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Tony Gwynn (Mr. Padre) Passes Away

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31 replies to this topic

#1 Kirby_waved_at_me

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

Ugh. This hits really hard. Tony Gwynn was my favorite non-Twins player.

http://www.mlbtrader...asses-away.html

#2 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:05 AM

Ugh. Just terrible. I went to high school in San Diego and have very fond memories of Gwynn. He seemed like a great guy all around.

#3 nicksaviking

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:05 AM

That's hard news, I was always a big fan. He and Puckett always had a lot of similarities in the evolustion of their games and what they meant to their franchises. Unfortunately passing too young is another.

#4 Hosken Bombo Disco

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:05 AM

RIP

Also a casualty of the 1994 strike --- batting .394 on August 12 when play stopped.

Among the best ever.

#5 TheLeviathan

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:06 AM

Definitely one of my all-time non-Twins favorites. Class act and fun to watch.

#6 DocBauer

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:08 AM

Awful, terrible news. And still so damn young! And so much still to offer.

I confess, I had forgotten of his recent battles.

You know, he never had much of anything in the way of HR power, and the second half of his career the speed began to decline and the SB's dropped considerably, though the percentage of successful tries was still there. But he was a solid doubles producer and an absolute hitting and on base machine. Gwynn, Boggs and Puckett are/were the three best, greatest, most pure hitters I have ever seen, (a healthy Mauer in that class). Gwynn could fall out of bed, stub his toe, fall in the shower, get in a car accident on the way to the ballpark, arrive late, miss batting practice, take two practice swings before stepping in to face the pitcher and still go 2 for 4 with a walk.

But the best things were his professionalism and enthusiasm. He was always a class act, always smiling, and always a team player who just loved the game and to compete. Everything from his talent and production to physical build to class and big smiles made him the NL equivalent, pretty much, to Puckett. Also taken from us way too soon. It's a shame.

#7 gunnarthor

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:08 AM

RIP. Great player and he seemed like a good guy. Thoughts and prayers to his family.

#8 tobi0040

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:18 AM

RIP. Great player and he seemed like a good guy. Thoughts and prayers to his family.



Very sad. He seemed like a very good guy. I wonder if this will jump-start a conversation about chewing and baseball.

#9 Kirby_waved_at_me

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:22 AM

I was looking through old articles on Mr. Gwynn and found this interview with Gwynn and Stan Musial about hitting. Some really good stuff from two of the greatest hitters of all time.
http://www.sportingn...-and-tony-gwynn

#10 TRex

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:52 AM

A bit of a side discussion but, as one who used chewing tobacco for 15 years, I couldn't help but notice the prominent bulge in the bottom left lip of our own Byron Buxton in the Strib article.

Let's hope he takes note of Mr. Gwynn's plea for players to stop using chewing tobacco, and starts a new chapter in his life today.

#11 jharaldson

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:54 AM

Sad news on what seemed to be an upbeat guy and a smart baseball guy as well as a HoF. Cautionary tale to kids about chew and what it can do to you.

#12 jharaldson

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:02 AM

I was just reading on this and found this quote:

[COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]“I haven’t discussed that with the doctors yet, but I’m thinking it’s related to dipping,” said Gwynn, who resumed the practice of using chewing tobacco after the first two surgeries.[/FONT][/COLOR]


http://newyork.cbslo...ynn-has-cancer/

Dipping must be as addictive as hell if you have 2 surgeries related to it and continue using it afterwords.

#13 tobi0040

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:08 AM

A bit of a side discussion but, as one who used chewing tobacco for 15 years, I couldn't help but notice the prominent bulge in the bottom left lip of our own Byron Buxton in the Strib article.

Let's hope he takes note of Mr. Gwynn's plea for players to stop using chewing tobacco, and starts a new chapter in his life today.


That is not the first picture of Buxton I have seen with a huge dip in. Very common even on high school teams. I have heard it is harder to quit chewing than smoking. It would be nice to see a discussion about this and a campaign or ban from MLB.

#14 JB_Iowa

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:38 AM

My deepest sympathy to his wife, children, grandchildren, extended family and legions of fans.

I would like to see baseball take "Stand Up to Cancer" seriously rather than just as an ad slogan. They provide good funding for many types of cancer research through their efforts but just as important is matching actions to rhetoric. So yes, ban chew at all levels. But also be aware of what you do -- I was incensed when the Twins made a public presentation of a humidor to Gardenhire for his 1,000th win. Tobacco is tobacco -- and it isn't good in any form.

#15 tobi0040

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:44 AM

My deepest sympathy to his wife, children, grandchildren, extended family and legions of fans.

I would like to see baseball take "Stand Up to Cancer" seriously rather than just as an ad slogan. They provide good funding for many types of cancer research through their efforts but just as important is matching actions to rhetoric. So yes, ban chew at all levels. But also be aware of what you do -- I was incensed when the Twins made a public presentation of a humidor to Gardenhire for his 1,000th win. Tobacco is tobacco -- and it isn't good in any form.


I agree. A ban would be a good thing. These guys are role models. If they didn't ask for it, too bad. It comes with the territory.

#16 kydoty

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 12:17 PM

Posted Image

"Mediocre breaking balls are a gift from God." - Kirby Puckett


#17 CRArko

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 03:47 PM

You were a good man, Tony Gwynn. You are missed.
Verrrrrry Interesting!

#18 darin617

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:29 PM

RIP
I wish there would have been inter league games back in the 80's so we could have seen Kirby Puckett and Tony Gywnn playing against each other besides All-Star games.
Best stats that I saw on yahoo about him.Gwynn had 45 games with at least four hits. In 2,440 career games, Gwynn had only 34 multi-strikeout games. So, the odds were better that Gwynn would get four hits than striking out twice. Let that sink in.

#19 Bark's Lounge

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:04 PM

Gwynn's death is plain and simply - awful. When I read the news this morning I had waves of nostalgia and melancholy run over me - maybe, I was even a bit misty eyed.

When I was able to watch Gwynn play, it was always a treat - the man was a hitting machine. Other than that, I checked the box score everyday to see what Tony Gwynn had done or where his BA was at.

After his career was finished, I always enjoyed when I was able to hear him guest announce a game on ESPN or whatever network - I cannot recall. His baseball acumen and love for the game, always made him an educational and enjoyable watch and listen. He was baseball family - I felt like I knew him.

7 times hitting over .350 is astonishing!

Rest well Tony Gwynn Sr., you will never be forgotten.

There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.


#20 Seth Stohs

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:17 PM

Very sad. He seemed like a very good guy. I wonder if this will jump-start a conversation about chewing and baseball.



I hope so!

#21 LaBombo

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:28 PM

RIP
I wish there would have been inter league games back in the 80's so we could have seen Kirby Puckett and Tony Gywnn playing against each other besides All-Star games.
Best stats that I saw on yahoo about him.Gwynn had 45 games with at least four hits. In 2,440 career games, Gwynn had only 34 multi-strikeout games. So, the odds were better that Gwynn would get four hits than striking out twice. Let that sink in.


Great find. Gwynn's career pre-dated the internet and inter-league play. Historical research well done, darin.

And yeah, the Kirby factor. Mirror image, and separated at birth. Body type a spot-on match. Easy .300+ hitters. Puckett was the force of nature. Gwynn was the technician. Klammer vs. Russi, 1976.

Godspeed, Tony G. The game is better from your contributions.

#22 kydoty

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:44 PM

RIP
I wish there would have been inter league games back in the 80's so we could have seen Kirby Puckett and Tony Gywnn playing against each other besides All-Star games.
Best stats that I saw on yahoo about him.Gwynn had 45 games with at least four hits. In 2,440 career games, Gwynn had only 34 multi-strikeout games. So, the odds were better that Gwynn would get four hits than striking out twice. Let that sink in.


To further the wow factor, of those 34 multi-strikeout games, only one of them was a three strike game.

"Mediocre breaking balls are a gift from God." - Kirby Puckett


#23 TheLeviathan

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

A whole list of stunning facts:

http://sports.yahoo....-182243389.html

#24 JB_Iowa

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 12:51 PM

http://byrnes22.com/?p=423

For those of us who were a little on our "high horses" about chewing tobacco above, this provides a great perspective.

And makes me inutterably sad.

#25 zenser

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 01:29 PM

To further the wow factor, of those 34 multi-strikeout games, only one of them was a three strike game.


I can't remember where I read it, but one year Tony Gwynn swung and missed like 50 times all year.

I grew up when he was in his prime but I didn't realize he stole 56 bases in 1987 and 40 in 1989.

#26 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 01:39 PM

As much as it pained me to say it as a kid, Gwynn was quite a bit better than Puckett. The guy was just a phenomenal hitter, unrivaled by anyone else during that time. His ridiculous swing and miss stats show just how amazing he was during his career.

#27 Kirby_waved_at_me

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:07 PM

Puck hit for more power, but I think a person would be hard pressed to find a better hitter than Tony Gwynn in the expansion era.

I think Puck also had a slight edge defensively, though Gwynn was no slouch in RF (he played a respectable CF in 1989 as well)

#28 Brock Beauchamp

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:09 PM

I think Puck also had a slight edge defensively, though Gwynn was no slouch in RF (he played a respectable CF in 1989 as well)


I think Puckett had a considerable edge defensively... I should have clarified with "Gwynn was the better hitter by a healthy margin". I wasn't factoring in defense at all.

#29 zenser

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:20 PM

What I liked about Gwynn is that he was one of those super stars that played for one team. Puckett and Ripken also did and they are a dying breed. I realize guys like Hrbek did this too but I don't put him in the same category as Puckett, Ripken, Gwynn.

With Jeter retiring, who will be the next super star to say they have played for only one organization? Mauer? Pedoria? Longoria?

#30 mike wants wins

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:29 PM

http://byrnes22.com/?p=423

For those of us who were a little on our "high horses" about chewing tobacco above, this provides a great perspective.

And makes me inutterably sad.


I'm not sure how that changes my mind that people should quit. Just like alcoholics or other drug addicts, or people addicted to gambling. Yup, its hard. Yup, some people are pre-disposed to being addicts. that doesn't change (it really reinforces, imo) the fact that people need to choose to stop.

oh, and milb should outlaw it. and the Twins should tell their minor leaguers it is a banned substance for them.
Lighten up Francis....