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Twins Minor League Talk Today, 01:57 PM
I'm going to try to keep a running list of all of the Twins Spotlight episodes here. Feel free to discuss any of them, ask questions or l...
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Comments on 41 MLB baseball I visited with 5 to go

Other Baseball Today, 12:17 PM
I've been to 41 MLB parks with 40 since 1993. I missed 5 or 6 starting in the early 1990s when I landed my first computer job and then jo...
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Twins Minor League Signings

Twins Minor League Talk Yesterday, 06:56 AM
I thought I should set up a thread for minor league signings. Use this thread to post when the Twins sign a minor leaguer or when a forme...
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Free Agency / Re-Signings 2020-21 Offseason

Other Baseball Yesterday, 08:34 AM
Free agency is likely going to be a really slow burn this year, but I still think it's worth having a thread to discuss signings. ...
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Kim Ng - First Woman to be Hired as GM in Baseball History

Other Baseball Yesterday, 06:34 PM
Monumental hire by the Marlins. Congrats to them and good luck to HER!
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3 Things the World Series Teams Have That the Twins Are Missing

Every MLB franchise wants to be in the positions occupied by the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Tampa Bay Rays. Getting to the World Series is no easy feat, but both these teams were at the top of their respective leagues for the majority of the regular season. So, what do the World Series teams have that the Twins are missing?
Image courtesy of © Bruce Kluckhohn-USA TODAY Sports
LA’s Superstars
In baseball, superstar players can’t impact the game in the same way as some of the other major sports, but it certainly helps to have top tier players performing at their best. The Dodger outfield is anchored by two former MVPs in Cody Bellinger and Mookie Betts and Clayton Kershaw has been one of this generation’s best starting pitchers. Betts has been good throughout his career, but he has used this year’s World Series to put himself in the conversation as quite possibly the best player in baseball.

Few teams have players in the same category as the names above, including Minnesota. The Twins signed Josh Donaldson, a former MVP winner, to help change that narrative. However, he was hurt for the majority of the 2020 season and the prime of his career might be behind him. Other players like Miguel Sano and Byron Buxton were touted as future superstars and both have suffered through some ups and downs in their career. Buxton might have the best chance to be Minnesota’s superstar player, but he will need to prove it again in 2021.

Tampa’s Bullpen
Well this is awkward. Two key members of the Rays bullpen, Nick Anderson and John Curtiss, were both drafted by the Minnesota Twins and neither was given much of an opportunity with the big-league club. Curtiss pitched 15 innings for the Twins and posted a 7.20 ERA while Anderson never made it out of Triple-A. Bullpen usage continues to increase as starters are asked to get fewer outs. Tampa Bay is in their current position because of a heavy reliance on their relief arms and other teams can follow this trend in the years ahead.

The Twins have some tough choices with their own bullpen during the coming offseason. Taylor Rogers can make as much as $7 million through arbitration, but he is coming off his worst big-league season. Sergio Romo has a team option for $4.75 million, but he turns 38 in March. Other players like Tyler Clippard and Trevor May are free agents in what is expected to be an offseason where all team’s cut payroll. Minnesota might be able to find someone like Matt Wisler or Caleb Thielbar, but that might be even tougher following a year where there was no minor league season.

Both Team’s Starting Pitching Depth
Even with bullpens getting more usage, starting pitching is still such an important part of any extended playoff run. LA’s one-two punch of Walker Buehler and Clayton Kershaw allow other pitchers to take on relief roles for the postseason. Add in the likes of Julio Urias, Tony Gonsolin, and Dustin May and it’s easy to see why the Dodgers were willing to part with Kenta Maeda. Tampa might not have some of the big names like LA, but many teams would love to have their top-4 pitchers (Tyler Glasnow, Ryan Yarbrough, Blake Snell, Charlie Morton).

Minnesota is entering their second straight offseason with multiple openings in their starting rotation. Jose Berrios, Michael Pineda, and Kenta Maeda are penciled into the top-3 spots, so how can the Twins find a way to complete their rotation. Trevor Bauer will be the biggest free agent starter this winter, but he is going to have multiple suitors and the Twins are unlikely to spend the money it takes to add him. Does it make sense to bring back someone like Jake Odorizzi or Rich Hill? Would those names put the Twins in the same territory as the Dodgers and the Rays?

What do the Twins need to do to get to the same level as the Dodgers and the Rays?

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21 Comments

I'm old enough and smart enough to know a few things and have a few connections in my life to have access to knowledge that few people do. The first is that Nicholas Tesla, and his associates, have knowledge for unlimited power potential that has been subterfuged by political power and and that an unknown and burried author by the name of Walter Olacandor has found a formula that equates to proven WS success in baseball.

Media and MLB ownership has suppressed this research for decades since attempted publication in 1973. And Walter has spent the remaining years of his life working for TMZ and stringing together mad networks or string and and printed articles in his attic like a Hollywood writer working on the next Morgan Freeman thriller.

I'm told he is dis-barred from the writers guild. But dark web research has informed me that his original thesis for a WS championship is based on a team that hits better and pitches better than the other team.

So let us let fun and sarcasm lie and die there. The Twins have no curse the same way the Cubs and Bo-Sox had no curse.

No matter how the WS turns out, it will remain an amazing diconomy how the wealthy battle the frugal. And our Twins remain somewhere in the middle of this battle of have and have not.

I have no answers to payroll, or how to slay the beast. Of course, despite their payroll, the Dogers haven't had the answer since '88. But I DO BELIEVE in trying to build the best and deepest team you can. That is where you get your chance. 2020 didn't offer up the chance we hoped for.

The FO has already stated they are looking to tweak some things. And no question $ play a part. But they do for everyone. But to blow things up and put on dark glasses is ridiculous. There is no secret formula. There is only building the best and most competitive team you can.
    • peterb18, Dantes929, alphanumeric and 8 others like this
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Nine of twelve
Oct 27 2020 05:38 AM

 

There is no secret formula. There is only building the best and most competitive team you can.

This is it. And as many have said before, scouting and player development are the keys to doing so. And it's necessary to have a manager who knows how to make good guesses regarding who plays where and when.

I find the criticism about the Twins losing Hendriks, Anderson, Curtiss and Slegers interesting. But what I have either never or almost never seen is a discussion of the situation the Twins faced when they made that decision.  

 

In most cases, it was fall with the Rule 5 draft approaching. I no longer have the data readily available as to who was added when Anderson was traded. But had they kept Anderson, they most certainly would have lost someone else. 

 

Yes, it stings when someone like Hendriks or Anderson takes that next step and becomes one of the better pitchers in the game. But making those decisions must be put into context with what the situation was at the time. Much more difficult than looking at it years later.

    • DocBauer, dbminn, arby58 and 1 other like this

 

I'm old enough and smart enough to know a few things and have a few connections in my life to have access to knowledge that few people do. The first is that Nicholas Tesla, and his associates, have knowledge for unlimited power potential that has been subterfuged by political power and and that an unknown and burried author by the name of Walter Olacandor has found a formula that equates to proven WS success in baseball.

Media and MLB ownership has suppressed this research for decades since attempted publication in 1973. And Walter has spent the remaining years of his life working for TMZ and stringing together mad networks or string and and printed articles in his attic like a Hollywood writer working on the next Morgan Freeman thriller.

I'm told he is dis-barred from the writers guild. But dark web research has informed me that his original thesis for a WS championship is based on a team that hits better and pitches better than the other team.

This is me now:  Tesla's story reminds me of Dr. Royal Rife. He invented an amazing machine that was curing cancer in the 1930's! His works were suppressed and he ultimately became a drunk. Why do I bring this up? Because I firmly believe that better health for players is like the final frontier for teams to improve their team! To my knowledge, I do not know any team that is using amazing health machines like the Rife to improve the teams health and improve productivity on the field. Perhaps even better is the Life Vessel machine. Who even knows about these types of machines?! They are perfectly legal, but the information has been suppressed.

 

This seems arbitrary.

 

TB is also missing LA's superstars and LA is missing TB's bullpen, yet both are WS teams.

    • KFEY93 likes this

Tesla's story reminds me of Dr. Royal Rife. He invented an amazing machine that was curing cancer in the 1930's! His works were suppressed and he ultimately became a drunk. Why do I bring this up? Because I firmly believe that better health for players is like the final frontier for teams to improve their team! To my knowledge, I do not know any team that is using amazing health machines like the Rife to improve the teams health and improve productivity on the field. Perhaps even better is the Life Vessel machine. Who even knows about these types of machines?! They are perfectly legal, but the information has been suppressed. 

 

There is a ton of luck involved.

 

- Players have a year where they play above/below average.

- Free agents are a roll of the dice. Consistent performance and age factor come into play

- Minor league players also a roll of the dice. Minor league performance does not always translate to the major league level. Both positively and negatively.

 

Bottom line is hindsight is 20-20. If we could remake some of our decisions over the years based on what we know now ... we would be in the midst of a dynasty!!

    • arby58 likes this

<<So, what do the World Series teams have that the Twins are missing?>>

 

Winning post season games.

    • Craig Arko, adjacent, Danchat and 7 others like this

<<So, what do the World Series teams have that the Twins are missing?>>

 

Winning post season games.

In the analysis-synthesis paradigm, you just cut to the chase and went straight to the evaluation step there. :)
 

 

<<So, what do the World Series teams have that the Twins are missing?>>

 

Winning post season games.

This is it. Most of the rest is overthinking.

 

I find the criticism about the Twins losing Hendriks, Anderson, Curtiss and Slegers interesting. But what I have either never or almost never seen is a discussion of the situation the Twins faced when they made that decision.  

 

In most cases, it was fall with the Rule 5 draft approaching. I no longer have the data readily available as to who was added when Anderson was traded. But had they kept Anderson, they most certainly would have lost someone else. 

 

Yes, it stings when someone like Hendriks or Anderson takes that next step and becomes one of the better pitchers in the game. But making those decisions must be put into context with what the situation was at the time. Much more difficult than looking at it years later.

The Twins kept Ryne Harper and traded Anerson to the Marlins for a C-level 3B.

 

    • USAFChief likes this
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stringer bell
Oct 27 2020 02:51 PM

 

The Twins kept Ryne Harper and traded Anerson to the Marlins for a C-level 3B.

I read a story about Anderson and I wonder how much of his back story is why the Twins were willing to let him go. To me, the miss on Anderson is probably least excusable of the current bullpen stalwarts who were in the Twins' system.

    • Danchat and flpmagikat like this
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stringer bell
Oct 27 2020 02:57 PM

I think the ingredients for postseason success are pitching, power, defense and speed in that order. I've said that for a long time. I guess pitching would now mean that there is enough starting pitching and a shutdown bullpen. 

    • Hosken Bombo Disco, Nine of twelve and BeatTheRich like this

I think the ingredients for postseason success are pitching, power, defense and speed in that order.

Besides pitching, the other three line up nicely with the classic Five Tools for a position player. Throwing is way down on most everybody's list, but would you not put hitting for average in that list of ingredients? How about the elusive sixth tool of batting eye?

 

Me, I have always thought that contact is the one must-have tool. Maybe must-have doesn't correlate with postseason success, but I would probably not put it any lower than just behind power, for what separates the elite teams.
 

    • BeatTheRich likes this
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SkyBlueWaters
Oct 27 2020 05:06 PM

 

 How about the elusive sixth tool of batting eye?

 

 

OMG. I can't get the image of Buxton swinging at those Astros curveballs in the dirt out my mind's eye.

 

Did it just get colder all of a sudden?

    • ashbury and BeatTheRich like this
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Nine of twelve
Oct 27 2020 06:51 PM

 

I think the ingredients for postseason success are pitching, power, defense and speed in that order. I've said that for a long time. I guess pitching would now mean that there is enough starting pitching and a shutdown bullpen. 

Same as the in the regular season, although pitching is even more important in the postseason than in the regular season.

Another thing I noticed is how much more flexible both teams.They have versatile players and more balanced line ups. They seem to be able to always have pinch hitters to offset the opposing managers pitching changes. I hope we keep Royce Lewis as a utility player for next year.He can play SS,3B and CF and if the other team brings in a lefty reliever which we see often we have a pinch hitter that may do some damage. The arguement against is he needs to play everyday to keep developing but seems to me that Marwin Gonzales played plenty this year. I think he should be able to bat more than .211 (Gonzales) or .191 (Adrianza)

 

 I think he should be able to bat more than .211 (Gonzales) or .191 (Adrianza)

 

We said that about Hicks and Buxton too.

 

It would be nice if Lewis is ready. But he probably isn't.

    • flpmagikat likes this
Staying healthy.
Donaldson our, Buxton concussion issues, Arraez some leg or ankle issue, Odorizzi, our catchers Garver and Avila. Polanco had ankle surgery right after the season ended.

This whole team has not been healthy since the middle of last season.
We need better players. Bottom line.

There’s a lot of excuses. Staying healthy and being able to play is part of being a good player. There is clearly a difference between the bright lights of a playoff game and some routine regular season game - most of these guys seem to fold (looking at the box scores of recent playoff games isn’t pretty) - and you can’t make the argument that they’ve been running into dominant ace level pitchers.

I don’t think there’s as much luck involved as people think. The guy from the Rays just hit 10 home runs in the playoffs. That takes something more than closing your eyes and getting lucky.

I think the one thing that is continually over-looked with players that left the Twins and became successful after doing so, no matter the circumstance, is that a new coach or manager or fellow player maybe helped them become better. Maybe the Twins organization didn't have what they needed to succeed, no matter what that was. 

I have commented previously about Sano being compared to Ortz. Ortiz may have never become the player he turned out to be had he stayed with the Twins. Honestly the Green Monster turned him into a different hitter but someone probably told him to hit the ball off that wall and he found success doing so. 

It doesn't take much for a successful player in high school or college or the Minors to fail at the major league level if they don't make adjustments or just plain ol' simply don't get the help they need. Sometimes it takes someone in a different organization to find it.

How many Hitters would be great instead of pathetic if they would get 3 hits every 10 at bats verses 2 hits? That could be something as simple as bunting down the 3rd base line when a shift is on. Yet 99 out of 100 hitters won't do it. If your talent is limited to hitting the ball one way and only one way then you are hurting yourself and your ballclub. Players today need to get better and smarter. I guarantee you if Pete Rose or Rod Carew were playing today they'd make any shift put on against them their lunch. 


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