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What's There to Say About Ehire?

There are some players who are simply around to fill out a roster. The technical baseball term for these kind of players would be replacement level, but let’s be real, they’re basically the Major League definition of blah.

Ehire Adrianza is one of those players. He's not going to help the Twins sell tickets, nobody's clamoring for his baseball card, but you know what? Players like that are still important.
Image courtesy of © Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports
Among Minnesota's 10 arbitration-eligible players for 2019, only two looked like legitimate candidates to be non-tendered. One, Robbie Grossman, was sent on his way last week. The other (less likely) was Adrianza, who the Twins were quick to lock up with a one-year, $1.3 million contract.

So that’s it, open and close, he's going to be on the Twins in 2019, right? Well, not necessarily.

Arbitration contracts are not guaranteed until a player breaks camp with the team. If a player is released during the first 16 days of spring training they’re only obligated to pay them 30 days’ worth of wages. If they’re let go sometime after that, but still before Opening Day, that jumps to 45 days’ worth of pay. There’s some more info at MLB.com on guaranteed contracts.

It appears at this current time that the Twins are expecting Adrianza to fill a utility role again in 2019, but they have plenty of time to change course. Should they?

Adrianza has proven a very useful pickup for the Twins. He’s appeared in the ninth-most games among Twins position players, and has played almost everywhere: first, second, third, short, left. Let's take a closer look at the versatile infielder, quietly becoming a relative mainstay on the Twins roster.

Defense
The biggest asset Adrianza provides is the ability to play shortstop. It’s really the only thing that’s kept him in the majors this long, but how is he over there?

There are 39 players who logged at least 700 innings at shortstop over the past two seasons. Adrianza ranks 33rd in Defensive Runs Above Average, per FanGraphs. That’s one spot ahead of Jorge Polanco. If we switch the focus over to UZR/150, Adrianza gets a slight bump up to 29th.

No, that’s not especially inspiring, but I would argue he is a capable major league shortstop. The main reason why he ranks so low among his peers is mainly because guys who simply cannot play the position don’t get that many opportunities to do so at the highest level.

Let’s zoom out a bit. If you change the criteria to all players who have a minimum of 500 innings at shortstop over the last four seasons combined, suddenly Adrianza ranks 34th among that sample of 68 players in Defensive Runs Above Average.

Hitting
Of the 298 players to amass at least 500 plate appearances over the past two seasons, Adrianza’s .689 OPS ranks 247th. Well that’s pretty bad, right? In the context of middle infielders, it’s actually not all that terrible.

Ehire still has a higher OPS the past two seasons than Addison Russell, Freddy Galvis, Tim Anderson, Jose Reyes, Jose Iglesias, Amed Rosario, Orlando Arcia, Dansby Swanson … you get the point. Quite a few of those guys were starting shortstops for their teams in 2018.

Being a switch-hitter, Adrianza also doesn’t see a big hit from the platoon advantage, though he has been a little better against lefties over his career (.266/.318/.381). That’s something that can come in handy for a bench player.

Something that surprised me about last season’s numbers was that Adrianza’s hard hit rate (the frequency in which he hit a ball in play 95 mph or harder) was actually higher than Eduardo Escobar last season. Ehire was at 30.5 percent while Eduardo was at 27.2 percent.

So is Adrianza’s bat an asset? No, I wouldn’t necessarily say that, but the bar is set pretty low for a shortstop. He’s better than a good number of the alternatives.

Running
Adrianza is right around average in terms of sprint speed, which means he’s pretty slow for a middle infielder. Among the players on the Twins last season, Robbie Grossman, Logan Forsythe and Tyler Austin all registered faster sprint speeds than Ehire. But, at the same time, Adrianza is 13-for-15 in stolen base attempts as a Twin and has rated out as a slightly above average base runner by FanGraphs.

When you take a look at the overall package Adrianza presents, yes, it’s pretty blah. Still, given how he stacks up against a lot of other shortstops, I actually think that he’d have a decent chance of beating that $1.3 million deal he agreed to with the Twins if he was on the open market.

Taking a look back at his history, I also think it’s reasonable to think he’s more likely to improve than he is to regress.

Development
Since he’s already 29-years-old and hasn’t ever really shown any flashes of becoming a better offensive player, the assumption is Adrianza is without upside. That’s completely fair, but I’m not 100 percent certain it’s true.

The climb up the ladder of the minor leagues is especially difficult for guys like Ehire who make their professional debuts at 16-years-old. They always get pushed eventually. Their developmental timetables are so different than, say, a guy drafted out of college.

Adrianza reached Double A for the first time in his age 22 season. It did not go well. He hit .220/.289/.310 in 512 plate appearances. He repeated the level in 2013 and fared a little better, hitting .240/.331/.312. That slight improvement earned him a jump up to Triple A in mid July of 2014 and he busted out in the hitter friendly Pacific Coast League. After hitting .310/.409/.441 in 45 games, Adrianza was headed to San Francisco as a September callup.

Was he ready? Probably not, but he was already on the 40-man roster, so it was time.

In 2014, Adrianza played just six games in the minors and had 106 plate appearances with the Giants. Not a lot of room for development there. This would be a theme over his last few seasons with the Giants.

Adrianza opened 2015 with another impressive run in Triple A, hitting .316/.384/.415 over 44 games. That earned him another shot with the Giants, but again he only logged 134 plate appearances with San Francisco. In 2016, his final season with the Giants, Ehire really struggled to stay on the field. He played a grand total of 17 games in the minors and got just 41 plate appearances in the bigs.

Add it all up and you had a guy entering his age 27 season with 105 career games at Triple A, never more than 45 in one season. In the Majors, he’d accrued just 331 plate appearances stretched across four seasons.

It can’t be easy to work on anything when you’re seeing so little playing time. It’s sad to say, but the best thing for Adrianza probably would have been if he cleared waivers, became a free agent and signed a minor league deal that allowed him to get regular at-bats.

Of course, that’s not what happened. The Brewers claimed him from the Giants, then when Milwaukee tried to sneak him through the Twins claimed him. Ehire had yet another fairly inactive season in 2017.

For the four seasons from 2014-17, Adrianza averaged a grand total of just 211 plate appearances per season. Just to put that into perspective, Twins prospect Ryan Jeffers managed to get 284 plate appearances in the minors this season and he was just drafted in June. Trade deadline acquisition Logan Forsythe got 205 plate appearances with the Twins last season. That lack of seeing competitive pitching could not have helped Adrianza’s swing or approach at the plate.

Thanks to the Jorge Polanco suspension and then the Eduardo Escobar trade, Adrianza managed to log 366 plate appearances with the Twins in 2018. He had one 10-day stay on the DL in early July due to a hamstring injury, other than that he was on the roster all season.

When Minnesota acquired Adrianza he had a .220/.292/.313 slash line in 331 MLB PA; since then he's at .256/.309/.380 in 552 PA. The "all glove, no bat" label doesn't quite apply, as his 23 doubles in 2018 ranked sixth on the Twins. His offense teeters between adequate and intriguing (again, in the context of a guy who can play shortstop).

I’d love to go out on a limb and say that somebody maybe more exciting such as Nick Gordon, who is now on the 40-man roster, would be a better option to fill the utility role. I can’t. Gordon is still at the point in his career where more time in Triple A might be key. Some players (like Adrianza) have suffered from not having that extra development in the high minors. Also, Ehire may not be a guy who’s going to win you any games, but he’s also not going to hurt you. That’s probably not true of Gordon.

Throughout a season, major-league teams always have extra players a phone call (and a day) away at Triple-A. But on a game-to-game basis, you need players with flexibility to fill multiple roles. Adrianza can capably handle virtually every position.

Ehire Adrianza isn’t going to be a guy the Twins promote on their banners outside of Target Field, but he does provide value to the roster. He remains a logical piece to the 25-man roster. In today’s age of three-man benches, having a player reserve capable of playing shortstop is a must.

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90 Comments

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TheLeviathan
Dec 05 2018 06:12 PM

 

Suggesting the Twins acquire two more guys that can play around the infield and OPS 750 displays an ignorance of the talent landscape?

 

Yes.It does.Do you know how many qualified infielders that play SS or 2B or 3B had an OPS of .750 last year? (Not all three, just any of the three)

 

35.If you take out 3B there were only 22.(And I'd say Ehire's ability to play SS/2B is a key part of his value)

 

So, yes, suggesting the Twins sign two such players (at least one of which is for a backup role) is completely out of touch with reality.

    • Minny505 likes this
Too much harshness shown to jkcarew. I understand his/her reasoning and it has validity.
    • USAFChief, Doomtints and Doctor Wu like this
"Out of touch with reality" is rude, insulting and unnecessary.

Adrianza is a backstop player who can fill in, primarily defensively, in a pinch. He won't embarrass himself offensively (unlike the Twins purported future stars can do, btw). He's the guy you keep behind the emergency glass.

 

Is he replaceable? Yes, but the Twins know him. There's not much point in bringing in someone new to fulfill the same role.

 

I'm amazed he OP managed to write so many words about him. That's true writing skill that I don't possess. Very impressive. Imagine what Tom can write about a really good player!

    • Riverbrian, JLease, Vanimal46 and 1 other like this

Yes.It does.Do you know how many qualified infielders that play SS or 2B or 3B had an OPS of .750 last year? (Not all three, just any of the three)
 
35.If you take out 3B there were only 22.(And I'd say Ehire's ability to play SS/2B is a key part of his value)
 
So, yes, suggesting the Twins sign two such players (at least one of which is for a backup role) is completely out of touch with reality.


What? As recently as 2016, the Twins extra infielder OPS’d 758. An if Polanco had been designated the extra that year...he OPS’d 730. They won 83 games. I want a guy with a better offensive upside in that role. They exist. So I guess ignorance would be bliss in my case.
    • Dr. Evil likes this
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TheLeviathan
Dec 05 2018 07:13 PM

 

What? As recently as 2016, the Twins extra infielder OPS’d 758. An if Polanco had been designated the extra that year...he OPS’d 730. They won 83 games. I want a guy with a better offensive upside in that role. They exist. So I guess ignorance would be bliss in my case.

 

One isolated data point from two years ago isn't particularly compelling.Among SS last year with at least 300 PA, Adrianza was in the top 30.If it helps, read that again.Meaning there were teams with starters who hit worse than him, much less his defensive contributions.  

 

You don't seem to be aware that there simply are not enough .750 OPS middle infielders to expect that you'll have one on your bench.It'd be great to have some dream number of infielders on your roster, but the realities of their scarcity make that totally unattainable.(At least via signing/trading players.You can have someone in your farm that steps up for that role, but expecting to acquire a utility player like that defies reality)

    • Minny505 likes this

Ehire hit .300/.355/.464 with men on last season.Much better than another now former Twins middle infielder who better stay unmentioned...

    • Dr. Evil likes this

One isolated data point from two years ago isn't particularly compelling.Among SS last year with at least 300 PA, Adrianza was in the top 30.If it helps, read that again.Meaning there were teams with starters who hit worse than him, much less his defensive contributions.  
 
You don't seem to be aware that there simply are not enough .750 OPS middle infielders to expect that you'll have one on your bench.It'd be great to have some dream number of infielders on your roster, but the realities of their scarcity make that totally unattainable.(At least via signing/trading players.You can have someone in your farm that steps up for that role, but expecting to acquire a utility player like that defies reality)


This is the reward for your much balleyhooed mid summer sell off.

We had such a guy, but I guess we needed more minor league depth instead. You and I can watch him in Phoenix.
    • Dr. Evil likes this

This is the reward for your much balleyhooed mid summer sell off.
We had such a guy, but I guess we needed more minor league depth instead. You and I can watch him in Phoenix.

So you're sayin it doesn' actually defy reality. Interesting.

 

This is the reward for your much balleyhooed mid summer sell off.

We had such a guy, but I guess we needed more minor league depth instead. You and I can watch him in Phoenix.

 

This team wasn't winning doodoo last year, trading off guys made sense. I don't know how anyone can disagree with that. 

 

That said, I don't have any confidence any of the guys they got will ever help. So far, I've not been impressed with any moves by this FO, other than Castro and the first round draft picks (which, they could have chosen any one of five players first overall and I'd be impressed, so that accomplishment isn't all that).

The utility infielder should be the next best infielder you can get on your roster through paying him. Not just a marginal major leaguer that you settle for because he's not good enough to be a starter. That's building a deep versatile roster with flexability to line up against RH/LH offensive splits. It's a valid idea that jkcarew has.
    • Riverbrian likes this

This team wasn't winning doodoo last year, trading off guys made sense. I don't know how anyone can disagree with that. 
 
That said, I don't have any confidence any of the guys they got will ever help. So far, I've not been impressed with any moves by this FO, other than Castro and the first round draft picks (which, they could have chosen any one of five players first overall and I'd be impressed, so that accomplishment isn't all that).

Makes sense provided we got something of value back. If not, it's just a give away.

One isolated data point from two years ago isn't particularly compelling.Among SS last year with at least 300 PA, Adrianza was in the top 30.If it helps, read that again.Meaning there were teams with starters who hit worse than him, much less his defensive contributions.  
 
You don't seem to be aware that there simply are not enough .750 OPS middle infielders to expect that you'll have one on your bench.It'd be great to have some dream number of infielders on your roster, but the realities of their scarcity make that totally unattainable.(At least via signing/trading players.You can have someone in your farm that steps up for that role, but expecting to acquire a utility player like that defies reality)


Yes, But there are a decent number of professional middle infielders...including players that have not yet had the opportunity to post a qualifying 750...that have materially better offensive upside than Adrianna...that have the potential to provide a pretty good bat in the role. Go get one of them...or at least explore the cost. Not easy, but I didn’t insinuate that it should be. And I agree that if we define “can OPS 750” to mean “has had qualifying seasons OPS’ing 750”...then you’re not realistically going to acquire that for the utility role.
    • Mike Sixel and Riverbrian like this

 

The utility infielder should be the next best infielder you can get on your roster through paying him. Not just a marginal major leaguer that you settle for because he's not good enough to be a starter. That's building a deep versatile roster with flexability to line up against RH/LH offensive splits. It's a valid idea that jkcarew has.

 

Except these are people and it's not that simple. It also has to be a player willing to be a backup and one who can perform off the bench, on a moment's notice, often while cold.

 

Most player's who are "good enough to be a starter" want to be starters, not sign in Minnesota to sit on the bench and pray for a teammate's injury, illness, or suspension. Most player's who excelled their whole young lives until MLB have never sat on the bench at all.

 

    • pbrezeasap, Twins33, TheLeviathan and 1 other like this

 

Yes.It does.Do you know how many qualified infielders that play SS or 2B or 3B had an OPS of .750 last year? (Not all three, just any of the three)

 

35.If you take out 3B there were only 22.(And I'd say Ehire's ability to play SS/2B is a key part of his value)

 

So, yes, suggesting the Twins sign two such players (at least one of which is for a backup role) is completely out of touch with reality.

 

First of all... I'm not sure where you are getting .750 from? 

 

Second of all... If you are making a projection that he will produce a .750 OPS and if you are right. Adrianza becomes just another example in my eyes of how the Twins screwed up again in 2018 when it came to playing time decisions and playing time allocation. .That OPS is Grossman and Field type production. 

 

Third...

 

Murphy, Asdrubal, LeMahieu, Lowrie, Dietrich and Desclasco are all middle infield players who were all legitimately over .750 last year and available right now. Kinsler, Schoop, Harrison, Beckham and Dozier have been over before.

 

Fourth...

 

If the free agents are just too expensive. We could simply mention bargain basement acquisition players who hit that magic mark with at least 300 AB's. I'll include some 200 AB's candidates because Adrianza wasn't supposed to get 300 AB's in the first place. :)

 

Braves: Culberson 

Cards: Yairo Munoz

D-Backs: Marte

Dodgers: Muncy, Chris Taylor, Kike Hernandez

Mets: McNeil and Flores (I cheated... Flores was only .736 but Adrianza was only .680)

Orioles: Villar (I cheated... he was only .729 and I'm only counting 200 AB's with the Orioles and not the Brewers but... Adrianza got stretched to .750 so... he's on my list)

Pirates: Adam Frazier

Rays: Wendle and Robertson (throw in Brad Miller... he's inexpensive now and looking for work). 

Red Sox: Holt

Reds: He's expensive now but Scooter was once bargain basement. 

Tigers: Our favorite Niko Goodrum was close at .747 

 

Also Aledmys Diaz who was traded to Houston for a 24th ranked prospect. He cleared the .750 mark with the Jays last year and was paid 2M.  

 

Fifth...

 

The reason it's hard (For the Twins) to find a middle infielder who can't surpass .750 OPS is because they consistently settle for guys who produce at a .680 clip. 

 

If they can't find better offensive production than Adrianza... there is no reason for me to get up tomorrow morning.:)

    • Aerodeliria likes this

 

Except these are people and it's not that simple. It also has to be a player willing to be a backup and one who can perform off the bench, on a moment's notice, often while cold.

 

Most player's who are "good enough to be a starter" want to be starters, not sign in Minnesota to sit on the bench and pray for a teammate's injury, illness, or suspension. Most player's who excelled their whole young lives until MLB have never sat on the bench at all.

 

So don't bench them and make them atrophy. Promise them that if they out-perform the others they will get the playing time. 

 

If I could change baseball... I'd strike the word "back-up" from the lexicon. I'd call them players who didn't play as well as the others. 

 

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Aerodeliria
Dec 05 2018 11:43 PM

Pitching and the infield are two places the Twins need help. I think they are not that far from being very, very competitive--especially in the Central Heating Division. I'd like to land at least one infielder of decent quality.

 

To be frank, I'm not really all that comfortable with Polanco winging throws from the shortstop side of 2nd base.

    • Minny505 likes this
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TheLeviathan
Dec 06 2018 07:08 AM

 

Yes, But there are a decent number of professional middle infielders...including players that have not yet had the opportunity to post a qualifying 750...that have materially better offensive upside than Adrianna...that have the potential to provide a pretty good bat in the role. Go get one of them...or at least explore the cost. Not easy, but I didn’t insinuate that it should be. And I agree that if we define “can OPS 750” to mean “has had qualifying seasons OPS’ing 750”...then you’re not realistically going to acquire that for the utility role.

 

Well, when you advocate "go get two of them" - it sure sounds like you think it's easy. Or it insinuates you don't realize how rare it is for middle infielders to get to that mark.  

 

What you suggest, of course, sounds good. I don't deny that.What I deny is how feasible it is.It's like my "Just go get a gold glove catcher with a 1.000 OPS!" - of course that would be great.But when the rubber meets the road....can that even happen?

 

Only 35 non-1B last year managed that kind of OPS.Among shortstops with 300 at-bats - Ehire was good enough with the bat to be a STARTING shortstop.It's not that your plan doesn't work in theory, it's that it doesn't work when you view the position through the lens of scarcity.  

 

Compare Ehire to other utility infielders and how does he stack up?The answer, based on facts, is that he stacks up pretty well.Better than average in fact.

    • Twins33 and Minny505 like this
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TheLeviathan
Dec 06 2018 07:12 AM

 

First of all... I'm not sure where you are getting .750 from? 

 

Second of all... If you are making a projection that he will produce a .750 OPS and if you are right. Adrianza becomes just another example in my eyes of how the Twins screwed up again in 2018 when it came to playing time decisions and playing time allocation. .That OPS is Grossman and Field type production. 

 

Third...

 

Murphy, Asdrubal, LeMahieu, Lowrie, Dietrich and Desclasco are all middle infield players who were all legitimately over .750 last year and available right now. Kinsler, Schoop, Harrison, Beckham and Dozier have been over before.

 

Fourth...

 

If the free agents are just too expensive. We could simply mention bargain basement acquisition players who hit that magic mark with at least 300 AB's. I'll include some 200 AB's candidates because Adrianza wasn't supposed to get 300 AB's in the first place. :)

 

Braves: Culberson 

Cards: Yairo Munoz

D-Backs: Marte

Dodgers: Muncy, Chris Taylor, Kike Hernandez

Mets: McNeil and Flores (I cheated... Flores was only .736 but Adrianza was only .680)

Orioles: Villar (I cheated... he was only .729 and I'm only counting 200 AB's with the Orioles and not the Brewers but... Adrianza got stretched to .750 so... he's on my list)

Pirates: Adam Frazier

Rays: Wendle and Robertson (throw in Brad Miller... he's inexpensive now and looking for work). 

Red Sox: Holt

Reds: He's expensive now but Scooter was once bargain basement. 

Tigers: Our favorite Niko Goodrum was close at .747 

 

 

 

jkcarew came up with .750.I simply said there are not that many guys better than Ehire and his .700ish OPS.And when you take the cheats off of this list, it comes down to about a handful of better utility players in the entire league.That's not because Ehire is some great player, as I said at the beginning, teams field utility infielders like Ehire not because they choose to, but because they have to.The scarcity context of guyswho can do what he does and hit like he does, forces them to.  

 

It's not like all the teams in baseball are too dumb or cheap to employ the legion of players better than Ehire for this role.It's that the legion of players you guys are insinuating exist....don't actually exist.

 

It'd be great if they did though!

    • Twins33 and Minny505 like this

jkcarew came up with .750. I simply said there are not that many guys better than Ehire and his .700ish OPS. And when you take the cheats off of this list, it comes down to about a handful of better utility players in the entire league. That's not because Ehire is some great player, as I said at the beginning, teams field utility infielders like Ehire not because they choose to, but because they have to. The scarcity context of guys who can do what he does and hit like he does, forces them to.

It's not like all the teams in baseball are too dumb or cheap to employ the legion of players better than Ehire for this role. It's that the legion of players you guys are insinuating exist....don't actually exist.

It'd be great if they did though!

They do exist. Often times the players you think will... don’t. And the players that you think won’t... do and it’s hard to predict obviously.

Right now my concern is pretty simple. If Adrianza was simply signed for a “he’s cheap and fine for getaway days” reason.

They have already screwed up the roster construction and I believe there are plenty of better options at the minimum salary even.

If they signed him because the front office believes he’s the best they can do and he could assume a starting position at a moments notice (including 3B for Sano). Then I have no complaints and I’ll trust those analytics they have that I don’t.

But I swear... if Cron or Polanco or whoever is hitting .185 and the manager doesn’t turn to Adrianza because he isn’t good enough. I’ll be pissed.

I simply don’t like the word back-up. The backups will have to start. There are 25 roster spots every spot should compete against the other spots and you have to roster players who can compete.
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TheLeviathan
Dec 06 2018 09:08 AM

 

I simply don’t like the word back-up. The backups will have to start. There are 25 roster spots every spot should compete against the other spots and you have to roster players who can compete.

 

Sure, but there aren't 750 good players.Even good teams, with a lot of money, end up rostering guys we wouldn't call "good". That isn't because all of these teams are too stupid to sign the good players.Or too cheap.There just simply aren't enough of them.The scarcity of such players is a reason to buy in to your flexibility idea, but even then there are limits because the scarcity is pretty significant.  

 

And when it's this significant, it needs to be remembered when we just flippantly throw around ideas like "Welp, we should just get a better player!"It's not that simple and I say that in agreement that we should acquire better players.It's worth pointing out, however, that relative to the rest of the league (which, frankly, is hte only context that truly matters) - the Twins are doing alright having Adrianza as their utility player.  

 

Suggesting they should "upgrade" him goes down a path that isn't nearly as supported by evidence or the reality of scarcity.

    • pbrezeasap and Minny505 like this

 

So don't bench them and make them atrophy. Promise them that if they out-perform the others they will get the playing time. 

 

If I could change baseball... I'd strike the word "back-up" from the lexicon. I'd call them players who didn't play as well as the others. 

This isn't football. There are only 9 positions and if you don't start, you don't play. Sometimes it takes a headache before Wally Pipp gets the day off.

Sure, but there aren't 750 good players. Even good teams, with a lot of money, end up rostering guys we wouldn't call "good". That isn't because all of these teams are too stupid to sign the good players. Or too cheap. There just simply aren't enough of them. The scarcity of such players is a reason to buy in to your flexibility idea, but even then there are limits because the scarcity is pretty significant.

And when it's this significant, it needs to be remembered when we just flippantly throw around ideas like "Welp, we should just get a better player!" It's not that simple and I say that in agreement that we should acquire better players. It's worth pointing out, however, that relative to the rest of the league (which, frankly, is hte only context that truly matters) - the Twins are doing alright having Adrianza as their utility player.

Suggesting they should "upgrade" him goes down a path that isn't nearly as supported by evidence or the reality of scarcity.


It isn’t easy on hand and incredibly easy on the other hand. Nearly every player on the list I put together wasn’t on the list prior. Meaning they got the chance and they produced plus .750.

They got the chance and produced but they won’t get the chance when you say .680 is the best you can do and lock in. The Twins have a real strong painful history of locking in with mediocre to below mediocre talent.

I dont have anybody in mind. I don’t have the data necessary. The front office does and this is where I have to trust them and I will. But if Baldelli won’t play Adrianza when we need him because he isn’t everyday material. I’ll complain.

This isn't football. There are only 9 positions and if you don't start, you don't play. Sometimes it takes a headache before Wally Pipp gets the day off.

It isn’t football. It’s a 162 game schedule. 12 position player roster spots, one of those is a catcher position. That’s two extra players to find playing time for 162 games. I’m theory nobody would have to sit much at all.

There is plenty of playing time for all. There is absolutely no reason to roster anyone as a backup until he earns the right to not play as much by actually not playing well.

If you give a precious 25 man roster spot to a player under the pretext of the won’t play much. You’ve already screwed up and wasted an opportunity to improve your club just to put all your eggs in a fragile basket.
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TheLeviathan
Dec 06 2018 10:49 AM

 

It isn’t easy on hand and incredibly easy on the other hand. Nearly every player on the list I put together wasn’t on the list prior. Meaning they got the chance and they produced plus .750.

They got the chance and produced but they won’t get the chance when you say .680 is the best you can do and lock in. The Twins have a real strong painful history of locking in with mediocre to below mediocre talent.

I dont have anybody in mind. I don’t have the data necessary. The front office does and this is where I have to trust them and I will. But if Baldelli won’t play Adrianza when we need him because he isn’t everyday material. I’ll complain.

 

I disagree that it is easy on any hand.I'm all for providing opportunity to players with upside, but if it was at all easy to identify than everyone would be doing it.This kind of identification is what separates the wheat from the chaff.

 

Good front offices should be trying, of that I am in lock-step agreement.But it isn't easy to achieve.And if now we're arguing about trying to turn formerly non-productive players into productive ones...I'm all for that too.Hell, the Twins should be doing that with Adrianza if that's the new center of the debate.

 

What needs to be acknowledged, however, is that scarcity and the talent landscape are clearly against the argument that Adrianza can be replaced with ease.In fact, the scarcity and talent landscape indicate the Twins are already at an advantage here relative to most teams.  

    • Original Whizzinator likes this

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