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Killebrew's 1964 season HRs and doubles.

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#1 thetank

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 09:05 AM

I was watching MLB network with Jim Kaat and they talked a little about Killebrew and his HRs. His 1964 season was interesting. He had 49 HRs and only 11 doubles and 1 triple while having 156 hits. How many fly outs did Killebrew hit that year where he hit 38 more HRs than doubles?

I saw at the All-star break he had 30 HRs and just 4 doubles.

Edited by thetank, 30 November 2013 - 01:42 PM.


#2 jorgenswest

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:30 PM

Thanks for the memories.

The Met would go absolutely quiet in anticipation whenever he came to the plate.

#3 thetank

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:37 AM

For hitting more than 40 HRs in a season this has to be the record for the fewest doubles and triples percentage-wise. One would think that more long flies would fall short of the fence and fall for a double. He had nearly a 100 singles and more production in Aug. and Sep. could have hit nearly 60.

#4 stringer bell

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 08:46 AM

Harmon was catcher-slow and the infielders would play way back. I doubt he hit many (if any) doubles on grounders down the line. The OF would play very deep and keep balls in front of them and again Harm just didn't run well at all. He hit homers that were majestic--high in the air as well as far-- so there weren't many drives where the OF couldn't get back to the wall or go into the gap to catch. He was Jim Thome before Jim Thome, complete with a transition from third to first and being one of the nicest gentlemen in the game in his era.

#5 thetank

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 09:45 AM

Harmon was catcher-slow and the infielders would play way back. I doubt he hit many (if any) doubles on grounders down the line. The OF would play very deep and keep balls in front of them and again Harm just didn't run well at all. He hit homers that were majestic--high in the air as well as far-- so there weren't many drives where the OF couldn't get back to the wall or go into the gap to catch. He was Jim Thome before Jim Thome, complete with a transition from third to first and being one of the nicest gentlemen in the game in his era.

I remember having his baseball card which depicted his 1969 season which was quite a season. Too bad he couldn't have made the 50 HR club which he missed with 49 twice. I started following baseball in 1973 when I was 8.