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Twins Acquire Chris Carter

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https://www.mlbtrade...ris-carter.html Should this be interpreted as bad news on Mauer?
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Article: The Evolution of Jose Berrios

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La Makina – The Machine. Jose Berrios’ moniker is best applied to his work rate. Follow Berrios on social media in the off-season and you...
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Article: A Whole New LoMo

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At the end of March, Logan Morrison was looking like a bad signing for the Minnesota Twins. He was struggling at the plate and he didn’t...
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Article: MIN 6, DET 0: Lynn Shows Will to Win

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Lance Lynn pitched his best game in a Twins uniform to date, and looked like he was about ready to punch himself in the face in frustrati...
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Twins Daily Roundtable: Romero's Rotation Spot

Twins Daily Roundtable is a new weekly series. As part of this series, a question will be posed to the site’s writers and they will respond in 200 words or less. This will give readers an opportunity to see multiple points of view and then add their own point of view in the comments section.

Fernando Romero versus Shohei Ohtnai certainly lived up to the hype on Sunday. That being said, Ohtani knows his spot in the rotation will continue to be safe. Romero doesn’t have that luxury with players like Ervin Santana and Trevor May returning to the roster in the days ahead.

Minnesota could find themselves with quite the decision. This week’s roundtable question is “What should happen to Fernando Romero when Ervin Santana returns?”
Image courtesy of Orlando Ramirez-USA TODAY Sports
Nick Nelson
Unless Romero experiences some sort of major backslide, his name shouldn't even factor into the discussion of rearranging to accommodate Santana's return. Right now the rookie right-hander looks like the Twins' best starter, and until that changes he needs to stick.

Given the lack of long-term investment in them, Lance Lynn and Jake Odorizzi should be atop the pecking order. But with Erv likely a month away, the rotation landscape will probably look quite a bit different by the time he's ready.

Seth Stohs
So, presumably Santana may be back in mid-June, so about a month from now. That's plenty of time for things to work themselves out, as they almost always do. Someone will need to be placed on the DL, a younger guy will be struggling.

But, if that answer had to be made today, it would be difficult. At least somewhat difficult. Jake Odorrizi and Kyle Gibson aren't going anywhere. Jose Berrios is struggling right now, but he's not going back to AAA (subject to change if he's still struggling in a month. And, no one wants to hear it, but Lance Lynn isn't going to be dropped now (again, maybe in a month if he's still not throwing strikes).

So, maybe the Twins should go the way of the Angels and use a 6-man rotation and treat Romero like Ohtani and the rest of the rotation works around the Romero schedule (purpose being to limit his innings).

Fortunately, that answer doesn’t need to be made today. However, Trevor May could return from the DL in two weeks, and roster/rotation construction could get very interesting then.

John Bonnes
Ervin Santana or no, Fernando Romero needs to stay in the Twins rotation right now. The only reason not to do so would be to limit his innings for the first half of the year in order to use them in the latter half, and specifically the playoffs, so let’s chart that out a little.

Following his Tommy John surgery, Romero pitched 90.1 innings in 2016 and 125 innings in 2017. He should likely be limited to ~150 innings in 2018. With his upside and injury history, stretching beyond that is just plain foolish.

So let’s do the math. He’s at 37.2 innings right now, so that leaves about 115 innings. There are 126 games left in the season, so approximately 25 starts. Over his last three years, he’s averaged about 5.1 IP per start, which would be 133.25 innings, which means he would likely miss his last four starts if he makes every start. Assuming the Twins also want him available for a couple of playoff starts, that means shaving off 3-6 starts.

That might be easy if he ends up on the DL at some point, so no need to panic now. So keep him in the rotation for now, with a plan to ease up on the innings mid-summer if he stays healthy and effective.

Tom Froemming
Fernando Romero’s a 23-year-old who’s never thrown more than 125 innings in a season. Ervin Santana’s a 35-year-old who’s recovering slower than expected from a major finger surgery. Neither of those guys sound like somebody you can rely on to pitch into October.

My short-term answer would be to insert Ervin into the rotation and piggyback him with Romero out of the bullpen in each of his starts. Santana is going to need some time to catch up, so you work him in slowly. It’s likely that an injury would open up a spot for Romero eventually, but let’s just say that doesn’t happen. In that case, I say once Ervin’s up to speed you roll out a six-man rotation. I think both Ervin and Romero could use the extra rest.

The hope would be you keep everyone healthy and get fresher pitchers for the stretch run/playoffs. The fear would be altering the routine of everyone in your rotation would also result in everyone falling apart. Personally, I think a team like the 2018 Twins is perfect for such an experiment.

Ted Schwerzler
Fernando Romero has been electric for the Twins in the early going. There's also the reality that it's been a very small sample size and the volatility with rookies is generally off the charts. That being said, he's a special talent and I've rated him highly on prospect reports given his potential to be the Twins ace for many years to come. Right now, I think it's hard to worry about what to do when Ervin Santana returns and in large part, because that timetable is so murky. Lance Lynn could turn things around by then, someone may be hurt, or another pitcher could falter.

If we're still having to look for answers to this question when Santana is a week out, I think then it becomes a bigger talker. Until then, Paul Molitor has to hope for continued strong outings from his full staff and go from there. I do know that as the pitching crunch continues to come down the pipe, Phil Hughes and his remaining contract money is looking more and more like a big bite for the front office to swallow (but a necessary one).

SD Buhr
Short of something dramatic happening in a Fernando Romero start before Ervin Santana is deemed healthy enough to join the Twins rotation, I think it’s obvious what you do with Romero at that point. You send him out there to pitch in his Twins jersey every fifth day.

The question becomes, what do you do with the other guys?

Maybe one of them joins (or replaces) Phil Hughes in the Twins bullpen until one of the other rotation members falters or gets injured, but you simply do not take a guy who is literally allowing no opponent to cross home plate out of the rotation in a season where you’re honestly trying to win your division.

I suspect the situation will resolve itself the way these things so often do. A starting pitcher that has given up a run or two more than they’d like to see will suddenly suffer an “impingement” in his throwing shoulder or a “strain” in his arm, necessitating a 10-day stint on the DL.

Poof! Problem solved.

Jeremy Nygaard
There are still a few starts to be had by Romero before decision time, but as of now you can't take him out of the rotation. There's also a doubleheader on June 5 that would require a sixth starter or pitching a guy on short rest later that week. Having too many capable starting pitchers is never a problem... and it won't be here either.

Short answer: He should stay in the rotation.

Andrew Thares
I think Fernando Romero needs to stay in the MLB rotation upon the return of Ervin Santana. If everyone in the rotation stays healthy, I don't think a six-man rotation is a bad thing for a few reasons. First, for Romero's sake, it would help the Twins limit his innings this year, as he has never thrown more than 125 in a season. Second, it will help keep everyone in the starting rotation fresh throughout the season as they get an extra day's rest between each start.

Next, the Twins don't have a front-line ace in their rotation, so it's not like they will be taking starts away from someone like a Max Scherzer or Corey Kluber. Finally, someone else in the rotation will inevitably get hurt, and when that happens the rotation can simply go back down to a five-man rotation without skipping a beat.

Jamie Cameron
Right now, we are evaluating Romero's initial performance through rose-colored glasses, and rightly so. He's been dominant against two really good teams. He's likely to run into bumps in the road as teams adjust and see him more. If he keeps pitching the way he has been, there's no way the Twins, who have less margin for error after a difficult start, can push him out of the rotation. I don't think it's debatable, even at this early stage, that he has the best stuff on the team. Right now, Lance Lynn is the odd-man out (performance wise) in the Twins rotation. This decision likely depends largely on what the Twins decide to do with Phil Hughes. Are the likely to cast aside an arm who is making $26 million over the next two seasons? I'm doubtful, although that's absolutely what they should do from a baseball standpoint.

I think it's likely that the rotation logjam works itself out naturally. The chances of the Twins starting staff staying injury free seems unlikely, in which case Romero stays occupying.


Ultimately, I think it's hard to argue that right now, the optimal Twins rotation would be: Santana, Berrios, Romero, Gibson, Odorizzi. We'll see what happens at the end of May, but Romero has undeniably provided some much needed spark and swagger to this pitching staff.

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60 Comments

There is no evidence that limiting innings growth prevents injuries.* If he pitches well, he should stay in the rotation.

Unsure about a six man rotation. I'd probably move Lynn to the bullpen, but I wouldn't disagree with a six man rotation if they go that way.

*The verducci effect is bunk. And no, we aren't taking about going from ten innings to two hundred.


I have a really hard time saying it's totally bunk. Just because it hasn't been conclusively proven, does not by any stretch mean it's been debunked. A guy following an incremental innings program blowing his arm isn't proof that it's never been an effective strategy for anyone.

I find it hard to accept that it's not true to some extent. Especially for guys throwing as hard as Romero.

It's like running, or anything else. You have to condition your body over a long period of time. Sure, maybe the act of throwing extra innings in a vacuum isn't a precursor to injury. But, if your body isn't conditioned for that load, you compensate, which opens you up for injury elsewhere. For example, if you're not feeling 100%, and may not get the explosion off the mound you normally would, you may try and horse you're way through the delivery with your back/shoulder/arm a little more.

There's just no way of knowing "it's bunk." People point to past, and to the higher number of blowouts now, but it wasn't the same back in those days. Pitchers didn't throw as hard, didn't throw as much in the offseason in a lot of cases, weren't as muscular and were more flexible, etc. It's nearly apples to oranges.

I'm not a proponent of of shutting him down at say, 150 innings. However, considering his upside and potential long-term value, I wouldn't be comfortable ramping him up to 200+ innings this year.
    • DocBauer, IndianaTwin and Andrew Thares like this

I have a really hard time saying it's totally bunk. Just because it hasn't been conclusively proven, does not by any stretch mean it's been debunked. A guy following an incremental innings program blowing his arm isn't proof that it's never been an effective strategy for anyone.

I find it hard to accept that it's not true to some extent. Especially for guys throwing as hard as Romero.

It's like running, or anything else. You have to condition your body over a long period of time. Sure, maybe the act of throwing extra innings in a vacuum isn't a precursor to injury. But, if your body isn't conditioned for that load, you compensate, which opens you up for injury elsewhere. For example, if you're not feeling 100%, and may not get the explosion off the mound you normally would, you may try and horse you're way through the delivery with your back/shoulder/arm a little more.

There's just no way of knowing "it's bunk." People point to past, and to the higher number of blowouts now, but it wasn't the same back in those days. Pitchers didn't throw as hard, didn't throw as much in the offseason in a lot of cases, weren't as muscular and were more flexible, etc. It's nearly apples to oranges.

I'm not a proponent of of shutting him down at say, 150 innings. However, considering his upside and potential long-term value, I wouldn't be comfortable ramping him up to 200+ innings this year.


I don't think anyone is or would argue against your main point there. Mike is arguing against an arbitrary number, with no thought given to other variables - aside from, he threw x innings last year, so he has to only throw y innings this year.

And Romero would have to make 29 MORE starts this year to get to 200 total innings. That ain't happening, obviously.

 

Pretty lame how many didn't answer the question by saying "Something will happen next two weeks to make the decision for you."

Even if that's true, answer the dang question. What do you do if they're all healthy? I only heard two good ideas:

 

1.) Lynn to the pen. He knows he has two weeks, if not he's pen bound.

2.) Six man rotation. This maybe makes you cut Hughes but that's something you might just have to do.

 

But overall, answer the question.

 

 

The question was: “What should happen to Fernando Romero when Ervin Santana returns?

 

Well... The latest estimates are Mid-June for Ervin. This makes it an extremely easy can to kick down that road. 

 

But if you want an answer? Based on what is going on right now on May 16: 

 

It's pretty easy... 4 guys are locked and ain't going anywhere. Romero, Berrios, Odorizzi and Gibson are pitching well. So the choice comes down to Lynn and Santana and the way Lynn is pitching... it isn't much of a choice. 

 

May hasn't pitched in awhile and he has an option so you can extend your look at him in the minors to gauge how helpful he might be later when we need him. 

 

Santana is the guy that gets the last spot because Lynn is struggling hard. So... you drop Lynn into the pen and you cut loose Magill even though he would not deserve it. You would certainly be obligated to cut Magill with a sincere apology note and a strong letter of recommendation. 

 

Everyone is focused on the rotation but I think the 40 Man Roster space is going to be the bigger issue. You can move an arm into the bullpen to relieve the rotation pressure but who do you cut to make room May and Santana.  

 

Castro can go on the 60 day and this will allow May to be rostered. For Santana to be moved off the 60 and reinstated, someone has to go and there isn't an easy cut right now. Magill is the only guy you would consider setting free and that is real tough break for him because he is pitching like he wants to stay. 

 

Now... If you want the question answered with predictions of what the landscape will look like a month from now: What do you do between Santana and Romero based on the predicted landscape? I predict that someone will be placed on the D.L and both Santana and Romero will be in the rotation. :)

 

 

 

 

    • Dantes929 and DocBauer like this
First, this is a tremendous addition to TD! Can't believe it wasn't suggested before, unless I missed it somewhere.

I agree with the consensus that these things tend to work themselves out because ultimately SOMEONE gets injured and needs a DL stint. But ultimately, Romero is absolutely in the rotation. And I get the various IP arguements...and I spoke about this in another thread a week ago, somewhere, lol...but it still has to be a consideration. Now that the tsunami/winter apocalypse that would never end seems to have ended there will probably be at least a game or two PPD, plus the All Star break, not to mention September roster expansion for Romero to skip a start or two.

Can we be honest for a moment? It doesn't necessarily change his IP, but as talented as he is, Romero could hit a rough stretch which demands a return to Rochester to right himself. Hope it doesn't happen, but it's a real possibility.

Unless his finger injury is just some tremdous handicap, come on, Santana is a fine pitcher. He, Berrios, Romero, Gibson and Odorizzi is your rotation. May has time and options on his side, and the Twins side. Lynn....i just don't know right now. But right now, trade or release or bullpen, he's the od man out.

Sorry to be insensitive, but Hughes should have already been gone, freeing up a spot for someone else who can actually get guys out.

Liked the Lynn signing. Think most of us did. But Romero has arrived, or at least partially so, TBD. Santana will be back. Slegers, May, Gonsalves and Littrell wait in the wings. There is just no room for him, soon.

 

I have a really hard time saying it's totally bunk. Just because it hasn't been conclusively proven, does not by any stretch mean it's been debunked. A guy following an incremental innings program blowing his arm isn't proof that it's never been an effective strategy for anyone.

I find it hard to accept that it's not true to some extent. Especially for guys throwing as hard as Romero.

It's like running, or anything else. You have to condition your body over a long period of time. Sure, maybe the act of throwing extra innings in a vacuum isn't a precursor to injury. But, if your body isn't conditioned for that load, you compensate, which opens you up for injury elsewhere. 
 

But for running or anything else you don't build up and then shut down. To train for a marathon you don't build up to run 5 miles by July and then shut down until the end of the year and then next year build up to 10 miles by June and then shut down until the following year and then to 15 the following year and so on.  Ok, I don't run so maybe you actually do it that way but I am guessing not. If you say a pitcher needs to condition his arm or body over a long period of time with regards to throwing a 100 pitches or more I would think that is reasonable. Maybe the problem is the incremental increases in pitches or innings thrown inSpring Training from start to start is too high. Maybe optimally Romero is only throwing 70 pitches per start by this point and only builds to 100 by mid June.  I don't know what is optimal but that is the part I agree with you in terms of the need to condition the body. 

 

 " For example, if you're not feeling 100%, and may not get the explosion off the mound you normally would, you may try and horse you're way through the delivery with your back/shoulder/arm a little more."   

 

I agree with this completely and alluded to it in an earlier post. This is the part that should be monitored and has little to do with innings accumulated in a given year. It might happen after building up to 20 pitches or 80 pitches. It might happen after 50 innings or 150 innings. If a pitcher is doing this that is the time to skip a start and work on mechanics or just give the arm a rest for a few days. Not the time to shut them down completely.

    • DocBauer likes this
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IndianaTwin
May 16 2018 11:10 PM
First, I like the premise of this new series. I think it has the potential for some great discussions.


Second, I wrote a lot of this in today’s game recap thread, but it may fit better here.


A lot of the responses above use the “cut Hughes” language. Sorry, but I’m not ready to give up on him.


He’s retired 10 of 12 in his four one-inning stints in the pen, and thrown the vast majority of his pitches for strikes after less than 60 percent for strikes as a starter. Two strikeouts and no walks. The first two games were the ninth inning in blowouts, but Monday was the first time he was tested in a game that was still in the balance. He succeeded, getting three outs on nine pitches with the team down just 1-0 in the ninth. He had a strikeout and two weakly hit balls.


It’s true that the two batters he hasn’t retired in relief have each hit homers. But they were each solo, because he hadn’t allowed any other runners. Overall, I think he was probably able to leave each of the four outings with a sense that he had taken at least a small step forward.


Those are the incremental steps toward getting the confidence of your manager. I think he’ll get a few more outings in low-leverage situations, but if he is able to continue progressing, I could see him moving into the mix.


But to the original question, I think the bigger issue at this point is how much longer they can afford to run Lynn out there every five days. Most of the posts have also focused on the Santana question, rather than the May question. But May threw 58 pitches on the 12th — is he scheduled to go tomorrow night? Whenever he goes, I assume the goal is 75 pitches or so.


This front office has seemed to operate by making their decisions at the last possible minute. Witness the way they played day-by-day on when they actually had to roll out Hughes as a starter amidst the postponements. We didn’t have large amounts of lead time on the fact that Romero was going to get a start.


Put all those pieces together, and I could see the following. Lynn pitched today and May potentially tomorrow? With a Twins off day tomorrow, Lynn and May are essentially on the same scale. Eventually optioning May is a legit possibility, and I could see wisdom in that, but if May pitches well in the next two rehab starts and Lynn struggles (again) next Tuesday, I could also see making the switch to May on the 28th when he is eligible and Lynn’s turn comes around.


In other words, one more guaranteed start for Lynn. If he pitches well on the 22nd, he gets to stay around. If not, May on the 28th.


Then what do you do with Lynn? The optimist in me says that I think Hughes can work his way into the legit bullpen options group by then. The realist in me says that someone is going to get hurt or pitch their way back to Rochester. Either way, Lynn slots into the current Hughes role, seeking to regain his effectiveness in low-leverage situations. He wouldn’t be the first starter forced to make that transition. And if Hughes and Lynn could both actually make that transition, that has the makings of a deep pen!


Now back to the original question. If from the mix of Romero, Berrios, Odorizzi, Gibson, Lynn, and May, there are five that are pitching effectively, add Santana and go to six. If not, Santana replaces the fifth most effective.


If Romero isn’t among the top four, send him back to Rochester for a few starts and to protect innings, with the possibility of coming back as a starter if needed, or as reliever if not, since 150ish innings is likely the limit.


(And by the way, if somehow they get through a six-man rotation for a few turns and all are effective, that sounds like a trade brewing, with either Odorizzi or Lynn hitting the road for prospects.)


Finally, let’s remember that all of these options are better than last year’s choices!
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launchingthrees
May 17 2018 01:20 AM

I'd really hate to straight up drop a 29 year old with a 3.4 career era but Lynn has been that bad. I don't see any other option.

 

If Santana struggles mightily, which I expect,

 

Is there any evidence to suggest this as the most likely outcome for Santana?

Setting aside risk of injury for a moment the questions becomes one of effectiveness. I think you need to keep Romero’s innings low to make sure his arm is not fatigued come Sept/Oct. Really like the idea of piggybacking him with May initially, and then perhaps Santana does the same with Berrios for a while. After the all star break you can reassess and hopefully young and previously injured guys are ready for the stretch run. Interesting question whether that is a better strategy for keeping a guy fresh versus skipping a turn in the rotation now and then.
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Don Walcott
May 17 2018 04:39 AM
Why would innings be used to measure a pitcher’s work load? Why not pitch count? Some innings are 30 pitches and some are 10. Why would they be considered the same work load? Some guys need 100 pitches to get through 5 innings, while others get through 7. Is the more efficient pitcher putting more stress on his arm by getting more outs per pitch?
Since the question was based on who goes in the event nothing else changes, it would most likely be Magill. If it's not him it will probably be Romero. If its not Magill you have Lynn and Hughes in the pen, and Molitor will truly burn up the front end of the pen. Btw, kudos to the poster who pointed out the bad math trying to get by with a 6 man rotation. You still need the same size BP, and then your bench is really short.

Is there any evidence to suggest this as the most likely outcome for Santana?


Most likely outcome? Probably not. I believe he was giving his opinion.
I share that opinion.
Why? Surgery to the most important finger on his pitching hand. When the surgery was announced I said I didn't think he'd ever be the same pitcher again, as I think he'll struggle to find his feel for the slider.
As we're seeing with Lance Lynn (who was almost equally as bad last year, just extremely lucky- hence the lack of offers), some pitchers just aren't the same following major surgery.
It seems like everyone is so ready to bail on Hughes and put Lynn in his bullpen spot. Lynn’s ERA is almos a whole run worse than Hughes, and his WHIP is 2.04 to Hughes at 1.45 … so which one do you dump first. I’m not saying that right now either of them have a spot on a competitive team but please don’t replace bad with worse. Santana to the rotation, May to the bullpen if a rotation spot doesn’t present itself, 4 inning starts for Romero every other time out piggy backed with May and dump the dreck. Rogers may also be a replacement candidate and Gonsalves is looking good and could also spot start if Romero needs to skip a start or two along the way.

 

Most likely outcome? Probably not. I believe he was giving his opinion.
I share that opinion.
Why? Surgery to the most important finger on his pitching hand. When the surgery was announced I said I didn't think he'd ever be the same pitcher again, as I think he'll struggle to find his feel for the slider.
As we're seeing with Lance Lynn (who was almost equally as bad last year, just extremely lucky- hence the lack of offers), some pitchers just aren't the same following major surgery.

 

This is from an article written by Doctor of Physical Therapy, Lucas Seehafer, shortly after Santana's surgery in February:

 

 

All things considered, an MCP release with debridement is a pretty straightforward procedure and one that Santana should bounce back from. The healing process is rather long, but as long as full range of motion is returned, there shouldn’t be many, if any, lingering effects.

 

He doesn't seem to concur your Santana-career-threatening concerns. Are other journalists leaning your guys' way, I haven't heard of any to this point.

Give him Lynn's.

    • jun likes this
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howieramone2
May 17 2018 08:37 AM

 

Yeah, if demoting Romero is even considered, then the FO is still in building mode, and not in win mode.

This is silly. The handling of one player doesn't determine if a team is rebuilding or not. Romero still has to go thru the trials and tribulations most young starters have to go thru. No need to panic, these things have a way of working themselves out. Depth is a good thing.

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howieramone2
May 17 2018 08:45 AM

 

I'd really hate to straight up drop a 29 year old with a 3.4 career era but Lynn has been that bad. I don't see any other option.

He's not the only proven vet who missed a lot of ST having problems. At worst, we can get an arm and a leg for him at the trade deadline.

The question was: “What should happen to Fernando Romero when Ervin Santana returns?

Well... The latest estimates are Mid-June for Ervin. This makes it an extremely easy can to kick down that road.

But if you want an answer? Based on what is going on right now on May 16:

It's pretty easy... 4 guys are locked and ain't going anywhere. Romero, Berrios, Odorizzi and Gibson are pitching well. So the choice comes down to Lynn and Santana and the way Lynn is pitching... it isn't much of a choice.

May hasn't pitched in awhile and he has an option so you can extend your look at him in the minors to gauge how helpful he might be later when we need him.

Santana is the guy that gets the last spot because Lynn is struggling hard. So... you drop Lynn into the pen and you cut loose Magill even though he would not deserve it. You would certainly be obligated to cut Magill with a sincere apology note and a strong letter of recommendation.

Everyone is focused on the rotation but I think the 40 Man Roster space is going to be the bigger issue. You can move an arm into the bullpen to relieve the rotation pressure but who do you cut to make room May and Santana.

Castro can go on the 60 day and this will allow May to be rostered. For Santana to be moved off the 60 and reinstated, someone has to go and there isn't an easy cut right now. Magill is the only guy you would consider setting free and that is real tough break for him because he is pitching like he wants to stay.

Now... If you want the question answered with predictions of what the landscape will look like a month from now: What do you do between Santana and Romero based on the predicted landscape? I predict that someone will be placed on the D.L and both Santana and Romero will be in the rotation. :)


Every year people worry any the forty man, and every year they leave a ton of guys unprotected. And that's in the off season when teams are looking to add players. I'm not worried.

Pretty lame how many didn't answer the question by saying "Something will happen next two weeks to make the decision for you."

Even if that's true, answer the dang question. What do you do if they're all healthy? I only heard two good ideas:

1.) Lynn to the pen. He knows he has two weeks, if not he's pen bound.
2.) Six man rotation. This maybe makes you cut Hughes but that's something you might just have to do.

But overall, answer the question.

with the catching, third base and short stop situations as they are, Falvine can not afford to thin the bench any further.

Any rotation changes needs to be done at the expense of the bullpen.

Hughes has not been utilized in any way that relieves pressure from the pen and can’t be trusted to hold a lead.

If an injury doesn’t surface on the pitching staff, and the JP doesn’t give the OK to release Hughes, that bullpen will get stretched very thin.

 

with the catching, third base and short stop situations as they are, Falvine can not afford to thin the bench any further.

Any rotation changes needs to be done at the expense of the bullpen.

Hughes has not been utilized in any way that relieves pressure from the pen and can’t be trusted to hold a lead.

If an injury doesn’t surface on the pitching staff, and the JP doesn’t give the OK to release Hughes, that bullpen will get stretched very thin.

Perhaps it's a matter of argument. If you're arguing "release Hughes so we can get Buesnitz or Vargas up" it's maybe not as convincing "We need to release Hughes to get Santana into the mix."

    • Sconnie likes this

 

Every year people worry any the forty man, and every year they leave a ton of guys unprotected. And that's in the off season when teams are looking to add players. I'm not worried.

 

I'm not worried about losing Magill.

 

I just have a thing against removing players who are actually performing at the MLB level from the 40 man. 

 

However... when you get to the point where that is necessary. You can file it under "Good Problem to Have.". 

 

 

 

    • beckmt likes this

 

I really like Tom's suggestion.Piggy back him with Santana.Yes, that would mean one less arm in the bullpen.BUT, the entire bullpen would get a day off every 5 days.Just may work.

 

Begin with Romero going 5-6 innings with Santana coming in to finish it.After a few of those games, flip so that Santana comes in and pitches 5-6 innings with Romero finishing.If Romero only pitches 3+ innings every 5th day for the last half of the season, his innings should be fine and his arm fresh for the playoffs.

 

This was exactly the point I came here to make. Tom's idea seems like a great one - it limits the innings on both arms, and saves the bullpen every fifth day (in theory). At the cost of a bullpen arm who hardly gets used (insert thinly veiled cough masking Phil Hughes' name)- this makes a lot of sense. 

When Santana comes back, Hughes needs to be cut. When May comes back, either Rogers or Lynn needs to be demoted.

I'm not worried about losing Magill.

I just have a thing against removing players who are actually performing at the MLB level from the 40 man.

However... when you get to the point where that is necessary. You can file it under "Good Problem to Have.".


Why are we talking McGill? He's doing his job. There are other options.
    • beckmt and Danchat like this
About the 40-man -- in addition to Castro going on the 60-day DL, I could easily see LaMarre and/or Cave getting DFA'd. Plus Petit, as soon as Sano is back. Duffey is pretty expendable at this point too.
    • USAFChief, Riverbrian, beckmt and 1 other like this

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