a career best, and his 15 homers were 43% of his career total. He swiped 20 bases being thrown out just twice, and he posted an impressive 11 DRS. 1. 2002 Jacque Jones 5.0 fWAR (12.5 career) The best season of any hitter on this list, Jones easily had the largest outlier year of recent Twins memory back in 2002. A team that wins 94 games and goes to the ALCS needs stars, and Jones was one of them. His .852 OPS was a career best, and it was one of only two times in his career that he batted .300. The 27 homers were also a career best, and 132 of his 149 games came with him starting in the leadoff spot. His 11 outfield assists were a high career high, and he had completely embodied an offensive and defensive threat. At no point throughout his career did he ever surpass 2.0 fWAR in a single season aside from that magical 2002 run. What other one-year wonders can you think of in Twins history? Who do they come from further back in history? MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
    1 point
  18. The USA Today’s Bob Nightengale is reporting that Major League Baseball is considering dropping the National League and American League for the 2020 season. This would allow clubs to play in their spring training sites and have completely new divisions based on geography. Minnesota’s new division would be much tougher than the American League Central, so how could that impact their 2020 season?Welcome to the Grapefruit League South! Under MLB’s new proposal, the Twins would play in a division that includes the Boston Red Sox, Atlanta Braves, Tampa Bay Rays, and Baltimore Orioles. With most of the original AL East and a strong Braves team, Minnesota’s path to the postseason will be tougher, but could it make the team stronger over the course of the season? The Cellar Baltimore is not going anywhere this season, especially coming off a season where the club lost 108 games. The Orioles are likely happy to be getting out of playing the Yankees 19-times this season. Other than that, they would see most of the AL East on a regular basis under this plan. Most teams in the Grapefruit League South should take full advantage of a rebuilding Baltimore squad. There are few up-and-coming stars on Baltimore’s roster and their farm system isn’t exactly overflowing with MLB talent. It seems like the Orioles are destined for the cellar no matter what division they are placed in for 2020. Predicted Division Finish: 5th The Mighty Have Fallen Boston entered this off-season with one goal, cut payroll and get under the luxury tax threshold. After messing up a three-team trade including the Twins, the Red Sox were still able to make a deal to dump Mookie Betts and David Price while acquiring some decent prospects (one of which has been injured since the team made the trade). Minnesota versus Boston seems like such an intriguing storyline for the 2020 season. The Twins can use the cancelled Brusdar Graterol trade as motivation and run over one of the top organizations in recent years. The Red Sox aren’t exactly in win-now mode, so they may have less to play for in a season where the divisions are realigned. Predicted Division Finish: 4th The Contenders Tampa Bay and Atlanta are certainly more difficult than Cleveland and Chicago in the AL Central. That being said, the Twins were already expected to finish higher than these two teams in the regular season. MLB.com had the Twins, Rays and Braves ranked as the fourth, fifth and sixth team in their early-season Power Rankings. Tampa seems to always find a way to compete in a tough division and Atlanta is on the rise. Realistically, anything could happen in an altered season with the possibility of an electronic strike zone, new ballparks and a shortened schedule. Atlanta would also likely need to adjust to using a full-time designated hitter after having little to no time to prepare for the transition. The Braves still have Ronald Acuna, who might be the MLB’s second-best player behind Mike Trout. Predicted Division Finish: 2nd (Atlanta) and 3rd (Tampa) The Favorite? The Twins were supposed to be good, like really good. A historically good offense, a dominate bullpen and depth at starting pitching made it hard not to conjure up memories of the 1987 and 1991 season. Minnesota also saw plenty of line-up pieces deal with injuries last season. A completely healthy line-up would offer little rest for a pitching staff from one through nine in the line-up. Rich Hill could also be healthy for the majority of the season. Realistically, the Braves, Rays and Twins would likely beat-up on each other throughout a shortened season and teams would need to take advantage of games against the Orioles and Red Sox. This is a significantly tougher division for the Twins, but it could make them more playoff ready and that could be a concern for other team’s across baseball. Predicted Division Finish: 1st How do you feel like the division would turn out? Leave a COMMENT and start the discussion. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook or email Click here to view the article
    1 point
  19. All: With all the free time due to not having a new MLB season to follow, I was thinking back to baseball past. Things like the sacrifice bunt, the importance of the RBI and the fun that Knuckleball pitchers brought to the game. This led to try and find if there were any Knuckleball pitchers still baffling hitters in the big leagues. According to an article last summer in the Washington post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/08/15/mlb-knuckleball-is-quickly-going-extinct) Steven Wright of the Red Sox was the only active Knuckleballer in the big leagues last season. The article talks about the steady decline of Knuckleballers over the past dozen years, and the likely reasons why. I'm wondering how the T.D. Universe feels about Knuckleballers. Who was your favorite Knuckleballer? (Mine is Wilbur Wood - He averaged more than 350 innings a season from 1971-73, with an ungodly 376.2 inning pitched in 1972. In 1973 he would become the first pitcher since Walter Johnson to win and lose 20 games in the same season, with a 24-20 mark.) Did you like the craziness that often came went a Knuckleballer pitched? How would Knuckleballers fair today with the hitting emphasis on Launch Angle, Exit Velocity, etc.?
    1 point
  20. Catch-up The Twins are coming off of a bummer of a homestand (2-4) and are looking to bounce back in Chicago. Meanwhile the White Sox are trying to claw back early in April and make a bid for the AL Central title for the first time since 2008. Pre-game 6:45pmCT Where to watch. https://www.twitch.tv/thuuuuney/ Starting Pitchers Chicago Carlos Rodon 1-1. 8.59 ERA, 7.1IP, 2.18 WHIP Minnesota Kenta Maeda 0-0, 2.70 ERA, 10.0IP, 0.80WHIP Minnesota Batting Order RF Max Kepler .224 BA, 3 HR, 6 RBI SS Jorge Polanco .291 BA, 1 HR, 8 RBI 3B Josh Donaldson .313 BA, 2 HR, 5 RBI C Mitch Garver .333 BA, 3 HR, 8 RBI LF Eddie Rosario** .333 BA, 3 HR, 9 RBI DH Nelson Cruz .260 BA, 2 HR, 8 RBI 1B Miguel Sano .179 BA, 2 HR, 5 RBI 2B Ehire Adrianza .182 BA, 0 HR, 2 RBI CF Byron Buxton .250 BA, 3 HR, 4 RBI** = Eddie Rosario: T-1st on team BA, (.333), HR, (3), 1st in RBI, (9). Chicago Batting Order SS Tim Anderson .132 BA, 0 HR, 2 RBI 3B Yoan Moncada .286 BA, 2 HR, 12 RBI 1B Jose Abreu .227 BA, 0 HR, 1 RBI DH Edwin Encarnacion** .209 BA, 2 HR, 6 RBI C Yasmani Grandal .317 BA, 1 HR, 6 RBI LF Eloy Jimenez .375 BA, 5 HR, 7 RBI RF Nomar Mazara .313 BA, 3 HR, 9 RBI CF Luis Robert .286 BA, 0 HR, 0 RBI 2B Leury Garcia .327 BA, 3 HR, 7 RBI**= Edwin Encarnacion: Career splits against Minnesota, (.287BA,27HR, 92 RBI, .954 OPS) Bomba Tracker - 2020: 20 - 2019 through 13 games: 19 Storylines 1. Kenta Maeda seeks his first win of the year after arguably the best start of his career on Saturday (6.0 IP, 2H, 14 K's, 0 ER) which resulted in a no-decision. 2. Tim Anderson is trying to make baseball fun again after a slow start,(.132 BA, 0 HR, 2 RBI), but the White Sox have been led early by the scorching hot bats of Yoan Moncada (12 RBI's in 12 games), and Eloy Jimenez (.375BA). 3. White Sox come into the ballgame 4-2 at home early in April while the Twins are 6-1 on the road thus far, something's got to give today!
    1 point
  21. I agree more with the good than I do the bad, Nick, to be honest. And it's not just that I'm an optimist. At various times and stages, through the minors and at the ML level we've seen what May and Duffey can do, more so with May probably. With both of them, I don't see lightening in a bottle for a single year. There's enough history, arm talent, hard work by them and the staff, I think they are both just fine. At some point, Romo and Clippard will finally regress or lose it. And sometimes it can happen quickly. But nothing seen recently indicates their cliff is 2020, assuming a season. While we don't have any long term success to feel 100% about Littell and Stashak, we've also seen an awful lot of good and potential. Wisler is a wildcard worth looking at and burning early if need be. I dismiss Graterol not due to talent or potential, only because he wasn't around long enough to make a true impact. Romero, Colina and Chalmers could be a "replacement" for him in the pen, even short term, in the case of Colina and Chalmers who still seem to have SP potential. And yes, Duran could fit in temporarily as well. And Poppen shouldn't be dismissed. There is tremendous depth here amongst options already established and options who could contribute short and long term, including Dobnak, Smeltzer, etc. I feel good about the depth of the pen. Completely different than when 2019 started.
    1 point
  22. Brock Beauchamp

    Coronavirus

    The reality is that we can’t prepare for every scenario if the, you know, really hits the fan and demand jumps astronomically for a specific set of devices/equipment. What we’re not paying enough attention to here is that this didn’t blindside us. Experts knew this was coming, at least in some capacity, 4-5 months ago. And we did almost nothing. And I’m being generous by using “almost” in that sentence. These orders to shift production should have come two months ago, which would massively lift the burden. Every day we didn’t act is two days lost to alleviate the supply chain problems we see right now.
    1 point
  23. Like I said above, lots of faith in the antibody testing. If there are already tens of millions of people that have been infected, it changes the landscape drastically. So the key is getting this test to as many as possible asap.
    1 point
  24. How has no one mentioned Charlie Hough? That's who I watched to master the knuckleball. Neikro's and Wakefield too. If only I would have been allowed to throw it in high school....
    1 point
  25. I'm almost positive Romero has a fourth option. No one's giving up on Duran as a starter. He was simply mentioned as one of the only arms in the system with a feasible chance of replacing what Graterol brought.
    1 point
  26. Anyone remember Allan Anderson he had a 2 year run including a 17 win season and an ERA title.
    1 point
  27. He is a great choice but I will defend him a little. I don't think he went back to his norm. I think he became a good pitcher as his 2012 year suggests and then had arm troubles which kept him from maintaining that. He started the 2013 year on the 15 day disabled list but his curve ball just never had the same bite when he came back. Much like Tyler Duffey though to his credit Duffey has come back from being a one and done guy.
    1 point
  28. I experienced a sense of deja vu on this one, sort of like it had been ranked #1 in another Tom video or something.
    1 point
  29. Good catch (no pun intended!). I lived in Toledo OH and watched Engle play regularly where I think he edged out Wade Boggs for a batting title and played a great RF with a rifle arm! I don’t think he ever caught a game for the Mud Hens who were Twins farm team for about 8 years. I became fan as 8 yr old in Orlando FL when my young self was impressed by s spring training rout of the Reds. I was hooked until now with the real intense years coming from listening to Herb Carneal "A pleasant good evening to you from the Big A in Anaheim"
    1 point
  30. Jaque Jones had more than one productive year though. He had multiple years of 20+ homeruns and he had multiple years where he hit decent he was a regular for multiple years, I see a Marty Cordova on this list way more than I see Jaque Jones.
    1 point
  31. That was a great way to spend 36+ minutes. Now I’m going to spend the next 36 minutes watching from 32:42-32:53 over and over.
    1 point
  32. Fun topic. I would add Joe Mays, Jim Hughes and Bill Zepp for consideration.
    1 point
  33. My nominee would be Glenn Adams who hit .338 in 1977. His slash line was .338/.376/.468. He had 8 RBIs in a 19-12 win at Chicago White Sox, a game I listened to from my home in Toledo, OH on 670 WMAQ with Harry Carey announcing! In 1977 he had only 269 AB, playing for Gene Mauch, who was a proponent of platooning back when teams used less pitchers and you could afford to platoon. Mauch was a brilliant manager and who know-how great that 1977 team could have been if Griffith didn’t let go of via free agency and trade, all of the stars of the team, Carew being the last to depart after 1978 season, a dark moment in Twins history but Griffith made Carl Pohlad look like George Steinbrenner !!!!!
    1 point
  34. The Canseco brothers have LOTS better ideas that that.
    1 point
  35. Can you remind me whether or not Romero has options this year? I think he is out, but then remember something about an extra year...which may have been used last year. If he is out, suspect the enlarged rosters may keep him with the Twins. Also, any news on the status of his getting his Visa so he can join the Twins whenever they start up? I see you included Duran. Do you see him as a reliever? And if so, long-term?
    1 point
  36. 2009 Joe Mauer? I KID, I KID!
    1 point
  37. One of the pastimes that is most celebrated in the baseball community is the ranking of prospects. Beyond producing more online bickering content, these lists provide a useful way to compare the quality of prospects across each team’s system. But there might be a different way we should be valuing the prospects in a single franchise.The argument for which Twins prospect is the best is a concise and frankly pretty boring one. The majority consensus has Royce Lewis as the Twins’ best prospect with Alex Kirilloff being the second best. Keith Law was one of the few writers to go against the grain as he placed Kirilloff much higher than Lewis in his most recent top 100 ranking. Even in cases like this, the list of prospects who are often considered to be the best is almost never longer than two names. But what if there was another way to look at the system? Lists like the common top 100 variant are created with no thought in mind besides the merit of the players being ranked. That’s the entire purpose of the list. But the importance of a prospect in context is more nuanced than how good they are or how good people perceive them to be. Their status rests on the value they bring to their specific organization in context with what that organization already has at that position. For example, if there was some ridiculous team out there that had a starting rotation of Gerrit Cole, Jacob deGrom, Justin Verlander, Max Scherzer, and Shane Bieber all under contract for the next five years, then having top pitching prospects would be pretty pointless. A prospect like Nate Pearson isn’t going to crack that starting rotation unless he steals one of their jerseys and wears a mask. This is where prospects become more useful in regards to their trade value in order to shore up a weakness elsewhere on the team. Now, no team out there will ever find itself in the same situation as the hypothetical one mentioned above (the Indians sure did try but cheapness can only take you so far). So figuring out which prospects are the most indispensable takes more thought and comes down to personal taste. While the Twins aren’t in the equivalent situation as the team with the incredible starting rotation, they do find themselves in a similar conundrum with Royce Lewis. Lewis’ position through the vast majority of his time in the minors has been shortstop. But the Twins already have a 26-year-old All-Star at the same position. Sure, Jorge Polanco has his issues defensively, but finishing 13th in MVP voting is nothing to scoff at. Third base would be the next logical move if the Twins hadn’t just handed their biggest free agent contract ever to a third baseman. Josh Donaldson remains an elite player on both sides of the ball despite his age but could relinquish the position if that age catches up soon. Even then, Lewis is even more of an unknown at third base and penciling him in there long term would be foolish. The last position that remains is center field. Some scouts have banished him there due to his incredible athleticism and current defensive shortcomings at shortstop. He has all of eight minor league innings at the position so placing him here also would fall under “unwise acts”. Oh, and the other top two position-playing prospects for the Twins (the aforementioned Kirilloff and Trevor Larnach) also play in the outfield. Maybe you’ve heard this, but the Twins already have a pretty solid outfield at the major league level. Likely their worst starter, Eddie Rosario, was projected to be around a 2 fWAR player in 2020. Again, that’s their worst starter. So if all of their top three position playing prospects are all blocked to varying degrees, one of Jordan Balazovic or Jhoan Duran likely is the Twins’ most indispensable prospect. The value of starting pitching around the league is already quite high as quality starting pitching becomes more expensive each year. When combined with the fact that Jake Odorizzi will likely leave next season, it becomes crucial for someone to step up and take over in the rotation. The Twins do already have some interesting names in Lewis Thorpe, Randy Dobnak, and Devin Smeltzer, but both Balazovic and Duran currently possess more upside. Whether they achieve that upside is another issue, but the talent right now is undeniable. Given that he has a relatively straightforward path to the majors and has yet to struggle mightily at any level, Balazovic may very well be the most indispensable prospect in the Twins’ system. Pitching prospects especially are from a given (Martín Pérez was once a top prospect), but Balazovic’s raw stuff combined with the Twins’ newfound ability to develop pitching gives him a great shot at being successful at the major league level. In the meantime, the Twins can deal their other top prospects with a relatively safe peace of mind. MORE FROM TWINS DAILY — Latest Twins coverage from our writers — Recent Twins discussion in our forums — Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, or email — Follow Matt Braun on Twitter here Click here to view the article
    1 point
  38. How about Chris Colabello? (Maybe for Toronto).
    1 point
  39. In 1985 Mickey Hatcher maybe peaked getting 9 hits in a row but couldn't keep it up for some reason. His peak year was 1983 though hitting .317. Injury related, but Scott Erickson really only gave us one good year.
    1 point
  40. I would LOL except unfortunately it's not funny.
    1 point
  41. Ahh, Seth, you've done it again. Thanks for this awesome rundown. These are the names and faces from my Elementary School days, the heroes who populated my baseball card collection, and whose exploits I'd fall asleep to with the transistor under my pillow with those night games coming in from the coast. What I'd give right now to fall into a sound, innocent sleep, with the crackle of static and the day's closing grain prices in between the innings where images of my childhood idols danced in my head...
    1 point
  42. The 1960s Baltimore Orioles had one of the originals, Hoyt Wilhelm, who was a relief pitcher and maybe even a closer. The catcher, Gus Triandos, would go to the dugout when Wilhelm came in and grab a huge over sized catcher's mitt so he could at least get a glove on Wilhelm's pitches. The fun part about the knuckle ball is that no one knows where it is going including the pitcher. The good ones can keep the ball around the plate and the batter almost has to swing.
    1 point
  43. I was always a fan of knuckelball pitchers. Tim Wakefield was my favorite, mainly because he was the best at it when I watched baseball, the 70's pitchers were before I was born. What I like best about them, much like the side arm or submarine guys is they were the underdogs. The guys that were cast off as failures in the sport and they decided to try something else to make it. How many top prospects fizzle out and never heard from, then you see theses guys, that at times needed to go through years of convincing teams they had a spot. It would be interesting to see how the new style of hitting would do against a good knuckleball pitcher. I am sure there will be others in the future, as teams will always try to find some level of an edge, and will buck the trends for that something different. Pitching is just as much of a chess game as a physical game, but knuckleballers are like playing whack a mole. You know what is coming but no one knows where the ball is going to be. The path to the next good knuckleballer will be one of two paths. A top prospect that fizzles but teams still willing to give a chance and he works on it separate until a team lets him do it full time, or a guy who is not in MLB affiliated teams and gets picked up by independent teams and works on it until a MLB team takes a waiver on him. It will take a player that will be willing to do anything to see his dream of playing at the MLB level and never give up on believing the knuckleball is his or her path.
    1 point
  44. glunn

    Coronavirus

    I agree that better leadership would have made a big difference. But I don't trust the private sector to prepare us for cataclysms -- that is not in their nature. I think that is something that the federal government should handle, and that, for example, the government needs to stockpile for all foreseeable emergencies, and preferably in a cost-efficient manner. This could be a lot worse if the virus was more deadly, and I think that the government needs to get ready for something worse, because there are some crazy people out there who have tried to develop biological weapons and who may one day succeed.
    1 point
  45. Dickey is my favorite, he was an oddity of an odd category throwing the knuckle faster than most and starting off in the pen. I have a real soft spot for funky pitchers, knucklers/ side armers/ submarine/ weird windup ect, Pat Neshek is my favorite Twin he was so fun to watch when he first came up. My fantasy (that I have created in multiple video games) is a submarine guy that throws a knuckle. They probably don't exist because both the delivery and the pitch are kinda last resort mechanisms for guys trying to stick around but it would be awesome.
    1 point
  46. and kiss that pretty girl on the tilt a whirl
    1 point
  47. Based on his 13 years of 20 wins it is not hard to believe that Spahn would have amassed over 400 wins without his service time. Many service guys did light duty, but as you mention - not Spahn. http://baseballegg.com/2018/12/03/warren-spahn-talks-about-his-experiences-in-world-war-ii/ Burdette was under rated in history https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/bc3fde89 his record In an 18-year career, Burdette posted a 203–144 record with 1074 strikeouts and a 3.66 ERA in 3067.1 innings, compiling 158 complete games and 33 shutouts is better than some HOF pitchers. https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/bc3fde89 Burdette is best known for winning the 13 inning game against Pittsburgh when Harvey Haddix pitched 12 innings of a perfect game only to lose in 13. Burdette was known for giving up lots of hits, but few runs and he told his clubhouse - ""He's not going to beat me. Get a run or else we're going to be here all night!" After Adcock hit a Home Run (and only got credit for a double) the game ended and Burdette called Haddix in the locker room, "You deserved to win," Burdette said, "but I scattered all my hits, and you bunched your one." Haddix hung up on him.https://vault.si.com/vault/2009/06/01/the-greatest-game-ever-pitched Imagine the duo - Burdette with 203 wins and Spahn with 363! And, by the way, Buhl had 166 wins.
    1 point
  48. In Ball Four Jim Bouton talked about how he could never get enough throwing in between starts cuz catchers didn't like catching them. He maintained that he needed to throw a lot because a live arm was no good to him. Made me think he would have preferred to start way more often than once every 5 games. Why couldn't a good one go 400 innings? What I always seemed to notice back in the 80's was the Twins didn't do so great against them but they also didn't do so great the game after facing a knuckleballer. It was like facing one just completely threw off their timing for a couple days. My favorite knuckleballer was Tim Wakefield.
    1 point
  49. Chicago has been doing nightly sing-alongs and diy light-shows, (it started in my neighborhood, but is catching on to other parts of downtown) to honor those working and providing necessary services; 8pm, 2 songs, people blast their stereos and do whatever with lights. Tonight is ‘Angel From Montgomery’ as a tribute to John Prine. https://www.facebook.com/groups/chicagouniteatnight/?multi_permalinks=3952385374773352&notif_id=1586195501881479&notif_t=group_highlights
    1 point
  50. Like but dislike! I am wondering what the internal discussions are. Maybe they could do another two-week modified training camp at their local sites and then a couple weeks of spring training, using the games already on the calendar, and start a shortened season after the All Star break. If the players want to play, I think MLB should try to make it work. However, the players might refuse, might need to remain separated from their families even during homestands, and games in empty parks seems downright depressing. Lots of moving parts to consider. Seems like they could sterilize their environments and make it work. I am an optimist. It would be a sad looking season, but better than nothing. The alternative in my opinion is worse.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to Chicago/GMT-06:00
×
×
  • Create New...