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Starting Pitcher Analysis: Lewis Thorpe

Posted by RDLARK , 30 January 2020 · 2,154 views

pitching thorpe starters dobnak rotation
Okay, time to take a look at Lewis Thorpe. This is, afterall, the reason we all woke up this morning, right? Thankfully for all involved, we can skip the lengthy preamble and just get into the analysis.
Like Dobnak, whom I covered in this space last week, Thorpe made his MLB debut for the Twins last season (though he started the year off in AAA, whereas Dobnak basically covered every level in the organization in 2019).

Let’s take a look at Thorpe’s results from his MLB stint:
• 27.2 IP (essentially the same sample as Dobnak)
• 10.08 K/9 (yes, please)
• 3.25 BB/9 (that’ll play)
• 6.18 ERA (yikes)
• 3.47 FIP (okay, let’s take a look at the BABIP, HR rates, and other batted ball tendencies)
• 4.14 xFIP (so he had a lower than league average HR/FB rate, but honestly ½ of a run isn’t much in this small of a sample, it’s a difference of 1.5 ER allowed in 27 IP)

I see a number of things I want to look at here, and we will see where this takes us:
• Swinging Strike Rate: 11.8%
• Zone Percentage: 44.3%
• BABIP: .438
• HR/9: 0.98
• HR/FB: 10.3%
• Line Drive Rate: 31.3%

Let’s start with his plate discipline numbers to see whether we think these strikeout and walk rates, which are the stuff aces are made of (a quick a dirty thing to do to identify elite skills is to subtract the BB/9 from the K/9; anything over 6 is great).

Let’s start off with the walks and underlying control skills. Thorpe was in the strike zone with 44.3% of his pitches in his limited MLB innings. Among qualified starters, he would have ranked 17th, just behind Yu Darvish and just ahead of Lance Lynn. As I mentioned last week, there were 61 qualified starters, so the top 20 is the top 1/3rd. It’s also worth mentioning that his BB/9 in nearly 100 AAA innings was 2.34 in 2019 and in AA and AAA in 2018, he compiled 130 innings with a 2.5 BB/9. I think it’s safe to say Thorpe has great control and can likely be relied upon to avoid free passes.

On to strikeouts. Thorpe has consistently delivered a K/9 in the double digits throughout his time in AA, AAA, and MLB in 2017 (10.50), 2018 (10.92 in AA; 10.80 in AAA) and 2019 (11.12 in AAA, 10.08 in MLB). I’m happy to report that his swinging strike rate during his MLB stint backs this up. His 11.8 swinging strike rate would have been 22nd among qualifying starters (again, right around the top 1/3). As I noted with Dobnak, it is not particularly common for the same pitcher to post strong control numbers and miss a lot of bats.

Here is the list of pitchers who had a zone percentage of at least 44.3% and a swinging strike rate of at least 11.8% (if you read the Dobnak post last week, this will look familiar).
• Gerrit Cole – 16.8%/45.2%
• Max Scherzer – 16.4%/45.6%
• Justin Verlander – 16.1%/45.2%
• Lucas Giolito – 15%/47.2%
• Yu Darvish – 13.4%/44.5%
• Charlie Morton – 12.9%/45.1%
• German Marquez – 12.7%/46.6%
• Walker Buehler – 12.1%/46.5%
• Joe Musgrove – 12%/45.5%

Still good company, just as it was for Dobnak last week (and I’m on board with prying Musgrove away from Pittsburgh).

Okay, so he’s in the zone and missing bats. Those skills have consistently translated to strikeouts and walks (for pitchers in general, and for Thorpe since he was promoted to AA in 2017). So if he’s so great why did he post an ERA of more than 6 runs per nine innings?

I know a lot of people won’t like to hear this, but he was unlucky. Pitchers cannot control everything that happens, and particularly in small samples some bad luck can really torch your ratios. For starters, he allowed a .438 BABIP. The highest BABIP among qualified starters was .347 – one hundred points lower! That’s a fluke. Thorpe also only stranded 66% of his baserunners. Only three qualified starters had lower strand rates, and none of then posted a K/9 over 8.5 (Musgrove had the lowest strand rate in the major leagues; more evidence that he'd be a great add).

He was helped a bit by having a relatively low HR/FB, particularly given the fact that he allowed a lot of hard contact (39.8%), and the BABIP was fueled by a 31.3% line drive rate. It’s likely intuitive to anyone who has read this far, but line drives are by far the most likely type of batted ball to result in a base hit. Again, though, so much of all of this is dependent on such a small sample that it’s hard to know if that’s really who he is. If those line drives turned into fly balls he’d likely see his BABIP come down, but he’d also likely allow more home runs. It’s also feasible that a pitcher who misses bats like he does can figure out how to induce weaker contact, especially if he relies more heavily on his slider.

A commenter noted on the Dobnak post that Dobnak had faced some weaker offenses. That’s also true of Thorpe, who faced AL central foes for the majority of his appearances. Something to keep in mind.

Honestly, he’s a lot like Dobnak. The biggest difference between the two (aside from pedigree) is that Dobnak had good fortune with batted balls and Thorpe had bad fortune. All-in-all, I’d say Thorpe gives us plenty of reason to be excited about the possibilities for the back end of the rotation in 2020. The Twins don’t need all of the potential starters on the 40-man to be great, and they appear to have put together a system full of high variance, high upside arms. Not a bad place to be.

  • Cory Engelhardt, CUtomorrownight, howieramone2 and 2 others like this



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LA VIkes Fan
Jan 30 2020 11:40 AM

I like Thorpe and Dobnak. I'd love to see them each get 5-7 starts at the beginning of the year (assuming at least decent performance, not if they bomb out of the gate) so we can really see them develop and see where they can go.

 

Having said that, I remember reading that Thorpe had below average spin rates and below average velocity on his fast ball. Wouldn't that help explain the high BABIP? He may be one of these guys who is good to great when he hits his spots and regresses not to average but to easily hittablewhen he does not. That may be our problem here.  

    • Patrick Wozniak and RDLARK like this

Isn't a low strand rate bad?

    • RDLARK likes this
Really enjoyed this and the previous Dobnak article. Gills me with much hope, and I already liked what I saw from both guys last year. A shame we only have such a SSS though. Really wish each could have taken a few more of Perez's and Gibson's outings in retrospect.
    • Patrick Wozniak and RDLARK like this

Having said that, I remember reading that Thorpe had below average spin rates and below average velocity on his fast ball. Wouldn't that help explain the high BABIP? He may be one of these guys who is good to great when he hits his spots and regresses not to average but to easily hittablewhen he does not. That may be our problem here.


That’s interesting. I’m going to try to look into this. Thanks!

Isn't a low strand rate bad?


As a result, yes. You’d obviously prefer to strand runners. But when you think about skills, the ability to strand runners isn’t really a skill. It’s a function of good fortune, generally speaking. That said, pitchers who are good at striking batters out are more likely to strand runners (I went into this a little in the Dobnak post), because some runs score on ground outs and fly outs. Nobody scores on a strikeout, obviously.

That being the case, a guy like Thorpe, with a high K rate should have a higher strand rate, not an extremely low one (I generally just expect most pitchers to be about average at stranding runners, TBH).

Really enjoyed this and the previous Dobnak article. Gills me with much hope, and I already liked what I saw from both guys last year. A shame we only have such a SSS though. Really wish each could have taken a few more of Perez's and Gibson's outings in retrospect.


Agreed. Plenty of reason to be excited. I look at these two, and a few others, as a portfolio of assets. If just a couple hit the Twins are in good shape. Also, thanks!
    • howieramone2 likes this
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stringer bell
Jan 31 2020 08:37 AM

First and foremost, it isn't fair to judge a pitcher from just 27 innings, as you said. Secondly, IMHO, the swing and miss rate negates the low spin rate. He's getting swings and misses and Ks. 

 

If I recall correctly, Thorpe seemed to be a victim of nerves leading to to crooked numbers. The other thing I remember is sailing along and then encountering an inning where he couldn't get anyone out. Bad luck? Different stuff out of the stretch? Lack of trust in his stuff? 

 

Regarding FIP and xFIP, some pitchers never can pitch to what would be predicted for them--Ricky Nolasco comes to mind--but usually ERA tends to normalize near those indicators. If Thorpe could pitch close to those marks, I think he'll be an asset for this year and years to come. 

    • CUtomorrownight and RDLARK like this

 

 

Regarding FIP and xFIP, some pitchers never can pitch to what would be predicted for them--Ricky Nolasco comes to mind--but usually ERA tends to normalize near those indicators. If Thorpe could pitch close to those marks, I think he'll be an asset for this year and years to come. 

Agree -- At the very least, he has the potential to be very good. Doesn't mean he will be great for sure, but his ceiling is pretty high.

    • howieramone2 likes this

Wait a minute, I remember what Thorpe looked like when he made his debut. Clearly he was having trouble controlling his emotions. He was sailing balls and over throwing, seemed like a majority of pitches. Pitching coach spent most of his time trying to calm the kid down.

 

This should be great news for us fans because it means this season it will no longer be a whole new world of pressure for Thorpe. He's done it before, so now he can relax and just pitch his game. 

 

And of course, kill Superman. That's all we ask.

    • RDLARK likes this