Jump to content

Providing independent coverage of the Minnesota Twins.
Subscribe to Twins Daily Email
Photo

Is it the ball?

  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#21 Willihammer

Willihammer

    Nostrombolimus

  • Members
  • 7,252 posts
  • LocationSaint Paul

Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:35 PM

 

I saw a stat on TV a couple of weeks ago comparing HRs hit 450 feet or more.  The 2017 total (all MLB) was about double from 2016 in the same time frame. I consider that damning information about the ball.

Do you remember the source?

Well, there's that.

-Dark Star, RIP


#22 Kwak

Kwak

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2,927 posts

Posted 05 July 2017 - 09:48 PM

 

Do you remember the source?

ESPN had some sort of a graphic as part of their discussion of total HRs in the majors.


#23 The Wise One

The Wise One

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,552 posts

Posted 06 July 2017 - 01:21 AM

So that explains the reliever who on most occasions has gotten out of innings unscathed. Those that he did not he got balls from the extra bouncy batch. 

 


#24 The Wise One

The Wise One

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,552 posts

Posted 06 July 2017 - 01:37 AM

Balls going further with the same launch angle and exit velocities being the same. The ball would have to be lighter or more aerodynamic.  The latter  cannot be the case  because pitchers are complaining of more blisters. The texture would be rougher, not smoother. I am not sure how much lighter a ball would have to be. Any change in the elasticity of the ball would result in a higher exit velocity


#25 spinowner

spinowner

    Minnesota Twins

  • Members
  • 3,989 posts

Posted 06 July 2017 - 12:10 PM

 

Balls going further with the same launch angle and exit velocities being the same. The ball would have to be lighter or more aerodynamic.  The latter  cannot be the case  because pitchers are complaining of more blisters. The texture would be rougher, not smoother. I am not sure how much lighter a ball would have to be. Any change in the elasticity of the ball would result in a higher exit velocity

Another factor is spin on the ball. More backspin = longer distance traveled. My guess is that this does not vary significantly between the two groups. I would think elasticity is the parameter that has changed the most since last year.

Regarding blisters, if the ball is smoother would it be more likely to slip slightly in the pitcher's hand and cause more blisters? I don't know that, I'm just positing a contrarian hypothesis.

eiπ + 1 = 0


#26 Willihammer

Willihammer

    Nostrombolimus

  • Members
  • 7,252 posts
  • LocationSaint Paul

Posted 06 July 2017 - 01:41 PM

I do wonder if pitchers throwing higher in the zone has lead to more backspin off the bat and greater carry.

Well, there's that.

-Dark Star, RIP


#27 The Wise One

The Wise One

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,552 posts

Posted 06 July 2017 - 07:40 PM

 

Another factor is spin on the ball. More backspin = longer distance traveled. My guess is that this does not vary significantly between the two groups. I would think elasticity is the parameter that has changed the most since last year.

Regarding blisters, if the ball is smoother would it be more likely to slip slightly in the pitcher's hand and cause more blisters? I don't know that, I'm just positing a contrarian hypothesis.

The article stated the seams were rougher..

 Elasticity changes would change exit velocity. 

If the exit angle has not changed how would a hitter get more backspin?


#28 spinowner

spinowner

    Minnesota Twins

  • Members
  • 3,989 posts

Posted 07 July 2017 - 05:32 AM

 

If the exit angle has not changed how would a hitter get more backspin?

The swing plane of the bat and the trajectory of the pitch come into play. If the swing plane is more horizontal than the pitch trajectory there will be backspin imparted to the ball. If the swing plane is more vertical than the pitch trajectory there will be topspin imparted to the ball. The greater the angle between the swing plane and the pitch trajectory the greater the spin.

eiπ + 1 = 0


#29 spinowner

spinowner

    Minnesota Twins

  • Members
  • 3,989 posts

Posted 07 July 2017 - 07:39 AM

Actually, my last note is not entirely correct. What I wrote is generally true, but it also depends on which part of the ball the bat makes contact with. There will be backspin if the bat hits the lower part of the ball (which will also increase the exit angle) and topspin if the bat hits the upper part of the ball (which will also decrease the exit angle).

eiπ + 1 = 0


#30 ahart10

ahart10

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 111 posts

Posted 31 July 2017 - 10:30 PM

New wrinkle: the seams are different, leading to more blisters for pitchers:

http://www.tsn.ca/st...-issue-1.795756


Tighter seems would lower drag allowing the ball to go faster/farther.

#31 Willihammer

Willihammer

    Nostrombolimus

  • Members
  • 7,252 posts
  • LocationSaint Paul

Posted 08 August 2017 - 11:43 AM

http://www.fangraphs...ined-home-runs/

Another juiced ball study discussed on FG, this one with a decent sized dataset of FBs hit at Tropicana from 2015-2017.
 

 

What Nathan found was that the ball did change, it had less drag, in comparing 2015 to 2016. But what was most interesting to me is the ball has apparently not changed from 2016 to 2017.

But HR/FB rates continue to increase — 13.7% this season compared to 12.8% in 2016 — even as the ball is playing similarly in 2017 compared to 2016, according to Nathan’s research. We can deduce there are reasons behind the spike.

I’m convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the ball has a role in this surge and perhaps even a leading one, but there are more elements involved and that was a takeaway, for me, from the presentation.

 

Well, there's that.

-Dark Star, RIP