Jump to content
  • Create Account

Byron Buxton's Body Has Betrayed Him Yet Again. It Sucks And It's No One's Fault.


Injuries are fickle. What we know for certain, something that pops up in the scientific literature over and over again, is that the best predictor for future injury is past injury. Beyond that, the world of athletic rehabilitation is a chasm filled to the brim with unknowns.

A sprained thumb. A groin strain. Migraines. A broken toe. Wrist injuries. A concussion. A subluxed shoulder that required surgery. A hip strain. And now a broken hand.

One would be hard pressed to not find even the slightest bit of sympathy for Minnesota Twins outfielder Byron Buxton after the spate of injuries he has suffered over the first seven seasons of his MLB career. Soft tissue. Bone. Brain. The injuries he’s experienced have run the gamut of both tissue and severity and have many wondering what he did to deserve such terrible luck. 

The fact of the matter is this: Byron Buxton has done nothing wrong and that makes his 2021 season the height of frustration, not because of himself as an individual, but because his body simply will not allow him to wow the denizens of Target Field on a nightly basis.

The term “injury prone” gets thrown around quite often, particularly in cases similar to that of Buxton’s. While it is true that some players suffer injuries more often than others, the underlying factors that cause such injuries are often anyone’s best guess. Perhaps the athlete has a genetic predisposition, a “flaw” in their DNA structure that codes for more feeble muscles or brittle bones. Perhaps they indulge themselves on too many cheeseburgers when their body is better at extracting nutrients from fish or plant-based protein sources. Perhaps they simply have just plain bad luck.

The term “injury prone” is not a neutral term, despite the insistence of many, fans and media members alike. The term often connotes a set of failures on the part of the athlete and suggests that if they had just done something better, they would be able to stay on the field. What that something is is often conveniently left blank - “How am I supposed to know? I’m not a doctor!” - but the implication persists.

The fact of the matter is that quite often the medical community does not know what can be done to sufficiently prevent injuries from occurring and that is frustrating as hell. The sciences of athletic rehabilitation and injury prevention are not as firm as we’d like to believe. Coming back from injury is not like chemistry. Preventing one is not like theoretical physics. Very infrequently are their concrete formulas that explain the exact best way for getting an athlete back on the field and keeping them there.

Many treatments and injury prevention programs are educated guesses, at best. There is little evidence that any sort of treatment works better than any other. Ultrasonic waves of energy delivered to a tissue by a specialized machine theoretically warm the tissue and promote blood flow and healing, but the results don’t bear out when tested. In theory, strengthening the muscles of the core, hip, and thighs will prevent catastrophic lower body injuries, but athletes around the world tear their ACLs and blow their Achilles at alarming rates.

Injuries are fickle. What we know for certain, something that pops up in the scientific literature over and over again, is that the best predictor for future injury is past injury. Beyond that, the world of athletic rehabilitation is a chasm filled to the brim with unknowns. A team’s medical staff may employ the current best evidence and practices and treat their athletes 100% “by the book” and yet see them suffer injury after injury. Another may use unorthodox treatments that have little, if any, scientific backing and be heralded as the best among their peers because their athletes are seemingly impervious to breaking down.

Injuries are not straightforward phenomena as much as we all wish them to be. Their occurrence is not straightforward. Their treatment is not straightforward. Their prevention is not straightforward. Nothing about them is straightforward and it is exactly this opaqueness that makes them so damn frustrating. 

By all accounts, Byron Buxton is one of the hardest working athletes in the game. He is revered by his teammates and coaching staff. He’s one of the good ones. And, yet, his body has betrayed him over and over and over again. That is not his fault. It is not the training staff’s fault. It is nobody’s fault. And that makes it all the more unfair.

MORE FROM TWINS DAILY

Latest Twins coverage from our writers

— Recent Twins discussion in our forums

— Follow Twins Daily via Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or email

 


View full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

Some, even many, or most injuries are just an instance of bad luck.

But over eight seasons, the number...and the number of different types of injuries...

I’m sorry, but over the long haul, the ability to be available...as Bud Grant famously said, the most important ability is availability. It’s an ability just like being fast or having power. And Buxton doesn’t have it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, jkcarew said:

Some, even many, or most injuries are just an instance of bad luck.

But over eight seasons, the number...and the number of different types of injuries...

I’m sorry, but over the long haul, the ability to be available...as Bud Grant famously said, availability is the most important ability, It’s an ability just like being fast or having power. And Buxton doesn’t have it.

It isn't really an ability, though, is my argument. If most of it is due to bad luck as you say and as I argue, doesn't that preclude it from being an ability? It's like being good at roulette. It's chance due to factors that are largely out of the athlete's control. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, jkcarew said:

Some, even many, or most injuries are just an instance of bad luck.

But over eight seasons, the number...and the number of different types of injuries...

I’m sorry, but over the long haul, the ability to be available...as Bud Grant famously said, the most important ability is availability. It’s an ability just like being fast or having power. And Buxton doesn’t have it.

It’s an ability to not break your hand when someone drills it with a 95 mph fastball?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, old nurse said:

About half the injuries were  from running into walls. That is not bad luck, unless you consider having the traits that would cause someone to understand actions and consequences bad luck.....

Not really.  A couple... maybe.  Most of them though are really just plain, dumb (bad) luck.

A really good comparison might be Michael Brantley and the absolute litany of injuries he suffered early on in his career.  Some players are just snake bit, and like Lucas said... sometimes it's not fair (although no one ever said life if fair 🤷‍♂️).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, prouster said:

It’s an ability to not break your hand when someone drills it with a 95 mph fastball?

I think there may be a bit of a "self-preservation instinct" at play there, similar to running into outfield walls.

Buxton is just so aggressive, even at the plate, I think he is less likely to protect himself on certain plays and pitches. And he's been having tremendous success with that approach at the plate, so who can blame him?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be interested in comments from the professionals here. Is it possible that the emphasis on building strength in certain areas and muscles leads to imbalances in the stresses placed on proximate soft tissue and leads to injuries to ligaments, tendons, and muscles? Just a naïve thought, but it seems logical that increased force on one side could cause injuries on the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have zero medical knowledge, however, I suspect that some bodies withstand potential injuries better than others.  Yes, a 95mph fastball on a hand is going to break anyone's bone.  But some of the other injuries may have been less serious with someone else's body.  Nothing Buxton can do about that, it is what it is.  Combine that with his style of play which is all out at all times and the risk/severity of damage is greater than for other, hell most players.  Unfortunately, that style of play is what makes him so special.

Expect what we are seeing is what he is.  Will probably play less than 80 games this year and heck, 120-130 may be all one can expect in his best years.  But he is so very exciting, I will take 120 games of Buxton over anyone else the Twins could have.  Hopefully, they can have a meeting of the minds and those 80-120 games a year will be with the Twins for a long time.  But this also means the Twins need to seriously find a fourth outfielder, or have someone close at AAA, to play when he is on the IL.  They sure didn't have that this year, although Refsnyder was a pleasant surprise before joining Buxton on the IL.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, PDX Twin said:

I'd be interested in comments from the professionals here. Is it possible that the emphasis on building strength in certain areas and muscles leads to imbalances in the stresses placed on proximate soft tissue and leads to injuries to ligaments, tendons, and muscles? Just a naïve thought, but it seems logical that increased force on one side could cause injuries on the other.

Kind of a complex question with a complex answer, so I'll do my best to keep it simple: 

At the end of the day, "force" is the key variable in practically every injury. Take the UCL for example. Ligaments provide stability passively, meaning they don't have the ability to contract like muscles. Muscles, though, provide stability actively through their contractions. A UCL alone cannot stabilize the inner elbow, but it can with aid from the surrounding muscles. That's often why players sometimes try rehab before undergoing Tommy John, particularly if they only have a partial tear; theoretically, the muscles could compensate for the decreases stability provided by the ligament. However, there is only so much that can be done when the UCL and muscles are exposed to a constant barrage of 95+ mph heaters.

Similarly, (and this is where I delve into educated guessing) Buxton's body produces so much force that the soft tissue has a difficult time keeping pace. He's fast, he's powerful and those facts may make him more susceptible to injury. Again, there is only so much that can be done to prevent injury when one moves as quickly and powerfully as he does. On a pure mathematical level, almost no one in the league submits their body to greater amounts of force than Buxton. That's just physics. What can be done to counteract that is, potentially, the $100 million question.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, prouster said:

It’s an ability to not break your hand when someone drills it with a 95 mph fastball?

No and that's a fallacious argument.  The poster you responded to clearly said that injuries have a large component of luck to them.  I will make no argument that Buxton's hand injury was some really terrible luck.

But the point of that post was to put this unlucky break in the context of what seems like an endless array of "unlucky" breaks.  At some point constantly falling victim to injuries of all sorts stops being a pattern we can deny based on luck and one we simply have to recognize isn't going away.  Not all athletes can match their amazing skillset with durability.  It sucks, he's a great person and a great player, but at some point we have to come to terms with the reality of his ability to stay on a baseball field.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, TheLeviathan said:

No and that's a fallacious argument.  The poster you responded to clearly said that injuries have a large component of luck to them.  I will make no argument that Buxton's hand injury was some really terrible luck.

But the point of that post was to put this unlucky break in the context of what seems like an endless array of "unlucky" breaks.  At some point constantly falling victim to injuries of all sorts stops being a pattern we can deny based on luck and one we simply have to recognize isn't going away.  Not all athletes can match their amazing skillset with durability.  It sucks, he's a great person and a great player, but at some point we have to come to terms with the reality of his ability to stay on a baseball field.

The person was clearly suggesting that Buxton has been doing something wrong, which undercuts the token acknowledgement of the role luck may play in injuries. 
 

Running into walls, probably not a great idea. Maybe there’s a different exercise or stretching regimen that could reduce the risk of muscle and ligament injuries. But there’s nothing a guy can do about getting drilled with pitches or colliding in the field with his teammates, both of which have caused Buxton to miss time with concussions and other things. Off the top of my head (I don’t care enough about this to look anything up), the only recent injuries not caused by HBP or person to person collisions have been his shoulder (outfield wall) and his hip. The migraines have been a persistent issue, but we don’t know enough to say whether they are related to his concussions or not. 
 

Anyway, my point is that I think it’s stupid and ignorant to blame the player—even implicitly—when he gets hurt. People spewed that same garbage all the time about Mauer. I dunno, maybe there’s something in Minnesota sports fan pathology that causes some people to lash out at the team’s best player. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, prouster said:

The person was clearly suggesting that Buxton has been doing something wrong, which undercuts the token acknowledgement of the role luck may play in injuries. 
 

Running into walls, probably not a great idea. Maybe there’s a different exercise or stretching regimen that could reduce the risk of muscle and ligament injuries. But there’s nothing a guy can do about getting drilled with pitches or colliding in the field with his teammates, both of which have caused Buxton to miss time with concussions and other things. Off the top of my head (I don’t care enough about this to look anything up), the only recent injuries not caused by HBP or person to person collisions have been his shoulder (outfield wall) and his hip. The migraines have been a persistent issue, but we don’t know enough to say whether they are related to his concussions or not. 
 

Anyway, my point is that I think it’s stupid and ignorant to blame the player—even implicitly—when he gets hurt. People spewed that same garbage all the time about Mauer. I dunno, maybe there’s something in Minnesota sports fan pathology that causes some people to lash out at the team’s best player. 

I really think you read something in that wasn't there.

It is a criticism of just, for whatever each individual reason, Buxton cant be available.  It isn't to blame Buxton but acknowledge the reality.  We should all be at that point with Donaldson too.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bad Luck or the result of big money for any athlete... Players have a lot of money on the line and by no means am I'm not saying Buxton is dogging some of the injuries or any other athlete but growing up with the "spit on it and get back in the game" mentality isn't followed anymore.  For certain injuries it shouldn't be, especially concussions and getting hit in the man jewels aka got Mitch Garvered... but big time paychecks and agents and "more sophisticated" analysis from the doctor world plays some part.  Players can get better diagnostics performed on their bodies to diagnose and recover, sometimes at the expense of injury prone status designation.  That's one of the things has me cringe when we start talking huge big money contracts to guys who lucky or not, just aren't on the field to earn all the cash they get signed for. Gives me pause and then you can't blame a player to get his money now and guaranteed as much as they can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, umterp23 said:

Bad Luck or the result of big money for any athlete... Players have a lot of money on the line and by no means am I'm not saying Buxton is dogging some of the injuries or any other athlete but growing up with the "spit on it and get back in the game" mentality isn't followed anymore.  For certain injuries it shouldn't be, especially concussions and getting hit in the man jewels aka got Mitch Garvered... but big time paychecks and agents and "more sophisticated" analysis from the doctor world plays some part.  Players can get better diagnostics performed on their bodies to diagnose and recover, sometimes at the expense of injury prone status designation.  That's one of the things has me cringe when we start talking huge big money contracts to guys who lucky or not, just aren't on the field to earn all the cash they get signed for. Gives me pause and then you can't blame a player to get his money now and guaranteed as much as they can.

I think Byron Buxton is actively losing money not being on the field.  This argument doesn't wash because, especially in baseball and now more than ever, teams are hesitant to dole out money to players they can't count on in the field.  I think this post implies Buxton isn't "tough" which is different than acknowledging he isn't "durable" or "available".

Make no mistake, every IL stint he has potentially costs him MILLIONS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reds pitchers have fault in 2 of his injuries. Tyler Mahle hit him on the hand and broke it, and Lucas Sims, in September of 2019, beaned him in the head, taking him out with a concussion! His luck there is that he was batting when the Reds pitchers threw the ball where they did. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, TheLeviathan said:

I really think you read something in that wasn't there.

It is a criticism of just, for whatever each individual reason, Buxton cant be available.  It isn't to blame Buxton but acknowledge the reality.  We should all be at that point with Donaldson too.

 

Agree to disagree. “[Staying healthy] is an ability just like being fast or having power” places the onus on the player to somehow cultivate their durability. Obviously there are things all players do for exactly that reason, like working out, eating well, and stretching regularly. But beyond the obvious things, there doesn’t really seem to be anything anyone can do to cultivate their durability other than retiring. It’s not on the player. Some things are simply beyond anyone’s control. 
 

FWIW, there are some posters who seem to like taking pot shots at Buxton whenever possible. Not naming names, but…

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, umterp23 said:

Bad Luck or the result of big money for any athlete... Players have a lot of money on the line and by no means am I'm not saying Buxton is dogging some of the injuries or any other athlete but growing up with the "spit on it and get back in the game" mentality isn't followed anymore.  For certain injuries it shouldn't be, especially concussions and getting hit in the man jewels aka got Mitch Garvered... but big time paychecks and agents and "more sophisticated" analysis from the doctor world plays some part.  Players can get better diagnostics performed on their bodies to diagnose and recover, sometimes at the expense of injury prone status designation.  That's one of the things has me cringe when we start talking huge big money contracts to guys who lucky or not, just aren't on the field to earn all the cash they get signed for. Gives me pause and then you can't blame a player to get his money now and guaranteed as much as they can.

Buxton is an arbitration player finishing out his rookie contract. As Levi pointed out, he’s costing himself a huge payday in free agency if, as you’re suggesting, he’s somehow choosing not to play. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, prouster said:

Agree to disagree. “[Staying healthy] is an ability just like being fast or having power” places the onus on the player to somehow cultivate their durability. Obviously there are things all players do for exactly that reason, like working out, eating well, and stretching regularly. But beyond the obvious things, there doesn’t really seem to be anything anyone can do to cultivate their durability other than retiring. It’s not on the player. Some things are simply beyond anyone’s control. 
 

FWIW, there are some posters who seem to like taking pot shots at Buxton whenever possible. Not naming names, but…

You quoted something but then interpreted it in a really strange way.....Let's try a simple analogy by using the same phrase you think is so dastardly and then subbing a few words: If I say "Kepler doesn't have the same ability to run the bases as Buxton"....have I somehow created an "onus for Kepler to cultivate that"?  I would think not.  It's just an acknowledgement of natural ability and natural abilities vary from player to player.  Can Kepler work around the edges of his speed or baserunning to make modest improvements?  Sure.  I feel like Buxton did that by adding some muscle in fact.  But at the end of the day, just like speed and power, durability is something I'm not sure you can fix.  And some players, again just like speed and power, either have it or they don't.  You seem to acknowledge what the poster said, but then twisted it for some reason I can't understand.  Nowhere in that post does it blame Buxton for anything, that's something you read into it.  (Unfairly, IMO, given how easily your example can be exposed by analogy)  

Yes, it's not in his control, but there is no reason not to acknowledge it either.  The guy has been a pro for almost a decade now and this is what it is.  His body just doesn't allow all that talent to stay on the field.  It sucks.  I feel bad for him most of all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, TheLeviathan said:

You quoted something but then interpreted it in a really strange way.....Let's try a simple analogy by using the same phrase you think is so dastardly and then subbing a few words: If I say "Kepler doesn't have the same ability to run the bases as Buxton"....have I somehow created an "onus for Kepler to cultivate that"?  I would think not.  It's just an acknowledgement of natural ability and natural abilities vary from player to player.  Can Kepler work around the edges of his speed or baserunning to make modest improvements?  Sure.  I feel like Buxton did that by adding some muscle in fact.  But at the end of the day, just like speed and power, durability is something I'm not sure you can fix.  And some players, again just like speed and power, either have it or they don't.  You seem to acknowledge what the poster said, but then twisted it for some reason I can't understand.  Nowhere in that post does it blame Buxton for anything, that's something you read into it.  (Unfairly, IMO, given how easily your example can be exposed by analogy)  

Yes, it's not in his control, but there is no reason not to acknowledge it either.  The guy has been a pro for almost a decade now and this is what it is.  His body just doesn't allow all that talent to stay on the field.  It sucks.  I feel bad for him most of all.

If durability is a skill, then it can be improved. If it’s not, then why debate it? I really don’t think it is, so I’m not interested in debating it. Agree to disagree. 
 

FWIW, I think it’s weird that you want to keep going on this. You seem to feel a lot more strongly about it than I do, and I think your feelings are coloring how you’re reading my posts. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, prouster said:

If durability is a skill, then it can be improved. If it’s not, then why debate it? 
 

FWIW, I think it’s weird that you want to keep going on this. You seem to feel a lot more strongly about it than I do, and I think your feelings are coloring how you’re reading my posts. 

Durability is a natural athletic ability and the extent to which it can be improved is limited.  Nelson Cruz, Max Kepler, and pretty much every other human on the planet has no chance of improving their speed to the degree that Buxton possesses.  Minor improvements?  Sure.  But they can't transform into something they're not. Likewise, there is nothing Buxton can do about his natural durability and resistance to injury.  It's simply not a gift he was blessed with.  It's not a "skill" like hitting or throwing a curveball, it's more like how fast you run or how tall you grew.

At this point I'm not even sure what you're trying to say.  I'll leave it at this:

The original poster just lamented that for all of Buck's talents, he wasn't blessed with the ability to stay on the field and there's nothing he can do about that.  And it sucks for all of us, but especially his career.  Whatever "weird" road you took us down from there is due to your interpretations of that rather simple, and IMO undeniable, observation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, TheLeviathan said:

Durability is a natural athletic ability and the extent to which it can be improved is limited.  Nelson Cruz, Max Kepler, and pretty much every other human on the planet has no chance of improving their speed to the degree that Buxton possesses.  Minor improvements?  Sure.  But they can't transform into something they're not. Likewise, there is nothing Buxton can do about his natural durability and resistance to injury.  It's simply not a gift he was blessed with.  It's not a "skill" like hitting or throwing a curveball, it's more like how fast you run or how tall you grew.

At this point I'm not even sure what you're trying to say.  I'll leave it at this:

The original poster just lamented that for all of Buck's talents, he wasn't blessed with the ability to stay on the field and there's nothing he can do about that.  And it sucks for all of us, but especially his career.  Whatever "weird" road you took us down from there is due to your interpretations of that rather simple, and IMO undeniable, observation.

I think we’re actually in agreement despite all this talking in circles. My point is simply that outside of a few basic things like training and nutrition, injuries are beyond human control. They just happen. I initially bristled and responded somewhat tongue in cheek to another poster who stated otherwise. That’s it. I don’t get why all this stuff about hermeneutics entered. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, prouster said:

I think we’re actually in agreement despite all this talking in circles. My point is simply that outside of a few basic things like training and nutrition, injuries are beyond human control. They just happen. I initially bristled and responded somewhat tongue in cheek to another poster, who seemed to imply otherwise. That’s it. I don’t get why all this stuff about hermeneutics entered. 

It came up because it seemed odd as a sarcastic dig at a post that agrees with you.  I think the problem came when you bristled at a completely innocuous post, not with your overall point.  You found (or implied at the very least) disagreement where there really was none.  I think we all share lament that the young man can't play and there isn't much he can do about it.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, MN_ExPat said:

Not really.  A couple... maybe.  Most of them though are really just plain, dumb (bad) luck.

A really good comparison might be Michael Brantley and the absolute litany of injuries he suffered early on in his career.  Some players are just snake bit, and like Lucas said... sometimes it's not fair (although no one ever said life if fair 🤷‍♂️).

 

In 2014, he injured his wrist while diving for a ball in spring training, then hurt it again while on rehab in Ft. Myers. In August, he got a concussion when he collided with a teammate in the outfield, then missed the AFL after somehow breaking a finger.

In 2015, he missed a few months after spraining his thumb when it got caught under his body while sliding into 2nd base.

In 2017, he had to come out of the WC game after crashing into the wall; they said that he cracked his ribs.

In 2019, he had to have labrum surgery after crashing into a wall.

In 2020, he missed some time the next season due to inflammation in that shoulder. He also had concussion symptoms after being hit by a pitch on the helmet near the end of the season, which apparently was the reason he could not start Gm 2 of the WC series.

This year, he hurt his hip after crashing into a wall, and now he's been hit by a pitch on the hand.

I feel like I might have missed one or two instances of him getting hurt by running into a wall, maybe some injuries that didn't require an IL stint, but that's what I've found for now. 

Anyway, it's not just bad luck. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, frightwig said:

 

In 2014, he injured his wrist while diving for a ball in spring training, then hurt it again while on rehab in Ft. Myers. In August, he got a concussion when he collided with a teammate in the outfield, then missed the AFL after somehow breaking a finger.

In 2015, he missed a few months after spraining his thumb when it got caught under his body while sliding into 2nd base.

In 2017, he had to come out of the WC game after crashing into the wall; they said that he cracked his ribs.

In 2019, he had to have labrum surgery after crashing into a wall.

In 2020, he missed some time the next season due to inflammation in that shoulder. He also had concussion symptoms after being hit by a pitch on the helmet near the end of the season, which apparently was the reason he could not start Gm 2 of the WC series.

This year, he hurt his hip after crashing into a wall, and now he's been hit by a pitch on the hand.

I feel like I might have missed one or two instances of him getting hurt by running into a wall, maybe some injuries that didn't require an IL stint, but that's what I've found for now. 

Anyway, it's not just bad luck. 

 

Not disagreeing with the pretty obvious correlation that Buck isn't directly responsible for some of his injuries.  But it's baseball , and I've seen plenty of guys do similar actions (at multiple levels - HS, college, professional) and not get hurt nearly as bad as Buxton has.

Sometimes guys are just unlucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just really unfortunate.  I know anyone can look this up but some notes looking at both Bux and Sano since their arrival in 2015, and yes, I get that there is a rookie season with limited AB's and a pandemic year in here but you get the point.

  • Buxton has one season with 93 or more games (140 in '17) played. Ooooff-dah
  • Buxton has 6 seasons (going to include this year) under 93 games played.
  • Buxton has 1 season with over 300 ab's.
  • Sano has never played more than 120 games in a season.  Ouch
  • Sano has 4 seasons below 81 games played
  • Sano has only 2 seasons with more than 400 ab's, '16 & '17.  

The availability/reliability for whatever reasons of these two guys has had a lot of negative repercussions over years.  Next year will be Bux's 8th year in the league, however, on a 162 game per year basis his on field time will most likely be only around 3 years at the start of it.  Bux only has 373 more ab's than Robbie Grossman did with the Twins and he only played for 3 years.  Yuck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

Featured Video

×
×
  • Create New...