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Target Field Ranked #7 in MLB in Craft Beer Offerings

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In The Best Shape of Their Life!

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Recent Blogs


Offseason Underway: Twins Make Flurry of Moves

The Minnesota Twins' offseason officially kicked off on Monday, with the club announcing several significant roster moves.

Nelson Cruz will be back, Martin Perez will not (at least not on the same contract), and Jake Odorizzi faces a tough decision. Meanwhile, another key instructor was extracted by another (dreaded) team, and a pair of former top pitching prospects exited the organization.

Read on for more detail on each of these developments as the Hot Stove begins to spark.
Image courtesy of David Berding-USA TODAY Sports
NELSON CRUZ 2020 OPTION ACTIVATED

This barely qualifies as news. Activating the ultra-reasonable $12 million club option on Cruz was a total no-brainer, and the club's intention had already been announced via media reports. Nevertheless, it's now official: Boomstick is back.



MARTIN PEREZ 2020 OPTION DECLINED

Around the middle of May, the decision to activate Perez's team option in 2020 looked about as obvious Cruz's does now. Through his first eight starts he put up a 2.17 ERA, pairing a standout cutter with eye-catching fastball velocity, but it was all downhill from there. He posted a 6.17 ERA the rest of the way and was left off the ALDS roster.

The Twins are exercising a $500,000 buyout on the southpaw's $7.5 million option for next year, so he'll enter free agency.

I wouldn't rule out the possibility of Perez coming back on a one-year deal as a reliever (lefty batters hit just .228/.291/.294 against him this year), but the Twins clearly need to aim higher for the rotation.

QUALIFYING OFFER EXTENDED TO JAKE ODORIZZI

Coming off a breakthrough season, Odorizzi is poised to hit the open market, but the Twins now have an inside track on retaining him. By making him one of 10 free agents to receive a qualifying offer, the Twins have placed the ball in Odorizzi's court – he can either accept a one-year deal worth $17.8 million, or reject it and negotiate with other teams. Should he sign elsewhere, Minnesota will receive valuable draft pick compensation. Should he find the market underwhelming with this stipulation, the Twins gain leverage as the only team that won't lose a pick by signing him. Carl Pavano's 2010-11 offseason exemplifies such a scenario.

It really could go either way with Odorizzi. On the one hand, $17.8 million is a lot of money (especially for a guy who's made around $20 million total in his MLB career), and accepting the QO would enable him to hit free agency unencumbered next winter. On the other hand, he's coming off an All-Star season, and he's still under 30. This might be his best chance to shop himself and score a career-making payday. If his market isn't hot, I assume the Twins would be amenable to a longer deal that makes sense for both sides (we suggested three years, $36 million in the Offseason Handbook). Either outcome puts the team in a favorable position. Odorizzi has 10 days to decide.

Michael Pineda was not extended a qualifying offer, so he'll head to free agency with no hindrance other than the 39-game ban carrying over from this year.

STEPHEN GONSALVES CLAIMED BY METS

Minnesota tried to sneak the lanky left-handed pitching prospect through waivers, but weren't so lucky. Though his entire 2019 season was basically washed out by elbow issues, Gonsalves – Twins Daily's No. 4 prospect as recently as spring of 2018 – has a 2.50 ERA and 9.6 K/9 rate in the minors. He showed some intriguing signs during an altogether inconspicuous MLB debut last year. It's a bummer to lose him for nothing.



But it's also not a shocking or controversial call by the front office. The elbow issues are concerning and likely to linger. Even beyond that, there have always been questions about the viability of his middling fastball against big-league hitters. Turning 26 next season, he isn't young by prospect standards.

There's certainly a chance the Twins could live to regret this, but they can mitigate that risk by aggressively pursuing high-caliber arms to replace Gonsalves and his enduring promise.

KOHL STEWART OUTRIGHTED, ELECTS FREE AGENCY

And there goes one of the most painful busts in franchise history. Drafted with the No. 4 overall pick in 2013, at a time where the Twins desperately needed a transcendent pitcher to reverse their sagging fortunes, Stewart never developed into anything more than a mediocre sinkerballer, incapable of missing bats or consistently throwing strikes anywhere above rookie ball. He departs Minnesota with a 4.79 ERA and 1.47 WHIP in 62 big-league innings.

Stewart isn't totally hopeless. He's still only 25 and a very good athlete. His outstanding ability to induce grounders is a building-block skill. Maybe a change of scenery will turn him around but the Twins could no longer justify giving him a 40-man spot.

CATCHING COORDINATOR POACHED BY YANKEES

Amidst this flurry of roster maneuvering, it was a non-player personnel move that hit me hardest today. Per Zone Coverage's Brandon Warne, Twins catching coordinator Tanner Swanson is leaving the club to join the Yankees (UGH) as Major League Catching and Quality Control Coach.



I've always heard good things about Swanson. My appreciation for him grew upon reading Parker's excellent spring training feature on his efforts to refine Mitch Garver's receiving technique, only to be crystallized as I saw those efforts pay off magnificently during the summer. Swanson is the real deal, and another tough loss in a young offseason that has already seen Minnesota lose hitting coach James Rowson and minor-league hitting coordinator Pete Fatse.

If there's any silver lining to be found in this scavenging by rivals, it's that having baseball powerhouses like Boston and New York hiring out of your ranks says a lot about your eye for talent. The Twins' newly reassembled baseball ops unit is becoming a hotbed, and that's about the highest praise you could give Derek Falvey as he enters his third year on the job.

(Speaking of which, let's us all just breathe a sigh of relief that Minnesota has evidently missed the biggest potential bullet: I wondered openly if the Red Sox would come calling on Falvey to replace fired GM Dave Dombrowski – turns out they did, and he said no.)

How are you feeling about this smattering of moves to kick off Twins' offseason? Anything you'd have done differently? Sound off in the comments.

And now an odd request from the Twins Daily community: if you found this page via Facebook, can you please add a comment telling us from which Facebook Page you followed it? It's getting quite a bit of traffic, and we would love to know who is sharing it. Thanks.

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83 Comments

So, are you saying its a reasonable expectation that they acquire impact players without trading top prospects or are you saying we should trade top prospects? It has to be one or the other.


I guess it depends on the meaning of impact. A decent relief pitcher would make an impact for this team. A number four innings eater would. I think those can be had without trading a top 80 prospect.

You can also get good players if you will take their contract, though I have no idea if any are available this year. And, good players can be acquired by trading multiple good prospects.

I'm also saying for the right player, is consider dealing any prospect. But that would be a unique, player by player, decision.

And, other teams have other needs.... Where they might be able to get a corner outfielder for a good prospect or three. The Twins don't need one of those.

Also, I'm saying there are no absolutes, like some here insist.
    • birdwatcher, Twins33, Danchat and 3 others like this

Ryan Pressley, Nick Anderson and Liam Hendricks sure could have helped the pen this past season.

I don't know much about Nick Anderson probably because we didn't get a look at him so that could be a strike against the FO. I don't agree on the other two. Hendricks was a marginally talented AAAA type starter that I was ok with letting go. That he was reinvented for what so far is a super small run of success in the pen doesn't move the needle for me at all. Pressly was an undeniable talent who couldn't seem to quite harness it and was equal parts inconsistent and maddening. They moved him for a good return while he had his world turned upside down and was jolted into some changes and a good run. Hey you can't win them all and the jury is still out on the trade anyway. Meanwhile the Twins three years in look as good from any perspective as any of us have seen (ok maybe not starting pitching at this moment). Now that they've got their bullpen manufacturing department in full swing we'll have plenty of young bullpen arms to trade for talent going forward!
    • birdwatcher likes this
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Kelly Vance
Nov 06 2019 01:20 PM

It is not as simple as "trade prospects or don't trade prospects" or "Trade veterans or acquire veterans."

 

There is usually a lot of reasoned calculated thinking involved.Would be contending teams with a glaring need at the MLB level should look to fill that hole with an established veteran who is likely to work out.When you are close to making the playoffs one or two veteran presences can make the difference.Case in point, our own Marwin Gonzalez.This is even more the case with established front line starters like Verlander. In those cases prospects are most valuable, not for their future contribution, but for what they can bring in a trade.

 

On the other hand, teams that are several players away, need to evaluatetheir upcoming talent and plan for the future. Like the White Sox currently.In those cases, an established stud is more valuable for what he can bring in the way of prospects that are likely to pan out in the show, a little bit downstream.

 

To me, the overriding factor is that, if you are close, there are only 9 spots on the field... 9 positions.You need your best 9. If you have a hole in your lineup, you are not likely to make the post season.And when trading for or moving prospects, you can't evaluate the trade right away. It usually takes a couple years at least.Nobody thought Frankie, Joe or Boof etc were all goingto pan out but the FO. If one or two worked out it was a fair trade. AJ was established so SF knew what they were getting. In hindsight they would not have made the trade, but it seemed like the thing to do at the time. 

 

The Twins are in a "future is now" position. Prospects are not just valuable for what they may contribute in 2 or 3 years, but in what they may bring right now by way of a trade. But that assumes that the Twins would go "all in" to win a Series.Houston decided to do that. We all know how that worked out for Steinbrenner. Like him or hate him, he played to win and win now. 

 

The Twins have traditionally valued low salary prospects more highly than a big market team would. We can understand that. But now that they are at thewindow of opportunity, they should try to capitalize on a solid core and make their move. That line of thinking means moving top prospects for a key difference maker or two. 

    • birdwatcher, Mike Sixel, diehardtwinsfan and 4 others like this
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birdwatcher
Nov 06 2019 06:17 PM

 

No one said sure fire. I responded to a post that said no mid market team ever trades prospects to get better when they aren't already good. I merely pointed out one team that does.

No one said it always works.... What we've said is that prospects don't either, and maybe trading them sometimes is a good idea... No one said it will always work.

 

 

I get that, Mike. I was simply pointing out that "saying hi to Milwaukee" as an example of a team that got better has a longer and much more complex story that may not turn out well for the organization. I applauded the Yelich trade, like I applauded the Verlander and Cole trades. But somehow, Milwaukee is now showing some strains, which I pointed out with facts. More facts have surfaced now, including trading Chase Anderson and his $8M cost. 

 

I remember having some of the very same types of discussions about the Detroit Tigers back when they emptied the farm system and strained their financial capacity. I remember that it paid off, but my point back then and is now that if my team's FO decides against a boom and bust approach, like the Red Sox have done and the Brewers have done, I can fully understand that. Falvey is trying to avoid having any of the three pillars, MLB, farm, and cash, crumble on him. In short order, he's strengthened this organization on all three fronts. I think he'll solve the pitching problem here too.

    • Riverbrian likes this
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birdwatcher
Nov 06 2019 06:29 PM

 

I don’t get this statement at all. Aguilera wasn’t established as anything in 1989. He was a swingman on a stacked Mets pitching staff. Viola was the reigning AL Cy Young winner. Also, Aguilera was traded WITH Tapani (and David West and Jack Savage) FOR Viola.

 

 

My bad on the facts, and it's a crappy example anyway for showing a good prospect haul for a veteran, even if the Twins won the trade of Viola for those good years of Aggie and Tapani. Frankie had some good years too.

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diehardtwinsfan
Nov 06 2019 06:35 PM

 

No argument here but and I am pretty confident there is not a person on this board that would object to any trade similar to the Yelich or Odorizzi trade. However, do those examples really support the type of trade practices being promoted here? Are the trade prospects advocates promoting trading for another Odorizzi? It sure seems to me that that the demand of these posters is to trade for top of the rotation SPs and/or elite BP arms. Those are not acquired without a very steep prospect price. Many posters have written that they would trade any prospect including Lewis / Kirilloff Graterol and Balazovic for player X? Using not trading Gonsalves to support what they really want is misguided. Trading Gonsalves or Stewart after his 1st couple years in the minors was not bringing an established impact player.

 

Are you really going to suggest another Odorizzi trade is the basis of this argument? That’s not what’s been argued here so it makes no sense to use this as an example. The Yelich example would be great if you could substantiate that it is not an anomaly. The twins and every poster here would never argue such a trade but to use that as the basis of supporting trading prospects at every opportunity is not exactly an objective argument. You are basically suggesting our strategy should be to engage in the practice of extremely lopsided trades. We would all love to make another AJ Perzinski which BTW demonstrates Lopsided trades also favor the team trading away the established player just as often as the reverse. Just ask Pittsburg how they feel out trading for Chris Archer.

 

Let’s debate the same question.

 

The Odorizzi trade was a good one, but let's not forget that he wasn't the same Jake in his first season here. It took 2/3rds of that season for him to figure it out. 

 

This is my big problem with any "project" or buy low guy. You're going to have to give him innings. There's a lot of risk there that it doesn't pan out for several months, like Odorizzi, or once MLB hitters adjust, like Perez... 

 

Those games cost wins, and just because the windows is open doesn't mean that we should sleep on Cleveland or Chicago. 

 

They really need to spend some cash and get some difference makers. 

    • SQUIRREL and birdwatcher like this

Gonsalves was an interesting move, unless the Twins know more than others do. If he is not a reliable alternative for 2020, then I guess adios is fine. But at some point you ask if his upside still wasn't above say, Hildenberger, Harper, Wisler or Poppen...not to mention Romero (who needs to be on the roster in 2020).

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birdwatcher
Nov 06 2019 07:21 PM

 

Exactly, prospects are cool but parades are cooler.

 

 

Yep, we all agree with that, and most of us also realize that the streets are clear in 29 out of 30 cities the day after the WS.

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birdwatcher
Nov 06 2019 07:40 PM

 

The Twins front office does though...

 

 

Nonsense IMO. ;)

 

Falvey isn't Ryan. And he's got more talent than Ryan often had. Falvey traded 3 40FV prospects and a 45FV prospect at the deadline. Boston has 5 45FV prospects in their whole system. 

 

Time to ditch that tired old trope. It ain't ringin' as true these days.

I get that, Mike. I was simply pointing out that "saying hi to Milwaukee" as an example of a team that got better has a longer and much more complex story that may not turn out well for the organization. I applauded the Yelich trade, like I applauded the Verlander and Cole trades. But somehow, Milwaukee is now showing some strains, which I pointed out with facts. More facts have surfaced now, including trading Chase Anderson and his $8M cost.

I remember having some of the very same types of discussions about the Detroit Tigers back when they emptied the farm system and strained their financial capacity. I remember that it paid off, but my point back then and is now that if my team's FO decides against a boom and bust approach, like the Red Sox have done and the Brewers have done, I can fully understand that. Falvey is trying to avoid having any of the three pillars, MLB, farm, and cash, crumble on him. In short order, he's strengthened this organization on all three fronts. I think he'll solve the pitching problem here too.

Of course, there is a long list of teams that never had any success lately. I'd rather show strain, than be Pittsburgh or Cincinnati, for example. As I was told over and over under the previous GM... Mid market teams can't sustain success over a super long period, because they draft later and their players get too expensive to keep. That will likely happen to Milwaukee, sure. But that's what you and others told me was the natural cycle of the game.
    • Hosken Bombo Disco likes this

 

I get that, Mike. I was simply pointing out that "saying hi to Milwaukee" as an example of a team that got better has a longer and much more complex story that may not turn out well for the organization. I applauded the Yelich trade, like I applauded the Verlander and Cole trades. But somehow, Milwaukee is now showing some strains, which I pointed out with facts. More facts have surfaced now, including trading Chase Anderson and his $8M cost. 

 

I remember having some of the very same types of discussions about the Detroit Tigers back when they emptied the farm system and strained their financial capacity. I remember that it paid off, but my point back then and is now that if my team's FO decides against a boom and bust approach, like the Red Sox have done and the Brewers have done, I can fully understand that. Falvey is trying to avoid having any of the three pillars, MLB, farm, and cash, crumble on him. In short order, he's strengthened this organization on all three fronts. I think he'll solve the pitching problem here too.

 


 

 

If you drain the farm you'll have to go to the market for your ingredients. You'll have no choice. 

 

The Brewers are now critically low on Barley and Hops but they had a couple of impressive keg parties.:)

 

 

 

 

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birdwatcher
Nov 06 2019 10:21 PM

 

Of course, there is a long list of teams that never had any success lately. I'd rather show strain, than be Pittsburgh or Cincinnati, for example. As I was told over and over under the previous GM... Mid market teams can't sustain success over a super long period, because they draft later and their players get too expensive to keep. That will likely happen to Milwaukee, sure. But that's what you and others told me was the natural cycle of the game.

 

Times have changed.

 

It's hardly disputable that the Twins have enjoyed a radical improvement in revenues, and that has allowed guys like me to argue that this team could AND SHOULD spend upwards towards $150M on payroll if they need to, WHEN doing so adds the last piece or two. Like, say, 2020 for the first time. They spend an average amount currently, but you wouldn't think that was the case if you read a lot of the comments on TD, including a great number of yours. A dozen teams spend less. Target Field has helped.

 

There were times in the not-so-distant past when they could have spent another $50M on FA talent (one year cost) and still would have been short a half dozen players, meaning it would be fruitless if the goal was a division title. I pushed back on blanket statements about spending, still do, always will. I say, connect the dots between the expenditures you think they should make and that elusive WS. How much have the odds improved?

 

Even though the league has evened the playing field with limits and pools, a half dozen clubs have the capacity to outspend the average team like the Twins by $50M on payroll alone. Alas, even the biggest spenders, teams like WSN, BOS, HOU are paring back, and fretting about their lack of prospect talent and unfavorable draft order and IFA allottments when success can be so fleeting at the MLB level. Again, my argument is that a strategy of maintaining relative strength by avoiding financial strain and farm system depletion makes sense.

 

You mention CIN and PIT. Both clubs HAVE felt financial strain, PIT in 2018, CIN today after a $25M bump in payroll expense. Both clubs are below average in MLB. CIN has an average pipeline at best.

 

Now more than ever, a favorable draft order will improve a team's health very quickly because the success rate among the top few prospects has skyrocketed. For example, Detroit's farm system is ranked #8 by FanGraphs, up from #23 two drafts ago. Which is why the strategy of no MLB fire sales, available cash, strong IFA capabilities, careful and assertive FA moves, and active, opportunistic trading makes sense.

 

The boom/bust thing is treacherous these days IMO. It's more a problem of expensive players declining (Price) than becoming too expensive, although that problem exists too of course. Boston is unloading Mookie Betts and is choking on its payroll costs while sporting the worst prospect pipeline in all of baseball. They won't like their Vegas odds either.

 

 

    • Major League Ready likes this
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Aerodeliria
Nov 07 2019 02:47 AM

I don't know how they would manage it (or if it's even possible), but I would love to get Livan Moinelo (Cuban) from the Softbank Hawks. He's a 21-yr old lefty and he was used constantly in high leverage situations. He throws a four-seamer with some pop, a splitter, a disappearing slider, a lollipop curve (which almost always freezes hitters) and he has a tremendous change-up.

    • birdwatcher likes this
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Aerodeliria
Nov 07 2019 03:35 AM

Of course there will be some Japanese players posting. Tsutsugo is posting for sure (I would say "X.") I am afraid he'll have trouble adjusting and we have heard that Tetsuto Yamada is almost certain to follow suit. I would say "O" for Yamada who is a very talented player--good hitter and very athletic. Unfortunately, neither are pitchers.

The Brewers are now critically low on Barley and Hops but they had a couple of impressive keg parties.:)

So, they switch to Budweiser's recipe. Problem solved.

    • SQUIRREL, USAFChief, birdwatcher and 1 other like this
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Battle ur tail off
Nov 07 2019 09:54 AM

 

Nonsense IMO. ;)

 

Falvey isn't Ryan. And he's got more talent than Ryan often had. Falvey traded 3 40FV prospects and a 45FV prospect at the deadline. Boston has 5 45FV prospects in their whole system. 

 

Time to ditch that tired old trope. It ain't ringin' as true these days.

 

What the hell does FV mean? He traded prospects that were way down the depth chart in our system. Wake me up when a difference maker is brought in and "gasp" they have to give up an actual MLB starting level player to get him. 

 

 

 

 

Times have changed.

 

It's hardly disputable that the Twins have enjoyed a radical improvement in revenues, and that has allowed guys like me to argue that this team could AND SHOULD spend upwards towards $150M on payroll if they need to, WHEN doing so adds the last piece or two. Like, say, 2020 for the first time. They spend an average amount currently, but you wouldn't think that was the case if you read a lot of the comments on TD, including a great number of yours. A dozen teams spend less. Target Field has helped.

 

There were times in the not-so-distant past when they could have spent another $50M on FA talent (one year cost) and still would have been short a half dozen players, meaning it would be fruitless if the goal was a division title. I pushed back on blanket statements about spending, still do, always will. I say, connect the dots between the expenditures you think they should make and that elusive WS. How much have the odds improved?

 

Even though the league has evened the playing field with limits and pools, a half dozen clubs have the capacity to outspend the average team like the Twins by $50M on payroll alone. Alas, even the biggest spenders, teams like WSN, BOS, HOU are paring back, and fretting about their lack of prospect talent and unfavorable draft order and IFA allottments when success can be so fleeting at the MLB level. Again, my argument is that a strategy of maintaining relative strength by avoiding financial strain and farm system depletion makes sense.

 

You mention CIN and PIT. Both clubs HAVE felt financial strain, PIT in 2018, CIN today after a $25M bump in payroll expense. Both clubs are below average in MLB. CIN has an average pipeline at best.

 

Now more than ever, a favorable draft order will improve a team's health very quickly because the success rate among the top few prospects has skyrocketed. For example, Detroit's farm system is ranked #8 by FanGraphs, up from #23 two drafts ago. Which is why the strategy of no MLB fire sales, available cash, strong IFA capabilities, careful and assertive FA moves, and active, opportunistic trading makes sense.

 

The boom/bust thing is treacherous these days IMO. It's more a problem of expensive players declining (Price) than becoming too expensive, although that problem exists too of course. Boston is unloading Mookie Betts and is choking on its payroll costs while sporting the worst prospect pipeline in all of baseball. They won't like their Vegas odds either.

 

I admit I literally have no idea what this post has to do with Milwaukee and the fact that they have a less good farm system now that they've traded for some real MLB players. Like, I have no idea

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Battle ur tail off
Nov 07 2019 09:59 AM

 

My original point was that GMs of average or below average teams all have proven to value prospects much more than Chief and some others here so I won't totally disagree. However, we should take a practical look at how trading lower ranking prospects would impact this team at the moment. Which position players could be upgraded without trading a top prospect? Maybe 1st base but is that how you would suggest we use top prospects? Are we going to get impact pitching without trading a top prospect? Can you give me an example of how you would acquire impact players without trading one of our top 5? The only way I see that happening is to take on a big contract and I am not sure who that would be.

 

I would love to see another Odorizzi type deal. The Mike Minor idea that was mentioned is good. I would think the cost would be outside the top 5 given he only has 1 year of control. I am on board with anyone who is advocating we find this type of trade.  

 

 

Our 5-10 ranked prospects in our system would be worth a fair amount IMO. Packaged up, there is no doubt in my mind they could bring back a player in the mold of Chris Archer, or someone of that stature. 

 

I don't believe trading these type of guys is a good idea all the time. Far from it. But when you are in the position the Twins find themselves in now. Young team/lineup on cheap deal, ready to contend, minor league full of talent, I think it's time to use a few of them to add those missing pieces and attempt to take things all the way. 

 

Will it be risky? Sure, of course it is. That said, if you see your team as that true contender and have that chance, it only comes around once every 10 years or so as we have seen by following this club. Just go ahead and go for it. If you have to move some of your veterans in a few years to re-stock, then by all means go ahead. The time is now though, the iron is hot. Let's not waste this chance. 

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birdwatcher
Nov 07 2019 10:24 AM

 

What the hell does FV mean? He traded prospects that were way down the depth chart in our system. Wake me up when a difference maker is brought in and "gasp" they have to give up an actual MLB starting level player to get him. 

 

Palacios was way down the depth chart, and he fetched Odorizzi. The team went from 78 to 101 in 2019. Odorizzi was a difference maker. Palacios, as I recall, was a 35+ or 40FV. 

 

Is your point that they should have given up one of the shortstop prospects that was higher up the depth chart? Or any prospect, as long as it was one higher up the depth chart?

 

Or is your point that Odorizzi was not a difference maker?

 

Or is it your hope that they peddle one of their starting MLB players and create a hole? I mean, they weren't THAT talent-rich. Many of us were dismayed by the Pressly trade and were against the idea of trading Kepler when that idea got helium here.

 

2020 may be the first year in a long long time when a starter becomes redundant, and that may not happen before August.

 

If your point is that, this off-season, they should shoot even higher than Odorizzi, I'm not sure anyone reading this thread would disagree with you. 

 

It just seems on one hand you're complaining that they didn't do something they actually did, which is to trade valuable prospects like Palacios, Lewin Diaz, Jaylin Davis, Berroa, and Teng, and on the other hand you're complaining about something they have not done, before they even have a chance to not do it.;)

 

They promised to pursue "impact pitching". Let's give them a chance to show us. 

 

You can go to the FanGraphs web site to read up on what the hell FV means.

 

101 wins.  

    • Major League Ready likes this
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birdwatcher
Nov 07 2019 10:41 AM

 

I admit I literally have no idea what this post has to do with Milwaukee and the fact that they have a less good farm system now that they've traded for some real MLB players. Like, I have no idea

 

 

My condolences.;)

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birdwatcher
Nov 07 2019 10:47 AM

 

Our 5-10 ranked prospects in our system would be worth a fair amount IMO. Packaged up, there is no doubt in my mind they could bring back a player in the mold of Chris Archer, or someone of that stature. 

 

I don't believe trading these type of guys is a good idea all the time. Far from it. But when you are in the position the Twins find themselves in now. Young team/lineup on cheap deal, ready to contend, minor league full of talent, I think it's time to use a few of them to add those missing pieces and attempt to take things all the way. 

 

Will it be risky? Sure, of course it is. That said, if you see your team as that true contender and have that chance, it only comes around once every 10 years or so as we have seen by following this club. Just go ahead and go for it. If you have to move some of your veterans in a few years to re-stock, then by all means go ahead. The time is now though, the iron is hot. Let's not waste this chance. 

 

 

Concur 100%, as do most other contributors here, and as does Falvey.

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Battle ur tail off
Nov 07 2019 10:54 AM

 

Concur 100%, as do most other contributors here, and as does Falvey.

 

Thanks and I agree with most of what you say as well. I just am not of the belief that there should be players or prospects that are off limits when it comes to improving a team such as this that has a real chance with a roster full of young talented ballplayers. 

 

If that means as Ace comes at the hand of trading one of our top 3 guys, then do it as long as you have someone on your MLB roster already manning their position. 

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So, they switch to Budweiser's recipe. Problem solved.

 

Wisconsin will never go for that! 

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birdwatcher
Nov 07 2019 02:05 PM

 

Thanks and I agree with most of what you say as well. I just am not of the belief that there should be players or prospects that are off limits when it comes to improving a team such as this that has a real chance with a roster full of young talented ballplayers. 

 

If that means as Ace comes at the hand of trading one of our top 3 guys, then do it as long as you have someone on your MLB roster already manning their position. 

 

 

Yeah, we're in agreement. I think there's this misconception out there that prospect-lovers like me believe prospects like Lewis should always automatically be off-limits, and that's not the case, for me or IMO for Falvey. 

 

Rumors were flying about Syndergaard, a borderline Ace in the minds of some, becoming available. True or not, it was rumored they asked for both Lewis and Kirilloff, and a number of commenters thought that would be a smart trade for the Twins. I can see that side, although I think it can be clouded by our frustration and desire for a WS experience. I also see the side that says Lewis and Kirilloff represent huge upgrades at two positions for years to come, with one of them projected to become a superstar, and therefore are necessary, not surplus.

 

Falvey was criticized for failing to outbid NYM for Stroman. TOR received two pitching prospects, a 1st and 2nd rounder, who now rank as their 4th and 5th best prospects. A comparable offer from the Twins would probably have been Duran and Balazovic. I suppose many might see that as a good trade-off. I can see and tend to be inclined toward the argument that, given the fleeting nature of pitching performances and the difficulty with finding front end talent, a club would really have to have great confidence that the acquisition would secure a long run in the postseason and be a big upgrade on the current options (Pineda and Gibson at the time).

 

Two sides to the argument, surely. IMO, Falvey is attuned to all of this and is willing to pull the trigger under what he regards as favorable circumstances.

 

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Major League Ready
Nov 07 2019 02:34 PM

 

Our 5-10 ranked prospects in our system would be worth a fair amount IMO. Packaged up, there is no doubt in my mind they could bring back a player in the mold of Chris Archer, or someone of that stature. 

 

I don't believe trading these type of guys is a good idea all the time. Far from it. But when you are in the position the Twins find themselves in now. Young team/lineup on cheap deal, ready to contend, minor league full of talent, I think it's time to use a few of them to add those missing pieces and attempt to take things all the way. 

 

Will it be risky? Sure, of course it is. That said, if you see your team as that true contender and have that chance, it only comes around once every 10 years or so as we have seen by following this club. Just go ahead and go for it. If you have to move some of your veterans in a few years to re-stock, then by all means go ahead. The time is now though, the iron is hot. Let's not waste this chance. 

 

The only place we differ here is that I don’t think a trade headlined by our 6 or 7th best prospect brings back an impact player.The only thing we are missing is impact pitching. We don’t need any position players and SP has historically been crazy expensive in terms of prospects. You know teams were asking for the moon last deadline based on the pitching that did not get traded.

 

This is not to say we can’t improve the team trading #6-30 but I just don’t see any such trade being a difference maker unless we take on a hefty contract but who would that be?

Someone brought up Mike Minor. I really like that idea because I am thinking he can be had without giving up the top 5. I would be curious to see what others think it would take to get him.


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