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Total Bases

Posted by mikelink45 , 07 April 2020 · 1,288 views

Total Bases
  • Joe Mauer
  • Joe Judge
  • Kirby Puckett
  • Sam Rice
  • Harmon Killebrew
  • Tony Oliva

Baseball records used to have so much more meaning for me, but now I realize the external and societal influences and they have taken on less meaning. 60 and 61 were magical - 70 and 73 on steroids - blah. 714 and 755 HR totals were meaningful, but they were steroided too and then along came the juiced ball and 300 + team HRs means less too.

Doubles, triples, stolen bases are all dynamic and I love them, but ball park configurations, saber rattlers, and new strategies have removed a lot of the really exciting base movements. HR hitters drive cadillacs according to the old cliche. What do double hits drive?

Hank Aaron had 6856 total bases in his career. He was most proud of that record. Total bases were the ultimate goal in his mind and I agree. The next highest total was 6134 (Stan Musial) - over 700 difference. Under rated Dave Winfield has 5221 and is 16 overall, while Molitor had 4854 and is #27. Harmon Killebrew is number #79 with 4143. 3998 is Carew's total - #92. Albert Pujols is the leading active player with 5863.

The Twins/Senators record book has Harmon Killebrew 4026, Sam Rice 3833, Kirby Puckett 3453, Joe Judge 3239, Joe Mauer 3040 and Tony Oliva 3002. Remember that these are total bases with the Twins only so Killebrew and Carew will have different totals for the MLB record book.

In a single season the Total Base records for the Twins has Tony Oliva with 374, Puckett 358 and 365, Rod Carew 351,and Brian Dozier 336. The Single season record for MLB is Babe Ruth 457, Rogers Hornsby 450, Lou Gehrig 447, Chuck Klein 445, Jimmy Foxx 438, Stan Musial 429, Sammy Sosa 425. Among active players Pujols has the 37th best season with 394. Tony Oliva's season rank 89th. Hank Aaron had fifteen seasons where he collected more than three-hundred total bases — the most seasons by any player and Lou Gehrig had five seasons of over 400.

https://www.baseball...g/hitotb1.shtml

  • jkcarew likes this



I like total bases, as well. Having said that, it's a stat that isn't kind to Killebrew. Poor Harmon had too many PA each season where the pitcher simply refused to throw the ball over the plate.

 

Got me to thinking...

 

In 1969, Killebrew had 324 total bases. But, his 145 BB that year give him 469 TB+BB. Killebrew had several years where his TB+BB were over 400. Oliva has the one year over 400...the year you reference (his rookie year!)...when he had 374 TB + 34 BB for 408.

 

(Carew's 1977 was 351 + 69 = 420; Pucket's 1986 was 365 + 34 = 399 and his 1988 was 358 + 23 = 381; Dozier's 2016 was 336 + 61 = 397 and his 2017 was 307 + 78 = 385; Morneau's 2008 was 387 and his 2006 was 384; Mauer's 2009 was 383)

 

 

    • Dantes929 and mikelink45 like this

 

I like total bases, as well. Having said that, it's a stat that isn't kind to Killebrew. Poor Harmon had too many PA each season where the pitcher simply refused to throw the ball over the plate.

 

Got me to thinking...

 

In 1969, Killebrew had 324 total bases. But, his 145 BB that year give him 469 TB+BB. Killebrew had several years where his TB+BB were over 400. Oliva has the one year over 400...the year you reference (his rookie year!)...when he had 374 TB + 34 BB for 408.

 

(Carew's 1977 was 351 + 69 = 420; Pucket's 1986 was 365 + 34 = 399 and his 1988 was 358 + 23 = 381; Dozier's 2016 was 336 + 61 = 397 and his 2017 was 307 + 78 = 385; Morneau's 2008 was 387 and his 2006 was 384; Mauer's 2009 was 383)

Good post - Hank Aaron - my hero had 1402 walks which meant his total bases would be 8258 for his career.

Babe Ruth in his best single TB year had 457 TB and 145 BB which meant 602 TB or and average of 3.9 bases per game in a 154 game season.  

Those are figures that blow me away!

    • Dantes929 likes this

 

I like total bases, as well. Having said that, it's a stat that isn't kind to Killebrew. Poor Harmon had too many PA each season where the pitcher simply refused to throw the ball over the plate.

 

Got me to thinking...

 

In 1969, Killebrew had 324 total bases. But, his 145 BB that year give him 469 TB+BB. Killebrew had several years where his TB+BB were over 400. Oliva has the one year over 400...the year you reference (his rookie year!)...when he had 374 TB + 34 BB for 408.

 

(Carew's 1977 was 351 + 69 = 420; Pucket's 1986 was 365 + 34 = 399 and his 1988 was 358 + 23 = 381; Dozier's 2016 was 336 + 61 = 397 and his 2017 was 307 + 78 = 385; Morneau's 2008 was 387 and his 2006 was 384; Mauer's 2009 was 383)

Seems like walks should be part of the equation in the first place.  

    • mikelink45 likes this

 

Seems like walks should be part of the equation in the first place.  

Agreed, but they are not. "In baseball statistics, total bases is the number of bases a player has gained with hits. It is a weighted sum for which the weight value is 1 for a single, 2 for a double, 3 for a triple and 4 for a home run. Only bases attained from hits count toward this total."