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Recent Blogs


Top Ten Twins Prospects of the Decade

Each year, you can find Top Prospect rankings and articles for your favorite team. The national sites post them. Your favorite Twins bloggers will write up their rankings. Today, I thought it would be fun to take a look back at the Twins top prospects of this past decade. How would you rank them?
Image courtesy of Steve Buhr (photo of Byron Buxton)
While I am still working toward completing the 2020 Twins Prospect Handbook, I am putting together my official 2020 Twins preseason Top 50 prospect rankings. In the Handbook, you can see my official prospect rankings dating back over 15 years.

But I thought it might be fun to look back at the past decade and try to rank the top Twins prospects of the decade. To do so, I considered several sources. First and foremost, I looked at my Top 30 Twins prospect rankings from the last ten years. I also considered how the players ranked nationally. And then, I tossed in some opinion too.

I hope you enjoy the rankings, and just as much, I hope you have some good memories as you think back to prospects past, guys who made it and guys who didn’t. Let’s start with some guys who just missed the list:

Honorable Mention
  • Max Kepler - Baseball America ranked him #30 before the 2016 season. One of the best European players of all-time already, Kepler signed in 2009. His 2015 season was one of the best that I can recall.
  • Wander Javier - Signed to a $4 million signing bonus in 2015, he has shown talent and athleticism. He just hasn’t had the ability to stay on the field much. Baseball America ranked him #95 prior to the 2018 season.
  • Jorge Polanco - Another international signing from 2009, Polanco is the longest-tenured player in the Twins organization, a few days longer than Max Kepler. Polanco was signed as a smooth infielder, but when he reached Cedar Rapids, it was his bat that took off. Before the 2016 season, he ranked #99 by Baseball America.
  • Fernando Romero - Before the 2018, MLB.com ranked Romero the #68 prospect in baseball. He made his debut that season. He missed two years of development due to Tommy John surgery or it’s quite possible that he would have had more time to rank high nationally.
  • Brusdar Graterol - Like Romero, Graterol missed about two seasons due to Tommy John surgery, but when he came back, he was hitting triple digits and people noticed. After staying healthy throughout the 2018 season, he ranked #33 by Baseball Prospectus and #55 by Baseball America. He should rank high again in 2020.
  • Oswaldo Arcia - The Twins signed Arcia early. He put up huge numbers in the lower levels and then flew up the ladder. Baseball America ranked him #43 before the 2013 season. He hasn’t played in the big leagues since 2016. He’s just 28 years old.
  • Brent Rooker - The Twins liked Rooker enough to draft him twice. Since the 2017 draft, he has moved up the ladder very quickly and is at the cusp of the big leagues.Baseball America ranked him #92 before the 2018 season. He spent 2019 in Rochester.
  • Eddie Rosario - Rosario was the Twins fourth-round draft pick in 2010 and he has been hitting ever since. While Baseball American never put him in their Top 100, Baseball Prospectus ranked him #87 in 2012 and #60 before 2014.
  • Kohl Stewart - The fourth-overall pick in the 2014 draft was a Top 100 prospect by Baseball America, MLB.com and Baseball Prospectus before the 2014 and/or 2015 season, ranking 28th on BP’s pre-2015 rankings. He struggled to get strikeouts but limited damage. He signed with the Orioles earlier this week.
  • Joe Benson - Benson was the Twins 2nd round pick in 2006. A great athlete, he had great speed and power potential. He ranked 100th by Baseball American before the 2011 season and 99th before the 2012 season. He spent that September with the Twins and never got back to the big leagues.
  • Lewis Thorpe - The Twins signed him from Australia. Baseball Prospectus ranked him #101 in 2014 and #91 before the 2015 season. He missed the 2015 and 2016 seasons due to Tommy John surgery. Since his return, he has pitched well and debuted in 2019.
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#10 - Stephen Gonsalves

The Twins selected Gonsalves from his southern California high school in the fourth round of the 2014 draft. While he wasn’t a flamethrower, Gonsalves simply put up numbers. In Low A, he went 8-4 with a 1.96 ERA. He had 121 strikeouts in 91 2/3 innings. In Ft. Myers, he went 12-6 with a 2.48 ERA. In 145 innings, he struck out 121 batters. In AA, he went 19-4 with a 2.35 ERA. He had 213 strikeouts in 184 innings. In AAA, he went 10-6 with a 3.46 ERA. He had 119 strikeouts in 125 innings. He went 2-2 with the Twins late in the 2018 season. He missed most of 2019 with forearm and elbow issues. The Twins tried to sneak him through waivers after the season, but the New York Mets claimed him. Before the 2017 season, he ranked #99 by Baseball America. A year later, he ranked #97. MLB.com ranked him #78 before the 2018 season.

Seth Rankings: 2014 (13), 2015 (15), 2016 (6), 2017 (1), 2018 (2), 2019 (10)


#9 - Nick Gordon

Gordon was the Twins top pick, fifth overall, in the 2014 draft. Along with genetics, he has a lot of talent. He’s got a smooth, line-drive swing and uses the whole field well. He’s athletic. He’s not as fast as his brother Dee, but he does have a little more power (though not much). He had a solid season in Rochester in 2019. Unfortunately he missed a lot of time with a knee injury. Prospect rankings love him. He was a Top 100 prospect before the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 seasons. He ranked #33 by MLB.com before the 2015 season. He ranked #35 by Baseball Prospectus before the 2018 season.

Seth Rankings: 2015 (4), 2016 (4), 2017 (4), 2018 (3), 2019 (12)


#8 - Kyle Gibson

Gibson was the Twins first-round draft pick in 2009 (21st overall) out of Missouri. He made his pro debut in 2010 and pitched in Ft. Myers, New Britain and Rochester. He was on the verge of his big league debut. Before the 2011 season, Baseball America ranked him as the #34 prospect in baseball. Unfortunately, in late 2011, he had Tommy John surgery. He returned late in 2012. Before the 2013 season, Baseball America ranked him #68. Baseball Prospectus ranked him #64 and MLB.com had him ranked #49.

Seth Rankings: 2010 (5), 2011 (1), 2012 (7), 2013 (6)


#7 - Aaron Hicks

Hicks was the 14th overall pick in 2008. He began appearing on prospect rankings in 2009. His prospect status peaked before the 2010 season when Baseball America ranked him #19 and Baseball Prospectus ranked #26. While he dropped out of the Top 100 before the 2012 season, he jumped back in before the 2013 season when he made his MLB debut. His combination of power and speed with a big arm and great centerfield defense made him intriguing to the Twins and scouts around the game. It took a little time for it to come together, but it certainly did.

Seth Rankings: 2010 (1), 2011 (3), 2012 (4), 2013 (5)


#6 - Alex Meyer

It was well known that the Nationals really wanted Denard Span from the Twins, enough that they were willing to deal former first-round pick Alex Meyer straight-up for him following the 2012 season. At the time, Meyer was a consensus Top 100 prospect. At 6-9 with a fastball in the upper-90s, teams knew he was raw but had potential to become a top-of-rotation starter. A year later, he ranked even higher, and before the 2015 season, he was the 14th prospect (overall) by Baseball Prospectus. He pitched in four games for the Twins before being traded at the July 2016 deadline. He retired from baseball after a series of shoulder injuries after the 2019 season .

Seth Rankings: 2013 (4), 2014 (3), 2015 (6), 2016 (14)


#5 - Alex Kirilloff

Kirilloff was the Twins top pick in 2016 (15th overall) out of high school. MLB.come ranked him #98 after that season, but he missed the 2017 season due to Tommy John surgery. He returned in 2018 and put together one of the best minor league seasons you’ll ever see, splitting his season in half between Cedar Rapids and Ft. Myers. He hit for average (.348) and power (44 doubles, 7 triples and 20 home runs). Before the 2019 season, MLB.com ranked him #9 while Baseball America ranked him at #15.

Seth Rankings: 2017 (3), 2018 (5), 2019 (2),


#4 - Jose Berrios

Berrios was the Twins supplemental first-round draft pick (#32 overall) in the 2012 draft. While he was a high draft choice, he was seen as a very raw prospect. Some saw him as a back-of-rotation starter. But as Berrios continued to put up strong numbers throughout the minor leagues, and his workouts became well known, his prospect status rose. He was Top 100 by MLB.com and Baseball Prospectus. Before the 2015 season, all three national sites put him in their Top 50 prospects and kept him there before the 2016 season too. MLB.com and BP ranked him in their Top 20 before 2016.

Seth Rankings: 2013 (8), 2014 (7), 2015 (3), 2016 (2)

Posted Image
photo by Steve Buhr


#3 - Royce Lewis

Lewis was the first overall pick in the 2017 draft out of JSerra High School. He put up strong numbers that summer between the GCL and Cedar Rapids. Before the 2018 season, he ranked between #20 and #27 in the three national rankings. In 2018, he put together a strong season between Cedar Rapids and Ft. Myers, helping both to the playoffs and the Miracle to a Florida State League title. He showed he can play shortstop, hit and hit for power. Before the 2019 season, he was Top 10 in each. MLB.com ranked him highest at #5. He struggled with the bat in 2019, so he’ll likely drop some in the rankings, but he will still be in the Top 50 and should be much higher.

Seth Rankings: 2018 (1), 2019 (1)


#2 - Miguel Sano

The Twins signed Sano in October 2009 from the Dominican. He was already the star of a documentary telling his unusual story and making him a known commodity around the baseball world. Before even playing a game as a pro, Baseball Prospectus ranked him #35. Even after missing the 2014 season with Tommy John surgery, Sano remained one of baseball’s top prospects. Baseball America ranked him in their Top 100 each year from 2010 through 2015. Four of those years he was Top 20, and twice he was in their Top 10. Baseball Prospectus also ranked him six straight seasons. He never got into their Top 10, but three of the years he ranked between 12 and 14. Lowest they ranked him was #31. MLB.com didn’t add him to their Top 100 until before the 2012 season. At that time, he ranked #23. Before the 2014 season, he reached #4 in their rankings. What made Sano so intriguing was his power potential, and we certainly have seen that!

Seth Rankings: 2010 (3), 2011 (2), 2012 (1), 2013 (1), 2014 (2), 2015 (2)


#1 - Byron Buxton

Byron Buxton was the second overall pick in the 2012 draft out of high school in Georgia. Buxton was as toolsy as any player or prospect. He hit. He had some power. He played elite defense and had a strong, powerful arm. Not only did he have all the tools, but he put up huge numbers. In 2013, he hit .334 with 19 doubles, 17 triples and 12 homers between Cedar Rapids and Ft. Myers. He also stole 55 bases. Baseball America named him the minor league player of the year. Before the 2014 season, he was the consensus #1 prospect in baseball. He continued to impress as he climbed the ladder. Before the 2015 season, he ranked #1 by MLB.com and BP while Baseball American ranked him #2. Before the 2016, he ranked #2 across the board. In 2017, he won the American League Platinum Glove Award. In 2019, we saw him put it all together for the first half of the season. When he is healthy, he is as talented and impactful as any player in baseball … not named Mike Trout, of course.

Seth Twins Rankings: 2013 (2), 2014 (1), 2015 (1), 2016 (1)


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So there you have it… My Top 10 Twins Prospects of the Decade. What do you think? It really is an impressive group of prospects and many of them (and some of the Honorable Mentions too) have achieved success in the big leagues.

Another theme is that the Twins have seen injuries affect so many of these players’ careers. Tommy John for pitchers and hitters. But the Twins have had a lot of talent and still more talent on the way.

How would you rank these prospects? Did I miss anyone?

  • SD Buhr, mikelink45, puckstopper1 and 3 others like this

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20 Comments

Looks like you’ve pretty well nailed things.  It’s not like there is a real clunker in the Top 10!  I mean the book is out on Gordon but he’s not done yet.

 

I wouldn’t mind seeing a write up of the best Twins minor leaguers, based on their stats, who never had more than a brief stay in the majors (not just the Twins...so guys that we gave up and did well elsewhere don’t count).  Guys who we were dying to call up but when we did they just faded.

 

 

Dang Gonsalves's minor league numbers are impressive. He seems to walk a lot of guys, which most likely is what hurt him in his brief stint with the Twins, but for some reason, a non flamethrower, you'd think that something like that would be fixable?? Seems weird to me that as pitching starved as the Twins are that they would have protected him??
    • mikelink45 likes this

Man, some of those names bring back some great memories of watching them in Cedar Rapids, either as members of the Kernels or, as with Sano, Rosario and Arcia, as Beloit Snappers when they'd come to town for a series.

 

No qualms with your rankings, given that they're based on each guy's prospect status, as opposed to actual performance, either as a minor leaguer or at the MLB level. Does show that prospect ranking is certainly not an exact science and that being highly ranked is no guarantee of MLB success... though it certainly has to be considered highly predictive.

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MMMordabito
Dec 31 2019 09:48 AM

How does Southern League MVP Max Kepler not beat out Gordon and Gonsalves? Neither ever achieved his national ranking high.

 

If it weren't for Flash and Dee, this would have never happened.

 

Wait are you trying to build prospect helium, so that Gordon counts for more points on the trade simulator.

    • Heistyman likes this

Have to wonder how things would've turned out for Arcia under different management. 

 

How does Southern League MVP Max Kepler not beat out Gordon and Gonsalves? Neither ever achieved his national ranking high.

 

If it weren't for Flash and Dee, this would have never happened.

 

Wait are you trying to build prospect helium, so that Gordon counts for more points on the trade simulator.

 

Kepler was only ranked in the national publications one year, and Gordon was ranked essentially just as high as Kepler's BA ranking by both mlb.com and BP at some point.Gordon was more highly regarded as a prospect for longer, maybe it was never correct but it was true.

 

Gonsalves never really ranked very highly nationally, so I would probably bump him to the honorable mentions to put Graterol somewhere on this list, who will probably be ranked in the 30-50 range for the second consecutive year.

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MMMordabito
Dec 31 2019 10:39 AM

 

Kepler was only ranked in the national publications one year, and Gordon was ranked essentially just as high as Kepler's BA ranking by both mlb.com and BP at some point.Gordon was more highly regarded as a prospect for longer, maybe it was never correct but it was true.

 

Gonsalves never really ranked very highly nationally, so I would probably bump him to the honorable mentions to put Graterol somewhere on this list, who will probably be ranked in the 30-50 range for the second consecutive year.

 

You make a good point, but Kepler didn't have the benefit of being a first round pick that just automatically got ranked high without ever producing.

Biggest major league surprise has to be Polanco, who has been excellent despite never gaining much national recognition as a prospect. 

 

Biggest MLB bust is probably Meyer, though that was in large part due to injury.Jury is still out on Gordon and Stewart, though they are looking like busts too.

    • Danchat likes this

Thanks for putting this together, Seth. It's a real trip down memory lane!

Are there any players who stand out to you who should have been ranked differently in hindsight (either by you, or nationally)? To me, it's surprising looking back that Kepler and Polanco weren't ranked higher nationally. Maybe it's a home team bias, but I was always high on those two.

 

Have to wonder how things would've turned out for Arcia under different management. 

Arcia will always be a big "what if" to me. Guy could mash, and did nothing but hit in the minors.

But I don't think it's a management issue. If it was, he would have caught on with another org. Instead, I think it's that baseball is really, really, hard. It's a game of inches, and a fraction of a second can make all the difference. Sometimes guys get tantalizingly close, but can't get over the last, toughest hurdle, for whatever reason. It's totally possible there was a way Arcia was mishandled that I'm missing, and I'm not a mechanics guy, but that's my thinking.

    • SwainZag and mikelink45 like this

Nice work Seth.

This was really fun and it is a reminder of how hard it is even for those with amazing talent like Mr. Benson to make the jump to MLB.Some fascinating names and good stories.

Thanks for the feedback and thoughts. I enjoy reading them too. 

 

As mentioned, Kepler was only top 100 (Top 50) one year, and deservedly so. Gordon's been ranked high all along, for whatever the reason. 

 

Dang Gonsalves's minor league numbers are impressive. He seems to walk a lot of guys, which most likely is what hurt him in his brief stint with the Twins, but for some reason, a non flamethrower, you'd think that something like that would be fixable?? Seems weird to me that as pitching starved as the Twins are that they would have protected him??

He just doesn't have the stuff to get MLB hitters out, his fastball barely touched 90 and his breaking balls don't generate enough swings and misses. Add injuries to that, and he's a non-prospect at this point. 

 

His minor numbers were always good, but there have been tons of guys who have crushed the minors but don't have what it takes to challenge MLB players, and I think he's one of them. It's a shame, especially since he was Twins Daily's #1 prospect at one point.

Looking at top ten prospects in the rear view, how can you not consider the best ones, regardless of the supposed experts and talking heads proclaimed pedigree and spin, are/were actually the ones that made it to the show and how well they performed at the highest level? That is the only thing that makes a prospect actually good, is that they weren't worthless at the highest level in the show, and became an MLB player. You can bypass all the mistakes and bad choices you made in real time. Kepler and Rosario don't even make the top 10 of the decade? It is like continuing to hang onto the hype instead of the reality, even when you have better, more complete info to judge from now. Kepler was one of the top five, even if you missed it/didn't see it while it was happening.

Looking at top ten prospects in the rear view, how can you not consider the best ones, regardless of the supposed experts and talking heads proclaimed pedigree and spin, are/were actually the ones that made it to the show and how well they performed at the highest level? That is the only thing that makes a prospect actually good, is that they weren't worthless at the highest level in the show, and became an MLB player. You can bypass all the mistakes and bad choices you made in real time. Kepler and Rosario don't even make the top 10 of the decade? It is like continuing to hang onto the hype instead of the reality, even when you have better, more complete info to judge from now. Kepler was one of the top five, even if you missed it/didn't see it while it was happening.


Any time you want to quantify something you need a standard to use to measure it. Obviously the standard and measurement going on in this exercise is not about who was the best player but who were the highest regarded prospects coming up through the system and Seth’s ratings appear to be based on how they were rated as they came up and not who ended up being the best. (Obviously with Alex Meyer ahead of the guys you mentioned)

It seems to me that looking back on it in this way could help a person examine their own perceptions and how they rate prospects so as to improve their ability to rate prospects in the future. I know I have over rated some (fine, many) prospects in the past and under rated others. That’s why I’m not a scout or even have my own site where people come to read my prospect lists.

Seth, I appreciate how well you do with these ratings you give us and your continued efforts to improve your skill at accurately assessing prospects. With how you have done in the past and how highly you’ve rated Lewis so far, I am excited to see him make it to the bigs.
    • SQUIRREL and Melissa like this

Looking at Seth's list of Top Prospects of the decade got me wondering who the many many promising names were in the system over the last ten seasons. I tend to follow John Sickels' look at prospects. So here is my view of his listed propects of the Past Decade.

 

Mitch Garver and Stu Turner showed up multiple times. Always wondered which of the pair would breakout with the Twins. One ended up with the Reds. Should also note that Wilson Ramos was in the mix in the beginning of the decade. And Josmil Pinto was there, too. Both Ryan Jeffers and Ben Rortvedt are the future.

 

Standout infield prospects were, of course, Miguel Sano and Jorge Polanco. But others appearing multiple times were Chris Parmelee, Lewin Diaz, Travis Harrison, Travis Blankenhorn, Wander Javier, Royce Lewis, Brent Rooker and the most – Nick Gordon. Other promising names were Danny Valencia, Levi Michael, Brian Dozier, Nico Goodrum, Danny Santana, Kennys Vargas, Amaurys Minier, Jeremaine Palacios, Andrew Bechtold, jose Miranda, Keoni Cavaco, Yunior Severino and Luis Arraez.

 

The decade started with the name of Ben Revere in the outfield. Eddie Rosario and Max Kepler were dominate listed top prospects, and with numerous listings the likes of Aaron Kicks, Joe Benson, Oswaldo Arcia, Nate Roberts, Angel Morales, LaMonte Wade, Adam Walker, Byron Buxton, Alex Kirilloff. Then we have guys like Trevor Larnach, Zack Granite, Gilberto Celestino, Gabriel Maciel, Misael Urbina, Matt Wallner and Luke Raley also making notice.

 

Pitchers getting recognized multiple times are Kyle Gibson, Kohl Stewart, Stephen Gonsalves, Billy Bullock, Adrian Salcedo, Carlo Gutierrez, Tom Stuifbergen, Alex Meyer, Tyler Robertson, Alex Wimmers, Manuel Soliman, Zach Littell, Bruster Graterol, Fernando Romero. Nick Burdi, Tyler Jay, Ryan Eades, Jose Berrios, Trevor May, J.T. Chargois, Zack Jones, Michael Tonkin, Lewis Thorpe and Blayne Enlow.

 

But also seeing listings were Ben Tootle, David Bromberg, Matt Bashore, B.J. Hermsen, Anthony Slama, Matt Hauser, Hudson Boyd, Pat Dean, Bruce Pugh, Kane Holbrooks, Liam Hendriks, Jeff Manship, Matthew Summers, Deolis Guerra, Lester Oliveros, Chase de Jong, Gabriel Moya, Felix Jorge, Huascar Yona, Adalberto Mejia, Chih-Wei Hu, Jake Reed, Michael Cederoth, Bailey Ober, Jhoan Duran, Chris Vallimont, Griffin Jax, Jorge Alcala, Jordan Balazovic, Luke Bard, Mason Melotakis, D.J. Baxendale, Corey Williams, John Curtsis, Tyler Kinney and Matt Canterino. Lots of intresting names there.

 

What I also found interesting was the number of people NOT CONSIDERED top prospects that did make the Twins in the last decade: Taylor Rogers, Willians Astulido, Dietrich Enns, Andrew Vasquez, Sean Poppen, Cody Stashak, Trevor Hildenberger, Pat Light, Tyler Duffey, Devin Smeltzer, Chris Hermann, Alex Burnett, Luke Hughes, Aaron Slegers, Randy Rosario, Caleb Thielbar, Kyle Waldrop, Rene Tosoni, Jeremy Beresford, Logan Darnell and Rob Delaney.

 

So many names over the decade. Interesting to see the number of people that do make the cut, considered possible future major league talent, and there is a story behind every name that doesn't make it.

    • SQUIRREL likes this

Looking at Seth's list of Top Prospects of the decade got me wondering who the many many promising names were in the system over the last ten seasons. I tend to follow John Sickels' look at prospects. So here is my view of his listed propects of the Past Decade.
 
Mitch Garver and Stu Turner showed up multiple times. Always wondered which of the pair would breakout with the Twins. One ended up with the Reds. Should also note that Wilson Ramos was in the mix in the beginning of the decade. And Josmil Pinto was there, too. Both Ryan Jeffers and Ben Rortvedt are the future.
 
Standout infield prospects were, of course, Miguel Sano and Jorge Polanco. But others appearing multiple times were Chris Parmelee, Lewin Diaz, Travis Harrison, Travis Blankenhorn, Wander Javier, Royce Lewis, Brent Rooker and the most – Nick Gordon. Other promising names were Danny Valencia, Levi Michael, Brian Dozier, Nico Goodrum, Danny Santana, Kennys Vargas, Amaurys Minier, Jeremaine Palacios, Andrew Bechtold, jose Miranda, Keoni Cavaco, Yunior Severino and Luis Arraez.
 
The decade started with the name of Ben Revere in the outfield. Eddie Rosario and Max Kepler were dominate listed top prospects, and with numerous listings the likes of Aaron Kicks, Joe Benson, Oswaldo Arcia, Nate Roberts, Angel Morales, LaMonte Wade, Adam Walker, Byron Buxton, Alex Kirilloff. Then we have guys like Trevor Larnach, Zack Granite, Gilberto Celestino, Gabriel Maciel, Misael Urbina, Matt Wallner and Luke Raley also making notice.
 
Pitchers getting recognized multiple times are Kyle Gibson, Kohl Stewart, Stephen Gonsalves, Billy Bullock, Adrian Salcedo, Carlo Gutierrez, Tom Stuifbergen, Alex Meyer, Tyler Robertson, Alex Wimmers, Manuel Soliman, Zach Littell, Bruster Graterol, Fernando Romero. Nick Burdi, Tyler Jay, Ryan Eades, Jose Berrios, Trevor May, J.T. Chargois, Zack Jones, Michael Tonkin, Lewis Thorpe and Blayne Enlow.
 
But also seeing listings were Ben Tootle, David Bromberg, Matt Bashore, B.J. Hermsen, Anthony Slama, Matt Hauser, Hudson Boyd, Pat Dean, Bruce Pugh, Kane Holbrooks, Liam Hendriks, Jeff Manship, Matthew Summers, Deolis Guerra, Lester Oliveros, Chase de Jong, Gabriel Moya, Felix Jorge, Huascar Yona, Adalberto Mejia, Chih-Wei Hu, Jake Reed, Michael Cederoth, Bailey Ober, Jhoan Duran, Chris Vallimont, Griffin Jax, Jorge Alcala, Jordan Balazovic, Luke Bard, Mason Melotakis, D.J. Baxendale, Corey Williams, John Curtsis, Tyler Kinney and Matt Canterino. Lots of intresting names there.
 
What I also found interesting was the number of people NOT CONSIDERED top prospects that did make the Twins in the last decade: Taylor Rogers, Willians Astulido, Dietrich Enns, Andrew Vasquez, Sean Poppen, Cody Stashak, Trevor Hildenberger, Pat Light, Tyler Duffey, Devin Smeltzer, Chris Hermann, Alex Burnett, Luke Hughes, Aaron Slegers, Randy Rosario, Caleb Thielbar, Kyle Waldrop, Rene Tosoni, Jeremy Beresford, Logan Darnell and Rob Delaney.
 
So many names over the decade. Interesting to see the number of people that do make the cut, considered possible future major league talent, and there is a story behind every name that doesn't make it.


Thank you for that review!

One question, we’re these based on top 10 lists or top 20?
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Richard Swerdlick
Jan 02 2020 07:03 AM

The more I read Twins Daily, the more intrigued I am with the minor league prospects and the development process. Thank you so much for your minor league coverage. This year I will subscribe to MILB TV and watch 1-2 games a week of AAA and/ AA ball. Should be fun.

    • SQUIRREL, Sconnie and Melissa like this

 

Thank you for that review!

One question, we’re these based on top 10 lists or top 20?

Top 20!

 

    • goulik likes this

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