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Wolfson: Twins Scouting Yoshinobu Yamamoto

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 10:04 PM
  Doogie Wolfson tweeted that the Twins are going to be scouting 22-year-old RHP Yoshinobu Yamamoto, "one of the premier young pitc...

2020 MLB (non-Twins) Postseason Discussion Thread

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Feel free to chime in here about any of the (non-Twins) 2020 MLB postseason games!

Not to add more doom and gloom

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 01:31 PM
This is interesting and sort of concerning. Article snippet comes from the incomparable Jayson Stark of The Athletic (Which is must read...

White Sox make changes

Other Baseball Yesterday, 10:44 AM
Both Manager Rick Rentaria and pitching coach Don Cooper were let go.     Was a bit surprised by this, because the White S...

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What's Next for Alex Meyer?

Posted by Cody Christie , in Minor Leagues, Twins 17 January 2016 · 2,069 views

alex meyer glen perkins brian duensing randy johnson
2015 was supposed to be his season, his moment. After working his way through two different minor league systems over three years, Alex Meyer was on the cusp of making his major league debut. In fact, Baseball Prospectus had him ranked as the 14th best prospect in baseball, his highest ranking on any national list during his professional career.

As Meyer entered his age-25 season at last year's TwinsFest, he compared his age to that of another late bloomer, Randy Johnson. Meyer said, "Randy Johnson, I think I read he came up when he was 25. He just so happened to be tall, too, so let's hope. If I could have half that career..."

Meyer started the year in the minor leagues and things didn't go exactly to plan. He made eight starts in Rochester and compiled a 7.09 ERA with 41 strikeouts and 24 walks in 39.1 IP. Something wasn't clicking and the Twins decided to move him to the bullpen.

"I love starting. I've done it my whole life," Meyer said later in the season. "But going out there and getting my teeth kicked in every game wasn't a good experience."

The transition to the bullpen came with some positive results. In his next nine appearance (17 IP), he posted a 0.53 ERA with 20 strikeouts and six walks. Opponents batted .188 against him during this stretch and got on base less than 27% of the time.

It was time to see if Meyer could resemble Mr. Johnson as the Twins called him up to make his big league debut. In two interleague games, Meyer pitched 2.2 innings and allowed five earned runs including two home runs. Opponents got on base 50% of the time and batted over .360. It wasn't exactly the magical moment Meyer had dreamed about.

Meyer wouldn't make it back to the big leagues in 2015. He'd spend the rest of the season figuring out his new bullpen role. Things didn't got perfectly as he allowed 15 earned runs in his next 13.0 innings pitched with a 17 to 8 strikeout to walk ratio. But he did improve in his last 10 games as he allowed two earned runs in 22.2 innings with 22 strikeouts and 10 walks.

The Twins have seen other failed starters succeed in bullpen roles. All-Star closer Glen Perkins was a starter before finding success in the bullpen. Brian Duensing went back and forth between starter and reliever before eventually being moved to the bullpen. Trevor May had success as a starter last season but his future looks to be that of a reliever.

Luckily for Meyer, the bullpen has more opportunities than the rotation as the Twins get closer to spring training. Minnesota hasn't made little to no offseason moves to bolster the pitching staff as the team seems destined to use internal options in 2016. That being said, it would take a strong spring from Meyer to prove he belongs at the big league level to start the year. Meyer's control and use of his change-up will be keys to him finding success at the next level.

It seems likely that Meyer will start the year in Rochester as the organization monitors how he can adjust to his first full season as a relief pitcher. His path to the big leagues has taken a different course but he can still be an impact player as the Twins become more relevant in the American League.

2015 wasn't his season but 2016 and beyond could bring better moments for Alex Meyer the relief pitcher.




Nice article, Cody.However, I believe that the Twins are not quite ready to give up on him as a starter.I don't know the number of SP candidates, nor RP, for Rochester, but I think that is where he'll start.Last year the bullpen was intended, at least suggested, to straighten him out.  The new pitching coach may be given a chance to right the ship first.At least that is my hope for 2016.If he can't succeed, then off to the BP.

Forgot to add this.Thanks for bringing up Meyer, as he seems to have been the forgotten talent this off-season. 

    • Hosken Bombo Disco likes this
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Hosken Bombo Disco
Jan 17 2016 08:27 PM

Yes and thank you for not repeating the old cliche that he "needs to stay healthy." Meyer has actually been pretty healthy in his career except for the precautionary rest he took in 2013 for his shoulder.

 

You cited his good ERA and BA-against when he was sent to the Bullpen. Then, in his final 10 appearances, going off memory, he had something like 22 innings, 25 base runners (half hits, half walks), 22 strikeouts, and a pretty good 30%+ strikeout rate. Maybe last September would have been a good time to have him up here, while he's pitching fairly well. My feeling is if Meyer pitches well in spring training the Twins really need to make a spot for him and use him right away in roles that are a little more important than first inning mop up duty (as was the case in his MLB debut). He was hailed as an ace when he was traded for. Too early to give up on him or pigeonhole him in the BP.

    • brvama likes this
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jorgenswest
Jan 18 2016 10:30 AM
The Twins should not give up on him as a starter.

When they moved him out of the rotation last year his FIP was essentially the same as it was in 2014. It was a BABIP well into the 400s that was the difference between the two years. Add his relief work and he ended the season with a FIP of 3.28.

The insanely high BABIP last year had to mess with his mind and confidence. The Twins were wise to get him out of the rotation. They would be unwise to give up on him as a starter knowing that his peripherals as a starter were essentially the same as 2014.
    • brvama and h2oface like this