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Morneau

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 08:52 PM
I thought he was was really good last year. Maybe I'm on an opening day high (Not high) but he is so good.Who would have thought he would...
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New Target field policy...no bags of any kind

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 08:44 PM
Thankfully we went before gates opened and were warned by a friendly security guy in advance that this year there are no bags of any kind...
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The 5 Rule Draft

Twins Minor League Talk Today, 05:58 PM
This year's Rule 5 draft we lost Akil Baddo and Tyler Wells. So I thought I'd check to see how they were doing. 1st I checked on Baddo, h...
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Ex Twins in 2021: Where Are They Now?

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 09:48 AM
One of my favorite annual threads on the site. Let’s stay updated on ex-Twins in the news... This is a start of a list, and feel free to...
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Why isn't Buxton on MLB OPS leaders list?

Minnesota Twins Talk Yesterday, 04:36 PM
Buxton is listed only on the MLB HR leaders list. Not on OPS or AVG or SLG or OBP. He should be the leader in several of these. He has as...
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The Immigration Challenges Ballplayers Face

Delays in visas for ballplayers are not uncommon and even more common during the pandemic. Here is a primer on the challenges they face and the process involved.
Image courtesy of © Pool Photo-USA TODAY Sports
When a sports fan hears that a player on their favorite team is unavailable or late to a season because of “visa issues,” their mind seems to default to Hollywood scripts with the player in a back alley of a dodgy third world country, sweet talking a fat guy smoking a stogie between games of canasta. My personal experience, having processed over 500 such visas, is that little is known about the day to day processes most foreign-born athletes have to go through to get travel and work authorization to enter the United States.

Then, when a situation happens like Dominican pitcher Fernando Romero’s now famous attempt to smuggle marijuana into the country, or off-the-field behavior like Sidney Ponson dealt with following an assault charge in his native Aruba, the “misbehavior” tag begins to be more readily applied to players awaiting visa issuance in their home country after the open of camp. But the truth is that the vast majority of visa delays, especially during a pandemic where consulates and embassies around the world are closed or short-staffed, are simply that – delays. They are often caused by bureaucratic headaches more than anything to do with the applicant. These same delays affect heads of Fortune 500 companies, families wishing to visit DisneyWorld, or even crewmembers on airplanes and cruise ships.

For baseball players, while the skids are usually greased far more than they would be for you and I applying to work abroad, challenges can still present themselves on frequent occasions. Remember that MLB and its minor league affiliates have a higher percentage of athletes from poorer countries than any of the other major sports leagues. (The MLS is the only comparable league in American sports). As a result, its clubs have become more familiar with not only documentation issues arising from availability and legitimacy of birth certificates, criminal records checks, and even passports, but also a heightened degree of scrutiny among US consular and border officials in places like the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Curacao, and Mexico than would be found in Canada or Western Europe.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at the standard process a foreign-born athlete deals with once they agree to play for a team.

The P-1 Petition
While not every baseball player has a P-1 visa, the vast majority do. The P-1 is available specifically to: “a professional athlete employed by: (1) a team that is a member of an association of 6 or more professional sports teams whose combined revenues exceed $10,000,000 per year, if the association governs the conduct of its members and regulates the contests and exhibitions in which its members regularly engage, or (2) any minor league team that is affiliated with such an association.” As such, nearly any foreign athlete who signs a contract with a Major League Baseball team is eligible for a P-1, issued for five years or the length of the contract, whichever is shorter. While some apply for heightened visas (allowing them to stay year round) or even green cards due to their level of play, the vast majority use the P-1 classification.

When a player signs with a new team in the offseason, or even if they re-sign with their old employer after their previous entry period expired, that team must file a “Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker” with the Department of Homeland Security to secure approval in the classification for the athlete. From a timing perspective, this is generally done concurrently with, or immediately after signing the player and adding them to the roster, to ensure that they meet the DHS requirement that a contract be enforceable at the time the Petition is filed.

The sponsor or “Petitioner” of a P-1 Petition is the team itself. In almost all cases, it’s the team who signs the P-1 Petition and then an agent or immigration lawyer (like myself) ushers it through the process. For a $2500 fee to the government, this Petition can be expedited with DHS for adjudication within 15 calendar days, and often major league teams see that time shortened down to the better part of a week to ten days. But during the pandemic, the full 15 day period has become more common as in-office staffing at the agency has been reduced and workers have been moved offsite.

Interestingly, when a player is traded midseason, the P-1 classification enables the player to play for the new team automatically for 30 days, allowing time for the new Petition to be filed by the new team. As we will see in the next section, the interplay between the Petition and the issuance of a visa can lead to challenges at the border for newly traded athletes, which comes into play in the rare instance the Twins would be playing in Toronto in late July or early August (or through some less common situations I’ve seen arise and mention below). But, with only one Canadian team in baseball, the issue can usually be avoided in baseball better than it can, for example, in the NHL.

Consular Visa Issuance
Once the P-1 Petition is approved, and the hard copy approval notice issued to the team (which can again be delayed in 2021 due to staffing issues), the Department of Homeland Security then notifies the consular post at the foreign athlete’s country of residence. Note that this not always the country of their passport or country of birth, such as with Cuban players who have taken residence in the Dominican Republic, or a player who may sign from the Blue Jays who has been living in Canada) but it most commonly is.

As you can imagine, this means the Embassy in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is quite familiar with P-1 visas for baseball players and generally tries to beef up staff in January and February of a given year to deal with the rush. However, the process of filing the visa paperwork online and getting a visa appointment is not always straightforward. Even in a standard year, a player may have to wait two to three weeks for a visa appointment, and since March 2020, when most consular posts have either been closed completely or offering limited services, even emergency requests such as are available to professional athletes are extremely limited.

As an example, most Twins fans are now becoming familiar with, the Embassy in Willemstad, Curacao, a country of less than 160,000 people, is likely prepared to issue less than five to ten visas a day TOTAL. This includes anyone wishing to travel to the United States for personal or business tourism, anyone with a work authorized visa such as an athlete or worker moving to the US, and even those traveling through the United States en route to a third country. With limited flights out of Curacao, many locals fly through New York or Miami to get to Europe, for example, and they all require physical visas to transit through our country.

What does this mean? That even in the best of times, clubs, agents, and immigration attorneys are often forced to wait in line to get their athlete into the building to have his visa issued. This year? If a player signed after January 1, they likely didn’t have an approval until close to February 1, and are even more likely not to have their day at the Embassy until mid-February.

While we hope that athletes are prepared with all the documentation required to get their visa on the day, it also happens on occasion (primarily to younger minor league players) that they don’t have the requisite passport photos, forgot to bring the copy of the receipt for visa payment (which was probably made on their behalf), or simply left some portion of the Petition packet (as they generally carry a copy of the entire 50-80 page Petition and approval notice with them) at home.

This won’t result in them having to get back in line to make a whole new appointment, but it can delay things a few days until the consulate can see them on a walk-in basis, especially considering COVID restrictions. Once the approval is finalized, however, they can expect the visa to be physically printed in their passport (and that of their family members) and delivered to them within a few days.

While this is a fairly pro forma process and is derailed generally only by a situation where the athlete was arrested in the offseason (which often requires a stateside review of the charges to assess their seriousness and therefore, whether they can result in a bar to entry to the US), it still can have delays – everything from a passport expiring too soon to a delay in the cabling (yes, the DHS literally still sends approvals to their offshore counterparts in the Department of State by “cable”) of the approval.

These things happen all the time and are part of the common parlance of any foreign national working in the United States. Do athletes have less of this than the stories you hear about your coworker’s cousin? Undoubtedly – but they still are quite common and frequent.

Once the athlete receives the visa, annotated with the name of the employing team on it, it’s time to pack up and fly. In the case of Spring Training, they usually leave the next morning with a duffel bag or travel sized suitcase and quite commonly arrive ahead of their family members who the team works with to pack up the majority of their belongings that they will need for the season.

The Border
With a P1 visa in tow, the rest of the process should be easy, but as anyone who has ever crossed an international border knows, it is not necessarily over with. This is the lesson that Fernando Romero learned last year when he had a legitimate visa but was identified with carrying a controlled substance over the border, a “crime” (literally and figuratively) that now requires him to apply for a waiver of his prohibition on entering to enter the United States, potentially preventing him from entering the United States for as long as a few years.

I can also name a half dozen cases where I’ve been called by teams because a guy missed a domestic US court appearance while he was outside of the country. Or, as I inferred in the first paragraph, a player took a quick trip to meet with his family in Mexico on an off day in Dallas after having been traded, forgetting that he required a new visa to enter the United States even though he didn’t need it to stay and work.

Less serious border issues are usually a delay of an hour or two, such as when I traveled with a major leaguer into the US from Curacao last year and the computer couldn’t match his with those he had given earlier in the offseason at the consulate. (He was signed in November, so was able to take care of it early). It took almost 90 minutes before a US border official acknowledged that the callus he had formed on his index finger from his throwing workouts were the cause.

I hope this quick primer, which is essentially the same that I offer to teams, agents, and new athletes, has helped the reader understand the three-step process involved in a player changing teams and securing the right to join his new team at the start of a season. Again, if the signing doesn’t happen until after January 1, it can be a very tight window to get the visa prior to the opening of camp.

In the case of Andrelton Simmons in 2021, he signed January 31, likely didn’t have everything available for review by the consulate before about February 20, and is likely to have his day in Willemstad, Curacao any day now, following on the footsteps of his countrymen who either re-signed late in the offseason or changed teams, like Didi Gregorius and Jurickson Profar, respectively. When that happens, all will once again be right in the world.

Cory Caouette is Managing Partner of BSIS, a professional immigration firm with a reputation for securing visas for foreign athletes. Who's Who of Corporate Immigration Law 2020 referred to BSIS and Mr. Caouette as "the go-to for sports immigration" and he has secured visas and permanent residence for athletes and teams in all four major sports leagues, as well as the PGA, UFC, ATP Tour, and several other athletic organizations.

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18 Comments

Thank you, TD staff, for reaching out to someone who has this kind of in-depth experience, to help us sort out fact from fiction.

    • Squirrel, diehardtwinsfan, TiberTwins and 12 others like this

 

Thank you, TD staff, for reaching out to someone who has this kind of in-depth experience, to help us sort out fact from fiction.

And where not to finger point and blame ;)

    • ashbury, diehardtwinsfan, TiberTwins and 3 others like this

Thanks for the insight into the process, Cory!

    • Channing1964 likes this
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puckstopper1
Mar 03 2021 12:39 PM

Terrific explanation of the process - Thank you!

 

I believe Twins fans will continue to have an enhanced sense of concern when we hear of a "Visa issue" surrounding one of the players after what happened to Romero given that a paperwork issue was really a stupidity issue...

    • adjacent, Major League Ready, Channing1964 and 2 others like this

What a great post - such pertinent information.

    • adjacent, PDX Twin and Channing1964 like this
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sampleSizeOfOne
Mar 03 2021 03:01 PM

"...all will once again be right with the world."

 

I am pleased with this sentiment.

    • Channing1964 likes this
I would have never guessed I would be fascinated with an article about visa paperwork!
    • Squirrel, diehardtwinsfan, Dman and 2 others like this

Incredible article! Thanks for explaining the process & potential hangups!

    • adjacent likes this
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Channing1964
Mar 04 2021 07:44 AM
I would feel way better about it if Rocco, Falvey, or Levine could give us some concrete explanation as to the exact circumstances why he is nearly 3 weeks late. To merely say he should be here soon is not cutting it with me. I haven't seen him make that much of a difference on a winning team yet in his career. You would think he could at least communicate to the FO his exact expected arrival date. IMHO this is not a great start to Mr.Simmons Minnesota Twins tenure. I am positive his checks will cash, expecting him to show up for work on time still doesn't seem that unreasonable.

Thanks so much, Cory. Coming from someone involved with this difficult process, it is enlightening.

 

If all who post negative comments wanting to blame someone would read your post, I would hope they would understand what is taking place. Truth is, sometimes sh.... happens and everyone needs to be patient and wait for someone to get it out of the barn.  

    • terrydactyls1947 likes this
If you're interested, I can describe the process for a newly International signee before the P1 permit is actually is approved.
    • Squirrel likes this
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Brock Beauchamp
Mar 04 2021 04:59 PM

I would feel way better about it if Rocco, Falvey, or Levine could give us some concrete explanation as to the exact circumstances why he is nearly 3 weeks late. To merely say he should be here soon is not cutting it with me. I haven't seen him make that much of a difference on a winning team yet in his career. You would think he could at least communicate to the FO his exact expected arrival date. IMHO this is not a great start to Mr.Simmons Minnesota Twins tenure. I am positive his checks will cash, expecting him to show up for work on time still doesn't seem that unreasonable.

Someone with extensive experience writes up this lengthy explanation of the process, including why it’s so difficult to predict timelines due to government bureaucracy and a pandemic, and this is your response?

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    • Major League Ready likes this
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nicksaviking
Mar 04 2021 04:59 PM

 

I would feel way better about it if Rocco, Falvey, or Levine could give us some concrete explanation as to the exact circumstances why he is nearly 3 weeks late. To merely say he should be here soon is not cutting it with me. I haven't seen him make that much of a difference on a winning team yet in his career. You would think he could at least communicate to the FO his exact expected arrival date. IMHO this is not a great start to Mr.Simmons Minnesota Twins tenure. I am positive his checks will cash, expecting him to show up for work on time still doesn't seem that unreasonable.

 

If you are trying to blame either the Twins or Simmons, you clearly only read the headline and skipped the article.

    • Brock Beauchamp, Major League Ready and Channing1964 like this

 

If you're interested, I can describe the process for a newly International signee before the P1 permit is actually is approved.

I would be interested to hear it from your side ... you would have insights the rest of us are missing.

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Major League Ready
Mar 04 2021 06:02 PM

 

If you are trying to blame either the Twins or Simmons, you clearly only read the headline and skipped the article.

 

It's easier to complain when you don't have any facts or information to impede your logic for complaining.

    • Brock Beauchamp likes this

 

I would be interested to hear it from your side ... you would have insights the rest of us are missing.

 

It's actually kind of funny what happens. When a MLB organization starts the process for a P1 Visa, the US government will give an order to a domestic investigation agency to do some research. Evidence must be profided of the existance and age of the player. This is because in countries like the Dominican a lot of age-fraud has happened. This agency should be approved by the CIA.

 

So some employee of the investigation agency will then come to the players house and will gather proof of existance. How do you prove your existance?

 

Well, first of all you need a birth certificate. Which is pretty understandable. In wealthy countries that's a pretty simple process. Apply for one by Internet and you will receive it by mail. In other countries this could be a complex process. Cause you have to go all the way to City Hall and even than there's no insurance that there will be a birth certificate. But that's not enough.

 

As parents you must provide evidence that when the child was born, it stayed in your household since and that you raised him all his live. So we had to provide a picture of every year of his life where the 3 of us were on the picture. If we were not on pictures with the 3 of us, than we had to find pictures where we as father & son or mother & son were on. But these had to be related to the same moment. This meant that we had to dig in our holiday- & birthday pictures, which brought us through memory lane.

 

Additionally to these pictures we had to provide class-pictures from kindergarten, primary school and secondary education. Nowadays luckily everything is digital. But there were some years when pictures where hardcopied and not all pictures survived through the years. Eventually we found them all.

 

Furthermore the investigator interviewed our neighbours and some of the teachers of the schools where my son went. This was to prove that he really exists, lives where he says he lives and is who he is. In this case you may hope that these people co-operate or else the process takes much longer.

 

After all the evidence is gathered, it is send back to the US and you have to wait for the approvement. When approved you can start the appliance with the US council. Between approvement and finally receiving the P1 permit it took about 4 weeks. The whole process about 3 months.

 

It's actually kind of funny what happens. When a MLB organization starts the process for a P1 Visa, the US government will give an order to a domestic investigation agency to do some research. Evidence must be profided of the existance and age of the player. This is because in countries like the Dominican a lot of age-fraud has happened. This agency should be approved by the CIA.

 

So some employee of the investigation agency will then come to the players house and will gather proof of existance. How do you prove your existance?

 

Well, first of all you need a birth certificate. Which is pretty understandable. In wealthy countries that's a pretty simple process. Apply for one by Internet and you will receive it by mail. In other countries this could be a complex process. Cause you have to go all the way to City Hall and even than there's no insurance that there will be a birth certificate. But that's not enough.

 

As parents you must provide evidence that when the child was born, it stayed in your household since and that you raised him all his live. So we had to provide a picture of every year of his life where the 3 of us were on the picture. If we were not on pictures with the 3 of us, than we had to find pictures where we as father & son or mother & son were on. But these had to be related to the same moment. This meant that we had to dig in our holiday- & birthday pictures, which brought us through memory lane.

 

Additionally to these pictures we had to provide class-pictures from kindergarten, primary school and secondary education. Nowadays luckily everything is digital. But there were some years when pictures where hardcopied and not all pictures survived through the years. Eventually we found them all.

 

Furthermore the investigator interviewed our neighbours and some of the teachers of the schools where my son went. This was to prove that he really exists, lives where he says he lives and is who he is. In this case you may hope that these people co-operate or else the process takes much longer.

 

After all the evidence is gathered, it is send back to the US and you have to wait for the approvement. When approved you can start the appliance with the US council. Between approvement and finally receiving the P1 permit it took about 4 weeks. The whole process about 3 months.

 

Thank you! That was useful and helpful information. I'm assuming once you've previously been issued a P1 visa, you don't have to go through the whole investigative process again, to prove existence, just the application part that takes about 4 weeks?

 


 

That's what I assume too. Current is still valid for 2 years.
    • Squirrel likes this

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