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Hey, is there a game tonight? Game thread 9/25/18

Minnesota Twins Talk Today, 08:38 PM
Nice job by Moya pitching around the Adrianza error. And once again worth remembering, yes Detroit is this bad.
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2019: The Nature, Organization, Augmentation of the Rotation

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There are currently a number of posts...as we near the end of the 2018 season...from the FO (positive and negative), to Buxton, to rookie...
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Article: First-Round Flops or Unfinished Projects?

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As a rebuilding team in desperate need of pitching, you can't really afford to miss on arms with two top-10 picks in the draft in three y...
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I'm Yawning...

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  Maybe I'm burned out on the horrible season the Twins had this year or maybe its apathy, but this is the first time in many years...
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2018 Vikings In Season Thread

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This is correct, they would lose cap room next year. He's going to stay on the team, the question is what role should he have. I'd li...
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Recent Blogs


Learning Leadership from Chris Gimenez

The Minnesota Twins have watched their 2018 season of promise turn towards a different direction, and now ramble on towards a close. Over the course of the year adversity has been a common theme, and in dealing with it, a monumental struggle. When building out a 25-man roster talent obviously reigns supreme, but the addition of personalities able to influence the human element in the optimal way is of the utmost importance as well.
Image courtesy of © Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports
Looking back on the offseason, it’s hard not to reminisce about how much talent was acquired through the dollars that were spent. A potentially unconsidered caveat however, is that the amount of one-year deals handed out played out counter-productively within the clubhouse. That sentiment has been offered by a few different publications, and the return of Matt Belisle was noted heavily as one rooted in veteran leadership.

As a team takes shape, leadership is a quality that is both formed and earned. Despite being outside of the organization for the vast majority of the year, Chris Gimenez carries a strong reputation for being a veteran leader. When looking to discuss how that leadership impacts the game, a conversation with the Twins backstop seemed imperative. I was able to ask him a handful of questions, and he provided plenty of insight as to what level of impact can be made when the fans aren’t watching.

Twins Daily: We often hear of "veteran leadership" as a term tied to why a player may be acquired. How is that defined for you? Is it a vocal thing, lead by example, or something entirely different?

Chris Gimenez: Veteran leadership is all the above! It’s absolutely a vocal thing, it’s being able to see things and either address it with the individual or in a group setting. The veterans are the ones that have been there and done that and have either failed or succeed and now are there to offer advice or just lead by example a lot of times!

TD: In assembling a 25-man roster, how important is it to have a true leadership presence. Is lacking in that area something that can be debilitating to a clubhouse?

CG: In putting together 25 guys one of the most over looked but most important aspects of a team is the leaders! It would be like going into battle but without a plan of attack. Not having someone in that locker room to lead is absolutely debilitating. I’ve often found that the leaders of the clubhouse are the guys who do not play every day! They can see things from a different perspective and are often able to address things.

TD: You've obviously been in plenty of big-league clubhouses, and now on two separate Twins teams. What are some of the most important takeaways from how a team comes together in your time as a professional?

CG: Teams often really come together around the first month of the season or the first real hardship you encounter. A lot of times the 25 guys that start the year together haven’t had much time together in spring training. Getting guys in the clubhouse joking around having fun on the ball field is what creates that. We often do team dinners on the road to get guys together and hang out off the field. It’s great for building relationships and having all the guys on the same page. All teams are different in how they come together ultimately, but these things help that along a bit. Leaders are integral in facilitating things like this on and off the field.

TD: It's probably a little bittersweet going from a contender to a team with no postseason chances this season. When something like that happens how do your personal goals change? What are you looking to bring to Minnesota over the final month?

CG: You are right anytime you move down in the standings it’s not ideal, but honestly, I think it was the perfect move for me. This place has really felt like home and what we accomplished last year was nothing short of spectacular. When a group of guys believe in each other it can become a very powerful thing. My goal for the rest of the season is to help wherever I can. Through the twists and turns of a season the team has gotten a lot younger, which is a good and bad thing. My job now is to be a vocal leader in the clubhouse to show these guys how to go about their business daily. Show these guys what it means to be a good teammate and a big leaguer! I will help young pitchers in the video room, catch pens, and give feedback. I’ll also help young hitters with the in-game adjustments they will have to learn to make. Most importantly, I’ll be the guy who shows everyone how to have fun and know that’s ok to do as well!

TD: Over the course of your career, you've been employed under both Thad Levine and Derek Falvey at multiple stops. What can you tell us about them as executives that fans may not see or know?

CG: Thad and Derek are very smart guys. I know that’s not breaking news, but I think you can expect a very forward-thinking front office. I know they have a plan, and last year might have altered that a bit, but they are very smart and knowledgeable in what they do. Derek has a great eye for pitching so that should be one area to look forward to as they move forward. Thad is great with people and relationships as well as advanced metrics. The plan might have been reset a bit this year, so I think you will still see a competitive team but some young kids getting valuable experience.

TD: As a veteran, you've crafted your game over a significant portion of time. Mitch Garver is playing through his rookie year this season and has seemed to progress nicely from early on. What's your assessment of him in the time you've spent working together?

CG: First off, Garv has made big strides this year behind the plate! I think we all knew it was in there and the bat plays but Jason getting hurt this year kind of thrust him in there to learn on the fly and he has done a great job. He needs to continue studying hitters, and I’ve been really impressed with his ability to formulate and execute a game plan! This year has been a long one for him, and this last month can really get to you physically if you’re not used to it. Because of that, he will be better prepared in the future as well. I think there is a lot to like about Mitch in the very near future, and I won’t be surprised when he is a very good big-league catcher and has a long, great career.

TD: Finally, having been a part of two Twins teams going in opposite directions, what do you think is the biggest factor in turning it around for 2019? Injuries and unfortunate situations have reared their head this year, but where does the biggest area of opportunity lie?

CG: Health will always be a big part of the next year. Loosing Erv really hurt as the anchor of your staff wasn’t there. He’s the guy that was supposed to lead by example out there every fifth day. I also think some next steps from a few core players will help that as well. I really like some of the bullpen pieces we have for the future, as well as a few of the young starters. Continuing to sprinkle in guys to fill in the gaps will also help. I love the coaching staff in place, they do a great job with the young guys.


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55 Comments

I like the essay, but it raises many questions for me.Leadership is a real thing, but we hire a manager and 9 coaches to lead, we have Kelly, Morneau, Hunter, Hawkins, Cuddyer, and Kaat to provide insight and leadership. http://m.twins.mlb.c...roster/coaches/ 

And the FO also has Oliva, Morris, Blyleven, Hrbek, and Carew listed as special assistants.  https://www.mlb.com/...am/front-office

 

We have had Mauer, Dozier, Wilson in addition to our to leadership specialists to provide veteran insights. 

 

I keep thinking of the "Swinging A's.The only non-Yankee team to win three WS in a row and five division championships."The Swingin’ A’s did it despite a clubhouse chemistry that could require a hazmat suit. Hours before Game 1 of the ’74 World Series, for example, players kept insisting to reporters that tales of their infighting were greatly exaggerated. Then Fingers and Odom started brawling right there in the clubhouse.

Fingers required six stitches in his head. Odom wound up with a sprained ankle."  https://www.mercuryn...he-early-1970s/

 

Leadership is great, but Belisle and Gimenez have been with us with our strange success last year and our back to the pack record this year - the team is 152 - 156 with their leadership and Gimenez has given us 0.6 WAR for the time with the Twins and Belisle -0.8 WAR.Gimenez 218/345/391 and Belisle 3 - 3 5.67 in 81 innings in 83 game with an ERA+ of 78.Imagine their leadership potential if they were any good.

 

Right now I give Jake Cave the badge for leadership because of his hustle, his work ethic and results or even Astudillo for his positive energy, hustle, and smile. 

 

Of course I can see the Twins adding another two coaches - we will call them Leadership coaches!

    • ashburyjohn, h2oface, tarheeltwinsfan and 1 other like this
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diehardtwinsfan
Sep 14 2018 08:36 AM

athletes have to deal with adversity too... that's essentially what Gimenez said in this piece. Judging by the fact that every FO makes signings based on this, I think we should give the Twins a bit of slack for acquiring Giminez…

"Leadership Quotient"....say hello to the next analytic stat :)

    • mikelink45 likes this

Sorry, but it is idiotic to have Chris Gimenez on the active roster and even more idiotic to play him.  

 

Using a roster spot on a player like Willians Astudillo and giving him reps isn't idiotic.

 

One player could be a potential valuable piece to the future of the team and the other not.I am not arguing that Astudlillo has the ability to be more than a replacement level player. He might, or he might not.BUT I KNOW THAT GIMENEZ IS BELOW THAT LEVEL.  

 

WHy the team continuously gives valuable playing time to mediocre players that are more than 30 years of age escapes all logic.  

 

WHen it all comes down to it,this is the real problem: We are a 67-79 team that isn't a "young team".I know that we pretend that this is a young, developing squad.But it really isn't.If you look at the players with at least 100 plate appearances, only 5 of the 15 players are 26 or younger (Rosario, Sano, Polanco, Cave, Kepler).The youngest of that group, Polanco, is 24, while "young" hardly prospect level young anymore.  

 

On the pitching staff, if you look at starters that pitched at least 100 innings or relievers who appeared in 25 games, only 2 pitchers are under the age of 25:Berrio (24) and Moya(23).

 

This is not a "young developing team with a lot of hope for its future".This is a collection of mediocre players and we have a management group that doesn't seem interested in doing anything more than gathering a collection of mediocre players for the team over the near term. What this means is continued mediocrity and when the next group of prospects (the Lewis, Kirillof, Rooker, etc) groups will have to go through their adjustment phase, extending the losing.

 

I have been very vocal stating that the proper way to go is take the adjustment phase NOW, not later.Lose lots of games but get the Gordons, Lewis', Kiriloffs and Rookers, Romeros, up starting Day 1 next season.Lose 100 games.Who cares.At least that gives some hope for the future.

    • mikelink45 and 3balls2strikes like this

My skeptical spidey-sense is tingling.

 

If an org knows it sucks at communication, but they have good communication with a catcher on someone else's team, would they bring in that catcher to bridge the gap?

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ashburyjohn
Sep 14 2018 10:12 AM

Moderator's note: Reminder, this is not a thread to conduct a full review of the state of the Twins organization, and it's never OK to call anything "idiotic". If Chris Gimenez's views on leadership don't interest you, perhaps move to a thread you find of more value.

    • glunn, Mike Sixel and nicksaviking like this
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Fritzderkat
Sep 14 2018 12:46 PM

So, generally disregarded here, what if Falvey and Levine like Gimenez so much, ostensibly for his "leadership", what's to make you think that maybe they intend to keep him around, if not as a coach, how 'bout as manager?

I don't know who's "led" the Twins since Torri Hunter. There were times when it seemed like Dozier, and among all of them Escobar seemed to me as the steadiest, most positive guy on the roster. Belisle? Can't personally say I ever saw anything about leadership coming out of him, but then we weren't sitting next to him in the bullpen every day, were we? For all we know, Falvey and Levine like Belisle just as much as Gimenez and maybe for the same reasons. 

    • Original Whizzinator likes this

 

Very strange. We need Gimenez like we need a hole in the head. I generally like Molly but this veteran security blanket thing is silly.

 

I love it! Linus talking about a security blanket. Spectacular!

    • Original Whizzinator likes this

Gimenez - "Derek has a great eye for pitching so that should be one area to look forward to as they move forward. Thad is great with people and relationships as well as advanced metrics."

 

Derek picked new pitchers that bombed, and the report is also that these guys do not have people skills, but are "cold". 

 

Proof is in results. Belisle and Gimenez ........ I mean really.... just how inspired can a young player be with these guys as their (self?) appointed leaders?

    • mikelink45, jud6312 and D.C Twins like this

So, generally disregarded here, what if Falvey and Levine like Gimenez so much, ostensibly for his "leadership", what's to make you think that maybe they intend to keep him around, if not as a coach, how 'bout as manager?


If they were leaning that way, I’d much prefer to see Mike Redmond as manager.
    • mikelink45 and D.C Twins like this

I know that the moderator wants to limit the discussion, but in fact, this thread reallydoes represent the frustration of the fans and is a healthy outlet for that frustration. 

    • jud6312 likes this

 

I think the whole leadership thing is overblown. I would rather have Astudillo getting innings behind the plate yet Gimenez is playing frequently.

How do you know it's overblown if we really can't measure it's influence?

 

I think it is important sometimes, depending on who the leader is.I think Jeter was a very important element to the Yankee teams because he led through example.The guy had such a high standard, worked so hard and give it all on the field.Other players saw that and understood they better do likewise.

 

It matters as much as poor leadership, which can sidetrack a team

How do you know it's overblown if we really can't measure it's influence?

I think it is important sometimes, depending on who the leader is. I think Jeter was a very important element to the Yankee teams because he led through example. The guy had such a high standard, worked so hard and give it all on the field. Other players saw that and understood they better do likewise.

It matters as much as poor leadership, which can sidetrack a team


I’m surprised that you have that much personal information about Jeter. I want good players and will worry about leadership later. Your mileage may vary.
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The Wise One
Sep 14 2018 06:05 PM

from robbing Garver of ABs, to hero leader. wow

    • D.C Twins likes this

Torii Hunter switched teams via free agency 4 times.With the Twins his highest WAR was 4.2.His career high WAR was 4.7 in 2012 (Angels).He accumulated 42.7 WAR over 17 seasons (average 2.5 WAR/season).Over the period from 1999 to 2015 he ranks 31st in total WAR. I have compared the records of the teams during switch years.The numbers in parenthesis is the comparison in wins to the following year.

 

2007/2008 Twins(+6) Angels(+7)

2012/2013 Angels(-11) Tigers(+5)

2014/2015 Tigers(-16) Twins(+13)

2015/2016 Twins(-24)

 

 

3 out of 4 times the team that Torii Hunter left did worse the following year.Every team he went to did better.Is this because Torii Hunter was a great player, or because Torii Hunter was a great club house leader?I think it is because he was a great club house leader.Leadership matters a lot.

 

 

Torii Hunter switched teams via free agency 4 times. With the Twins his highest WAR was 4.2. His career high WAR was 4.7 in 2012 (Angels). He accumulated 42.7 WAR over 17 seasons (average 2.5 WAR/season). Over the period from 1999 to 2015 he ranks 31st in total WAR. I have compared the records of the teams during switch years. The numbers in parenthesis is the comparison in wins to the following year.

2007/2008 Twins(+6) Angels(+7)
2012/2013 Angels(-11) Tigers(+5)
2014/2015 Tigers(-16) Twins(+13)
2015/2016 Twins(-24)


3 out of 4 times the team that Torii Hunter left did worse the following year. Every team he went to did better. Is this because Torii Hunter was a great player, or because Torii Hunter was a great club house leader? I think it is because he was a great club house leader. Leadership matters a lot.


How did they do in year two and three?
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diehardtwinsfan
Sep 15 2018 05:33 AM

 

I know that the moderator wants to limit the discussion, but in fact, this thread reallydoes represent the frustration of the fans and is a healthy outlet for that frustration. 

There's no desire to limit discussion. The desire is to eliminate the portrayal of unfounded speculation as fact as well as the tendency of some to disparage character. 

    • ashburyjohn, glunn and mikelink45 like this
Great interview Ted! If you get a chance, please pass along my thanks to Mr. Giminez for his insights.

Generally for anyone to comment.

At my place work, part of our development plans is identifying leadership activities and concepts to work on. This happens at every level of the organization, from the CEO to the Janitors.

There’s been some chatter from the FO that they may have found the threshold to the “too many one year contracts” and its effects on a baseball franchise.

Is it just that this years team is too mercenary? Kind of an odd solution to trade for a rental to gain leadership...

Torii Hunter switched teams via free agency 4 times. With the Twins his highest WAR was 4.2. His career high WAR was 4.7 in 2012 (Angels). He accumulated 42.7 WAR over 17 seasons (average 2.5 WAR/season). Over the period from 1999 to 2015 he ranks 31st in total WAR. I have compared the records of the teams during switch years. The numbers in parenthesis is the comparison in wins to the following year.

2007/2008 Twins(+6) Angels(+7)
2012/2013 Angels(-11) Tigers(+5)
2014/2015 Tigers(-16) Twins(+13)
2015/2016 Twins(-24)


3 out of 4 times the team that Torii Hunter left did worse the following year. Every team he went to did better. Is this because Torii Hunter was a great player, or because Torii Hunter was a great club house leader? I think it is because he was a great club house leader. Leadership matters a lot.


Way too many variables, and way too small of a sample, to quantify Hunter's leadership from this data.

Just an example, your analysis implies we should give Hunter's leadership partial credit for Victor Martinez being +7.1 bWAR better in 2014 than in 2015, or Pujols being +3.3 bWAR better in 2012 than he was in 2013, or Verlander staying healthy in 2014 but getting hurt in 2015, or Anibal Sanchez starting +17 games for the 2013 Tigers over 2012, or Ervin Santana being +5.5 bWAR in 2008 over 2007, etc. (Beyond any defensive credit behind the pitchers, of course.)

I'm open to the idea of leadership as a meaningful factor, but it's this kind of analysis and conclusions that would actually turn me the other way on the issue.
    • jimmer likes this
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Section234HHHMet
Sep 15 2018 10:16 AM

Great to hear from Chris G on TD and appreciate him taking time to share his experience/perspective.

At this point in the season, it seems beneficial to carry a player like Chris G on the club who can lead by example even if he is going to be neither high production nor long term contributor on the field.  

However, earlier in the season I do have some questions prioritizing veteran leadership over on field production. Many would argue that managers account for very little difference in a teams' ultimate W/L record.It seems that veteran leadership is unlikely to contribute more than a manager. Certainly a veteran leader who is producing at a high level bring value in both production and leadership. Later career of Tori Hunter or Jim Thome are obvious examples of win/win with production and veteran presence. There is a cost for carrying a player on the roster primarily for leadership purposes. The production of Hunter and Thome alone justified their roster place. You could add a great coach to to dougout, but they can't produce on field.The leadership from Tori/Thome was an added bonus on their production which came at no roster cost.

My question for Twins Daily:

To what extent can a player/club house leader on the roster be more effective than a former-player/non-roster coach?

 

Everyone who has ever worked more than one job knows how effective leaders influence organizations.

 

There always has been and always will be people in baseball circles who will die on the hill insisting that such a thing doesn't exist. They demand hard evidence. Yet soft sciences are real -- businesses run on them, universities teach them, and we all experience them. We can't put a gauge on language development but we can learn a thing or two about it and be predictive about it, same with countless other fields, processes, and products.

 

What people don't realize they are saying is that baseball teams don't need leaders, and of course that's not true. No one says these words directly, but when people argue this point this is ultimately what they are arguing without realizing that's what they are arguing. No leaders = no coaches, no mentors, no managers, no collaboration.

 

I would argue that Torii's leadership style was counter to what people think of as leadership. He is in the work/life balance camp. Work hard, but also take the time to blow off steam and to put that extra energy into letting your guard down. This is a good philosophy for a job that has a countless 12-hour days in half a year. Sure Hunter helped with baseball skills, but every team has people to do that.

    • jimmer likes this

 

3 out of 4 times the team that Torii Hunter left did worse the following year.Every team he went to did better.Is this because Torii Hunter was a great player, or because Torii Hunter was a great club house leader?I think it is because he was a great club house leader.Leadership matters a lot.

This completely disregards any other changes to the rosters. And as spycake pointed out, it disregards any improvements or regression from existing players on those rosters. Basically, it proves nothing in any capacity.

There are several academic papers that have attempted to quantify the importance of leadership attributes.

 

I have copied what I consider to be the relevant portions of the research below.I have linked the research paper for those who are interested in reading this.The results suggest that social cohesion and social networking are correlated with a teams success.The role of team leaders is to promote these attributes.  

 

The Relationship Among Athlete Leadership Behaviors and Cohesion in Team Sports
Diana J.E. Vincer and Todd M. Loughead, University of Windsor

http://citeseerx.ist...p=rep1&type=pdf

 

This study examined the influence of athlete leadership behaviors on perceptions
of team cohesion. The participants were 312 athletes from 25 varsity and club level
teams. Each participant completed the Group Environment Questionnaire (Carron,
Widmeyer, & Brawley, 1985) that assessed cohesion and the Leadership Scale
for Sports (Chelladurai & Saleh, 1980) that assessed athlete leadership behaviors.
Overall, it was found that individual perceptions of Training and Instruction, and
Social Support positively influenced all four dimensions of cohesion (ATG-T,
ATG-S, GI–T, GI-S). Furthermore, Autocratic Behavior was negatively associated
with the four dimensions of cohesion. Finally, Democratic Behavior was positively
related to ATG-T. These findings provide researchers, sport psychology consultants,
athletes, and coaches with some initial evidence that it is important to foster
the development of athlete leader behaviors to influence the team environment.

 

Note. ATG-T = Individual attractions to the group-task, ATG-S = Individual attractions to the groupsocial,
GI-T = Group integration-task, GI-S = Group integration-social. TI = Training and instruction,
DB = Democratic behavior, AB = Autocratic behavior, SS = Social support, PF = Positive feedback.

 

The first aspect pertaining to the results is the positive relationship between
athlete leader behaviors and cohesion. Based on the operational definitions of the
subscales of cohesion and leadership, the results suggested that athlete leaders who
demonstrated leadership behaviors toward improving performance through rigorous
training and instruction and showed an increased amount of concern for the team
member’s welfare had teammates who perceived a higher sense involvement in the
productivity of team goals, of personal acceptance and social interactions within
their team, of similarity, closeness, and unity within the group around the team’s
task objectives, and to their team as a social unit.The results of the present supplement the Dupuis et al. (2006) finding by suggesting that the leadership behaviors of Training and Instruction, and

Social Support can positively influence a team’s cohesiveness both at a task and
social level. Thus, it is important for athlete leaders to use high levels of Training
and Instruction, and Social Support behaviors.

 

A second point pertains to the negative relationship between the athlete leader
behavior of Autocratic Behavior and all four dimensions of cohesion. Previous
coaching leadership research has shown that this leadership behavior is negatively
related to both task and social cohesion (e.g., Gardner et al., 1996). Thus, the athletes’
perception of their cohesiveness (i.e., team’s productivity toward their goals
and their personal acceptance within the team) was lower when they felt their athlete
leaders taking a more authoritative role in the decision making process. This negative
relationship between Autocratic Behavior and cohesion (task and social) may
be viewed from a cohesion perspective as the athletes feeling a decreased sense
of closeness, bonding, personal involvement, and personal acceptance with their
teammates. Consequently, it would appear that autocratic type of athlete leadership
behaviors can detract from a team’s cohesiveness.

 

2nd Article

TIES, LEADERS, AND TIME IN TEAMS: STRONG INFERENCE ABOUT NETWORK STRUCTURE’S EFFECTS ON TEAM VIABILITY AND PERFORMANCE
PRASAD BALKUNDI State University of New York at Buffalo
DAVID A. HARRISON The Pennsylvania State University

 

(PDF available at Research gate https://www.research...nd_performance)

 

How do members’ and leaders’ social network structures help or hinder team effectiveness? A meta-analysis of 37 studies of teams in natural contexts suggests that teams with densely configured interpersonal ties attain their goals better and are more committed to staying together; that is, team task performance and viability are both higher.Further, teams with leaders who are central in the teams’ intragroup networks and teams that are central in their intergroup network tend to perform better. Time sequencing, member familiarity, and tie content moderate structure-performance connections. Results suggest stronger incorporation of social network concepts into theories about team effectiveness.

 

    • Craig Arko, Sconnie and Doomtints like this

Everyone who has ever worked more than one job knows how effective leaders influence organizations.

There always has been and always will be people in baseball circles who will die on the hill insisting that such a thing doesn't exist. They demand hard evidence. Yet soft sciences are real -- businesses run on them, universities teach them, and we all experience them. We can't put a gauge on language development but we can learn a thing or two about it and be predictive about it, same with countless other fields, processes, and products.

What people don't realize they are saying is that baseball teams don't need leaders, and of course that's not true. No one says these words directly, but when people argue this point this is ultimately what they are arguing without realizing that's what they are arguing. No leaders = no coaches, no mentors, no managers, no collaboration.

I would argue that Torii's leadership style was counter to what people think of as leadership. He is in the work/life balance camp. Work hard, but also take the time to blow off steam and to put that extra energy into letting your guard down. This is a good philosophy for a job that has a countless 12-hour days in half a year. Sure Hunter helped with baseball skills, but every team has people to do that.

couldn’t agree more, but when you are hiring an accountant, you don’t look at your pool of applicants and say “he’s entirely unqualified, but let’s hire him anyways: just look at the leadership”

You hire the most qualified accountant and use leadership attributes as the tie breaker.

I suppose there’s this pool of relievers in the x dollar range or catchers in the y dollar range and Levine recruits and signs the one that checks the most boxes and he can come to an agreement to price.

It doesn’t sound like that, it sounds like the FO is seeking out leaders specifically, which we know the old adage about too many cooks spoiling the soup.

I agree that leadership is important, but there’s a gap in my understanding of how it fits in the acquisition of talent and outcomes on the field. There was another poster that pointed out, and I agree, that leadership doesn’t directly impact individual players. If all Buxton needed to pull it all together to be a superstar, he’d have his mentor by now.
    • Doomtints likes this

 

 If all Buxton needed to pull it all together to be a superstar, he’d have his mentor by now.

 

It is more complicated than this, although I don't understand why.This is why leadership is such an intangible.There was a lot written on TD as well as others venues about the impact Torii Hunter had on Aaron Hicks.Many of the discussions and questions about batting performance for Hicks can be applied to Buxton.I have linked several of these articles below. Why was Torii Hunter able to help Aaron Hicks reach his potential, when the Twins coaches and manager could not.It is not as if they were not trying.  

 

http://twinsdaily.co...-his-potential/

 

https://nypost.com/2...ed-aaron-hicks/

 

https://nypost.com/2...re-aaron-hicks/

 

    • Sconnie likes this

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