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darin617
06-26-2012, 09:26 PM
What a great MLB debut for Tyler Robertson. I would like to know how many RP's who made their MLB debut who have also struck out the side debut? It would be great to see him stick with the club as a starter or reliever.

Thrylos
06-26-2012, 09:44 PM
Totally agreed. And he is a great guy to boot on top of that. I think that he found his niche in the pen plus he does have the intimidation factor (he is as big as Jared Allen) and I hope he continuous up in the majors for a while

killebrew
06-26-2012, 10:01 PM
What a great MLB debut for Tyler Robertson. I would like to know how many RP's who made their MLB debut who have also struck out the side debut? It would be great to see him stick with the club as a starter or reliever.


Per Baseball Reference it's happened 7 times previously, first by Gopher sports legend Paul Giel for the '54 Giants and most recently when Edwar Ramirez KKK'd the Twins on July 3rd, 2007.

I can only search for guys who K'd every batter they faced in the debut. It's probable that others struck out their first three, but stayed in the game.

hawkiconk
06-26-2012, 10:04 PM
In a night game on April 12, 1962, a rookie southpaw, Pete Richert, was summoned from the bullpen by manager Walt Alston of the Los Angeles Dodgers to replace starter Stan Williams in the second inning. In this, his very first major league appearance, Pete struck out seven of the Cincinnati Reds, six of them in succession. That effort tied the record of six consecutive strike outs by a pitcher in his first major league game. Pete struck out the first man he faced to end a four run Cincinnati explosion. He got four in a row in the third when JohnnyRoseboro dropped a third strike and then he fanned the first man to bat in the fourth to complete the remarkable feat of striking out the first six batters he faced in his major league debut. The Dodgers rallied for seven in the fifth on five hits, three walks, and four Cincinnati errors to give Richert credit for an 11-7 victory.

hawkiconk
06-26-2012, 10:08 PM
can't google up whose record he tied......

killebrew
06-26-2012, 10:14 PM
Ten others recorded all of their outs by strikeout in their debuts. Among them is the immortal Gary Wayne, the only other Twin on the list. He went K BB BB K BB BB K vs. the Orioles on 4-7-1989.

Cody Christie
06-26-2012, 11:06 PM
His slider looked great against some tough batters tonight. Glad he found success in his debut. Hopefully he can keep it up.

The Greatest Poster Alive
06-26-2012, 11:09 PM
I was disappointed that injuries to other players in AAA forced him to be the callup... but I like how he's played so far.

Seth Stohs
06-26-2012, 11:30 PM
yeah, I think that expectations need to be tempered... it's unfortunate, but things can really only go down for him and his career at this point. Ha!

Good news, I was at the game for Robertson's debut... Bad News, I was in the bathroom... Oh well!

glunn
06-27-2012, 12:55 AM
We needed something positive tonight. And I hope that this kid can stay up permanently.

jokin
06-27-2012, 01:38 AM
We needed something positive tonight. And I hope that this kid can stay up permanently.

What a pleasant surprise. The odds are long, but with that size, and the demeanor he demonstrated tonight, he can be an imposing figure out there. Add a Fu Manchu and a scowl, he could become a manster-sized Al Hrabosky. In a game where practically all a lefty pitcher needs to be in posession of, is a pulse, he could stick, especially with more ABs against RH batters like Youkilis.

spideyo
06-27-2012, 07:26 AM
What a pleasant surprise. The odds are long, but with that size, and the demeanor he demonstrated tonight, he can be an imposing figure out there. Add a Fu Manchu and a scowl, he could become a manster-sized Al Hrabosky. In a game where practically all a lefty pitcher needs to be in posession of, is a pulse, he could stick, especially with more ABs against RH batters like Youkilis.

We totally need more intimidating facial hair on our pitching staff

Mauerzy4Prez
06-27-2012, 07:40 AM
His slider looked great against some tough batters tonight. Glad he found success in his debut. Hopefully he can keep it up.

His slider looked very good, if I remember correctly he used a dirty slider off the plate to strike out Youk in the second AB of the inning. Ball looked like a straight fastball out of his hands and totally fooled the batter. One of the things I liked the most is the fact that he did not waste any time and threw strikes! Hopefully he can keep it up as teams start to adjust to him, and stay up for a while... were going to need a good lhp next year in the pen once Perkins makes his move to closer! :)

Brock Beauchamp
06-27-2012, 07:53 AM
His slider looked very good, if I remember correctly he used a dirty slider off the plate to strike out Youk in the second AB of the inning. Ball looked like a straight fastball out of his hands and totally fooled the batter. One of the things I liked the most is the fact that he did not waste any time and threw strikes! Hopefully he can keep it up as teams start to adjust to him, and stay up for a while... were going to need a good lhp next year in the pen once Perkins makes his move to closer! :)

If this front office was smart, they'd take advantage of Perkins and make him the Bullpen Ace and do away with the horrible closer model of bullpen management. Lefties have a rough time as closer; they face too many righties (who often hit lefties, even good ones, well) to throw them out there at random. It would be much smarter to use Perkins to his strengths and put him in there when the matchups are favorable to his skill set. Right now, the Twins have a great complementary right-hander in Burton. If the team is leading in the seventh inning with one out and two guys are on base, wouldn't you rather seen Burton or Perkins come in at that time to shut down the rally? Let one pitch the rest of the seventh, the other can take the eighth or ninth based on who's coming to bat.

Last night is a perfect example of why "closers" in their current form are completely useless. Addison Reed, "White Sox Save Specialist", came in with nobody out in the ninth and a three run lead. He promptly gave up two earned runs and almost lost the "save". Why was he even used in that situation? Isn't that a complete waste of his talents? Jeff-freakin-Manship could have pitched in that situation and 95% of the time, he'd get the "save" for it.

It's time to start using the best arms in the bullpen when they're needed most. Perkins being a lefty (along with a complementary Burton) would be the perfect time to start using a new brand of baseball thinking that will lead to more wins and better bullpen management.

With that said, it's never going to happen on the Twins. They're too stuck in tradition (even if it's only a 25 year old bad tradition) to try something so forward-thinking.

plantagious
06-27-2012, 01:29 PM
If this front office was smart, they'd take advantage of Perkins and make him the Bullpen Ace and do away with the horrible closer model of bullpen management. Lefties have a rough time as closer; they face too many righties (who often hit lefties, even good ones, well) to throw them out there at random. It would be much smarter to use Perkins to his strengths and put him in there when the matchups are favorable to his skill set. Right now, the Twins have a great complementary right-hander in Burton. If the team is leading in the seventh inning with one out and two guys are on base, wouldn't you rather seen Burton or Perkins come in at that time to shut down the rally? Let one pitch the rest of the seventh, the other can take the eighth or ninth based on who's coming to bat.

Last night is a perfect example of why "closers" in their current form are completely useless. Addison Reed, "White Sox Save Specialist", came in with nobody out in the ninth and a three run lead. He promptly gave up two earned runs and almost lost the "save". Why was he even used in that situation? Isn't that a complete waste of his talents? Jeff-freakin-Manship could have pitched in that situation and 95% of the time, he'd get the "save" for it.

It's time to start using the best arms in the bullpen when they're needed most. Perkins being a lefty (along with a complementary Burton) would be the perfect time to start using a new brand of baseball thinking that will lead to more wins and better bullpen management.

With that said, it's never going to happen on the Twins. They're too stuck in tradition (even if it's only a 25 year old bad tradition) to try something so forward-thinking.

Have you read Jim Caple's column on this idea? When closers used to be "firemen". http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/page/caple-120615/a-plan-save-save-make-relief-pitchers-meaningful-again

Brock Beauchamp
06-27-2012, 01:31 PM
Have you read Jim Caple's column on this idea? When closers used to be "firemen". http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/page/caple-120615/a-plan-save-save-make-relief-pitchers-meaningful-again

Yep, but the idea predates Caple by a longshot. The idea has been rattling around the SABR community for almost ten years (and at least five).

StormJH1
06-28-2012, 11:48 AM
If this front office was smart, they'd take advantage of Perkins and make him the Bullpen Ace and do away with the horrible closer model of bullpen management. Lefties have a rough time as closer; they face too many righties (who often hit lefties, even good ones, well) to throw them out there at random. It would be much smarter to use Perkins to his strengths and put him in there when the matchups are favorable to his skill set. Right now, the Twins have a great complementary right-hander in Burton. If the team is leading in the seventh inning with one out and two guys are on base, wouldn't you rather seen Burton or Perkins come in at that time to shut down the rally? Let one pitch the rest of the seventh, the other can take the eighth or ninth based on who's coming to bat.

Last night is a perfect example of why "closers" in their current form are completely useless. Addison Reed, "White Sox Save Specialist", came in with nobody out in the ninth and a three run lead. He promptly gave up two earned runs and almost lost the "save". Why was he even used in that situation? Isn't that a complete waste of his talents? Jeff-freakin-Manship could have pitched in that situation and 95% of the time, he'd get the "save" for it.

It's time to start using the best arms in the bullpen when they're needed most. Perkins being a lefty (along with a complementary Burton) would be the perfect time to start using a new brand of baseball thinking that will lead to more wins and better bullpen management.

With that said, it's never going to happen on the Twins. They're too stuck in tradition (even if it's only a 25 year old bad tradition) to try something so forward-thinking.

Totally agree with every thing you wrote. So would anybody associated with sabermetrics, and many educated fans. But I don't know it will "never" change (on the Twins or elsewhere). Gardy's decision to use either Perkins or Burton could be interpreted as labeling the the LH or RH "bullpen ace", respectively.

Of course, your point is that they'll still only be used in the 8th or 9th, and by then it may be too late. In that way, the Twins are unlikely to change anytime soon. If they brought out Perkins to put out a fire in the 5th inning after one of the starters melts down, I feel like the broadcast crew and a lot of fans would beat Gardy up if the score remained close and Perkins wasn't available later. That makes no sense, of course, but that would be a popular sentiment.

I think a lot of it, too, has to do with making managers (and certain relievers) look good by putting them in situations where they succeed, even if that's not best for the team. It's much easier to start the 9th inning with the bases empty and a 1-3 run lead than to enter the middle of an inning with a runner on 3rd and fewer than 2 outs. Even if you give up a garbage bloop hit or sacrifice fly, the relief pitcher will be perceived as "failing" (even if the earned run is charged against the replaced pitcher). It's much safer for a manager to follow the script and throw their hands up when the players don't execute. Nevermind that it was overkill watching Joe Nathan blow away the 6-7-8 hitters of the Royals over and over again because that was who happened to be up in "his inning".