Jump to content

Providing independent coverage of the Minnesota Twins.
Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

The Forums

Article: Twins Game Recap (7/17): Mets Blow Out Twins, Co...

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 07:49 AM
Things started out great for the Twins, who had the lead until the sixth inning, after yet another quality start by Martín Pérez. But ter...
Full topic ›

Article: Series Preview: For Whom The Schedule Tolls

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 07:47 AM
The first three-game losing streak of the Twins’ season sets them up for a four-game series against one of the hottest teams in baseball;...
Full topic ›

Article: Arraez Is What Minnesota Has Craved

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 07:44 AM
Last September a robust 26-year-old rookie played in 29 games for the Minnesota Twins and posted an .887 OPS. He did so while looking the...
Full topic ›

Article: Let's Make A Deal, Part I: 2020

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 06:41 AM
This is a fun time of the season for all 30 teams. This year, we as fans get to speculate about how the Twins are going to acquire other...
Full topic ›

Game Thread Mets @ Twins 12:10 PM 7/17/19

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 05:41 AM
The Twins face the Mets in the finale of a two-game series. After a tough 3-2 loss and two straight one-run defeats, can the Twins bounce...
Full topic ›

Using Derek Falvey and Thad Levine's Past to Forecast the Minnesota Twins' 2019 Trade Deadline

Welcome to the final day of the All-Star break! The Home Run Derby has concluded (shout out to Pete Alonso for Justin Morneau-ing the hell out of Vladdy Jr.) and the All-Star Game came and went. Now we find ourselves smack dab in the middle of my favorite time of the season: trade season. After the All-Star game, every beat writer in America with any sort of following dusted off their phones, confirmed their “sources” and now keep Twitter even closer than before in the hopes that they might be the first to drop some juicy news regarding the potential interest of a team in another team’s player.
Image courtesy of © Patrick Gorski-USA TODAY Sport
For the Twins, they find themselves solidly on the other side of the table this year as they will not be looking to shed veterans for prospects but instead they will be adding veterans in exchange for their much-coveted prospects. Essentially, this will be the first deadline under the new front office headed by Derek Falvey and Thad Levine where their play is obvious and on the spectrum that involves making a World Series contender instead of aiding another team in their efforts to win the title. I phrase it that way with the odd 2017 deadline in mind where Jaime García was acquired just to be shipped off to the Yankees a week later and Brandon Kintzler was sent to the Nationals. But that was hardly a team looking to become true World Series contenders and the fact that they made the playoffs that year at all was a minor miracle.

This year is different, the fruits of Falvey and Levine’s efforts (along the many coaches and players) have blossomed and the Twins sit at the top of the AL Central with a 5.5 game lead. Since the introduction of the new front office, basically everything that was ever synonymous with Twins’ baseball has been stomped on and thrown out the window. Long gone are the days of small ball and pitching to contact and in are the days of slugging and striking out other batters. The results have been pretty decent if you ask me as Stage 1 of the plan has been a success but Stage 2 emerges and the question now is; how will the Twins attack the trade deadline?

We all have our own personal beliefs for whom the Twins should acquire (I say a top-tier starter, a top-tier reliever, and a mid-tier reliever for depth but that’s a different topic), but as I mentioned before, we are heading into uncharted territory as the Twins go into the deadline as kings with a vast bounty in front of them to choose from, something that has not happened under this front office. Shoot, the last time you could really even say they were in a similar place was 2010 when they last took the division, but even that team was only at 58 wins at the deadline (the current Twins are already at 56) and the only big move at the deadline then was the addition of Matt Capps which was… Yeah let’s just leave that topic alone.

Without any recent Twins history of deadline moves as World Series favorites, I looked to the history of Derek Falvey during his tenure with the Indians and Thad Levine when he was with the Rangers in order to get a good feel for how those teams acted when they were in a similar spot as the Twins are now and then use that information to predict what they will do in the coming weeks.

Derek Falvey
Falvey first joined the Indians in 2007 but was promoted to co-director of baseball operations after the 2011 season so that is where I will start my investigation. In the season immediately following his promotion, the Indians won just 68 games as they continued to wander aimlessly through the baseball landscape like the Israelities when they left Egypt but with fewer curses, or maybe more actually ... anyway, they were bad for a while.

It was a different story in 2013 for the Indians, as they won 92 games and made it to the Wild Card game. They would eventually lose that game but they finally reversed course toward a successful future and the groundwork was set. At the deadline the Indians were at 59 wins and their lone move was acquiring reliever Mark Rzepczynski who definitely made me check my spelling no less than four times when typing his name.

The Indians were really boring for the next two years so let’s skip those.

The 2016 Indians is where stuff gets really fun. That team won 94 games and not only won the division but made it to Game 7 of the World Series where they lost in heartbreaking fashion, a shame. That Cleveland team had 60 wins at the deadline and shocked the baseball world by acquiring a little known reliever named Andrew Miller at the deadline. They also were on the verge of acquiring catcher Jonathan Lucroy but he exercised his no-trade clause and the trade died.

What can be learned from this? Well, unfortunately there was only one year where the Indians were in a position much like the 2019 Twins. But what is really interesting is the addition of Andrew Miller as he proved to be a key cog in their bullpen and was an instance where the Indians bought high on a controllable reliever who would help the team that year and a few years down the road. What possibly is frightening is that the one weakness of that Indians squad was their bench depth that was half-heartedly addressed by adding Brandon Guyer and journeyman Michael Martinez who of course happened to be the final out of that World Series. The 2019 Twins currently hold a better bench than the 2016 Indians, but it will be pushed to the limit in every capacity during the playoffs and Derek Falvey would be wise to remember what happened in 2016.

Thad Levine
Thad Levine was brought on as an assistant to the general manager for the Rangers following the 2005 season. Since he was there was that many years ago, I’ll cut out some seasons that amounted to nothing, you’re very welcome.

For the first few years, the Rangers really didn’t do much winning but in 2010 they won 90 games and made it all the way to the World Series. With 61 wins heading into the trade deadline, the Rangers were big buyers, as they traded for starter Cliff Lee and reliever Mark Lowe along with some depth pieces like Bengie Molina, Jeff Francoeur, Jorge Cantu, and Christian Guzmán during July and August. Cliff Lee was a hired gun as his contract was up after the year, Mark Lowe was a controllable reliever who stuck around for two years following the 2010 season and the other players mostly didn’t stick around long.

What I find very interesting is that the Rangers in 2010 had no previous history of success leading into the season but saw what unfolded in front of them and were very aggressive in acquiring the pieces necessary to make a run not just that year but for years in the future. They covered all their bases (pun most certainly intended) and just happened to run into the buzzsaw that was the Giants that year in the World Series. Speaking of the future, though …

The 2011 Rangers didn’t like losing the World Series in 2010 so they went and made it again! This year they won 96 games and had another aggressive trade deadline by acquiring relievers Mike Adams, Koji Uehara, and Mike Gonzalez in order to boost a bullpen that was the third worst in baseball by fWAR before the deadline (it was then the sixth best bullpen by fWAR in baseball after the deadline). The Rangers after the deadline were again a very well-rounded squad but just couldn’t seal the deal against a scrappy Cardinals club and they again lost the World Series.

What I really like is that the Rangers again showed that they were willing to aggressively attack what they saw as the biggest weakness on the team in order to put themselves in the best place possible to win a championship.

The next two years, the Rangers still fielded good teams but not quite good enough to make more deep playoff runs and they made a number of trades for veterans in which they gave up prospects who eventually would become quality players in a desperate attempt to continue their run (guys like Kyle Hendricks, Carl Edwards Jr., and Leury Garcia). Their contention window with that core was over after 2013.

Now knowing how each team conducted their deadline when in a position to succeed, I am even more looking forward to the deadline as it could be a combination of the Indians' pragmatism in 2016 for quality players who would stick around for more than just that season (Andrew Miller and almost Jonathan Lucroy), and the Rangers' aggressiveness in 2010 and 2011 where positions of need were identified and addressed and depth was made a priority in order for their squad to best make their playoff run. I can’t know for certain what the plan is, but I am damn excited to see it unfold.

  • pbrezeasap and caninatl04 like this

  • Share:
  • submit to reddit
Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

Subscribe to Twins Daily Email

85 Comments

 

Cleveland indeed lowered payroll, but I don't think they did it by "selling off parts", at least not in a negative way -- their 3 big offseason trades are pretty easy to justify as "baseball moves" too:

 

- traded Yan Gomes (58 OPS+)

- traded Encarnacion (117 OPS+) and Yandy Diaz (117) for Carlos Santana (149) and Jake Bauers (89)

- traded Alonso (55 OPS+)

 

I think they'd like Diaz back with that production, but it's hard to argue with what Santana is doing right now, cheaper and more flexible than Encarnacion. And the other two deals are the kind that some folks here have applauded the Twins for making the past couple years.

 

On the free agency front, yeah, they definitely should have tried harder to bring back Michael Brantley -- that was the clear, questionable money-conserving move. But otherwise, letting Allen and Miller go seem like more solid baseball moves.

Yeah Cleveland didn't really make themselves much worse over the offseason. When they had a poor start to the year many people thought it was because of selling but it was really just bad injury luck. How could any team expect to compete without Clevinger, Kluber, and Carrasco for an extended time? They also had Lindor out for a stretch and Jose Ramirez is finally starting to play at his usual level.

 

Its really impressive the Indians are where they are. If less players or just less important players were to get injured, the Indians are probably the division champ like everyone thought. Its not that the Indians misjudged the Twins state, they just had a serious run of injuries to their most important players. Terry Francona is their MVP.

 

Michael Brantley was the only real loss in the offseason but how does a small market team justify spending that much on a guy they know first hand was always injured? Their trades were good moves.

 

It is scary that the Indians get Kluber, Salazar, and possibly Carrasco back without making any deadline moves. They could do a soft buy and grab a cheap outfielder (someone like Corey Dickerson) and maybe a reliever, and I think they would be a very good team.

    • DocBauer likes this
Photo
SpicyGarvSauce
Jul 12 2019 09:24 AM

ESPN has this trade as one they predict....

 

2. The Twins acquire LHP Madison Bumgarner and LHP Will Smith from the Giants for OF Alex Kirilloff, LHP Lewis Thorpe and two prospects outside of Minnesota's top 10.

 

They even mention SF possibly adding Melancon to the deal, assuming SF picks up a majority of his salary. Thoughts? For 2 rental players, that is a pretty steep price IMO.

    • DocBauer likes this

Zaidi moonlighting as an ESPN writer now?

 

 

ESPN has this trade as one they predict....

 

2. The Twins acquire LHP Madison Bumgarner and LHP Will Smith from the Giants for OF Alex Kirilloff, LHP Lewis Thorpe and two prospects outside of Minnesota's top 10.

 

They even mention SF possibly adding Melancon to the deal, assuming SF picks up a majority of his salary. Thoughts? For 2 rental players, that is a pretty steep price IMO.

 

Photo
nicksaviking
Jul 12 2019 10:27 AM

 

Carl started out by buying foreclosed properties (mostly farms) during the Great Depression. He continued to buy failed or failing assets and properties, including banks, land, buildings, etc., throughout his lifetime.

 

 

I always liked to say that Carl Pohlad was the villain of The Grapes of Wrath.

    • Doomtints likes this
Photo
diehardtwinsfan
Jul 12 2019 10:30 AM

 

ESPN has this trade as one they predict....

 

2. The Twins acquire LHP Madison Bumgarner and LHP Will Smith from the Giants for OF Alex Kirilloff, LHP Lewis Thorpe and two prospects outside of Minnesota's top 10.

 

They even mention SF possibly adding Melancon to the deal, assuming SF picks up a majority of his salary. Thoughts? For 2 rental players, that is a pretty steep price IMO.

 

That's an extreme overpay for two rentals. 

    • Twins33, DocBauer, Vanimal46 and 3 others like this

That's an extreme overpay for two rentals.


ESPN hasn't been paying attention to the rental trade market the last 2 seasons.
Photo
diehardtwinsfan
Jul 12 2019 10:37 AM

 

ESPN hasn't been paying attention to the rental trade market the last 2 seasons.

ESPN doesn't pay much attention to anything but Boston and New York. 

    • DocBauer, gagu, rdehring and 2 others like this
Photo
nicksaviking
Jul 12 2019 10:41 AM

 

I'm not sure I see a real difference between MN and CLE ownership in terms of payroll over the years. What difference do you see?

 

Well I would say that after Cleveland got their new stadium in the mid 1990's and were good through the decade and into the early 2000's, they were almost always a top 10 payroll team. The Twins have cracked the top 10 once. Recent Cleveland teams haven't been given that luxury though. 

 

The Twins never cut payroll in the middle of a period of contention. That's a pretty big difference right there.

 

Good counterpoint though. They were competitive for a decade and didn't stress the front office about easing back on the throttle. Though, it's not like they were spending all that much to begin with.

    • DocBauer likes this
Photo
whosafraidofluigirussolo
Jul 12 2019 12:58 PM

their lone move was acquiring reliever Mark Rzepczynski who definitely made me check my spelling no less than four times when typing his name.

 

M-A-R-C 

:)

 

    • Hosken Bombo Disco likes this
Photo
yarnivek1972
Jul 12 2019 01:42 PM

ESPN doesn't pay much attention to anything but Boston and New York.


Eastern
Seaboard
Prejudice
Network
    • DocBauer and gagu like this
Photo
birdwatcher
Jul 12 2019 01:59 PM

 

Bill Smith was given enough rope, it seems, but Jim and Terry were both clear that every expenditure had to be run through both Jim Pohlad and Dave St. Peter after Smith was demoted.

 

St. Peter has stepped back since Levine was hired, but Levine has still made it clear that he has to run things through Jim.

 

The closest thing to what you are alluding to is a statement by Jim Pohlad during the Terry Ryan firing stating he was surprised that Terry Ryan didn't come to him more often to ask for more money in order to make a move. Considering payroll is heading downward since then, I suspect this statement was largely for PR.

 

Heck, every statement this team has made since 2010 regarding payroll has been for PR. Reality has never jived with their statements.

 

 

I get why you'd paint this picture, but I think it's more than blurred. It's mostly a false read.

 

The Pohlad Companies are not some small, unsophisticated affair. As with every other one of their businesses, they expect management to adhere to very clearly laid out disiplines and to comply with standard practices regarding corporate governance.

 

Businesses the size of, say, United Properties or Minnesota Twins Baseball, to name two of the Pohlad Companies' 30 businesses, will always have a governance control that requires management to present potential expenditures of a certain amount to the board of directors.

 

That's all that's going on. People love to opine (and to believe) a narrative that equates running expenditures by "Jim Pohlad" as clear evidence of cheapness or an unwillingness to invest additional cash (it ain't spending, folks!) when management views it as a prudent investment.

 

So yes, these are business decisions, absolutely. You are entitled to believe Minnesota Twins Baseball as a billion dollar business shouldn't be run like a business. But we're not entitled to that.

 

I personally get tired of the cheap and the not wanting to win and the stuffing it in his own pocket stuff.Yes, the three boys are the majority shareholders and major beneficiaries of any profitability. But I promise you, if you spent any time at all around them ( I have), you'd see that they care about the welfare of their thousands of employees, all the other shareholders, their community, and even you.

 

As for your cynical PR bit, I'd tell you that Jim Pohlad hardly knows how to spell it. He's only slightly better at avoiding PR blunders than the old man was.

    • Carole Keller, USAFChief, DocBauer and 3 others like this

 

I get why you'd paint this picture, but I think it's more than blurred. It's mostly a false read.

 

The Pohlad Companies are not some small, unsophisticated affair. As with every other one of their businesses, they expect management to adhere to very clearly laid out disiplines and to comply with standard practices regarding corporate governance.

 

Businesses the size of, say, United Properties or Minnesota Twins Baseball, to name two of the Pohlad Companies' 30 businesses, will always have a governance control that requires management to present potential expenditures of a certain amount to the board of directors.

 

That's all that's going on. People love to opine (and to believe) a narrative that equates running expenditures by "Jim Pohlad" as clear evidence of cheapness or an unwillingness to invest additional cash (it ain't spending, folks!) when management views it as a prudent investment.

 

So yes, these are business decisions, absolutely. You are entitled to believe Minnesota Twins Baseball as a billion dollar business shouldn't be run like a business. But we're not entitled to that.

 

I personally get tired of the cheap and the not wanting to win and the stuffing it in his own pocket stuff.Yes, the three boys are the majority shareholders and major beneficiaries of any profitability. But I promise you, if you spent any time at all around them ( I have), you'd see that they care about the welfare of their thousands of employees, all the other shareholders, their community, and even you.

 

As for your cynical PR bit, I'd tell you that Jim Pohlad hardly knows how to spell it. He's only slightly better at avoiding PR blunders than the old man was.

Hey bird...ask Jim to prompt Falvine to get some GD bullpen help, stat.  

    • Carole Keller and gunnarthor like this
Photo
Brock Beauchamp
Jul 12 2019 02:30 PM

 

The Twins cut payroll in 2008, when we traded Johan and let Torii walk. And they kept it below 2007 levels in 2009 too.

https://legacy.baseb...innesota-twins/

They were also coming off a losing season where they finished third in the division.

 

I remember being not happy about that but at least the team wasn't on a run of domination, as Cleveland was up until this year.

They were also coming off a losing season where they finished third in the division.

I remember being not happy about that but at least the team wasn't on a run of domination, as Cleveland was up until this year

Should a team spend more when its competition is weak, or when its competition is strong?

It's also relative. Cleveland increased their payroll dramatically in 2017 and 2018 -- team record high payrolls both years. 2019 is only a cut relative to those years, and frankly it is a pretty modest cut so far. Easy to say now that they should have QO'd/re-signed Brantley, but that would have given them a team record high payroll in 2019 -- even after shedding Alsonso, Gomes, and exchanging Encarnacion for Santana. Same if they had signed Pollock or McCutchen instead.
    • Mike Sixel likes this

It is kind of stunning to read so many withering criticisms of current ownership. Most of the “supporting” examples reference Carl Pohlad’s ownership. They do not appear relevant as the Twins have clearly been run differently since Jim took over. To me it seems as if virtually every unproductive philosophy the “old Twins regime” had has been thrown out. Hard to believe all of the negativity when we are watching one of the best Twins teams ever, brought to you by people hired by current ownership.


I think is a really good post!

The "modern" Twins organization, whatever dates you wish to use, consists of 2 different eras, the Metrodome era, and the Target Field era.

Those 2 eras were run, including today, by 4 different FO, if you go back to MacPhail. There was a massive payroll explosion that began about 30yrs ago, along with a revenue explosion, to be fair. Remember when Pucket was the highest paid player in baseball for about 3 days at $2+M before Ricky Henderson signed his deal days later.

Despite Target Field, the Twins remain a mid market team due to many factors. In 2010, if memory serves, the FO and ownership believed in the team's contention status and raised payroll to an all time level. If memory serves, I believe they were around 10th or so that season.

In 2018, coming off a late surge that lead to a WC spot in 2017, this new FO took a shot on various moves that took the payroll up to right about middle of the pack of MLB. Unless you have a team going all in, that's about where you would expect amid market team to be most years.

Huge dollars and payroll are nice. But it's also about spending money wisely.

Some came unglued when the Twins cut payroll after last season. I get it. But looking back now at the season's mid point, can you really see any move made, or not made, that hasn't turned out to be smart as well as prudent?

Financially, the team is in fine shape at this point for additional extensions, a couple re-signings, as well as bringing on additional payroll in the form of trade acquisitions. Can this even be disputed?

Now, exactly who and what they add remains to be seen. Is there really a SP to add that makes SENSE and is AVAILABLE? Considering the way this FO, and an entirely new way of thinking and examining players has changed, do they target a big name RP or two? Or do they see another Nathan, another Pressly out there that makes more sense?

I stated in another thread I believe the FO will bring in 1-3 new arms. Depends a lot on trade cost, availability, and who is on hand they believe in. I maintain we could be surprised by who they believe in and bring in, not necessarily a BIG NAME.

But everything this organization is doing now is very, very different in how things were handled previously. The old mantra of ownership is cheap and doesn't care is not only tired and old, it also doesn't apply to everything we've seen thus far with the new regime.

Until, or unless, this FO just does nothing, I think it's time to let old arguements go.
    • birdwatcher, gagu, Wizard11 and 1 other like this
Photo
yarnivek1972
Jul 12 2019 09:30 PM
Anyone think that a guy like Mejia might be a throw in on a deal? He’s relatively young, he’s controllable for four more years, he’s left handed, throws hard and until this year was a better than average MLB pitcher. A non-contending team might try to stretch him out and put him in their rotation and see what happens.

Obviously, he’s not going to be a centerpiece. But I’d imagine there’s someone out there that thinks he can turn him around and steal a guy.

Mejia is pretty likely to be DFA to make room for any incoming reliever as it is, why not throw him in?

 

I'm not from Minnesota. What is it that the Pohlads stand for which is so lothesome?

 

Running a sports team strictly for profit, and never taking the big financial risk to win.

Photo
birdwatcher
Jul 12 2019 10:19 PM

 

Well for starters, we have a Twins Daily writer, in a different thread, confirming that the Pohlad's refuse to authorize the FO to overspend their draft allotment, something 23 other teams did last year, even though it would only cost them a $1 million penalty.

 

 

Can anyone tell me if anyone has asked why the organization elected to honor their agreement with the other clubs to adhere to the agreed-upon system and not harm other clubs by breaching their agreement?

 

Is there any chance, whatsover, that management decided to stay within allotment limits for a reason other than that they're frugal?

 

 

Photo
birdwatcher
Jul 12 2019 10:51 PM

 

Don't forget the stupid moving to North Carolina saga

 

 

But isn't this history irrelevant in 2019?

Photo
birdwatcher
Jul 13 2019 04:51 AM

 

Hey bird...ask Jim to prompt Falvine to get some GD bullpen help, stat.  

 

 

Will do, Chief. Any requests about what he should tell United Properties to do?

    • rdehring likes this

Can anyone tell me if anyone has asked why the organization elected to honor their agreement with the other clubs to adhere to the agreed-upon system and not harm other clubs by breaching their agreement?

Is there any chance, whatsover, that management decided to stay within allotment limits for a reason other than that they're frugal?


It's not a hard cap.
It's akin to the HOV lane, you just have to pay a small fee and you can use it.

 

I get why you'd paint this picture, but I think it's more than blurred. It's mostly a false read.

 

The Pohlad Companies are not some small, unsophisticated affair. As with every other one of their businesses, they expect management to adhere to very clearly laid out disiplines and to comply with standard practices regarding corporate governance.

 

Businesses the size of, say, United Properties or Minnesota Twins Baseball, to name two of the Pohlad Companies' 30 businesses, will always have a governance control that requires management to present potential expenditures of a certain amount to the board of directors.

 

That's all that's going on. People love to opine (and to believe) a narrative that equates running expenditures by "Jim Pohlad" as clear evidence of cheapness or an unwillingness to invest additional cash (it ain't spending, folks!) when management views it as a prudent investment.

 

So yes, these are business decisions, absolutely. You are entitled to believe Minnesota Twins Baseball as a billion dollar business shouldn't be run like a business. But we're not entitled to that.

 

I personally get tired of the cheap and the not wanting to win and the stuffing it in his own pocket stuff.Yes, the three boys are the majority shareholders and major beneficiaries of any profitability. But I promise you, if you spent any time at all around them ( I have), you'd see that they care about the welfare of their thousands of employees, all the other shareholders, their community, and even you.

 

As for your cynical PR bit, I'd tell you that Jim Pohlad hardly knows how to spell it. He's only slightly better at avoiding PR blunders than the old man was.

 

You start by saying they are not unsophisticated. You end by saying they don't know PR.

 

In the middle, you talk about things I wasn't talking about, all while saying I'm wrong.

 

Thanks for the vent.

Photo
diehardtwinsfan
Jul 13 2019 07:23 AM

 

Anyone think that a guy like Mejia might be a throw in on a deal? He’s relatively young, he’s controllable for four more years, he’s left handed, throws hard and until this year was a better than average MLB pitcher. A non-contending team might try to stretch him out and put him in their rotation and see what happens.

Obviously, he’s not going to be a centerpiece. But I’d imagine there’s someone out there that thinks he can turn him around and steal a guy.

Mejia is pretty likely to be DFA to make room for any incoming reliever as it is, why not throw him in?

I wouldn't be shocked at all if he's traded. he's still a project and out of options. A tanking team would love a guy like that b/c there's decent upside and lots of control. He's either part of their next core, or someone they can flip a in a couple years for more help.

 

It's not a hard cap.
It's akin to the HOV lane, you just have to pay a small fee and you can use it.

That's not entirely true.You can go over your allotment by 5% with what I understand is a 75% cash penalty.The Twins allotment this year was what, $6,400,000 something, so 5% would be roughly $320,000.So they couldn't spend another million, as you suggest, without the harsh penalties kicking in.And those penalties are severe as they deal with the loss of future draft picks.

 

Photo
birdwatcher
Jul 13 2019 07:52 AM

 

It's not a hard cap.
It's akin to the HOV lane, you just have to pay a small fee and you can use it.

 

 

I realize this is the almost universal belief around here. But it was a contractual agreement. The original intent was crystal clear, even though the language in the contract was poorly written. The penalty provisions were poorly designed. This allowed teams to rationalize the original intent away and dismiss their breach of faith with the non-cheating teams and instead treat it as a "pay for privilege" thing.

 

They tightened it up and made the penalties onerous to eradicate the cheating. This by an organization which is not exactly reputed for its virtuous ethical behavior.

 

My point was, if an organization's ethics demanded it comply with the intent and terms of that CBA contract and refuse to blow through their agreed-to allotment, then presuming they did so for another reason, like frugality, is, well, presumptuous.


Similar Articles


by Matt Braun , Yesterday, 09:22 PM
Photo


by Ted Schwerzler , Yesterday, 12:03 PM
Photo


by Cooper Carlson , 16 Jul 2019
Photo


by Andrew Thares , 16 Jul 2019
Photo


by Ted Schwerzler , 16 Jul 2019
Photo