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Article: My First Professional Offseason: Finding a Job

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#1 AJPettersen

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 04:35 PM

You can view the page at http://www.twinsdail...n-Finding-a-Job

#2 Nick Nelson

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:17 PM

Interesting stuff, AJ. Thanks for sharing. It's clear that you have a skill for writing, so I'm glad you've found a way to monetize it. That's always the struggle.

#3 John Bonnes

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:24 PM

AJ, does the Twins organization help with offseason employment at all? It seems like with their corporate relationships, they might be able to open some doors.

#4 AJPettersen

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:44 PM

Nick, thanks! I appreciate that. John, I haven't heard of that happening, that is an interesting thought. I bet if someone were to ask they would be more than happy to help.

#5 John Bonnes

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:53 PM

I would think that would especially be the case for a talented writer. Besides all the contacts they have with media, I would think they would have a ton of contacts with marketing departments, who are often looking for writing skills.

#6 greatski

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:53 PM

Maybe that would be a new job next off-season: Headhunter for others seeking offseason employment :)

#7 Twins Fan From Afar

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:51 AM

AJ, thanks for the interesting article. Outside of teaching baseball at camps and thing like that, I have to admit that I never thought too much about what minor leaguers do in the offseason. Writing is a great skill, so way to go!

#8 AJPettersen

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 08:36 AM

Maybe that would be a new job next off-season: Headhunter for others seeking offseason employment :)


Great idea! Now keep it quiet so I can get it up and running :)

#9 BeefMaster

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 08:45 AM

Out of curiosity, do you happen to know what any of your teammates do? I imagine it's especially difficult to find things because lots of seasonal industries (e.g. construction) are active in the summer, not winter - contractors don't need extra guys in Rochester in December. I think that's an underappreciated part of being a pro ballplayer from the fans' perspective - for all the "you get played to play baseball!" stuff, there really isn't a lot of money in it at the lower levels.
"There are only two things that are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." - Albert Einstein

#10 roger

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:49 AM

Welcome to the world of blogging A. J. You are with a great group of guys, will look forward to your posts.

#11 dwintheiser

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 03:48 PM

Welcome, AJ, and best wishes on both your baseball and non-baseball careers.

#12 AJPettersen

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:02 PM

Thank you both. Roger, I hope the MN winter is treating you well. It seems we are getting close to warmer weather and sunshine again!

#13 AJPettersen

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:07 PM

Out of curiosity, do you happen to know what any of your teammates do? I imagine it's especially difficult to find things because lots of seasonal industries (e.g. construction) are active in the summer, not winter - contractors don't need extra guys in Rochester in December.

I think that's an underappreciated part of being a pro ballplayer from the fans' perspective - for all the "you get played to play baseball!" stuff, there really isn't a lot of money in it at the lower levels.


Sorry it took me so long to respond. I have a few friends in pro ball who do a number of different things. The most common work players find is doing clinics. It pays pretty well per hour and ballplayers are well qualified. I had a friend from the U of M who worked for an engineering company this offseason. His dad works there and he has a degree in mechanical engineering, so it was a good fit. My buddy I workout with in Rochester worked at a factory for 40 hours a week this year. His dedication to making money to support his dream of playing baseball was pretty inspiring. So to answer your question, the jobs are varied. It depends significantly on the financial situation and qualifications (degree, previous work, etc).