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Article: Manfred Should End Outdated Selig Policies

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#21 Mike Sixel

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 12:54 PM

I'm not sure most of them get that much money, btw......

One of the best opening day rosters in years. Now go get 'em.


#22 JB_Iowa

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 01:05 PM

What percentage goes to the agent?  I know not all of the players use them initially but it is a factor.

Edited by JB_Iowa, 26 January 2015 - 01:06 PM.

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#23 REPETE

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 01:14 PM

I'm not sure most of them get that much money, btw......

No, but that's a 9th round pick.  For higher picks, i'm sure they make a little more, picks below that make less.  But for a chance to chase your dreams, I'm just saying it's a trade-off, and they have 7 months out of the year to earn more than their $1100 stipend.


#24 SD Buhr

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 01:45 PM

Suggest you also look at each minor league team's roster and look at how many players were drafted in the top 10 rounds (which are the only rounds where the slot value is over $100K signing bonus). After the "advisor" gets his cut and taxes take roughly 40% of what's left of that bonus (lump sum bonuses have taxes withheld at the highest tax rate), only a very small percentage of players have much with which to "supplement" their monthly salary.

 

As for earning more money in the offseason, that argument is even less convincing than when people try to argue teachers aren't underpaid because they can get summer jobs.

 

What do you suppose the "offseason" consists of? While they may only get paid for five months (a little longer if they get to attend fall instructional league, where they do, I believe, receive some modest additional pay, but I'm not sure on that), their offseason is far shorter than what you would get simply by measuring the time from their last game in the fall to the first game they get paid for the following spring. (They are not paid for spring training, for example.)

 

As far as the minor league season not being as "grueling" as a MLB season, I think most players would beg to differ, since minor leaguers get fewer off-days in their schedule. I'm also pretty sure MLBers don't sit through 250-500 mile bus rides. And, actually, most minor leaguers prefer those bus trips over the daily 150-200 miles they spend on buses for "commuter road games" where teams don't even stay over night, but make the round trip for each game.

 

What kind of offseason jobs do you suppose guys can get when they each also have expectations of an offseason workout plan laid out for them by the parent organization. I know a number of minor leaguers who essentially provide hitting/pitching instruction to young players in the offseason. Not exactly big money in that.

 

Sorry, but imo there is absolutely no justifiable excuse for paying professional ballplayers less than legal minimum wages. The guy you buy your hot dog from in the concession is likely making a better hourly wage than the players on the field.

 

Maybe minor league organizations should start "passing the hat" through the crowd during the 7th inning stretch so fans can throw a few bucks worth of "tip money" to players having a good game at that point!

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#25 chaderic20

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 01:53 PM

Just want to clear up one minor point.MLB.tv blackout restrictions have nothing to do with game attendance.MLB.tv blackout are designed to force people in the "home market" to buy cable TV packages.

 

But I still agree that something needs to change.As a fellow Iowan who can't get the Twins on cable, this really annoys me.It's actually driven me to the point of finding a pirate site to stream games. And I've gotten comfortable enough with that now, that even if they did lift the blackout here, I kinda doubt I'd be willing to pony up the $100 (or whatever it is) for MLB.tv since I can stream for free from a pirate site.Call me jaded, but it's the truth.


#26 REPETE

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 02:10 PM

I do agree.  $130K is NOT $130K, I'm assuming they're walking away with about $70K after taxes/agents (give or take).  But it's an opportunity to pursue a dream.  If the dream comes true, that's when the big payoff comes.  They know this going in.

Most guys know (especially college draft picks) in about 3 years whether they have a legitimate chance at the show.  That's where the signing bonus helps.  If it's a High School pick, they're getting paid something.  In college, they don't even get a stipend, They're paying their dues, and hoping for the best.

I don't know how many minor league players each team has, or what the financial impact would even be for a MLB owner.  And I certainly won't begrudge anyone for making more money.  If they can get it, more power to them.  Again, all i'm saying is, the article mentioned they make $1100/month.  I just didn't think it was 100% accurate, portraying these guys as making $5500 annually..  


#27 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 02:50 PM

I do agree.  $130K is NOT $130K, I'm assuming they're walking away with about $70K after taxes/agents (give or take).  But it's an opportunity to pursue a dream.  If the dream comes true, that's when the big payoff comes.  They know this going in.

Most guys know (especially college draft picks) in about 3 years whether they have a legitimate chance at the show.  That's where the signing bonus helps.  If it's a High School pick, they're getting paid something.  In college, they don't even get a stipend, They're paying their dues, and hoping for the best.

I don't know how many minor league players each team has, or what the financial impact would even be for a MLB owner.  And I certainly won't begrudge anyone for making more money.  If they can get it, more power to them.  Again, all i'm saying is, the article mentioned they make $1100/month.  I just didn't think it was 100% accurate, portraying these guys as making $5500 annually..  

The biggest problem is that MiLB players don't have a seat at the negotiating table. That's a big issue and it's just. plain. wrong.

 

If they can't negotiate more money, so be it... but the fact that they don't get to negotiate is a huge problem. They have one shot to bargain (initial draft signing but even that is now restricted due to slotting) and after that, they're at the conscripted mercy of a boss that gets to control them for a decade.

 

The largest group of employees in an industry making money hand over fist doesn't have anyone looking out for their interests. That needs to change.

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#28 TheLeviathan

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 03:03 PM

In addition to being unfair that they can't negotiate a larger piece of the pie, giving MiLB is an investment in the game. If you're an athlete, do you really want to sit around making peanuts for five years when the other leagues offer substantially more?

Baseball has a massive pie to divide, it's ridiculous in every possible way and for all parties, to keep giving such a tiny slice to a vital component of the games health.

Also, as a teacher, the myth about getting a summer job is way overplayed. That doesn't happen because it's almost impossible to arrange for the vast majority.

Edited by TheLeviathan, 26 January 2015 - 03:04 PM.


#29 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 03:40 PM

Also, as a teacher, the myth about getting a summer job is way overplayed. That doesn't happen because it's almost impossible to arrange for the vast majority.

Even if you do find a "summer job", chances are it's for peanuts because who needs a highly-paid employee for just a few months of the year?

 

It's hard to find short-term development work (under three months) and development is a great fit for short-term employment based on the need employers have to ramp up/down project cycles.

 

And even despite that fact, most employers would rather hire someone to develop 40 hours a week (whether they need it or not) than hire a part-time or temporary employee.


#30 TheLeviathan

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 09:01 PM

Even if you do find a "summer job", chances are it's for peanuts because who needs a highly-paid employee for just a few months of the year?

 

It's not even a clear three months, it's like mid-June to mid-August and that's only if you don't coach or do other things.  It's not like it's three scot-free months.  

 

So yeah, you basically have to be a mercenary for construction crews or Green Giant or something to find summer work.  That's something you do when you're 16, not 36.


#31 USAFChief

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 07:03 AM

If enough "youths" would refuse to play minor league baseball, the pay situation would resolve itself.

But I don't see any want ads asking for players to fill out minor league teams.

I think in their own interests, teams will start providing proper nutrition to minor leaguers. Pay? Not so much. Not until they have to.

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#32 diehardtwinsfan

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 03:49 PM

Honestly, if they took care of housing and nutrition, they'd never need to address the pay.If you a place to stay and food to eat, you don't exactly have a lot of costs.I'd think both would be very beneficial to teams as a whole.

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#33 Hosken Bombo Disco

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 07:08 PM

That's the one big thing the owners have going for them. If the players don't like it, they can in theory walk away at any time. Though obviously it's not that simple for an individual to do that. 

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#34 SD Buhr

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 12:36 PM

If enough "youths" would refuse to play minor league baseball, the pay situation would resolve itself.

But I don't see any want ads asking for players to fill out minor league teams.

 

But isn't this pretty much the same argument that opponents of a legal minimum wage have made for decades? If an employer can adequately fill its staff with people willing to work for low wages, why shouldn't they be allowed to do so?

 

I'm a registered Republican and even I don't believe that.

 

There are a lot of businesses that, due to location or other perceived perks, would have no trouble filling their staffs with 16-22 year olds, even without paying minimum wages. I guess I just don't believe thatmeans they should be allowed to do so.

 

Let me put it this way... Let's say I open a business on a popular beach in Florida. I have no shortage of college kids trying to land work with me (especially if I bring in a bunch of impoverished kids from Latin America to supplement my domestic work force). 

 

I implement a compensation plan that calls for wages below legally mandated miniumum wage levels and even 10-11 hour work days much of the time, but, in return for agreeing to work for illegally low wages, I agree to hold a lottery where I put the names of every employee who has worked for me for four or more years in to a hat and draw one name to pay $500,000. Win or lose, if you're still employed the next year, your name goes in to the hat again. (Of course, any time I want to, I can simply fire you.)

 

Does that gimmick entitle me to avoid compliance with minimum wage laws, even if I have no problem finding more than enough kids to run my business?

 

After all, nobody is forcing them to choose to work for me.

Edited by SD Buhr, 28 January 2015 - 12:40 PM.

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#35 JB_Iowa

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 01:07 PM

Jon Morosi ‏@jonmorosi· 7m7 minutes ago 
From STATS LLC: 15,007 defensive shifts in 2014, up from 7,641 previous year. And the BABIP went UP, from .297 to .299. UP!

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