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Article: Why Miguel Sano's Strikeouts Are Not a Problem

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#81 Aerodeliria

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 03:03 AM

 

I guess you missed the article on ESPN that talked about Bellinger and Trout and how batters are getting smarter and learning how to beat the shift and make choices about what to swing at.Not swinging less hard, but eliminating the trash that gives away an AB.

 

https://www.espn.com...strikeout-trend

 

As an old guy I will always remember the sadness Mickey Mantle felt when his BA for his career dropped below 300.Yes contact can give you a DP, but it can also advance the runner, cause an error, get a hit, rearrange the defense.  

 

I want Sano, but I also want a batter who has a little bat control.  

Amazingly, you can add Joey Gallo to that list as well. I think he compares very well to Sano. Although Gallo's SO rate is almost identical to previous years at about 35.5, he has refrained from chasing so many bad pitches. His BB rate has climbed a whopping 6.1% from last year, and of course his BA is at a very nice .270+ and of course his OBP is now almost laughable at .421. What about his slugging; it must have dropped off a bit? Hardly. It is almost .100 points higher compared to his best season ever (making his OPS a number that is hard to believe at 1.074). His home run rate is actually up about 1%. In other words, when he does choose to swing, he is getting more hits and still driving the ball. Due to all of these factors, he will be in the all star game. 

 

Am I here to trash Sano? No (I don't want to get pelted with frozen homer hankies). I do think he can become a better player and maybe even a star again. We don't have to take the attitude that he can never be... If we think he can't change than we are accepting the notion that he will always be a .225 hitter that hits 35 or so home runs, but also misses frequent opportunities in all situations. That is the Joey Gallo of last year (and all previous years), but the Joey Gallo of this year is an all star for a good reason. Sano has such potential, but will he become that player? That is indeed an interesting and a fair question to be asked.

 

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#82 Aerodeliria

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 03:09 AM

 

I'm curious what impact shifting has on defensive metrics like that. Regularly playing Sano in the hole or on the other side of 2nd base isn't really a fair assessment of how he performs as a 3rd basemen. But then again if that's the direction the game is going maybe the skills required for 3rd basemen are changing also, pushing guys like Sano across the diamond or elsewhere.

This is slightly off-topic. About once a week, they broadcast a show called the 50 best plays in MLB here in Japan. I always watch hoping to see a Twins highlight or two. They showed Arraez's play at 3rd when Morin was pitching (the team they were playing slips my mind at the moment), I was thinking at the time that Sano probably could not put his glove on the ball, although, I am sure he could have made an equally strong throw had he gloved such a ball. That was a very fine play indeed. Arraez looked like the real deal on that play (granted it is just one play).

Edited by Aerodeliria, 13 June 2019 - 03:11 AM.


#83 mikelink45

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 05:46 AM

 

Amazingly, you can add Joey Gallo to that list as well. I think he compares very well to Sano. Although Gallo's SO rate is almost identical to previous years at about 35.5, he has refrained from chasing so many bad pitches. His BB rate has climbed a whopping 6.1% from last year, and of course his BA is at a very nice .270+ and of course his OBP is now almost laughable at .421. What about his slugging; it must have dropped off a bit? Hardly. It is almost .100 points higher compared to his best season ever (making his OPS a number that is hard to believe at 1.074). His home run rate is actually up about 1%. In other words, when he does choose to swing, he is getting more hits and still driving the ball. Due to all of these factors, he will be in the all star game. 

 

Am I here to trash Sano? No (I don't want to get pelted with frozen homer hankies). I do think he can become a better player and maybe even a star again. We don't have to take the attitude that he can never be... If we think he can't change than we are accepting the notion that he will always be a .225 hitter that hits 35 or so home runs, but also misses frequent opportunities in all situations. That is the Joey Gallo of last year (and all previous years), but the Joey Gallo of this year is an all star for a good reason. Sano has such potential, but will he become that player? That is indeed an interesting and a fair question to be asked.

Thanks for the additional comments and information - you make an excellent comparison.

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