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Article: Supplemental Draft Picks have great talent, made tough decisions

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#1 Seth Stohs

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:33 PM

You can view the page at http://twinsdaily.co...tough-decisions

#2 clutterheart

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:00 PM

If you have the chance to get 1 MM USD as a HS kid you have to take - especially a pitcher. The way the some college coaches abuse their stars arms is almost criminal.

#3 righty8383

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:11 PM

Agree. You can always put money aside and use it for college if baseball doesn'twork out

#4 mini_tb

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 06:10 AM

Good read, Seth. Thanks! Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the Twins re-signed Capps following the 2011 season. The second supplemental pick came from losing Kubel.

#5 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:11 AM

Good luck to both, and thanks to both for taking the time to talk to us fans. Appreciated greatly!

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#6 roger

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:24 AM

Clutterheart points out a real concern, abuse of college pitcher arms. Just ask Matt Fox!

We all think these kids should get giddy over their $1,000,000 signing bonuses. Do we all feel the same if someone said the kid got $550,000? Because after FED and State taxes, barrring some real creative tax avoidance, that is what they get.

#7 gunnarthor

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 08:25 AM

Nice article, Seth. I really like Harrison and I think that, if nothing else, Boyd can become a nice bullpen arm. Good supplemental picks by the Twins.

#8 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 08:28 AM

$550K after taxes.....compared to the median FAMILY income in the US? Yes, yes they should be excited by that.

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#9 Jim Crikket

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 08:51 AM

Sure, it's good money either way. But I think the point is that it's not an easy decision to make.

If they elect to go to college, it doesn't mean they have no shot at getting that kind of bonus later. In fact, if they perform well in college, they may make more money. Then again, they may wash out in college due to injury or poor coaching decisions or inability to focus on their game because of those pesky classes they have to take to remain eligible to play baseball.

In the end, it comes down to how you want to spend your first 2-3 years playing baseball after high school... for a college coach who's job security is tied to wins and losses or for managers who's job performance is evaluated by how well he gets his players prepared for advancing to the next level of professional ball.

Either way... signing immediately or signing after 3 years of college... you should be roughly at the same level within the organization (somewhere between low A and high A). After that, you're on even footing with the guys who chose the other path.

The question shouldn't be so much about which path will get you the bigger bonus, but which path do you see having the better shot at getting you to that Class A-A+ level successfully?
I opine about the Twins and Kernels regularly at Knuckleballsblog.com while my alter ego, SD Buhr covers the Kernels for MetroSportsReport.com.

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#10 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 09:05 AM

I was responding to Roger's post about the money, not indicating one way or the other what someone should do. I am not sure I get roger's post at all, frankly. That's nearly 20 years of income for a family in the US, in one check......

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#11 Jim Crikket

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 09:40 AM

I was responding to Roger's post about the money, not indicating one way or the other what someone should do. I am not sure I get roger's post at all, frankly. That's nearly 20 years of income for a family in the US, in one check......


I won't speak for Roger, but here's what I took from it. $550,000 is no small amount, but when you consider what it will provide to a guy over, say, the course of his likely working years (40-45 years), it's not all that much... maybe $15-20K a year, depending on what interest rates run.

The difference in household income in the US between someone with just a HS education and one with a 4 year college degree is about $30K a year.

If he ends up using that nest egg to go back to college, that could easily eat up 20-30% (or more) of the $550,000 for four years (which would have been free if he had chosen to take a baseball scholarship).

Personally, I'd have taken the money in a heartbeat and I think most others would, too. But then, I'm a guy who left his spot on the bench of his JuCo basketball team midway through his second year of college to run fast food restaurants... so I'm probably not the guy to provide advice in this area.
I opine about the Twins and Kernels regularly at Knuckleballsblog.com while my alter ego, SD Buhr covers the Kernels for MetroSportsReport.com.

~You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant~

#12 diehardtwinsfan

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 10:08 AM

You have to take the money. Set 80K aside in a low risk investment as college money should baseball not work out. Invest the rest wisely and you have a nice supplemental check for the rest of your life... or blow it all on whatever you want, just don't touch the 80k until you've played a few years in the pros.

#13 roger

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 10:34 AM

I was responding to Roger's post about the money, not indicating one way or the other what someone should do. I am not sure I get roger's post at all, frankly. That's nearly 20 years of income for a family in the US, in one check......


My point was simple, when you see those big gaudy numbers thrown around for the top few rounds, divide it roughly in half as most of the other half goes to taxes. A $550,000 bonus looks a lot different than a million or in Buxton's case, a $3,600,000 bonus is really different than $6,000.000. Expect Buxton is also very happy he got the bonus last year before this year's taxes went up.

Yes, they all are a lot of money and a lot more than the average fan will see in many years of working or a lifetime for most of us in Buxton's case.

Also thought that Mr. Crikket did in excellent job taking a look at what a young high school grad should consider when offerred these opportunities.

#14 cmathewson

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 10:53 AM

$550K = five years of good wages. It takes five years to make the majors. Until then, the minor league minimum is like $30K + meal money or something, before taxes. They certainly don't get rich off of signing bonuses.

#15 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 11:09 AM

your definition of good wages is way off. You are suggesting 110K after taxes is a "good wage"? That's nearly double the median, pre-tax, income for a family in this country.

yes, they get rich off getting $1MM in one check. That's 10 years of 100K per year pre tax. Around 20% of US households make that in a year. College educated (or higher) does not "average" that until a male is in 35-44.

Assuming they can generate 8% in the stock market off of 500K, they can get 40K per year. If they then work a regular job, even as a HS graduate, they make significantly more than the 80% of US households. Oh, and they still have $500K in the market if they need it, instead of tens of thousands in debt.

If a minore leaguer makes 30K per year, and they get 40K per year in investment income, that is a lot of money. A lot.

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#16 70charger

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 11:49 AM

"Rich" or not, the math seems kind of simple to me. College is retarded expensive, but even in pricey private schools, you're looking at $50k a year, which should include living expenses. Four years and you're not even halfway through your post-tax bonus. No scholarship in the entire NCAA is worth that. It seems like a tough decision, but realistically, in the sandwich round, it just isn't.

#17 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 12:05 PM

From a financial perspective, agreed. The college experience is potentially more fun than the MiLB experience though.

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#18 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 12:06 PM

Oh, and I have a HS senior, and make good money. AFTER help from schools and whatnot, we are looking at $35K+ per year for the schools he wants.....

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.


#19 cmb0252

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 01:48 PM

Don't forget the agents cut of their signing bonus and/or the cost of any other advisor that comes out of their pocket: lawyer, CPAs, PR people, off season trainer.

#20 mike wants wins

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 02:07 PM

don't forget, they get meal money, and in lower minors some live with families for free. And sorry, but lots of people pay for gym memberships/trainers. Really, people are still arguing a million dollars isn't a lot of money? Really?

What I just typed is probably an opinion, not a fact. I mean, I'm usually right, so you should maybe assume it is or will be a fact soon, but that's up to you. :) Also, I am NOT trying to convince anyone I am correct, I'm just talking here, not arguing.