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To bunt, or not to bunt? That is the question.

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105 replies to this topic

#101 Mr. Brooks

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 04:11 PM

I'm not going to defend my position, because I've clearly stated what my position is.


I wasn't asking you to defend anything.
I was asking you to expand on your position.
Surely you have reasons why you don't think players should bunt if a pitcher has a no hitter. I'm curious what those reasons are.

#102 Blake

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 07:56 PM

 

I wasn't asking you to defend anything.
I was asking you to expand on your position.
Surely you have reasons why you don't think players should bunt if a pitcher has a no hitter. I'm curious what those reasons are.

Fair enough.

 

I did not say "no bunting with a no hitter under no circumstances."

 

I stated the unwritten rules of no bunt are fine, providing the hitter is being played straight up. However, if the hitter is trying to hit against a shift, by all means lay down the bunt.

 

The unwritten rules date back to before shifts became as prevalent as they are now. Baseball has long had those unwritten rules that everyone knew about and played by. I happen to like those traditions and I believe they have a place in baseball.  

 

However, that tradition is being turned on its head with all the shifts that are being used.

 

So, if teams want to remain true to the unwritten rule, then they need to play the hitter straight up and not shift in the ninth inning.

 

If a team wants to shift, then all bets are off in regards to the no bunt to break up the no-hitter.


#103 Mr. Brooks

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 08:41 PM

I'm aware that the unwritten rule exists.
I was curious if you had specific reasons for agreeing with it.

#104 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 01:55 PM

 

Personally I think it would be a lot easier to get a hitter to hit the ball the other way than to bunt.Bunting, especially with a slugger who likely hasn't practiced.....ever, is so unnatural to your regular hitting approach.Standing at a completely different angle, opening yourself up and a 100% different motion .If you think hitting a major league slider was hard, now imagine trying to bunt it.Slapping or check swinging would in theory be a lot more natural and would generally cut down on the pop ups to the catcher and pitcher. 

I disagree. Laying down a good bunt against a straight-up defense is a challenge and certainly takes time to practice and hone the skill.

 

But against the shift, all you need to do is keep the ball left of the pitcher and bunt the damned ball as hard as you can.

 

Most of the nuance of a traditional "good bunt" doesn't exist when bunting against a shift. In fact, you want the opposite effect against a shift (bunt hard versus practicing making the ball die in the grass 20-30 feet from the plate). When bunting against a shift, you want the ball to roll as far as possible as quickly as possible. If the defense is radically shifted, there's a chance you get two bases if it reaches the outfield grass.

 

Is doing that easy? Eh, I hesitate to call anything at the MLB level "easy" but holding out a bat, putting wood on the ball, and hitting it in a specific direction isn't the most challenging skill to learn.

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#105 Nine of twelve

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 08:29 PM

I disagree. Laying down a good bunt against a straight-up defense is a challenge and certainly takes time to practice and hone the skill.
 
But against the shift, all you need to do is keep the ball left of the pitcher and bunt the damned ball as hard as you can.
 
Most of the nuance of a traditional "good bunt" doesn't exist when bunting against a shift. In fact, you want the opposite effect against a shift (bunt hard versus practicing making the ball die in the grass 20-30 feet from the plate). When bunting against a shift, you want the ball to roll as far as possible as quickly as possible. If the defense is radically shifted, there's a chance you get two bases if it reaches the outfield grass.
 
Is doing that easy? Eh, I hesitate to call anything at the MLB level "easy" but holding out a bat, putting wood on the ball, and hitting it in a specific direction isn't the most challenging skill to learn.

Yes. When bunting toward third base against a standard defensive alignment you want the ball to stop very close to the line, about equidistant from the pitcher and the third baseman. Against the shift you want it to be hit hard enough to get past the point where the pitcher can field it.

#106 old nurse

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 10:10 PM

 

I think we're seeing a new generation of players that is willing to embrace the simplicity and fun of the game.I hope it pays off for baseball like I think it will.  

 

The outcry against Dozier's remarks are a good sign of that IMO.  

the simplicity they seek is elevate and celebrate