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Twins Blogosphere


Where Are The Twins Getting It Wrong?

The rebuild of Minnesota's front office started in autumn of 2016, with the hirings of Derek Falvey and Thad Levine at the top. It progressively continued after that, with additions and swaps throughout the regime, and nearly two years later the Twins have a very different look.

The end goal of this overhaul was clear: Bring in new ideas, fresh thinking, modernized evaluation. The Twins wanted – and needed – to reach the sophisticated level of fellow small/mid-market franchises like Tampa and Oakland, which manage to overcome their inherent restrictions and succeed beyond expectation.

Yet here in 2018, with their new baseball operations department settled in, the Twins still find themselves lagging behind. What gives?
No one made much of the Rays or Athletics this spring – ostensible rebuilders in extremely tough divisions. As we enter mid-September, though, Oakland is nipping at Houston's heels in the AL West, while Tampa remains relevant in the wild-card standings, 14 games above .500.

Meanwhile, the Twins are hopelessly out of contention, potentially headed toward another 90-loss finish. Despite being tailored largely to the new front office's specifications, this team never really mustered a threat in an historically bad division. Highly favorable circumstances and a record payroll couldn't save Minnesota from almost front-to-back irrelevance.

Once again, we Twins fans are left to look longingly at the Tampas and Oaklands of the world, and wonder why their success continues to elude us.

It's not like those teams have been without setbacks. The Rays lost top prospect Brent Honeywell, verging on MLB-readiness, to Tommy John surgery in spring training. Jose De Leon, too. The A's rotation has gone through the wringer this year – they're rattling off wins these days behind a patchwork group that includes a resurrected Edwin Jackson.

These scrappy, savvily constructed teams are simply rolling with the punches, getting it done, hitting all the notes Minnesota seems to miss.

The Twins are trying their best to imitate some of the rising trends being championed by these innovative franchises.

We've seen them follow in Tampa's footstops with the "Opener" strategy a few times, albeit with dismal results. A noted pitching guru, Falvey has implemented new methods and helped lift Minnesota's strikeout proficiency from the deepest dregs, but the overall results have been customarily mediocre.

Like the A's, we've seen the Twins eagerly embrace the launch angle revolution – they hit the second-highest fly ball percentage of any team in baseball behind Oakland – but like its pitching staff, Minnesota's offense has been lackluster, paling in comparison to the contending units they are supposed to be challenging.

The inferiority of this club was thoroughly evident last week when they were dismantled by the Astros. The same has been true frequently when Minnesota has faced off against top-tier teams.

Diagnosing the Problem

In general, I think it's tough to knock the strategies deployed by Falvey and Levine since taking over the Twins. They've been opportunistic with player acquisition, making a number of smart future-focused additions, and they've undeniably killed it with both their first two drafts. The new top execs have also populated the ranks of Minnesota's front office with plenty of sharp, respected pros.

But something isn't clicking. Why does Ryan Pressly only fully unleash his curveball and reach his potential upon departing Minnesota for Houston? Why do Twins pitchers and hitters continue to struggle with adjustments, experiencing endemic regressions? Why are this team's weaknesses being exploited so much more often than the reverse?

There are several theories. One is that the shift to an analytical focus has been too extreme.

Terry Ryan was the ultimate people person, and that has underlying value. Falvey and Levine are friendly and engaging guys, to be sure, but their style of management could only be described as cold and calculated.

They shuttle players in and out from the minors with total abandon. They took Kyle Gibson to arbitration – a step the Twins haven't taken with a player in more than a decade – in their first full offseason at the helm, almost as if to make a statement.

And most strikingly, they left Byron Buxton off the September roster, in a move transparently motivated by service time preservation.

These intangible, relationship-based factors are almost impossible to analyze, but it's foolish to ignore them. The 2018 Twins felt in many ways like a mercenary gang – heavy on one-year contracts, light on long-term commitments – and the Buxton decision seems to epitomize this "all business" mindset.

The human element does matter. TR's teams in the early 2000s were consistently greater than the sum of their parts. This year's club never seemed to gel.

Maybe there's a disconnect somewhere. As much as Falvey talks about fostering a collaborative culture, he has radically shaken up a firmly entrenched organizational structure. He is also channeling his agenda into the clubhouse through a manager he inherited, and whose merits have hardly been proven on the field.

All the data and analytics and research in the world don't matter if they aren't fully absorbed and applied. I thought this tweet from Parker last week framed it pretty well:



This all brings us to what is in my mind the most likely, and least concerning, scenario: it's all still coalescing. October 3rd will mark the two-year anniversary of Falvey's hiring. And his ranks as a lengthy tenure in a franchise that's seen unprecedented churn.

I believe in him, and Levine, and what they're building. I do believe that the first two problem areas discussed here – misalignments at both the human and organizational levels – have substance, and need improvement. But I also think both are natural byproducts of the circumstances before us: a cerebral 35-year-old thrust to the top of a major-league baseball franchise for the first time, with a second-year GM still acclimating to the head role.

Some might disagree, and I'd be curious to hear your thoughts in the comments, but from my view, the front office shortcomings of 2018 can be chalked up mostly to growing pains. As we head into Year 3, it's time to regroup, look inward, and get these issues ironed out.

A critical offseason lies ahead.

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238 Comments

I think the characterization that they inherited a mess is inaccurate. The farm system was highly ranked and had quickly supplied Buxton Sano Kepler Polanco and Berrios. There are plausible excuses to give the new FO but this isn’t one of them
    • Oldgoat_MN, Rigby and RichReese like this

 

The minute any orgainization becomes all business (or what have you done for me lately) and you are just a number, many people (players or workers) try, but do not care to be in that situation.I am one of that type, my managers made all the difference in the world.If they did not respect my work, it was better for both of us if I moved on.  

 

Did you say the same things last year when the Twins were on their way to the playoffs? Were you complaining about them being numbers?

 

I love how 90% of the board has swallowed "The Front Office Sees Players As Numbers" hook line and sinker with no evidence. Like we never even validated that claim. Being analytical is not the same thing as being inhuman. I'm pretty sure that Flavine are just as human as TR, who also made hard decisions like trading AJ and Dougie when the time was right.

 

A hint: when you sound like a gasbag retired player complaining about how these kids don't know how to play like you did in the old days, it's perhaps time to dial it back a notch.

 

    • 70charger, SwainZag, Ben Noble and 5 others like this

Buxton was not about a short term benefit. There is room to criticize the FO, but their reasoning was the exact opposite of that.

Buxton has largely been bad at his job, you should keep that in mind in your analogy too.


Instead of operating in good faith and working with him on an extension over the remaining 3 years he's under control, they elected 4 years of control and torpedoed their chance at extension talks any time soon.

The early season slump is on Buxton. The remaining 40 some ABs out of 90 total this year are him playing with a broken toe and obviously hindering his ability to play. It's a lost season.

P.S. I would love to be largely bad at my job and win a Platinum Gold Glove award along with receiving MVP votes.
    • Doomtints likes this

 

There is so much in this that is ridiculous and reflexively negative.

 

1.) The 40 man roster is bad now because the Twins sold at the deadline. It’s supposed to be bad after that. You try random guys, you bring in mid-season free agents. Judge the Twins 40 man by the beginning of the year (talented!) or the beginning of next year (TBD but talented and augmented!)

 

2.) Worst in your lifetime? Are you two years old? Because the Twins teams of the early 2010s were undeniably worse, top to bottom. The 2016 team lost 103 games with Robbie Grossman as their second best hitter. The starting pitchers had a 5.39 ERA. If you think this year’s team is worse, you’re suffering from delusions. Unless you have some actual evidence to back up the absurd claims?

 

3.) I think people overestimate the ability to sign long-term contracts for young players. Yes Evan Longoria signed a deal but that doesn’t happen every day. Most of the Twins better young players have already signed decent contracts when they were drafted/signed. They have a nest egg and have every incentive to wait for free agency. There’s also value in waiting – this year’s Buxton season would be way more disappointing if you were paying him $8-10 million. Same with Sano. I’m for signing long-term deals with guys but I’m not naïve enough to think it’s easy to do or to blindly criticize a process about which I have no information.

 

4.) Do you really think that the front office isn’t involved in lineup construction? Molitor makes the decisions but I’m positive that they are weighing in and having a dialogue. You’re trying to create a fire where there is none. Stop it.

 

5.) I predict that you will never have to answer for the absurdity of that Orioles prediction. I’m going to try to remember it for next year but will almost certainly forget. I wish I could bet large sums of money with you on this (and am willing to). The Twins are a team that was in the playoffs last year, had a down year but still a lot of great pieces, and have a top 5-10 farm system with top-end talent to augment the current core. The Orioles are a historically bad team that sold off its top-end talent, has terrible contracts to veterans, and has a bottom ten system that lacks any high-end talent. They will almost certainly be a bottom-feeding team next year.

 

6.) You think the Twins have no hope for 2019? Are you crazy? I’m not saying they’re going to be favorites but let’s take the negativity down a notch or nine. The Twins have a good core of young pitching, solid upside pieces at six different positions (RF, LF, CF, 3B, SS, C), the payroll to address areas of concern (pitching, DH, 2B, maybe 1B), and are still in a terrible division (KC will be worse, Detroit is bottoming out, Chicago is still a few years away). There is every reason to have hope for next year, even before offseason moves. C’mon.

 

You’re being negative just to be negative. This isn’t Sportscenter, we don’t need hot takes. We need reasoned discussion. Work in some figures or evidence or analysis to support your rantings. Otherwise it’s really hard to take you seriously.

You realize you're responding to two separate quotes, from two separate posters here, right?

 

As for the portion I wrote: the 40 man roster in 2016 looked a great deal better than it does today. In 2016, Sano/Buxton/Kepler/Rosario/Berrios et al were in the big leagues, 2 years younger, and still looked like a solid corps on the verge of emerging. There were good, major league quality pieces on the 40 man such as Dozier, Escobar, Nunez. Mauer was two years younger.  

 

The 40 man in 2016 was a great deal better than today.

 

If there's a comparison, it'd be to the 1980's, not 2016, in terms of 40 man rosters largely bereft of plausible upside.

 

And yes...I'm older than 2.

 

 

    • Platoon likes this

 

Worst in your lifetime? Are you two years old? Because the Twins teams of the early 2010s were undeniably worse, top to bottom. The 2016 team lost 103 games with Robbie Grossman as their second best hitter. The starting pitchers had a 5.39 ERA. If you think this year’s team is worse, you’re suffering from delusions. Unless you have some actual evidence to back up the absurd claims?

 

Exactly. The first couple of years of Ryan's second tenure allowed us to coin the phrase "AAAA players." No outfield, no pitching. I get depressed just thinking about it and this was over five years ago.

 

And heck, the first few years of Ryan's first tenure weren't any better. He took two teams that needed some work and gutted them completely without addressing the issues that actually needed working on.

 

 

I haven't seen it confirmed anywhere that the FO chose not to call up Buxton without conferring with him. Am I missing something?

 

This is literally what every article on the issue has stated, and the front office said so too....

    • drbob524 and KirbyDome89 like this

 

It's the responsibility of Derek Falvey, Chief Baseball Officer IMO.

Fair enough.

 

I dont owe them 5 years of my baseball fan life to get on the job training. If they are junior executive whiz kids then why arent they still working for the Rangers and Indians? I didnt see Texas blow up their team and trade Odor, Andrus, Beltre, Mazzara, Gallo, ir even DeShields. Remember them? They are the same guys that waxed our Twins 18-4 last weekend.

 

1.) I mean, you do realize that the Rangers and Indians already had GMs right? That the way you become a GM is you come up under someone good and then other teams that don't have good GMs hire the assistants of good GMs to see if they can replicate that good work. You get that right? That's how the system works. If they were still working for the Rangers and Indians it would be because they weren't any good and no one else wanted them.

 

2.) The Rangers are a bad team because they kept trying to be middle-of-the-pack. And the Indians have a long history of trading away players to rebuild/retool.

 

3.) Yes, we should totally judge front offices by one game. That's the only fair way. Though I think you're not going far enough. We should judge them on one inning. Or maybe one batter? How about one pitch?

 

Here's another hint. If you're using phrases like "whiz kids" pejoratively, you're probably not making a reasoned argument.

    • 70charger, SwainZag and Dozier's Glorious Hair like this

 

 

Instead of operating in good faith and working with him on an extension over the remaining 3 years he's under control, they elected 4 years of control and torpedoed their chance at extension talks any time soon.

The early season slump is on Buxton. The remaining 40 some ABs out of 90 total this year are him playing with a broken toe and obviously hindering his ability to play. It's a lost season.

P.S. I would love to be largely bad at my job and win a Platinum Gold Glove award along with receiving MVP votes.

 

Exactly. He lead the team last year in WAR ... and he hit like crap most of that year too.

 

Buxton is valuable even when he isn't hitting, the MOST VALUABLE PLAYER ON THE TEAM.

 

Yes, this is a bizarre concept as it's something no one has ever seen before in baseball. Nonetheless, it's true.

If he's healthy, let the kid play. His hitting will only get better if he's playing baseball.

 

For a front office that is supposedly data-driven, they sure seem oblivious to a lot of data.

    • gunnarthor, Vanimal46 and KirbyDome89 like this

 

The minute any orgainization becomes all business (or what have you done for me lately) and you are just a number, many people (players or workers) try, but do not care to be in that situation.I am one of that type, my managers made all the difference in the world.If they did not respect my work, it was better for both of us if I moved on.  

Not quite an apt comparison.

 

It's hard to respect work production when the production isn't there.

I haven't seen it confirmed anywhere that the FO chose not to call up Buxton without conferring with him. Am I missing something? Everyone in there Buxton-ness is assuming the player has been wronged significantly. So much so that I've seen articles on TD promoting/advising Buxton's agents to file a grievance with the Players Association. Based solely on speculation?

There are plenty of articles out there citing how Buxton was disappointed in the decision, how the Twins recognize this, and how his agents and his union reps are looking into it for a possible grievance. Here's one:

https://www.twinciti...e-recalled/amp/

Maybe it was still a wise decision for the team, maybe it will all blow over eventually, but please don't pretend that the short-term negative consequences are simply fan speculation.
    • beckmt and Vanimal46 like this

 

Hopefully the FO learns from this year’s unpredictability and truly commits to a full blown youth movement in 2019.

I mean we traded Pressly, might as well trade Gibson, Odorizzi, and Castro too.

 

The lesson from unpredictability is not "give up". 2018 is not the only thing to take a lesson from - what about 2017 when they surprised and made the playoffs? We should take no lessons from that? Why is 2018 more instructive than 2017?

 

The Twins are not a team that should be going all-in but they aren't a team that needs to rebuild. There's no reason that they can't be next year's A's or Rays (after all, the Rays and A's are last year's Twins). They need to put a solid team on the field next year while preserving payroll and resources for the future. That's pretty doable if they (A) Sign a 2B from the glut of FA options (B) augment at DH/corner OF/1B and © sign some high-upside veteran starting pitching like Ervin.

 

There's no reason to give up, especially since the return for Odorizzi and Castro would be minimal.

    • gagu likes this

 

You realize you're responding to two separate quotes, from two separate posters here, right?

 

Yep. Number3 quoted you and said he agreed and the elaborated. Seemed fair to tackle both posts since they built on one another.

 

Exactly. The first couple of years of Ryan's second tenure allowed us to coin the phrase "AAAA players." No outfield, no pitching. I get depressed just thinking about it and this was over five years ago.

 

And heck, the first few years of Ryan's first tenure weren't any better. He took two teams that needed some work and gutted them completely without addressing the issues that actually needed working on.

 

The negativity down the stretch is crazy. People wanted to play the young 'uns but are surprised when they aren't all-stars and when the Twins lose as a result. Not saying that Gonsalves will be the next Romero or that Astudillo is the next Al Newman but you're getting what you wanted and there is that chance. If it doesn't taste good, you shouldn't have ordered it.

    • Oldgoat_MN, SwainZag, Doomtints and 3 others like this

All grousing and hind sight aside, when you look at the surprise that is the Oakland A's and the disappointment that is the Twins, it just goes to show how many things have to go right in order for a team to contend. 

 

Conversely, when a perfect storm of injuries and lack of production come along, it's very difficult for a team to overcome.

 

    • Carole Keller, birdwatcher, 70charger and 4 others like this
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nicksaviking
Sep 11 2018 09:22 AM

 

The human aspect of the job seems to be the thing Falvey and Levine struggle with the most. Minimal to no communication with key organization players past and present.

Ignore your personal feelings about these players... They did not speak to Dozier about an extension or his future with the team. They did not speak to Mauer about his opinion of getting traded or not. They did not speak to Buxton about their decision to send him home for the season.

Most decisions they've made so far is for the benefit of the organization, and Pohlad's wallet. It's not like they've done anything beyond the rules set in place. However, they don't sound like people I would personally want to report into.

I want to feel like a real person, not an ant in an ant farm.

 

Honestly, I want a Terminator in the front office. This organization has for so long put emotions ahead of sound baseball decision. I'm not saying our current Terminator is making sound baseball decisions, but I wouldn't have approached Dozier about an extension just because he was asking for one, I'd only do it if I actually wanted him back. Decisions on Mauer and Buxton should be based on what's best for the team, not the individual players (not saying they got it right, just that I don't want the players dictating the decisions).

 

All this century we've been doing the "we are family" "aw-shucks" "let's just go out there and have fun" underdog bit. I've had enough. Maybe I'm a monster, but I want to win and at any costs. I don't think that starts with making concessions to players who aren't pulling their weight or aren't in the team's future. Let the field manager handle the human emotions, the motivation and the pep talks, that's supposed to be his job anyway. I want the guys actually running the show to make the best baseball decisions, even if it seems cutthroat.

    • TheLeviathan, chpettit19, gagu and 1 other like this

 

You realize you're responding to two separate quotes, from two separate posters here, right?

 

As for the portion I wrote: the 40 man roster in 2016 looked a great deal better than it does today. In 2016, Sano/Buxton/Kepler/Rosario/Berrios et al were in the big leagues, 2 years younger, and still looked like a solid corps on the verge of emerging. There were good, major league quality pieces on the 40 man such as Dozier, Escobar, Nunez. Mauer was two years younger.  

 

The 40 man in 2016 was a great deal better than today.

 

If there's a comparison, it'd be to the 1980's, not 2016, in terms of 40 man rosters largely bereft of plausible upside.

 

And yes...I'm older than 2.

 

Are you older than 7? Because those early 2010s teams were pretty awful too. Or was there a valuable core there as well that I'm forgetting? I also think you're forgetting the mid to late 90s. The Twins had nothing like Buxton/Sano/Kepler/Rosario/Polanco/Garver/Berrios/Romero/Gonsalves/Buesnitz back then.

 

Escobar 2018 >>> Escobar 2016. Rosario 2018 >>>> Rosario 2016. Kepler 2018 has the same stats as 2016 Kepler and is still 25 - the upside is still there. You're right that Buxton/Sano have regressed but neither is by any means done. Dozier is gone. I'd agree that 2018 position players are not as exciting as 2016 but that's mostly because the unknown is exciting and has a higher ceiling.

 

And the pitching is where it's totally different. 2016 Santana was good but the rest of the staff was Hot Garbage Gibson, Duffey 2.0, Hughes, Tommy Milone, Ricky Nolasco. The Twins of 2018 have so much more upside: Great Gibson, Berrios, Romero, Gonsalves, even Odorizzi. And that's not even getting into the pen. The 2018 Twins pen is up-and-down but there's more upside now than there was in 2016 - go look at those names and get excited.

 

I'd take the 2018 Twins situation over the 2016 Twins situation in a heart-beat. Pitching is way harder to find than a few patches in the lineup.

    • 70charger, SwainZag, Doomtints and 5 others like this

The 40 man roster is bad now because the Twins sold at the deadline.


It was pretty bad before that too. Belisle, Motter, Bobby Wilson. A bunch of marginal relief "prospects", many of whom have been added by the new front office.

I don't know about worst of my lifetime, but the bad roster was part of the reason we had to sell at the deadline.

I think it takes longer than two years to completely change an organization.Most of this organizations players/prospects were inherited.Terry Ryan's FO had a lot of success in the 2000's, but it was severely outdated.This much change will take time.The philosophical changes, I assume, are being implemented in the minor leagues and it may take another couple years before we start to see the effects of that with the big league club.

I think the Buxton decision is the best example...not calling him up was, no matter how Falvine tries to spin it, purely a business decision.There was no "follow your gut", no thought on relationships, no thought of someones feelings.Whether that's good or bad I don't know.We will find out I guess.In 2022 or whatever, we may be singing their praises b/c they didn't call him up and lose that extra year.  

    • Original Whizzinator likes this

 

Are you older than 7? Because those early 2010s teams were pretty awful too. Or was there a valuable core there as well that I'm forgetting? I also think you're forgetting the mid to late 90s. The Twins had nothing like Buxton/Sano/Kepler/Rosario/Polanco/Garver/Berrios/Romero/Gonsalves/Buesnitz back then.

 

Escobar 2018 >>> Escobar 2016. Rosario 2018 >>>> Rosario 2016. Kepler 2018 has the same stats as 2016 Kepler and is still 25 - the upside is still there. You're right that Buxton/Sano have regressed but neither is by any means done. Dozier is gone. I'd agree that 2018 position players are not as exciting as 2016 but that's mostly because the unknown is exciting and has a higher ceiling.

 

And the pitching is where it's totally different. 2016 Santana was good but the rest of the staff was Hot Garbage Gibson, Duffey 2.0, Hughes, Tommy Milone, Ricky Nolasco. The Twins of 2018 have so much more upside: Great Gibson, Berrios, Romero, Gonsalves, even Odorizzi. And that's not even getting into the pen. The 2018 Twins pen is up-and-down but there's more upside now than there was in 2016 - go look at those names and get excited.

 

I'd take the 2018 Twins situation over the 2016 Twins situation in a heart-beat. Pitching is way harder to find than a few patches in the lineup.

Agree.I would also add that the FO was lauded for the shrewd moves made to bolster team's chances in 2018.Duke was good.Rodney was good.Odorizzi has been exactly who he's always been.Morrison was terrible.Lynn had a terrible April then was solid.All the FO can do is put pieces together, it's up to coaches to coach and players to play.Even the trades...the only guy who would have been with them next year was Pressly.They stocked the lower minors with prospects they could now either a) develop, or B) trade for a piece later.This season has surely been frustrating.It's frustrating having to watch Field, Giminez, etc. instead of getting a look at Nick Gordon, Byron Buxton, etc., but I do think this organization is in much better shape than it was two years ago.

    • beckmt, SwainZag, gagu and 2 others like this

Bottom line folks......PATIENCE :)

    • Dozier's Glorious Hair likes this
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diehardtwinsfan
Sep 11 2018 09:52 AM

Mod note:

 

This thread is starting to get hostile. Let's back up... if you cannot post without getting worked up, don't... respond to arguments, not to posters.

 

Thanks. 

    • ashburyjohn, Blake and nicksaviking like this

This front office group tells the media everything it so desperately wants to hear but this is not what is being put forth to the players and I believe to coaching staffs. Now were hearing for the problem is Molitor which he may have some fault but when we have heard complaints from the players its hasn't been Molitor its been the front office. The problem is this front office has never been sold on this group of players and never has invested in them to win. Yes they did this off season moves but all short term contracts that could be converted into new prospects. Attitude of any organization starts at the top and this has been problem with this team since this front office has been in charge. We have heard it from the problem veterans of Santana and Dozier they have thrown in the towel way to early. When you have teams that are close to competing you need to pursue because things happen where you may never get a chance again. Look at Washington Nationals from 3 to 4 years ago they shut down there pitcher and they were going to get ready in the future with him. The problem they have never been that close again. This team is farther away from being contender now than when they were hired. Everyone raves about their drafts but its way too early to know how those drafts will turn out. Those players are at least 2 to 3 years away from reaching majors. The trades for prospects are same way so we have know idea on the value of the trade until those players either reach the majors or don't. Another thing is I hear is they are following what these other clubs are doing but to be honest I would prefer they were doing their own plan. This club is in total rebuild next year will just be another 90 to 100 loss season sooner people face up to it better understanding where we are as organization. I don't think media and a lot of public realize the team was gutted this summer and will continue on that path next year with Gibson, Pineda , Ordorizzi, and Castro probably will all begone by next August for more prospects. The future of this club rest with prospects at high A level minors. 

Honestly, I want a Terminator in the front office. This organization has for so long put emotions ahead of sound baseball decision. I'm not saying our current Terminator is making sound baseball decisions, but I wouldn't have approached Dozier about an extension just because he was asking for one, I'd only do it if I actually wanted him back. Decisions on Mauer and Buxton should be based on what's best for the team, not the individual players (not saying they got it right, just that I don't want the players dictating the decisions).

All this century we've been doing the "we are family" "aw-shucks" "let's just go out there and have fun" underdog bit. I've had enough. Maybe I'm a monster, but I want to win and at any costs. I don't think that starts with making concessions to players who aren't pulling their weight or aren't in the team's future. Let the field manager handle the human emotions, the motivation and the pep talks, that's supposed to be his job anyway. I want the guys actually running the show to make the best baseball decisions, even if it seems cutthroat.


There's a style out there for everyone. That style is not for me if I was an employee or player for them.

I worked for a cutthroat sales organization before and my Director was the Terminator. If you didn't close business that month and hit your quota, you were shown the door. The only way he knew how to motivate people was instilling fear of losing your job. It was awful.
    • beckmt, SwainZag, SF Twins Fan and 1 other like this
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Hosken Bombo Disco
Sep 11 2018 11:42 AM

 

The negativity down the stretch is crazy. People wanted to play the young 'uns but are surprised when they aren't all-stars and when the Twins lose as a result. Not saying that Gonsalves will be the next Romero or that Astudillo is the next Al Newman but you're getting what you wanted and there is that chance. If it doesn't taste good, you shouldn't have ordered it.

Lots of people wanted to play Buxton, Escobar and Dozier down the stretch, too.

 

Not many fans ordered this current product. A lot of loud TD posters, maybe, but not the fan base in general.