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Article: Shoulder Impingement Q & A

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#21 Mr. Brooks

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 03:49 PM

I shudder at the thought of speculation and generalization on an internet fan forum.
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#22 Heezy1323

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 06:17 PM

 

Again another great explanation of the medical problems athletes often face. Also thank you for diagnosing my ailment - all along I thought it was just old age. Certainly not the cause in Graterols case. Where should mail the fee?

For some reason Bonnes says all checks need to be made out to him...?:)

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#23 hybridbear

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 06:30 AM

These are my favorite articles on TD! Thanks Heezy1323 for helping us understand the medical side of baseball injuries. Your articles are always very clear & well written.

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#24 Heezy1323

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 02:16 PM

We discussed your time with Andrews after I put together a piece on Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, and it's great to have that level of insight in this discussion. I think it's interesting how TOS blew up and suddenly disappeared as a diagnosis that you'd see in pitchers while elbows and shoulders persist.


TOS is a very complicated condition, indeed. I’d love to hear your thoughts about it.

#25 biggentleben

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 02:53 PM

 

TOS is a very complicated condition, indeed. I’d love to hear your thoughts about it.

 

I personally believe the TOS stuff was similar to the prevalence of back injuries among NFL linemen as the 300-350 pound weight for an offensive lineman became a requirement upon league entry instead of something teams developed in house after drafting a guy. Guys just built up muscle without regard to how those muscles were useful in the game and also without regard to developing the muscles to support that additional weight.

 

The push to have every arm throwing mid-90s or better has often been done without accompanying work at the high school (and lower) levels to strengthen core and upper legs. Ideally, velocity is generated through the turn at the peak of the delivery, generated through the hips, upper thighs, and lower back, using the arm as more of a slingshot rather than placing heavy stress on the chest, shoulder, and elbow. While there hasn't been an immediate change in how velocity is generated, the reports of TOS have gone down significantly as if there really has been a major change across amateur and pro ball. Ideal velocity generation is being taught more widely through places like Driveline, but certainly not enough that you should be hearing no reports of TOS.

 

 

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#26 Heezy1323

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 11:42 PM

 

I personally believe the TOS stuff was similar to the prevalence of back injuries among NFL linemen as the 300-350 pound weight for an offensive lineman became a requirement upon league entry instead of something teams developed in house after drafting a guy. Guys just built up muscle without regard to how those muscles were useful in the game and also without regard to developing the muscles to support that additional weight.

 

The push to have every arm throwing mid-90s or better has often been done without accompanying work at the high school (and lower) levels to strengthen core and upper legs. Ideally, velocity is generated through the turn at the peak of the delivery, generated through the hips, upper thighs, and lower back, using the arm as more of a slingshot rather than placing heavy stress on the chest, shoulder, and elbow. While there hasn't been an immediate change in how velocity is generated, the reports of TOS have gone down significantly as if there really has been a major change across amateur and pro ball. Ideal velocity generation is being taught more widely through places like Driveline, but certainly not enough that you should be hearing no reports of TOS.

Thanks for the reply- very interesting to hear your take. I'm not even sure we know exactly what TOS is. I know we often divide it into neurogenic and vascular types, but it likely is even more complex than that, IMHO. I believe some component of UCL injury is that we are probably reaching the edges of human performance. Muscles can be made stronger, but ligaments have an intrinsic strength that probably can't be appreciably improved. Nerves and blood vessels likely similar...

 Did you see the injury Nick Burdi had, that was called basically a brachial plexus strain? He was in excruciating pain... not sure how to explain that one exactly.

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