Jump to content

Providing independent coverage of the Minnesota Twins.
Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

The Forums

Hey, is there a game tonight? Game thread 9/25/18

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 09:02 PM
Nice job by Moya pitching around the Adrianza error. And once again worth remembering, yes Detroit is this bad.
Full topic ›

2019: The Nature, Organization, Augmentation of the Rotation

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 08:29 PM
There are currently a number of posts...as we near the end of the 2018 season...from the FO (positive and negative), to Buxton, to rookie...
Full topic ›

Article: First-Round Flops or Unfinished Projects?

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 08:11 PM
As a rebuilding team in desperate need of pitching, you can't really afford to miss on arms with two top-10 picks in the draft in three y...
Full topic ›

I'm Yawning...

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 07:44 PM
  Maybe I'm burned out on the horrible season the Twins had this year or maybe its apathy, but this is the first time in many years...
Full topic ›

2018 Vikings In Season Thread

Minnesota Vikings Talk Today, 07:36 PM
This is correct, they would lose cap room next year. He's going to stay on the team, the question is what role should he have. I'd li...
Full topic ›

Recent Blogs

Twins Blogosphere


Where Are The Twins Getting It Wrong?

The rebuild of Minnesota's front office started in autumn of 2016, with the hirings of Derek Falvey and Thad Levine at the top. It progressively continued after that, with additions and swaps throughout the regime, and nearly two years later the Twins have a very different look.

The end goal of this overhaul was clear: Bring in new ideas, fresh thinking, modernized evaluation. The Twins wanted – and needed – to reach the sophisticated level of fellow small/mid-market franchises like Tampa and Oakland, which manage to overcome their inherent restrictions and succeed beyond expectation.

Yet here in 2018, with their new baseball operations department settled in, the Twins still find themselves lagging behind. What gives?
No one made much of the Rays or Athletics this spring – ostensible rebuilders in extremely tough divisions. As we enter mid-September, though, Oakland is nipping at Houston's heels in the AL West, while Tampa remains relevant in the wild-card standings, 14 games above .500.

Meanwhile, the Twins are hopelessly out of contention, potentially headed toward another 90-loss finish. Despite being tailored largely to the new front office's specifications, this team never really mustered a threat in an historically bad division. Highly favorable circumstances and a record payroll couldn't save Minnesota from almost front-to-back irrelevance.

Once again, we Twins fans are left to look longingly at the Tampas and Oaklands of the world, and wonder why their success continues to elude us.

It's not like those teams have been without setbacks. The Rays lost top prospect Brent Honeywell, verging on MLB-readiness, to Tommy John surgery in spring training. Jose De Leon, too. The A's rotation has gone through the wringer this year – they're rattling off wins these days behind a patchwork group that includes a resurrected Edwin Jackson.

These scrappy, savvily constructed teams are simply rolling with the punches, getting it done, hitting all the notes Minnesota seems to miss.

The Twins are trying their best to imitate some of the rising trends being championed by these innovative franchises.

We've seen them follow in Tampa's footstops with the "Opener" strategy a few times, albeit with dismal results. A noted pitching guru, Falvey has implemented new methods and helped lift Minnesota's strikeout proficiency from the deepest dregs, but the overall results have been customarily mediocre.

Like the A's, we've seen the Twins eagerly embrace the launch angle revolution – they hit the second-highest fly ball percentage of any team in baseball behind Oakland – but like its pitching staff, Minnesota's offense has been lackluster, paling in comparison to the contending units they are supposed to be challenging.

The inferiority of this club was thoroughly evident last week when they were dismantled by the Astros. The same has been true frequently when Minnesota has faced off against top-tier teams.

Diagnosing the Problem

In general, I think it's tough to knock the strategies deployed by Falvey and Levine since taking over the Twins. They've been opportunistic with player acquisition, making a number of smart future-focused additions, and they've undeniably killed it with both their first two drafts. The new top execs have also populated the ranks of Minnesota's front office with plenty of sharp, respected pros.

But something isn't clicking. Why does Ryan Pressly only fully unleash his curveball and reach his potential upon departing Minnesota for Houston? Why do Twins pitchers and hitters continue to struggle with adjustments, experiencing endemic regressions? Why are this team's weaknesses being exploited so much more often than the reverse?

There are several theories. One is that the shift to an analytical focus has been too extreme.

Terry Ryan was the ultimate people person, and that has underlying value. Falvey and Levine are friendly and engaging guys, to be sure, but their style of management could only be described as cold and calculated.

They shuttle players in and out from the minors with total abandon. They took Kyle Gibson to arbitration – a step the Twins haven't taken with a player in more than a decade – in their first full offseason at the helm, almost as if to make a statement.

And most strikingly, they left Byron Buxton off the September roster, in a move transparently motivated by service time preservation.

These intangible, relationship-based factors are almost impossible to analyze, but it's foolish to ignore them. The 2018 Twins felt in many ways like a mercenary gang – heavy on one-year contracts, light on long-term commitments – and the Buxton decision seems to epitomize this "all business" mindset.

The human element does matter. TR's teams in the early 2000s were consistently greater than the sum of their parts. This year's club never seemed to gel.

Maybe there's a disconnect somewhere. As much as Falvey talks about fostering a collaborative culture, he has radically shaken up a firmly entrenched organizational structure. He is also channeling his agenda into the clubhouse through a manager he inherited, and whose merits have hardly been proven on the field.

All the data and analytics and research in the world don't matter if they aren't fully absorbed and applied. I thought this tweet from Parker last week framed it pretty well:



This all brings us to what is in my mind the most likely, and least concerning, scenario: it's all still coalescing. October 3rd will mark the two-year anniversary of Falvey's hiring. And his ranks as a lengthy tenure in a franchise that's seen unprecedented churn.

I believe in him, and Levine, and what they're building. I do believe that the first two problem areas discussed here – misalignments at both the human and organizational levels – have substance, and need improvement. But I also think both are natural byproducts of the circumstances before us: a cerebral 35-year-old thrust to the top of a major-league baseball franchise for the first time, with a second-year GM still acclimating to the head role.

Some might disagree, and I'd be curious to hear your thoughts in the comments, but from my view, the front office shortcomings of 2018 can be chalked up mostly to growing pains. As we head into Year 3, it's time to regroup, look inward, and get these issues ironed out.

A critical offseason lies ahead.

  • brvama, dbminn, nclahammer and 2 others like this

  • Share:
  • submit to reddit
Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

238 Comments

Photo
ChrisKnutson
Sep 11 2018 07:29 AM
Hopefully the FO learns from this year’s unpredictability and truly commits to a full blown youth movement in 2019.

I mean we traded Pressly, might as well trade Gibson, Odorizzi, and Castro too.

 

I can tell you one place where they're getting it wrong: take a look at the current 40 man roster, two years into their tenure.

 

Arguably worse than at any point in my lifetime. And none of what young talent they do have has been signed to a long term contract. Not one single player. 

 

Maybe they've made improvements behind the scenes, but you'll have a hard time convincing me it's made any positive difference to date.

 

And maybe they have a strong lower minor league system. We've had that in the recent past, too. And as Twins fans, nobody should have to tell us a strong lower minor league system isn't a guarantee of anything.

 

It's only been two years, I get that. And they weren't handed a healthy organization. But it's reasonable to conclude the organization is in worse shape now than when they took over. 

I'm going to toss this out there: What the FO does with the 40 man this off-season should tell us a lot.

 

If it's cleaned up and players let go that have no business being on the 40 man, then good.

 

Otherwise, yeah.

 

 

    • birdwatcher, SF Twins Fan, wsnydes and 1 other like this

 

The human aspect of the job seems to be the thing Falvey and Levine struggle with the most. Minimal to no communication with key organization players past and present.

Ignore your personal feelings about these players... They did not speak to Dozier about an extension or his future with the team. They did not speak to Mauer about his opinion of getting traded or not. They did not speak to Buxton about their decision to send him home for the season.

Most decisions they've made so far is for the benefit of the organization, and Pohlad's wallet. It's not like they've done anything beyond the rules set in place. However, they don't sound like people I would personally want to report into.

I want to feel like a real person, not an ant in an ant farm.

Yes, but is that the responsibility of the CEO or the department head? 

Photo
Original Whizzinator
Sep 11 2018 07:36 AM
I don't see how anyone can say things are worse that all those 90 loss seasons. Those were some super high draft picks, if they don't pan out this will just take longer. Houston is where they are because their super high draft picks did pan out. This FO has made moves to improve the farm at every opportunity. I am bothered by some of the 40 man/ rule five stuff and the current marginal talents in the lineup. The angst over Buxton is overblown. Gibby got sent down twice something Ryan's regime wouldn't have done and it worked. That was some tough love. If Buxton is complaining now i hope it is in front of a mirror. Some of these guys need to understand the toughness it takes to be a Correa or Lindor. Talent is great but even the best are supreme grinders.
    • beckmt, ChrisKnutson and gagu like this

 

Why is the 40-man roster a disaster?Lets begin by looking at how several players who are on it have performed.Gonsalves, not getting it done.Ditto, Stewart.Slegers, always a AAAA player.Romero, probably a good one who is going thru his first year troubles.Little, one they brought in who is a long shot.Gordon, sure failed when promoted to AAA.Wade, although not on the 40-man, ditto Gordon.Busenitz, great at AAA, but last night was an example of what happens when they bring him up.Duffey, don't know what the problem is but he ain't the pitcher he was his rookie season.

 

That's 9, or more than 20% of the 40-man.Those of you contemplating some changes this winter had better hope you are right.Unfortunately, there isn't a magic wand that is gonna fix it next year....well there is, its called Buxton and Sano.Just don't know if that wand is gonna get turned on.

 

 

Yes, but is that the responsibility of the CEO or the department head?


It's the responsibility of Derek Falvey, Chief Baseball Officer IMO.
    • beckmt and SF Twins Fan like this
Photo
tarheeltwinsfan
Sep 11 2018 08:05 AM

A strong lower level minor league system may simply indicate that the major league team has consistently been drafting high, due to poor won lost records annually. 

The front office might figure things out. They need more time.

 

- They chose to do nothing their first offseason. I can buy it that they were working on figuring things out internally (though I'm not sure doing both was impossible).

- Last year's trade deadline flip flop was laughable.

- They did a good job picking up people in the offseason, but they were not perfect. Morrison was nonsense, and the franchise mistreated Vargas one last time which finally broke him. I'm sure they love shouting "I told you so" from the rooftops after Vargas finally performed like they always wanted him to this year in the minors.

- They did a good job selling off people when the season was hopeless, though they won't be able to replace Pressly nor Escobar.

- They jacked up the bullpen because they weren't patient enough.

- Good leaders communicate. With everyone. If a worker doesn't know where he stands, he's not going to be happy and he's not going to perform well for you.

- Most of us have seen enough of Molitor. He doesn't do poorly enough to get fired (although 103 losses in between two >.500 seasons with mostly the same players ... hmmm), but mediocrity is his middle name.

 

What it boils down to is this team needs to 1) be more patient, 2) communicate better, 3) look at data just a little bit harder before making a move, 4) install their own manager.

    • Vanimal46 and SF Twins Fan like this
Photo
Channing1964
Sep 11 2018 08:22 AM
wow is all I can say. I would love to know the average age of the posters to this thread. The Minnesota Twins I grew up with and the most recent successful teams(pre 2011) never resembled this mess AT ALL. Some of you would try to argue with me and say we couldn't beat the Red Sox, or the Yankees or the Astros this year anyway. These people support tanking a season with 60+ games to go. I assure you that those that concur with that decision are not season ticket holders. That being said, I remember 1987, everyone picked us to be swept out of the playoffs by the mighty Motor City Kittys. Our Twins had the 4th best record in the AMERICAN LEAGUE!! I would give my fortune to see you eat the crow if that would have happened last year. As a baseball fan you have to realize it takes a fair amount of good luck to win a title. If you dont believe me ask 1990's Brave Fan. All I ever wanted is for the Twins to be in it in September, and if they are, I know anything can happen. The Twin's Way taught me that. I wish i knew where that was now. Id rather make the playoffs and lose 10 years in a row than put up with this abomination even one more time. We didn't ask for this.
When Andy McPhail was hired he inherited an interim manager and he himself was not even prepared to be offered the position of General Manager of the Minnesota Twins. At that time a decision was made to bring Ralph Houk in as a sort of overseer or consultant to both Andy and the rookie field manager, a guy named Tom Kelly. Do any of you remember him? I wonder if he is available to help us fix this mess. Before none of us even care anymore.
    • gunnarthor, Oldgoat_MN, Ex-Iowegian and 2 others like this
Photo
JaleelWhite FanClub
Sep 11 2018 08:26 AM

And most strikingly, they left Byron Buxton off the September roster, in a move transparently motivated by service time preservation.

 

LET!

IT!

GO!

ALREADY!

 

Buxton hitting below.200 for another month and risking injury, as he always does, through September would mean nothing for the team's future.

 

 

    • 70charger, gagu and rdehring like this
Photo
Channing1964
Sep 11 2018 08:29 AM
I dont owe them 5 years of my baseball fan life to get on the job training. If they are junior executive whiz kids then why arent they still working for the Rangers and Indians? I didnt see Texas blow up their team and trade Odor, Andrus, Beltre, Mazzara, Gallo, ir even DeShields. Remember them? They are the same guys that waxed our Twins 18-4 last weekend.
    • mikelink45 likes this

 

The organization doesn't care about the players? 

 

The organization under the new regime looked at what happened last year and, in the off-season, rewarded the team by going out and spending money on free agent acquisitions, which, from I read, was greeted with enthusiasm by the clubhouse.

 

Something the FO has been loathe to do in the past.

 

Yet, the players brought in by Ryan didn't respond and step up.

 

Also, key players, players that were brought in by the previous FO, have struggled at the MLB level.

 

Sorry, this whole, "the organization doesn't care about the players" crap is another way to avoid the obvious: The players on the field aren't getting the job done.

The minute any orgainization becomes all business (or what have you done for me lately) and you are just a number, many people (players or workers) try, but do not care to be in that situation.I am one of that type, my managers made all the difference in the world.If they did not respect my work, it was better for both of us if I moved on.  

I'm not sure it's fair to compare the Twins to the Athletics and the Rays based on this year. Over the last three years, the A's averaged 70 wins and the Rays 76. Things happened to pop for the Rays and A's this year and they happened to pop for the Twins last year. Especially in a year where the Twins had so many issues with injuries and effectiveness that Oakland seems like it's gotten it easy (and they haven't).

 

We need a broader perspective than this year. And that pertains to a lot of the grousing about the Twins. We get it, this year went poorly. But overall this organization has an excellent farm system featuring some exciting players approaching or in the high minors, a solid MLB core, and payroll flexibility to augment weak areas.

 

This glass is 3/4 full people.

    • birdwatcher, Blake, 70charger and 6 others like this

I don't see how anyone can say things are worse that all those 90 loss seasons.


Don't look now, but 2018 might be another 90 loss season (currently on pace for 88).

 

The problem is the Twins haven’t acted like a rebuilding team. As evidenced by signing guys like Lance Lynn and trading for Odorizzi. Those are moves of a team trying to contend. And further, let’s talk about the continued playing time for Petit, Field, Belisle, Forsythe. If this organizationis trying to rebuild, they are not doing so in a way that any other team has done.

 

The Lynn and Odorizzi contracts aren't anathema to a rebuilding effort - they really blocked no one, especially with Santana being injured and the young starters being predictably up and down. Those were short term moves to keep the team competitive.

 

And I don't think it's a rebuild and I'd be surprised if you could find the FO saying it is. This has been a retool and rightfully so. The Twins have the pieces to be competitive - it just didn't work out this year. They should be working for short term veteran moves that give the team a chance now while preserving resources for an upswing in the next few years.

    • birdwatcher, SwainZag, chpettit19 and 5 others like this

 

I dont owe them 5 years of my baseball fan life to get on the job training. If they are junior executive whiz kids then why arent they still working for the Rangers and Indians? I didnt see Texas blow up their team and trade Odor, Andrus, Beltre, Mazzara, Gallo, ir even DeShields. Remember them? They are the same guys that waxed our Twins 18-4 last weekend.

 

True. The entire history of the Texas Rangers ball club can be summed up thusly: They are great when Nolan Ryan is running things ... and they're not so great when he isn't.

 

As for the Indians, they haven't lost a step, so it doesn't seem like the Twins nabbed anyone essential from them.

 

 

 

I dont owe them 5 years of my baseball fan life to get on the job training. If they are junior executive whiz kids then why arent they still working for the Rangers and Indians? I didnt see Texas blow up their team and trade Odor, Andrus, Beltre, Mazzara, Gallo, ir even DeShields. Remember them? They are the same guys that waxed our Twins 18-4 last weekend.

 

Yes, the guy that runs them is Jon Daniels, and the reason for their position is that their pitching staff is worse than a dumpster fire, it is a full grown forest fire.That will take far longer to fix, than the Twins patching holes into what is a fair pitching staff.  

Yes we have underperformed and the staff ERA is going higher as we give tryouts to pitching for next year, but we are in far better shape than Texas. 

    • birdwatcher, SwainZag, gagu and 2 others like this

And most strikingly, they left Byron Buxton off the September roster, in a move transparently motivated by service time preservation.

LET!
IT!
GO!
ALREADY!

Buxton hitting below.200 for another month and risking injury, as he always does, through September would mean nothing for the team's future.


1. You don't know Buxton was going to hit below .200. Historically, September is the best statistical hitting month over his career.

2. This story isn't going away because nothing has been resolved yet.

3. Buxton getting called up wouldn't do anything for the short term future of this team, agreed. However, the FO chose to piss off one of their foundational players for the organization's short term benefit.

Imagine you at your own job. Working through injury, being a team player. You're 13 days away from getting a raise and other benefits. Instead your boss says we don't need you anymore this year. No one would take that well.
    • gunnarthor, drbob524, Oldgoat_MN and 4 others like this
When you look at Rochester, who would you want on the 40 right now. No one is in danger of being lost, as it can be recalibrated this winter. As to Dozier not being offered an extension or a new contract? Maybe that simply tells us, and BD exactly what it sounds like. Add to that the view that he couldn't wait to get outa here, and it is what it is. As far as for EE, he is just as attainable this winter in this situation,as he was this summer. Pay him, he comes back, don't he doesn't.
    • gagu and SF Twins Fan like this

 

Buxton hitting below.200 for another month and risking injury, as he always does, through September would mean nothing for the team's future.

 

We all understand this viewpoint but many of us disagree. Buxton gets better by playing baseball, preferably with the Twins, not by sitting at home playing with his XBox while the Twins play on without him.
 

The Twins could have used this time to work on Buxton's skills AND work on fostering the relationship. Even sitting on the bench is better than sitting at home.

    • gunnarthor, Oldgoat_MN, Rigby and 3 others like this
Photo
TheLeviathan
Sep 11 2018 08:54 AM

 

1. You don't know Buxton was going to hit below .200. Historically, September is the best statistical hitting month over his career.

2. This story isn't going away because nothing has been resolved yet.

3. Buxton getting called up wouldn't do anything for the short term future of this team, agreed. However, the FO chose to piss off one of their foundational players for the organization's short term benefit.

Imagine you at your own job. Working through injury, being a team player. You're 13 days away from getting a raise and other benefits. Instead your boss says we don't need you anymore this year. No one would take that well.

 

Buxton was not about a short term benefit.There is room to criticize the FO, but their reasoning was the exact opposite of that.  

 

Buxton has largely been bad at his job, you should keep that in mind in your analogy too.  

    • diehardtwinsfan, Ben Noble, chpettit19 and 3 others like this
Photo
nicksaviking
Sep 11 2018 08:55 AM

I think there are two main issues, one old school, one new school. As far as analytics go, I don't think this team is practicing what they preach. I just can't see any possible scenario where an in-depth dive supports giving players with no upside like Matt Belisle, Robbie Grossman, Johnny Field, Jake Odorizzi and so many of these other replacement level players so many looks. Maybe that weighs into Nick's last point, things are still coalescing, or maybe it speaks to the second to last point that there's a disconnect.

 

My other main issue is the absolute lack of energy and enthusiasm. I know it sounds like a cheap shot and it is in no way measurable, but I'm putting that on Molitor. I don't believe the stereotypical stoic and emotionless Minnesota demeanor is appropriate for managing a baseball team in this centruy I wouldn't be excited about coming to work if my boss looks like he just put his dog down every day.  

    • birdwatcher, beckmt, 70charger and 2 others like this

 

Per USAF Chief

"I can tell you one place where they're getting it wrong: take a look at the current 40 man roster, two years into their tenure.

Arguably worse than at any point in my lifetime. And none of what young talent they do have has been signed to a long term contract. Not one single player."

 

 

Bingo, bingo, and bingo! The Twins are in worse shape than at any time including 2016 and that includes the Manager. Molitor seems to be daring the FO to fire him with the lineups and batting orders he has been sending out there. "What are you going to do, fire me?" Only good news is that there should be absolutely no false hope for 2019 and absolutely no marketing slogan that can sugar coat the obvious. Proof in the pudding will be the Baltimore Orioles who crashed and burned this year. I predict they will out perform the Twins next year.

 

There is so much in this that isreflexively negative.

 

1.) The 40 man roster is bad now because the Twins sold at the deadline. It’s supposed to be bad after that. You try random guys, you bring in mid-season free agents. Judge the Twins 40 man by the beginning of the year (talented!) or the beginning of next year (TBD but talented and augmented!)

 

2.) Worst in your lifetime? Are you two years old? Because the Twins teams of the early 2010s were undeniably worse, top to bottom. The 2016 team lost 103 games with Robbie Grossman as their second best hitter. The starting pitchers had a 5.39 ERA. If you think this year’s team is worse, you’re suffering from delusions. Unless you have some actual evidence to back up the absurd claims?

 

3.) I think people overestimate the ability to sign long-term contracts for young players. Yes Evan Longoria signed a deal but that doesn’t happen every day. Most of the Twins better young players have already signed decent contracts when they were drafted/signed. They have a nest egg and have every incentive to wait for free agency. There’s also value in waiting – this year’s Buxton season would be way more disappointing if you were paying him $8-10 million. Same with Sano. I’m for signing long-term deals with guys but I’m not naïve enough to think it’s easy to do or to blindly criticize a process about which I have no information.

 

4.) Do you really think that the front office isn’t involved in lineup construction? Molitor makes the decisions but I’m positive that they are weighing in and having a dialogue. You’re trying to create a fire where there is none. Stop it.

 

5.) I predict that you will never have to answer for the absurdity of that Orioles prediction. I’m going to try to remember it for next year but will almost certainly forget. I wish I could bet large sums of money with you on this (and am willing to). The Twins are a team that was in the playoffs last year, had a down year but still a lot of great pieces, and have a top 5-10 farm system with top-end talent to augment the current core. The Orioles are a historically bad team that sold off its top-end talent, has terrible contracts to veterans, and has a bottom ten system that lacks any high-end talent. They will almost certainly be a bottom-feeding team next year.

 

6.) You think the Twins have no hope for 2019? Are you crazy? I’m not saying they’re going to be favorites but let’s take the negativity down a notch or nine. The Twins have a good core of young pitching, solid upside pieces at six different positions (RF, LF, CF, 3B, SS, C), the payroll to address areas of concern (pitching, DH, 2B, maybe 1B), and are still in a terrible division (KC will be worse, Detroit is bottoming out, Chicago is still a few years away). There is every reason to have hope for next year, even before offseason moves. C’mon.

 

You’re being negative just to be negative. This isn’t Sportscenter, we don’t need hot takes. We need reasoned discussion. Work in some figures or evidence or analysis to support your rantings. Otherwise it’s really hard to take you seriously.

    • birdwatcher, 70charger, SwainZag and 6 others like this
Photo
JaleelWhite FanClub
Sep 11 2018 09:02 AM

 

1. You don't know Buxton was going to hit below .200. Historically, September is the best statistical hitting month over his career.

2. This story isn't going away because nothing has been resolved yet.

3. Buxton getting called up wouldn't do anything for the short term future of this team, agreed. However, the FO chose to piss off one of their foundational players for the organization's short term benefit.

Imagine you at your own job. Working through injury, being a team player. You're 13 days away from getting a raise and other benefits. Instead your boss says we don't need you anymore this year. No one would take that well.

 

I haven't seen it confirmed anywhere that the FO chose not to call up Buxton without conferring with him. Am I missing something? Everyone in there Buxton-ness is assuming the player has been wronged significantly. So much so that I've seen articles on TD promoting/advising Buxton's agents to file a grievance with the Players Association. Based solely on speculation?

 

When this website starts favoring (continuously over 2+ weeks) a player, an under-performing one at that, to a point of calling for the team to be hurt for some perceived and unconfirmed wrong, then I as a reader start getting frustrated and confused.

 

    • Ex-Iowegian, Ben Noble, gagu and 2 others like this

I wouldn't be excited about coming to work if my boss looks like he just put his dog down every day.


Although perhaps related to your other point, this roster is full of Old Yellers.
    • nicksaviking and birddog like this